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What are the most cost-effective construction methods to research and consider for building a 75' (23m) habitable structure that will stand safely for at least 500 years in the absence of structural maintenance? What aesthetic considerations should be made before blighting the earth with such a durable structure?

The structure will be on flat wooded acreage in western Pennsylvania, USA, with construction beginning within the next three years at the earliest. Ideally, it would be designed in such a way as to permit the building of one story at a time, as funding is available, but I can put off the project for several more years if it makes better financial sense to do so. Initial usage will be roughly equivalent to a hunting cabin and over-built hunting blind, eventual usage will be as a residential home. Natural lighting is important.

I anticipate eventually assembling some kind of knowledge archive on the site, so any ideas on that front would be appreciated, as well.
>>
Concrete and rebar, like everything else
>>
>>2227708
I've done some work with concrete and rebar decks but haven't done much with tall walls or multi-story structures. Any pointers on where to read about this? What do I need to do to not have to replace the concrete in 50 years?
>>
>>2227707
megalithic
>>
>>2227721
Though it would be really cool, I have a suspicion that quarrying and transporting the stone for a 75' megalithic structure would probably not be cost-effective. It could be worth checking into cyclopean architecture, however, depending on what kind of quarries are nearby and what kind of friends I can make locally.
>>
>>2227707
Holy Jesus kid! Stop eating your mom's meds.
>>
>>2227707
>most cost-effective construction methods
>for at least 500 years
stones make the best building material, only problem is theyre expensive. you can get around some costs by doing things yourself by hand but that can become time consuming.

if i were you i would start digging out the foundation, see what your hole gets you
if you find alot of large stones you can probably reduce costs by using your own stones instead of buying them.

if you find alot of clay (common in pa) you can make your own bricks. theyre not as longlasting as stone but you can take steps to prevent their deterioration.
brick making is easier than you might think, it just takes commitment. you can look up "brick making" on youtube.

for cheap construction you can make a significant part of the base concrete, to prevent deterioration you can build stone/brick around the concrete pillar as well as a roof/gutter/water directing system. if rain doesnt touch the concrete you wont see the melting/cracking that usually comes with concrete buildings.
>>
>>2227707
Stainless steel rebar.
>>
>>2227818
Now your talking!
Six or 7 story concrete tower with a 25' diameter base, walls 4' thick at ground level
with stainless rebar welded. Mix carbon fiber into the concrete.

first floor is 17' on the inside diameter.
Use half of that for an elevator

The pilings for the foundation would go maybe 40' down.

Get your buddies to help on the weekends and you could do it for about 15,000.
>>
>>2227919
15,000 Bitcoins, that is.
>>
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>>2227707
DIE MONOLITH UNFREN
>>
Use lots and lots of concrete. So much so that it cannot be dynamited. Stone can be chiseled away and repurposed but concrete will never be worthwhile to remove. Hitler's AA towers are still standing for this very reason.
>>
>>2227707
stack rock, build phalicly, and most importantly, build taller than the bushes.
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>>2227927
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drunk retard here. will concrete and rebar last anywhere near as long as huge sandstone blocks?
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>>2227988
No of course not. Concrete will eventually crack. Then water gets in, freezes, it cracks more, the water reaches the rebar, it starts to rust. Why do you think concrete road infrastructure needs so much maintenance? Buildings experience different stresses than roads of course but if you don't actively maintain it your building collapses like that one in Florida or every single parking garage in the next 30 years.
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>>2227715
>What do I need to do to not have to replace the concrete in 50 years?
not make it from todays shitty concrete
>>
>>2227988
>>2227994
Oh, and I'll just add on that sandstone holds up a lot better in the Sahara desert than it does in fucking Pennsylvania. It barely ever rains in the desert. In Pennsylvania it rains significantly more and there's more water vapor generally in the air. While it gets cold in the desert little if any water condenses out. In PA water will condense out and freeze which will crack sandstone just as well as concrete. The weather of sandstone blocks would be faster so in that sense concrete is a better pick but is still not future proof.
>>
>>2227926
I haven't played the game yet but I have read Roadside Picnic, which is a good book.
>>
>>2228275
Try STALKER Anomaly for free. Lost Alpha is also free but much harder if you didn't play the official games.
Roadside Picnic has been in my cart for a while. Looks good.
>>
>>2227707
No real DIY projects is discussed.

Fantasy DIY is not DIY because there is no Y doing any sort of D'ing.

You won't. You can't. You and other fantasoids never will.
>>
Look at an old concrete/brick silo for an example of what works. A lot of them have been standing for over 100 years with zero maintenance.
>>
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>>2228315
I closed on the land parcel last week. I have family ties to regional construction companies and have worked several trades myself. The Monolith will tower over Man long after your name is forgotten. Cope harder, serf.
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>>2228336
If you were as clever as you claim you are, you would have used a search engine instead of asking here.
>>
staircase or ladder
>>
>>2228366
A clever man would do both, you salty serf.
>>
>>2227994
>Why do you think concrete road infrastructure needs so much maintenance?
...because concrete road infrastructure companies want to get paid annually and not do one job that lasts forever? You think planned obsolescence is only a thing in the tech world?
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>>2228369
That's kind of where this project started. I got it in my head to build a fire lookout tower to hang out on in the middle of my woods and started thinking about how to make something more interesting than a big deer stand on stilts.
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>>2227707
Henry fords hemp fiber recipe + the needed weather resistance additive to make it "non biodegradable".
>>
I've thought of a similar idea-
You need land with stone already available. I have looked at old defunct stone quarries for sale. You can find some, but not many. The trick stone. You can get a giant wet saw and face the stone into bricks. But like the other commenter 5hat becomes time consuming.
Stone brick walls finished with a sort of durable lime plaster. Lime plaster cures and gets harder over time, and with each watering.
>>
>>2228506
To add; think of things you can build with old growth timber. Some of the oldest standing buildings are built from timber. If maintained can last hundreds of years.
Incorporate a history of yourself and your family into the structure to ensure a place your lineage can improve/maintain.
>>
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>>2228508
One more thing;
Read about Carl June's Bollingen tower.
He incorporated esoteric and metaphysical elements. It became a place for his study and meditation
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>>2227707
>knowledge archive
Nobody in the future cares about your porn.
>>
>>2227708
nah, rebar rusts and destroys the structure
not an issue if designing for 50, maybe a hundred years, but couldn't survive 500 years unless you use an absolutely massive layer of concrete to protect the rebar (at that point probably cheaper to just use arches)
>>
>>2227707
>>2228336

>I am very serious about building this, I've even purchased the land already
>I've been fired from several trade related jobs
>"So guys what material, designs, and method should I use to build my fantasy?"
>>
>>2228715
What's your problem?
Have you considered actually contributing to the thread instead of being like that? OP didn't say he was fired.
>>
If I was rich(er)
(cmon bitcoin!)
I would buy something like this
https://youtu.be/908jVbHjrNE
And a bunch of heavy equipment and move it out to where there's marble.
>>
>>2228740
I want to know how they thread the diamond wire around the stone to be cut
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>>2228736
ah you’re right, sorry OP—ignore my comment and do your thing
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this is your best bet, long brick combined with stone. stone goes on the outside to help protect the structure. the foundation near the ground will need to be pure stone
>>
Shipping containers for
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>>2228943
>>
>>2229038
It's beautiful
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>>2228315
The dood is a visionary, he doesn't need an engineer, architect, permits, or $500,000 to do this!


Just hook up a Minecraft game to a 3D printer!
>>
>>2228787
I've got about 10' of clay between my sod and bedrock, might have to try my hand at making autism blocks.
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>>2228509
>Bollingen tower
very cool, I like the additions, too
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>>2228715
>>2228736
Never been fired from any job, but I've worked several different trades in response to economic shits or personal preference. So far in construction I've worked in fitting, welding, paving, site development (dirt, drain pipe, etc.), and some aspects of bridge building and repair. From bridge work I've gathered that the norm is that modern concrete goes to shit after a few decades, which is why I'm asking a bunch of spergs about their special interest instead of going to a normie consultant for normies.

>>2229291
>engineer
I've consulted local structural engineers before, will definitely do it again.
>architect
Will probably do my own drawings and have a couple different engineers review the various drafts. My Dad and Grandpa can help out with that.
>permits
It's a rural enough area that I could actually get around that for a while if I wanted to, very lax building rules and you don't need a permit unless you're going over a certain square footage.
>$500,000 to do this
That's very possible by the time everything is 100% finished. I'm not in any hurry to fund it all at once. If it's done in time to stand on top with my grandkids before I die that's good enough for me.
>>
>looks at pyramids
Geopolymer
>>
>>2227707
Brick corn silos with good foundations have been standing for 200.
If the roofs had been tin, they'd stand for another 300
>>
You and me have the same dream.

You must take inspiration from Europeans. They used stone foundations and stone walls.

The key ingredient though is the mortar and cement. You can't use Portland cement. Portland cement will fall apart softer 50-150 years. The Euros used some kinda limestone cement, I'm not sure of the exact ingredients, but this is why their buildings are still being held together 100s of years later.

Also, as the other anons have said, don't use rebar. There's going to be lots of factors which decide how long your structure will last. Just don't fuck up the foundation, don't let water get in, and don't use home Depot cement.
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>>2227707
>Trying to build a wizard tower
>doesn't consider using magic
what a fool
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>>2233273
>The Euros used some kinda limestone cement
i wonder if bags of limestone sold at lowes could be turned into roman concrete. the firing temperature seems easy to achieve. i might have to test it out someday.
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>>2227731
Well, do you have mineral rights to your land? How deep is bedrock? Are you comfortable firing brick?

My advice would be building with long flat bricks in the Roman style fired from clay from your backyard walls about 36" thick at the bottom tapering to 12" at the top, increasing the number of windows as you rise. The structure should be circular in nature, which creates a powerful compressive structure that resists wind from any direction.

This lets you quarry materials locally without splitting stone, but firing bricks can be pretty tricky, so read up. Also, the foundation needs to go down to bedrock. No excuses. No rebar or iron whatsoever if you want it to last 500.
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>>2234429
>Well, do you have mineral rights to your land?
Yes, with an active gas lease.
>How deep is bedrock?
~10ft in most places, going to have some proper sampling done before I finalize the exact monument placement or do anything else.
>Are you comfortable firing brick?
Not yet, but I'm willing to give it a go. I've been wanting a kiln eventually anyway for other projects so I'll probably go commercial rather than /diy/ for the brick oven if the /diy/ brick route ends up being otherwise practical.
>long flat bricks in the Roman style
>about 36" thick at the bottom tapering to 12" at the top, increasing the number of windows as you rise
>firing bricks can be pretty tricky
Do you have any reading material suggestions supporting these points? I've been looking through pictures of old block structures and have been trying to learn about brickmaking.
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how will anon make floors/stairs
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>>2235800
Haven't you ever built a tower out of brown bricks in Minecrap? Just have a spiral stairway or two going up the inside of the exterior wall. Admittedly, this might be a bit more difficult if you use plain concrete for longevity (since you can't just cantilever the stairs straight out of the wall), but it certainly isn't impossible.
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>>2235800
(And, as for floors, where did OP say he wanted multiple floors? Maybe it's just an ordinary 1500-ft^2 house that happens to be embedded within a 75-ft-tall hollow pyramid of concrete.)
>>
actually, steel is out of the question, but that doesnt mean no metal at all.
anon can use nice aluminum stairs
they might wear down a little with use though..
so he can have a ladder too, so he doesnt use the stairs too much
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>>2235800
Honestly I'll probably be content with letting the floors and stairs go before the 500 year mark and make them out of wood. There are ways to build vaults, support floors, and build stairs with masonry but I'm not sure if that will be worthwhile with how small of a footprint this structure is likely to have. I would like to learn more about that kind of masonry, however, and will probably do some relevant reading before breaking ground.
>>
>>2227994
>Why do you think concrete road infrastructure needs so much maintenance
Because of road vehicles, moron.
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>>2227707
Step 1: Read The Fountainhead, by Ayn Rand.
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>>2237594
step 2: get a lobotomy to forget any drivel created by an idiot like Rand that you accidentally read.

Step 3: burn any books of hers you've bought but not yet read.
>>
>>2237624
Her predictions regarding a State Science Institute are surprisingly accurate.
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>>2227707
I plan to make a pyramid so big it makes the Egyptians insecure. Penslyvania has too much weather
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>>2227715
learn structural engineering.
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>>2231935
Ok fag, I'm from Western PA. Whereabouts are you thinking of putting this structure?

Also, there are castles and shit, built centuries ago that are still standing. I would copy the materials used there and wouldn't even think about any modern shit.
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>>2227994
>roads
cars... oil.... carbonation....

>parking garages
cars.... oil.... carbonation....

>that building in florida
shitty design and building =/= concrete failure

OP, disregard this retarded nigger's entire post.

Concrete longevity is based on load, mix, water and strike time.
rebar longevity is based on cover and environment.

reinforced concrete can last a thousand years if done correctly - longer if necessary.
>>
We thank you, oh Monolith, for revealing the cunning plans of your enemies to us.
May your light shine down on the souls of the brave soldiers who gave their lives in service to your will.
Onward warriors of the Monolith, avenge your fallen brothers, blessed as they are in their eternal union with the Monolith.
Bring death to those who spurned the holy power of the Monolith.
>>
you can use glass bricks instead of windows to let in light while keeping the structure strong
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>>2238383
a lot of york city centre in UK is hundreds of years old, look at the minster and how theyre renovating it, decoratively and structurely. it can be done OP, just use the right tools and materials for the job
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>>2228336
Based
>>
>>2238383
I have land somewhere within a 40 mile radius of these mid-19th century stone and brick buildings.
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>>2227707
There's some information in this other thread: >>2239519
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>>2227708
rebar won't last.
pure concrete would probably last.
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>>2227708
>Concrete and rebar, like everything else
Horrible advice. Rebar encased in concrete is a ticking time bomb. It will rust, swelling to four times its original size, and make the structure crumble.
>>
>>2227707
You are going to need something to seriously divert lightning.
It also needs to be well ventilated to avoid gas build up.
The rest is materials that will support their weight and not blow over.
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>>2227715
>Any pointers on where to read about this?
Sorry, not very many that I know of. The best forms of ancient masonry have been lost through to time. What we do now is pathetic compared to the level of stonemasonry that built things like Machu Picchu and pyramids and temples of Egypt.

>What do I need to do to not have to replace the concrete in 50 years?
Use stones instead of concrete, don't use rebar. Granite is an excellent stone to build with if you have the choice. Where is this building being built? What sort of geography and climate are we looking at? How far up in elevation? How far down is the bedrock?
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>>2228003
use granite, not sandstone
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>>2228000
>What do I need to do to not have to replace the concrete in 50 years?
>not make it from todays shitty concrete
Okay, yeah, well where can I buy ancient concrete? Seriously, I need to know.
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>>2240331
No need to use granite for the entire structure. Just place the granite on the bottom of the building -- we call these water tables. When the water runs off the roof, it hits the ground and splashes into the granite, which is hard an durable. The stones above the granite can be limestone or whatever. Just make sure the limestone doesn't come into contact with water and you're solid.

Granite is so heavy, but if I had access to it, I'd build the structure entirely out of that. I'm just saying though, you don't need to if you want a structure to last. Even concrete will last for 100s of years if you do a few simple things to it. There's shit loads of different mixtures you can use that will provide a long lasting and durable structure.
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>>2240331
>Where is this building being built?
western Pennsylvania, USA
>What sort of geography and climate are we looking at?
bedrock in the region reportedly varies between limestone and shale. Dfa/Dfb humid continental climate.
>How far up in elevation?
roughly 1150' +/- 50', depending on where exactly I put it on the lot; lower elevations would be prone to flooding in the event of a 500 year flood and need to be graded to improve standard storm water management (might also install some drains and/or ponds just in case). I need to collect more data on my property's geology and hydrology before I finalize the location of the foundation.
>How far down is the bedrock?
roughly 10' in most places
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>>2240808
>+/- 50
is the property sloping gradually or abruptly
>>
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>>2227707
>[ M O N O L I T H ]
*heavy breathing*
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>>2228336
Holy based
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>>2227707
>most cost-effective construction methods
>500 years without maintenance
Looking at some stone structure and shaped like a dome or pyramid or a tapered spire
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>>2240808
How dumb would it be to strip all of the dirt away and then build a pyramid on bedrock. I figure dirt would not be stable enough. Did the Egyptians build on bedrock?
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>>2242185
>Did the Egyptians build on bedrock?
I don't know about them pharoehs but Fred Flintstone built his house on bedrock.
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>>2227707
Use local materials with high longevity; Stone, brick, rammed earth. Don't fall for the concrete jew.
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>>2242203
Also if you go with stone or brick, use traditional lime mortar, avoid cement mortar like the plague. Unless in extremely dry environments, it'll fuck up your stone or brick in less than 200 years.
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>>2242185
>Did the Egyptians build on bedrock?
Wikipedia says the Great Pyramid of Giza, at least, was built on bedrock.
>>
>>2242205
>>2242197
>>2227707
>go somewhere bedrock is only a few feet below surface
>clear wide area to bedrock
>quarry bedrock into stone blocks
>make pyramid with blocks
Tell me why this wouldn't work
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>>2227707
dig a giant trench mit excavator, add sand / core. melt 3 gigatons of iron next to trench. tap and pour. wait for cool. connect giant come along / winch / pulley / dozer to top of object. pull upright. chimp out.
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>>2242226
for a new era trash look, why not try the same with reinforced concrete?
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>>2242215
Perfectly doable with 20,000 slaves.
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>>2242241
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>>2242197
Based
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>>2242185
Since the dirt is probably only 10' deep it would seem foolish to not dig down to bedrock.
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>>2240808
>western Pennsylvania, USA

Snow, rain, humid summers, rocky but with bedrock close. Ideal conditions for degrading just about every man made structure.
The only monoliths that have effectively stood the tests of time in such conditions similar are aztec pyramids/temples. But with snow and cold temperatures? It could work due to the high incline of their pyramids. Granite would work...expensive though. Slate would be too, shale wouldn't last. Bluestone perhaps would be your cheapest alternative. Concrete would not last, but perhaps stacked stones and mortar. There are miles of stacked stone walls in Connecticut/new england, some are foundations of old houses too. In any case, dig to bedrock, especially since it's not too deep. that would make it last as long as possible and it wouldn't frost heave any hidden stones under the foundation.

>>2242215
This is what they did in new england, only replace the "quarry" and "stone blocks" with "farmland and frost heaved stones". Digging anywhere here is a nightmare.
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>>2242614
>Concrete would not last
Can't you just use a better grade of concrete? It isn't as if engineers haven't put any thought into this problem.
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>>2242622
Concrete is reconstituted stone...which just proves ever further that stone is better (for longevity). The problem with concrete vs stone is that stone is naturally created as a coherent piece of molten minerals/metals. Concrete is incoherent, just a bunch of rocks glued together with a chemical reaction. Even if it were low permeable to water it would still crack and succumb to itself. The "better solution" is to just remelt the rocks back together instead of gluing them.

With cut stones...they just sit on each other. They are as stable as the foundation they're put on.
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>>2242614
some shoreline lighthouses have lasted since they were built 300 years ago
they were built out of large sturdy stones though. idk if anon can afford that.
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>>2242622
The purpose of autism is not served by concretes, they do not feed the dream.
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>>2227988
>https://www.geopolymer.org/archaeology/pyramids/are-pyramids-made-out-of-concrete-1/
The huge sandstone blocks are a type of concrete.
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>>2227707
MONOLITH
MONOLITH
MONOLITH

(MY) MONOLITH (OF CHOICE) IS OBSIDIAN!
>>
>stone
erosion
>metal
rust and falling over
>obsidian
truly lasts forever and only requires you to use a volcano
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>>2243681
Are you retarded? Why would you say stone erodes? That shit takes millions of years. Granite will last forever you fucking twat.
>>
>>2243678
>>2243681
Thank you. I do actually plan on putting a token piece of obsidian in the monolith just because it's funny to me, though I'm afraid erecting a true 75' obsidian monolith is likely to remain outside of my practical means.
>>
>he is AFRAID of the obsidian monolith
as you should be!
a million years is a million years; the obsidian monolith is literally eternal.
>>
douglas lighthouse
dude built is so tough they couldnt bomb the foundations and just said fuck it and made an entire new base when they tried to replace it
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>>2228486
so you built the watch tower?
Just kidding, you didnt
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>>2244343
Based
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>>2227927
This is an interesting design. Weather is one concern but keeping future unborn niggers from pulling it apart is another.
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>>2227777
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>>2227707
I havent read through the whole thread to see if anyone has suggested this, but why not buy a Glazed Tile Silo?
In western PA there should be a lot of them that the old German farmers built, much like they did here in MN.
If not glazed tile, a 120 year old poured concrete with no rebar silo with a poured roof would also surfice.
I've looked into this same idea before and my conclusion was with my skill and money, the only reasonable thing would be to convert one of these silos and then make sure the ground and foundation are sloped properly so that it will last as long as possible.
You dont need to reinvent the wheel, instead preserve something that already has the potential to last.symw2
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>>2244344
If you possessed basic reading comprehension you wouldn't have felt the need to make that post.
>>
>>2244528
damn thats pretty
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>>2244528
That's a good idea, Anon. Are you talking about buying land that already has one or about buying one and hiring a crew to transport it?
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>>2244344


>>2244528
good idea, i didnt know you could coat a brick with salt to waterproof it
>>
a fcking monolith, my brothers
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Cast solid glass bricks as big as you can manage to effectively stack. Coat them in a non-uv-reactive plastic.

The lower cost but potentially more time consuming option is to find the largest solid rock you can and carve it into whatever shape will most affront all things natural and untouched by mankind.8gyj0
>>
buy land next to a volcano (sandy)
dig a hole in the sand, wait for eruption
will the volcano into calming down. soothe volcano (trial of the monolith)
dig around the now monolith so it stands tall
bury it in cement or whatever the other MONOLITHs are suggesting you use for material (weaker than obsidian obviously)
>>
>>2228622
Historical porn nerds exist and are likely to exist in the future.
>>
>>2227707
Read the Russian engineers files from the soviet era lighthouse building project.
I believe what they found is that durability was secondary to stability, an object of this weight would cause soil movement, and foundations will effect drainage often to the same effect.
Like with the pyramids, a good understanding of geology is required to work out WHERE to put it.

I would look at casting cement blocks and pilling them together with lead.


>>2244528
Thats factastic, based deuchvolk
>>
>>2227707
As someone already mentioned, Geopolymeres.
Longevity should be 1000 years+ as unlike normal concrete they aren't damaged by moisture.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rf9qK9QTlq0
>>
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>>2244701
>could coat a brick with salt to waterproof it
What?
Glazing is treating the brick at higher temperature, adding sand to the surface melting it to become a layer of glass.
Even without glazing the quality of bricks also differs if higher temperature is applied.
>>
>>2244985
>largest solid rock you can and carve it into
Geopolymere is identical to natural rock.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=znQk_yBHre4
>>
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>>2246345
i googled glazed tile silo and it said salt
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>>2227707
in oslo norway they just built a wooden skyscraper using prestressed wood laminate beams. the lighter weight of wood and prestressing of beams allows you to build well over 75 feet and timber frame construction lasts a hell of a lot longer than stick frame especially if you use something like black locust or bamboo for the wood.
>>
>>2246528
salt or baking soda act as a flux to lower the melting point of the silica in the clay to create a glass coating on the exterior of the ceramic. you can also use wood ash or tin as a flux.
>>
>>2227707
Roman concrete. Has lasted for thousands of years so far.
>>
>>2247028
is also this kinda stuff
>>2246339
>>
>>2246533
you forgot to use the searchable nomenclature "Mass Timber"
>>
>>2228336
Idk if it matters to you or not, but "monolith" is mono (one) and lith (stone), and is generally reserved for things carved of one single stone.
Neat fact, what would have been the largest monolithic obelisk ever, cracked while still being hewn from the rock bedrock roughly 3500 years ago.

>nb4 ackchyually
>>
>>2228629
What's an alternative to rebar that won't rust? Carbon fibre rods?
>>
>>2227708
THIS
>>
>>2240290
DONT KEEP Rebar NEAR SURFACE
>>
>>2249022
Maybe it wouldn't have broken if they didn't let tourists walk all over it. Pretty dumb.
>>
>>2227707
I plan to cashout my Roth 401k when I hit 60. Spend it all on building a pyrmanid made of stone blocks. And then promptly blow my brains out. I have 35 years to make enough to fund this project.
>>
>>2249228
It still rusts over time, which makes it expand and even allows more moisture in through cracks.
If you are optimising for longevity you'd probably want to treat it first.
>>
Titanium alloy rebar + pure concrete = at least a couple of thousands of years. Am I wrong?
>>
>>2249300
imposible, have no oxigen inside
>>
>>2249271
Actually I can cash out at 55
>>
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>>2249545
>he didn't go full FIRE and retire at age 34
ngmi
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-a27xwcLfU
now that i think about it, bricks are the way to go.
i did the calculations, and enough bricks to build a 50 foot monolith is only going to cost about 10,000 including shipping. its real cheap
a full 75 foot one would only be about 20,000.
thats reasonable.
>>
>>2249309
Oxygen will get in somewhere in 500 years.
Fibreglass rebar won't ever rust and has higher tensile strength anyway.
>>
>>2249990
>Fibreglass
plastic composite? or how (You) gona solder it?
>>
>>2249596
Nigga I'm gonna grind hard AF until 55 then spend it all on my monolith.
>>
>>2249733
get a job in masonry, steal two bricks a day in your lunchbox. I know someone who built a HOUSE.
>>
>>2249303
If we are talking about budgetless dreams, why not just stainless? Do you need light weight?
>>
>>2251243
stainless rusts. titanium does not
>>
>>2251348
It does? Why titanium clad? Im sorry for amateur metallurgy class, please direct if too much to cover here.
>>
>>2235817
That Mike Matei reference caught me offguard
>>
>>2251195
one piece at a time
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=060A15ELz00
>>
>>2229038
id have a fireman pole all the way down
>>
>>2240347
You don't buy concrete, you buy the ingredients and mix it yourself to make sure you don't get jewed.
>>
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would this system work? what if he encased a huge block of concrete inside granite bricks. would that prevent it from breaking/eroding?
>>
>>2251872
no...why would you think it would? The first line in a civic engineer textbook will tell you concretes nature is to crack. Its not real rock, however much it constricts most of the water out in 3 days or whatever. Its always getting dryer, thus cracking, thus gettting weaker. You want cut stone, Massachuetts pink granite is 3 billion years old....im thinking it has proved it will last.
>>
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>>2229038
>>
>>2251909
>The first line in a civic engineer textbook
Any textbook recommendations?
>>
Carve stone
Stack stone
Become immortal
>>
>>2253794
t. grug
>>
>>2253553
That guy is an ignorant idiot.
Quality concrete can last for thousands of years, some Roman concrete is still hardening.
Cracking happens for other reasons, early cracking is due to bad curing and late cracking is due to lack of reinforcement.
>>
>>2253809
>Roman concrete is still hardening.
Isn't that a geopolymere and not our type of current concrete?
>>
>>2253809
i looked up the cost of volcano ash, and cant find a bulk seller, just bags of 2 pounds for 40$ all active volcanoes in the US are in west cost so he cant just rent a truck and haul his own ash (unless he wants to drive 3000 miles)
it seems like a better strategy would be to seek out natural stones or brick
>>
>>2249221
High grade stainless steel rebar; the carbon fiber rods prevent rust cracking but the epoxy itself will degrade, definitely not good for more than 1-2 centuries
>>
>>2254730
>haul his own ash
I'm sure the elites don't want you to know this, but is the ash in the park free?
>>
>>2249022
damn imagine after months of carving being there as the thing cracks, and the egyptians doing the universal ''crossing arms, looking around'' thing followed by an exhale everyone does when shit hits the fan in any profession.
bonus points if you're the one who cracks it
>>
>>2255265
i assume its not illegal to take it. its basically dirt.
>>
>>2235800
Spiral case, ever heard of it?
>>
>>2227707
The secret to longevity is maintenance. There can be no old building without prolonged care.
>>
>>2227707
Buy an old silo that's still plumb and build out the inside
>>
>>2255961
can a novice with limited resources do a 60 to 70 foot staircase? it sounds like engineer work.
>>
>>2256159
Anyone competent can make something functional.
Engineering is the art of making something barely functional.
>>
>>2227708
>rebar
Look at the bunkers on Normandy. If the rebar rusts, it poisons and destroys the concrete.
>>
>>2227707
sinkholes can compromise anything and appear unexpectedly. a big series of apartments not far from me was compromised by sinking and many feared a sinkhole and sold their houses around the building
>>
>>2256178
>Engineering is the art of making something barely functional.
and call it "sound engineering practice"
>>
>>2249221
Basalt rebar.
>>
>>2254730
Search for stuff on Geopolymeres, there are many mixtures that work, often using waste from power-plants and other industries as basis.
>>
>>2256190
I'm in a limestone/shale region so it's possible but not a karst region so not overly likely. I should check old mining maps and make sure I'm good there but I'm pretty sure I'm fine.
>>
>>2255981
Some structures require less maintenance than others and can still be recognized centuries after abandonment.
>>
>>2227707
Roman concrete
>>
>>2249733
Based fred
>>
>>2227937
Breaking up a driveway and tearing down the Fuhrer's towers are two different things
>>
>>2250016
I don't know how they do it but fibreglass rebar is used in a lot of civil engineering projects, especially bridges and such.
>>
>>2227927
Those AA towers will last a couple thousand years at least
>>
Build it from modern concrete, only lasts 60 years but you’ll be long dead and it’ll be torn down after you’re dead anyway
>>
>>2227707
I can see that from my house
>>
>>2259251
ive been wondering if you can make it with mexican red/brown pumice stone. as thats literally everywhere in west texas/mexico/new mexico, like you could just pull over and collect it off the sides of public roads.
>>
collect stones from creeks and local forests and put them in a big pile on your land.
>>
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>>2262445
>ive been wondering if you can make it with mexican red/brown pumice stone.
Try to ask this guy.
>>
>>2262802
i just made my own to see, i'll make a topic in a month once its cured.
>>2262504
this is probably the best advice so far, go out on a walk with a backpack every day and just bring a couple flat stones home with you. end of a year you'll have over 700 stones to build with
>>
>>2263041
>go out on a walk with a backpack
Within a year I intend to have established a perimeter trail adequate for pulling a small utility trailer with an ATV; within three I'm hoping to achieve something flat enough for a lawn tractor and wide enough for a pickup truck. The main purpose is to facilitate the collection of firewood and the transportation of construction materials, which could include the consolidation of natural stone into large piles. I still haven't had a chance to fully scour the woods since I'm not moved in yet but I did see an encouraging amount of stone just walking the property line.
>>
>>2261036
You should get some good detail shots highlighting the construction and design. Can you go inside?
>>
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>>2265240
Idk, they lock the door sometimes but I don't have a camera or phone to take pictures for you anyways sorry
But I can give you these pictures of it pulled from the internet
>>
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>>2265240
>>2265753
>>
>>2265240
>>2265753
>>2265754
I'd bet building like this would cost a fortune to now. But if you want something to last it is going to cost you no matter what
>>
>>2265757
>>
>>2265753
>>2265754
>>2265759
How are the floor joists set in the stone? Is there just a little shelf that the set upon?
>>
>>2267532
In general you either have stones ticking out, or more commonly a few holes to stick wood in.
>>
>>2227927
>>2260984
THOUSAND YEAR BLOCK
>>
>>2228336
Based Bronze Age chieftain
>>
>>2238384
>reinforced concrete can last a thousand years if done correctly - longer if necessary.
The same shit that has been said over and over by the industry and modern designers yet there is at the moment 0 proof. There is a further 0 proof that concrete with rebar ever reaches stasis. Water always penetrates concrete, all the way. Steel always rusts from water. Steel always rusts when it expands, concrete always cracks and breaks under tensile load from internal pressure.
>>
>>2267660
>, concrete always cracks and breaks under tensile load from internal pressure.
And yet things that matter like the Washington Monument and the US Capitol look brand new after hundreds of years.
>>
>>2242203
+1 for rammed earth. Ideally you would want clay subsoil and aggregate, mixed with 5% cement, then faced with several layers of ceramic bricks for weatherproofing. Optionally reinforce with rods that won't rust away.
>>
>>2267532
No it's the wall it's self that is built so the floor can be set upon it
>>
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>>2267663
>Washington Monument
Im not even a burger and know its all stone, what the fuck you on about? Even then it still has people constantly maintaining the structure and doing all sorts of preventative CivEng shit because of the foundation.

>>2267670
On a budget I think this is the way, circular structure, tapered, properly tested rammed Earth mixture reinforced, maybe basalt rebar like that other anon mentioned if you can guarantee longlife epoxy, some sort of protective outer surface, downsloping sheet of waterproof material under the ground from the base to draw away water, balanced foundation that spreads out far beyond the building footprint and can compensate for vertical/lateral shifts over time.
Think that's about it.
Oh yeah also some steps for the goats
>>
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ooooh boy I get to dump my castle folder
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manipulate terrain
get a mattock
get a pick
get a shovel
>>
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take advantage of what nature has to offer
>>
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>>2268560
>you see that mountain?
>you can claim it
>>
>>2268448
How many slave should acquire to build this one? A least a dozen yes?
>>
>>2227707
>weld two 40ft shipping containers together
>bury one end 5 feet into ground
>optionally, install one end 5 feet into a hole and fill with concrete, fill 20ft up in height with concrete
>>
>>2269164
if I were building for longevity I wouldn't use slave labor
>>
>>2268560
i always imagine the cost to build something like this must have been astronomical
>>
>>2269685
It's an old place built up over many generations.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mont-Saint-Michel
>>
>>2268422
> castles
but but but .... where are the machicolations ???
>>
>>2268425
>>2268426
>>2268429
Why did they leave giant holes in their buildings in these picture?
>>
the pyramids have lasted this long for a reason.
there is your blueprint
>>
is there an easy way to shape rough rock into squares? or at-least make it flat on the top/bottom
>>
>>2267660
>Steel always rusts from water.
wrong nigger.

submerged steel in distilled water will not rust unless exposed to oxygen.
>>
>>2267660
nigger the fucking concrete in the colosseum is still standing and we've long since (rediscovered and) surpassed the concrete tech of the Romans
>prevent steel from rusting using anti-oxidant in conc mix
>use patina-ing steel for rebar like core 10
>use rubber / polymer for adding "flexibility" to the concrete itself so that seismic activity doesn't create cracks and microfissures
concrete can last thousands of years if laud with all modern techniques
and our techniques keep improving on top of that
>>
>>2267670
You don't use aggregate for rammed earth.

it creates cracks and discontinuities that will destroy it

cement stabilised yes, aggregate no.
You need to be certain the atterberg limits of the clay are suitable and check the soil and particle size for the clay.
>>
>>2268266
look up stone corbels.

>>2267532
no. there are pockets cut into the stone, or stone corbels.

timber crushes under the weight of 10 storeys of stone, retard.
>>
>>2270893
why dont construction companies do all this then?
>>
>>2271776
Because it's expensive ????

>Why don't we build houses from stainless steel ? Its stronger, safer, fireproof, etc. then the wood 2x4 frames ?

>>2267660
Steel is there for tensile strength

Shitty steel is there for cheapness.

there are steel alloys that dont rust but cost

you can use PCE superplasticiser to make "waterproof" concrete

you can use surface treatment to make it even more waterproof
>>
>>2271020
>stone corbel
Neat, looks like a little shelf upon which one could set joists and beams.
>>
>>2249022
why didn't they just pour glue in the crack
>>
>>2270893
>concrete can last thousands of years if laud with all modern techniques
Where do I go to read about this?
>>
>>2227707
>>
>>2271776

As pointed out, it's more expensive.

As a complicating factor, we only (relatively) recently discovered the fact that putting steel into concrete fucks it up after 50-80 years. But now there's huge industry behind doing exactly that, and industries that big are generally slow to change.

As a further complicating factor...what are you supposed to replace it with? Any metal corrosion-resistant enough to last "indefinitely" is going to be horrendously expensive, and would only get even more expensive as millions of tons of it gets put into buildings and roads. The alloying materials to make steel itself more resistant to rust are, themselves, expensive. Polymers might work, but aren't as strong, and there may be thermal or moisture expansion issues, depending on the polymer. Glass fiber looks almost ideal on paper, since it's cheap, doesn't corrode, and is a good match for concrete in terms of thermal/moisture issues. But it may not handle shock loads from seismic effects very well.
>>
>>2275158
Holy numerology
>>
>>2227707
Look up ferrocement. It will last several centuries if done properly with steam treatment.
>>
>>2273192
Elmer's glue wasn't invented until the 20th century.
>>
>>2228787
>>2228943
>>2229038
>>2229043
>>2242053
>>2227926
>>2244343
>>2262504
same exact post as last thread word for word
>>
>>2278273
Are you sure it isn't the same thread? /diy/ is a slow board.
>>
>>2278360
shhhh! let him believe theres some bot conspiracy
>>
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>>2270893
"Core 10" (cor-ten or corten, you dumb nigger faggot) wouldn't work in concrete, which is why nobody makes cor-ten rebar
>>
>>2228000
This is just stupid. Cement and concrete production practices are as good as they ever were. It's just when you buy shitty cement (the wrong type for your purpose), mix it with shitty aggregates (alkali silica reactions, etc), mix it improperly, place it improperly (insufficient rebar cover, poor consolidation), cure it improperly (heat of enthalpy management), etc.things might not last 300+ years.

When you look at 2000year roman structures, you are looking at survivorship bias and restorations works in action. We will have some structures last just as long and still be serviceable.

Source: am practicing structural engineer and university researcher
>>
look, they make silos/smokestacks/lighthouses out of brick/ceramic/stone, not concrete. they do it for a reason
>>
>>2279645
For ease of construction. Not durability or strength
>>
>>2227708
I have shit that was on my property when I bought it. Less than 15 years old and its all crumbling. Fuck that garbage. High pressure concrete is better anyway.
>>
>>2279843
>tall brick structures are easier than pouring concrete
U fookin wot
>>
>>2279530
Roman concrete takes forever to cure, which is why it's not used today, but also why it's so good. The long cure eliminates a lot of internal stresses that a quick cure simply can't
>>
>>2228315
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop_Castle

It can be done if you dedicate your entire life to it. This is a board full of aspies, thst is not an impossible feat.
>>
>>2240290
Does this explain the WTC towers (WTC7 included)?
>>
>>2240220
not at 75ft tall. the point of rebar reinforcement is to steady the structure against tension - concrete is great at holding itself up, but as soon as anything starts shifting or swaying it tends to crack. rebar is there to support tension on the structure, which would be created by the strong winds which are present above a treeline
>>
>2228315
You're a fantasoid
>>
>>2280789
youre saying he needs some type of aerodynamics or wind protection?
>>
>>2280807
see >>2228336
>>
>>2279530
>Source: am practicing structural engineer and university researcher
Any reading suggestions?
>>
The Complete Visual Guide To Building A House

magnet:?xt=urn:btih:c5dfc4745d1621bb49a8125af4ddaa9b9a54ca06&dn=The%20Complete%20Visual%20Guide%20To%20Building%20A%20House&tr=udp%3a%2f%2fcoppersurfer.tk%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.coppersurfer.tk%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2fopen.stealth.si%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.open-internet.nl%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.cyberia.is%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.internetwarriors.net%3a1337%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2f9.rarbg.me%3a2850%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2f9.rarbg.to%3a2720%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.opentrackr.org%3a1337%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.leechers-paradise.org%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.dler.org%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2fopentracker.i2p.rocks%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.zer0day.to%3a1337%2fannounce
>>
>>2227707
Concrete is probably your best bet, just remember that it sweats and is somewhat porous. Not ideal for long term storage of documents
>>
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>>2270422
Heavy machinery ..
Or if the material allows soften and re-agglomerate.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rf9qK9QTlq0
>>
>>2227708
If you want to use rebar, you must absolutdly use very blue concrete, which is not feasible for anon. Normal concrete without rebar is a better choice here, though trying to make it 75' high is stupid. Make a pyramid, maybe one with more edges, instead.
>>
>>2237626
And obvious.
>>
>>2228336
> Cope harder, serf.
>you salty serf.

The LARPer certainly has amusing delusions.
However it did start an entertaining hypothetical discussion that has lasted nearly 3 months.

Keep up the good work, Sir Stonepenis!
>>
>>2279530
Any recommendation for easy to reliably source geopolymere base materials?
>>
any easy geopolymer recipes available? i can source fly ash probably
>>
>dig hole for rocks to build tower
>have cool tower beside massive hole
bad

>dig trench for rocks around tower
>have cool tower surrounded by cool moat
good

be good op
>>
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>>2286527
>dig trench for rocks around tower
not a bad idea, diverts rain water from the foundation
>>
To be completely honest, I think a tower is the worst possible structure if you're talking about longevity. Lateral stress from rain, storms, erosion and so on will only need to bring it out of balance by a few degrees and it will crack, no matter if you use concrete with rebar, quarry stones or whatever you can come up with. If you really want something that will endure centuries you might want to look at a structure with a footprint at least 3 times the size of its peak as well as a rough height-to-diameter ratio of 2:1 at max.
>>
>>2227707
Solid fucking granite blocks shaped in a way they can be interlocked together.
>>
>>2288043
but then it doesn't look like a giant dick
>>
>>
>>2288183
So basically Japanese carpentry but with rocks?
>>
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>>2290077
Dovetailing, as was done in some lighthouses. Or clycopean masonry if you don;t want to be that fancy.
>>
>>2227707
> stand safely for at least 500 years
a cave
>>
>>2288311
benis XD
>>
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I suggest building a 45 degree angled pyramidal structure out of monocrystalline silicon, or out of cast monocrystalline silicon blocks. If you have the budget and wherewithal, silicon carbide would represent an excellent upgrade path for even better durability and stability.


Monocrystalline Silicon, is among the most stable and cheap materials known to man.
It can be purchased in cast boules or blocks at modest prices, particularly when bought in bulk.
it is lighter and stronger than virtually all mixed mineral materials.
It is extremely thermally stable, and does not react readily with anything found in significant quantities in the environment, it is nonporous and impervious to water infiltration and ice cracking, it provides no nutrition and so is not attacked by lichens or other lithotrophs.
It is readily mass produced, and has a melting point of 1400 degrees C, and a thermal expansion that is well matched to its naturally occuring passivating oxide layer, as well as the oxide having better chemical resistance and higher heat tolerance than the silicon.
Further, the silicon oxide layer fills any cracks that could form or be made by future chiseling, wear, rock strikes or vehicle strikes, etc. And prevents further oxidation within those cracks as well as sealing them against further erosion by providing a hard, heat, chemical, moisture, biology and impact resistant surface layer.

The cost of such a project would probably be less than a comparably durable maintenance free structure made of any other material.
>>
>>2294754
https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/monocrystalline-silicon-ingot-price.html

quick followup or sourcing of silicon monocrystal ingots.
>>
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>>2284944
That's Sir Brickdick to you, peasant. I'm going to mess around with these in the spring to get a feel for brickwork, probably going to do some property line markers/overbuilt fence posts back in the woods where no one can see my amateurish attempt to learn brickmasonry. Currently leaning towards using as much brick as possible on top of a water table of yet-undetermined materials.
>>
>>2296643
>on top of a water table of yet-undetermined materials
For the practice mini-towers I'm thinking of using free/cheap 55 gallon drums with the ends cut off as concrete form tubes for my foundation and water table. I've got a lot of reading to do and then phone calls to make before I finalize the foundation materials of the M O N O L I T H.
>>
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Martello towers are cute. Cute !!
>>
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>>2296677
>>
https://www.nps.gov/maritime/nhlpa/handbook/HistoricLighthousePreservationHandbook_07_Part4Masonry1.pdf

alot of good advice here. apparently ventilation and sun are vital to the health of the structure. youre going to need to build windows towards the rising/setting sun to let in maximum light.
>>
>>2296721
Thanks fren. I think I might style these posts >>2296643 as mini lighthouses and see if there's enough sun through the trees for little solar panels roofs and LED night lights (not too bright).
>>
>>2296677
>>2296678
They're like charming squat silos with downs syndrome.
>>
>>2227707
>building a 75' (23m) habitable structure
>that will stand safely for at least 500 years in the absence of structural maintenance
>with construction beginning within the next three years at the earliest.

So, why should you have something built to last at least up to 2525 A.D. ?
>>
>>2229038
>strong gust inbound
>>
>>2227707
BUY A SMALL MOUNTAIN

CARVE IT INTO ETERNAL MAGNIFICENCE
>>
>>2300323
>eternal
The Appalachians once stood as tall as the Rockies and Alps stand today.
>>
>>2227707
>some kind of knowledge archive on the site
>>2299847
a service to humanity.
>>
All our supposed technology and wealth cannot achieve what the ancients did with stone tools. We are living in a dark age.





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