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Keeping warm in a house with no heating or insulation. As winter approaches I'm starting to worry about keeping warm. I have a plug in electric radiator but it is very expensive to run and somewhat pointless because all the heat just gets sucked out the air-vents. I'm looking for diy ways to stay warm that don't cost much. Was thinking about erecting a tent in my front room and living inside it
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>>2227256
wear more/thicker clothes?
>>
>>2227256
Buy some of those plug-in heaters, anon. It’s impractical to keep your whole house warm, but you can keep an area/room you’re using warm.
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>>2227256
Years ago I lived in a large house that did not have heat for a whole winter.

I basically just living in the front room.
I blocked off the doorways with heavy blankets. There was a front window, I used window plastic wrap insulation (its basically saran wrap) and then hung heavy blankets there too. I taped over the air vents.

I ran an electric oil heater 24/7 on low, unless it got particularly cold and then I would bump it up.
It cost less than my normal utilities did since the furnace wasnt on.
Eat hot foods, wear socks, long underwear/undershirts, and wear sweatpants and shirts over it.
It sucks running down a freezing cold hallway to go the bathroom but what can you do?
When you need to shower, run the shower for 5-10 minutes at high heat before you go in and itll have warmed the bathroom up.

How did you get stuck in a house with no heat?
Very long story short for me, I moved into a house on a whim, where I sort of knew the landlord who barely had her shit together.
Turns out her shit was only held together by her wealthy long term boyfriend.
When a former heroin addict becomes a relapsed addict, and her money source leaves her because of it, turns out thats not good landlord material.

Also when she starts raising the rent $50-100 a month, leaving threatening voicemails saying she is going to send her "black drug dealer" friends to attack me if I dont pay rent on time, randomly knocking on the door at 3AM just screaming incoherently, you really dont want to be anywhere near this person.

Just as luck had it, my state had the coldest winter in 20 years, and all of this shit happened in october right as it got cold so it was very difficult to move until winter was over. And right as it got seriously cold, the furnace failed. I threw a replacement board and a few other things spending a couple hundred bucks to try and fix it, but I couldnt do it, wouldnt pay an HVAC guy to do it.
Enjoyed camping in the front room and moved the second I could.
>>
>>2227256
Own clothes and a sleeping bag that will keep you comfy no matter how cold it gets and own TWO sets of boots. Milsurp are best for the money since you're obviously poor.
>>
Kotatsu

Amazon sells just the heater.

Or you could let a couple of homeless women live with you in exchange for blanket snugglling

But that might be a more costly solution.
>>
Grampa taught us that 53* is perfectly acceptable winter house temperature as long as the bathroom and kitchen is hotted up to 67* so that's how I've always lived.
Layers. 2 pairs of the same boot, swapping daily. Down sleeping bag. A dog helps but don't be an asshole and let your pitbull freeze or husky melt in sleeping bag, pick the right breed.
Move around, work, go do something, clean. Or if you can't move around, build a greenhouse inside a greenhouse in the yard and hang out. Careful with humidity and electronics.
>>2227284
Good points
>>
>>2227256
>Get job
>Pay electrical bill from running heater
>???
>Profit!
>>
get a night shift
>>
>>2227582
>Grampa taught us that 53* is perfectly acceptable winter house temperature

Based, fuck heat cucks
>>
>>2227794
>>2227582

but why when we live in a modern world
why do people choose to live in such shitty conditions
>>
>>2227913
He's 95 and still lives alone so clearly it works. Heat is for pussies.
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>>2227913
I can't wait until everything collapses and you freeze and suffer because you are used to modern decadence like heaters
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>>2227938
>modern decadence like heaters
The height of modern decadence is to have a house with a heath and an open fireplace.
>>
>>2227913
>why do people choose to live in such shitty conditions
Heating isn't free, anon.
>>
>>2227944
Neither is Internet and yet here we are.

Turns out that adequate shelter is less vital than shitposting in maslow's hierarchy of needs.
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>>2227950
Internet's a lot cheaper than heat, and often necessary to remain employed. You also aren't going to freeze to death at 53f. Internet can be more vital than a cozily warm house.
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>>2227957
The point is more that if you can't afford to heat your house maybe you should be working to fix your life and finances rather than coming to a Mongolian yak butter churning bbs to ask the diy subreddit to tell you how to break the laws of thermodynamics and produce heat for free.
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>>2227938
Not him but I've got a woodstove. I walk around shirtless in the winter it's so hot and societal collapse will have no effect on that lol.
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>>2227794
>>2227582
>>2227931
>>2227938
gotta be the strangest fucking flex I've seen on this board I swear
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>>2227283
Yeah get the infra red heaters, esp with ceramic. My friend has one and it's crazy crazy warm. I use a vornado heater, myself, as it really really heats up a large space, unlike conventional and gas ones hwere you need to be right fucking near it.
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>>2227256
OP, i've lived poor as fuck for most of my life, in sheds and tents etc. I've found that electric blankets are amazingly useful if you can use even a little electricity. They only use 50 watts or less compared to the 1200w+ of those electric plug in heaters. And even if your indoor temperature is in the 30's or 40's, you can sleep plenty warm and comfortable with just some adequate blankets and one of these electric ones on low. They work when you're at the computer too, but not when you're moving about the house.

Another important point, as other anons have pointed out here, is to learn to dress for the cold weather. I'm from a part of the country where we don't really have very bad winters, and noone really taught me how to dress when I was a kid. As a kid, I would usually be in a house, or at school, and either place had heat.
Cheap wool socks from ebay, the thicker the better, some decent thermal long sleeve underwear, tops and bottoms, a cheap warm hat all go a very long way towards staying warm. It doesn't have to be very expensive, and you can easily stay comfy with indoor temperatures in the 30's at least. If you can't keep it at least in the 30s indoors, you run into a lot more problems as all the food and water freezes and you can't use the toilet anymore.

God bless you OP
>>
Lidded buckets. I've got about 500-600 that I've filled with water, with lids, and that adds a sizeable thermal mass to the house. It's almost always at a constant 68 degrees no matter the temperature outside
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>>2228686
stay warm soiboi
>>
>>2227574
I've been thinking about building one and sewing the blanket with grommets in the middle to hold the blanket in place.
When spring rolls around I want to be able to make it a coffee table in front of my couch.

Anybody ever done one before or have any thoughts on making one better?
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>>2228777
...500-600?? is 70% of your entire occupiable space taken up by thermal mass buckets?
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>>2228902
nevermind, forgot bucketbro..
>>
>>2227574
>>2228789
coal version seems like a convenient way to gas yourself
>>
Dressing properly is a game changer. WOOL socks and top. Stuff like long johns and a hat prevent a ton of body heat being lost. Beyond that, spot heating rather than space heating.
I would also suggest getting out of the house and off the computer so you're not just sitting still all day but that's one of those things you have to decide for yourself.
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>>2228777
so that would be what, 10-12 tons of extra weight the house is somehow able to hold?
>>
Have shoes specifically for house, to be clean, and keep them on, also wear a hat but you can't all the time it's unpleasant for the skin
Use 2 or 3 duvets
Cook stuff in oven, 2 in 1
Obtain as many free rugs as you can
Unless it's quite sunny keep the curtains / blinds shut
Keep all doors shut
Grow weed
>>
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>wool socks
>long johns and thermal undershirt
>a winter sleeping bag or a high tog duvet
>an extra blanket just to wear around you when shitposting etc.
>slippers if you have un-carpeted floors
>hot drinks like tea, ovaltine, hot chocolate etc. before bed

another anon has mentioned an electric blanket but imo that is pleb shit compared with a covered hot water bottle since it can be carried around with you not just in bed and at night if you end up too hot you can just take the bottle away instead of having to switch off the blanket and wait for it cool down.

tl;dr buy a fucking kettle
>>
Buy a white Hungarian Goose Down filled Comforter. 700proof
And a duvet cover... For this blanket.
Do not buy polyester fill or duck down...it's useless. You need Geese Down. Sometimes you can find them at salvation army. You can easily lower your thermostat with just this.
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>>2227284
>long story short
https://youtu.be/dpPQE56Zezk
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>>2227938
Already happening in the uk
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>>2228700
>electric blankets are amazing
Absolutely this

Get a electric blanket and you pretty much don't need to heat at all.
I've got one as well. They use somewhere between 50W and 120W and will keep you absolutely warm.
I use a smaller one basically as a heated seat while I'm working from home and there's absolutely no need to turn on the heat.
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>>2228700
>Cheap wool socks from ebay, the thicker the better,
M8 woolen knit socks are one of the best items to /diy/ out there.
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>>2227256
Tent is a good idea. Cover it in old blankets or thick cotton thrift store shit and duct tape.

Windows are KEY. Fuck any and all drafts. Each piece of glass you have may as well be a 12" hoke in your house. Putting even the best of windows in a house is the equivalent of buying a yeti cooler and sending 10 shotgun rounds in it.

Get whatever insulation you can on them and board them up from the inside bit check weekly for mold there also. Stupid fucking glass always sweats.

Build a shorter roof out of whatever you can. Hot air rises and it will double as more insulation.

Appliances put off a lot of heat. Move those one to you if you gotta have then anyway. We got out gas shut off as a bunch of teens. We moved camp into the basement and it was cold as shit but like 30 degrees warmer pissing into the basement drain and only leaving the room in groups to take a shit a few times a day.

If you are unable to pay you may be able to set up some sort of a plan and it may even be illegal to shut your power off in winter. Call you local government if you can't resolve it with the electrocucks.

Those hothands packs can be reused and you might score some from a church or homeless shelter.

Mylar survival blankets a about the place.

If you have a sturdy floor large barrels of water can act as a radiator maybe throw a little bleach if you want emergency drinking water and RV antifreeze if you want to drink it. If not drinking it and they might freeze hit up a local mechanic and ask them to save old antifreeze in buckets. Just tell them it's for black barrels and your doing it in a green house if you're embarrassed.

Body heat and cheap candles can go a long way. If it doesn't get stupid suffering cold get a roommate or dogs and thrift store candles.

If you got natural gas shit like a hot water heater or oven post up near those. I lived in a closet with my hot water heater comfy as fuck for a few months.
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>>2227794
LOL. My thermostat is at 78 and I jave an electric heater on me.

I grew up poor. Ain't Trina live my life a miserable uncomfortable KEK for 20 degrees and $80 a month.
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>>2227960
AHAHAHA! https://youtu.be/L397TWLwrUU
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>>2229693
IF YOU AIN'T VIETCONG TUNNELING UNDER YOUR HOUSE SETING CONCRETE PEIRS AND LEVELING YOUR FLOORS EVERY SATURDAY AFTERNOON THEN WHERE THE FUCK U AT?
>>
>>2230402
Can anyone recommend window insulation? Gas prices just went 2.5x here and rising. Landlord suggested applying some kinda plastic window foil but I doubt that will do much (based on my research it'll help 10%?). I'm thinking of creating an airgap by applying foil over the windowsill, and maybe putting one or 2 layers of bubblewrap on the pane, is that sane?
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>>2230560
Depends if you want the windows to still pass light or not.
Look into multilayer insulator. It's the insulating blankets that they use in spacecrafts and it's the best thermal shield ever devised. It's basically a sandwich of many layers of mylar and plastic mesh (that only serves to keep the blankets separated), you can diy one easily with emergency/space blankets and tulle. They work best in vacuum, but the working principle should still make them insanely good even in the atmosphere; in space you hit hard diminishing returns at 100 layers, just to give you an idea. I always wanted to make one, but I wouldn't have a use for it.
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>>2230560
>some kinda plastic window foil
These work surprisingly well.
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>>2230604
Awesome, thanks for the tips.
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Good tips in here but WTF do you do if you don't have electric?
>No space heater
>No electric blanket
>No hot water
I'm looking into how I can use a 100w solar panel to generate heat but fuck me if heaters are all 200w or above.
So now I'm looking at combining a 100w solar panel with a car battery and a converter for 240v--could I run a basic bitch heater this way?
>t. live in midwest and am scared of a midwinter brownout or derecho fucking my shit up
>>
>>2231362
If you don't have electricity, a car battery and inverter is NOT a good way to go; it couldn't run a little plug in 1000w radiator heater for even an hour.

You caould consider direct-vent gas or propane heaters if you have gas service or a good sized home propane tank. A lot of these heaters can easily heat a small house to perfectly comfy, and they're safe and with no fumes. (outside air is used for combustion; it has an intake and exhaust duct)
And they should be able to run for weeks and weeks without electricity if you have even a reasonable sized propane tank. They're not pretty, but they can be had for ~500$ or less brand new.

Kerosene heaters are a more portable option, but then you have to keep fuel for them around. They also tend to have a lot more fumes and they're sometimes less safe than the vent free type. These units are pretty cheap though, less than 200$, and you can just stick them anywhere with no real installation (as long as you mind the safe clearance to flammable materials)
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>>2227256

Buy two high quality heated jackets. Charge one while wearing the other. Electric blanket for bed. Much cheaper than space heaters.
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>>2231362

Calm down. Get a buddy heater, Get the 20ft hose and fuel filter for it. It will last about a week on low with a 20lb propane tank. Keep at least 4 tanks ready and full. Keep the tank outside and run the hose through a window. This will provide for approximately 2 weeks heating and cooking fuel. It is safe to run indoors, just leave a window cracked for ventilation.
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>>2227256
You need to seal the room or rooms you're heating. Caulk, weather strip, vapor barrier and tape the doors, windows, outlets, any anything that can be tracked to allowing unacceptable airflow. A tent simply deduces the area you're heating and adds a layer.
A heated blanket will heat just your person.
Any device in your room running will heat your room with 100% efficiency. A candle, a computer, tv, lightbulb, hot plate, space heater, anything.
A leaky house will just sieve all the heat from the gas your furnace is burning outside. That's why these plow up your gas bill. When you're isolating specific areas to heat to a livable temperate and let everything else stay just above freezing, then you can knock your bill down significantly.
>>
One thing people don't bear in mind is how hard your room will get FUCKED if you block up all the airflow with insulation. I had a mold problem for years every winter that was completely solved by just cracking the window slightly in every bedroom.
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>>2231475
JOKES ON ME, MY NIGGA
I LIVE IN A 2ND FLOOR APARTMENT
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>>2231768

Then use the 1lb tanks. On low, they will last about 5 or 6 hrs. Only use on the coldest days.
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>>2231707
This is true, a human being is a potent humidifier.
>>
>electricity will soon double in price in my cold country
>rent cuck
>pay for electricity but water is included in rent
How can I use hot water to heat up my place without getting moisture damage?
>>
>>2229955
Hot water bottles are amazing, I have one right now boiling my feet off me and combined with a blanket across me legs, it's actually making me too warm. Protip for OP, use water you used for cooking (boiling vegetables, pasta, etc) for your hot water bottle instead of wasting the heat by pouring it down the drain and electricity for boiling water just for your bottle.

Another tip I've saw but haven't done yet is to hang blankets/rugs on your walls as an insulation barrier. Apparently that's what they used to do in northern countries before modern insulation. I suppose it would be the same principle as a tent, but thicker and bigger.

>>2231362
I have a camping stove with a few canisters of gas for electric cuts. That should be enough to heat meals and water. Also have packs of tealights for light and heat.

>>2232052
Do you not use electricity to heat up your water? Either way, hot water bottles!
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>>2231768
So store them indoors. You're poor and it's not as if faveloids can afford to care about safety.

Buddy heaters actually are one of my emergency options as they burn less then my gas fireplace or stove, but I'm used to dealing with industrial gas and everything gets leak checked (simple soap and water will do). It's not high risk.

>>2232100
Is wise. Look at porn from poor Slavic zones and many commieblocks use rugs that way.
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>>2232052
Get 100 hosepipe, run it from your tap along the edge of your wall and back to your sink, turn on tap. Voila, you have made a rudimentary radiator.
>>
why nobody mentioned mining shitcoins
>>
>>2232052
You have to get 500-600 five gallon buckets with lids, then you fill them with hot water. They will store it for a long time, and slowly release it into your apartment. It's basically a smarter, better version of the traditional masonry stove.
>>
Ok, what about terracotta pot heaters? With a Crisco candle? Serious question, would that keep me alive?
>>
Mylar thermal / reflective heat blankets. There's also mylar sleeping bags apparently
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>>2227274
This is actually the most efficient way honestly.
>>
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>>2227256
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>>2227256
Take some cardboard boxes and put them in the windows then put blankets over the windows. Put boxes on every wall that ices up. The more you seal it up with tape and cardboard the warmer you'll be. You can get it to the point where cooling it down becomes your issue. Just keep stuffing plastic bags into gaps and corners. If you own that place, spray foam insulation is really handy stuff, wear gloves when using it. The more cardboard you put up the warmer you'll be. If you have holes in your basement walls, fill them in with the spray foam insulation. You can use the cardboard to make fake walls in the basement and fill them in with the spray foam insulation. Do your attic ceiling as well. Seal everything up you can. I leave my heat at 55-60 and it never kicks on.
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>>2233679
I live in an RV. If this is your case, you have an amazing option. Thick black plastic. Just cover the entire rv and tape it down with window flashing tape or zip tape. Make sure the plastic touches the ground, use sticks to poke it into the ground. You'll be so warm all winter. Don't use propane heaters like the big buddy Mr heater, it'll burn your house down or make you incredibly sick. Electric heater on low at night with cardboard on the windows and covering all the metal inside with tape and cardboard. You'll be sweating your ass off.
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>>2233683
In an RV that metal door is your worst enemy along with the windows. Getting them covered is your first and foremost weapon against the cold. Cardboard is free from the store.
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>>2233685
I put cardboard in my wind shield. As well. There really isn't anything like it. I can't recommend it highly enough. Just cut and stuff it in. Put styrofoam in your air vents and cardboard in your ac units, closing the ac vents. Do everything I state and your rv will never drop below freezing. Getting skirting around the base is super important and can be done with styrofoam or plastic and tape. Use some rocks to hold it down. I just cover the whole thing with black plastic and it's so nice all winter long. Wood stoves are a cheap way to heat things up but can go south quickly.
>>
Last year in April I bought and moved into a big antique house that lacks heat except for one 24,000 BTU gas space heater, which was enough to keep a few rooms reasonably warm some of the time, and entirely insufficient at other times. I could not leave it on when I left the house or went to sleep. I supplemented it with electric space heaters, and by using two in my bedroom, left on all the time, I was able to keep it reasonably warm except on the coldest nights.

I was trying not to spend a lot of money on staying warm because I wanted to save as much money as possible until I could afford to buy a more effective heater, but I eventually caved and bought a $220 down comforter from Ikea. I should have done that the very first time I was cold at night. Ikea describes their comforters as "light warm", "warm", or "extra warm", and when they say "extra warm", they are not fucking around. It could be 45 degrees in my bedroom and I would be almost uncomfortably warm in my bed, sleeping naked. Dressed warmly I could probably stay warm in bed down to around freezing, though getting out of bed in a room that is below 50 is pretty miserable.

My house generally has one electrical circuit per room, which is not the case for every house, and so in order to have two in my room, I had one on an extension cord. People will lose their minds if you tell them that you are doing this, because everyone knows that doing this will definitely start a fire. The reason that you're not supposed to do this is that cheap household extension cords are generally not rated to carry the current the a space heater draws, and if you try to pull that much current through them they will get so hot that they will melt their insulation. However, you can buy extension cords that are rated for 20 amps at 125 volts, more than enough for a 1500 watt space heater. Just be sure that each heater is on a different circuit and all of the wires supplying it are properly rated for the current they carry.
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>>2228686
This. Literally one of the first breakthrough invention was heat and you can bet these cavemen sat around their campfires as much as they could when it was cold.
Fucking luddites
>>
>>2233725
>electric space heaters
>$220 down comforter
There was a time I tried out the poverty lifestyle. But I did it with wood fires to keep the house at 35 degrees, and an electric blanket.
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>>2227256
Wool blankets and flannel sheets are cozy as fuck so load your bed up with those, get ugly 70's wool blankets from thrift shops if you have to.
Dress in layers, wear polypropylene thermals top and bottom under regular clothes, wear a beanie and consider a neckwarmer too.
Seal as many window and door gaps as you can, partially cover air vents too and if you don't mind looking like a schizo get bubble wrap and tape it against the windowframes to trap a layer of air against the glass, this alone will stop almost 50% of indoor heat from being lost.
Close all the doors and seal off every room so your house is collection of cells rather than one big space, makes it easier to trap heat in the room/s that you're spending the most time in.
Cook slow one pot meals and roast shit in the oven so you're kitchen heats up, sleep there if you have to.
Under no circumstances use charcoal inside, monoxide will fuck your shit up. If you're very desperate heat up bricks over a charcoal pit outside and then stack them on a flameproof surface indoors, the thermal mass will radiate heat for hours.
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>>2232100
>Protip for OP, use water you used for cooking (boiling vegetables, pasta, etc) for your hot water bottle instead of wasting the heat by pouring it down the drain and electricity for boiling water just for your bottle.
Sounds like a good way to have a completely disgusting hot water bottle.
>>
Guys I respect that you have put a lot of interesting and resourceful ideas in this thread, really respect for that, but OP said that he doesn't have money.
Most of your ideas mean he has to spend at least some hundreds of dollars. But if he did that, he might as well spend that same money to simply buy one more plug in electric radiator, and just burn and pay electricity probably?
(unless he plans to use all that stuff for more than one winters)
I just wanted to make it a point, so you take that into account too.
Also, OP:
don't completely seal up everything with plastic sheets, insulation foam, to every vent, crack, etc. You need fresh air and oxygen to get inside the house, and daily refresh the air of the house at least once.
Especially if you have some kind of gas heating, i.e. fire burning, you got to be careful to not tight seal everything, to avoid monoxide poisoning.
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>>2227256
How about putting a light bulb in your pocket.
>>
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>>2233651
Is that a...nun in the crowd walking past the path to Jesus?

Also, what do you guys think of terracotta pot heaters?
>>
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>>2227256
never used this video but this idea of tea candle heaters work friggen great.
the terracata pots or flat or even bricks are hella cheap and the so are the te candles. it doe not make more carbon monoxide than a candle so its safe to breath....just be careful for fire

https://youtu.be/b11dqKJrulk
>>
>>2228789
The actual Japanese ones have a frame with a removable top and the blanket is sandwiched in between. The blanket doesn’t have a hole in middle.

The easiest thing to do would be to buy one of the heaters off of eBay or Amazon, screw it to the bottom of a coffee table, throw a blanket over the top of it and put a piece of 3/4 plywood or something over the top of the blanket. Then you can just pull the blanket out when when it’s not cold. I think someone did a write up on using a coffee table from ikea, if you bing search ikea kotatsu you should be able to find it.
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>>2233809
Not really, just rinse it out. Besides, hot water bottles should be replaced every 5ish years anyway as the rubber hardens.
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>>2227256
Hot water bottle
>>
>>2234424
Dope, thanks anon.
I would've thought just placing a loose piece of wood over a table with a blanket wouldn't be amazingly stable though.
But if that's what the nips do then it must work well enough.
>>
>>2233798
>Cook slow one pot meals and roast shit in the oven so you're kitchen heats up
Terrible plan. You increase the temperature and the humidity, then all that water you boiled off condenses on all your shit when the place cools back down. Hope you like mold.
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>>2235144
If you're not covering food when you roast it, you're doing it wrong and it's probably dry as leather when it comes out. The only cooking method that should be raising your humidity an appreciable amount is boiling.
>>
>>2233725
If you were I Korea I'd say get what they call a "mink blanket". Things aren't mink tho, they are just super fuzzy synthetic blankets. Sad thing is they cost like 15$ there but go for way more online.
Also throw rugs, cover up some vents, use cloth curtains to close doorways (cuts down on drafts), stuff insulation into any cracks around the old windows.
>>
>>2235144
It's gets very dry the winter. I have a large pot of water on top of my fire place all winter and I regularly boil a pot of water to heat the house up in the morning. I have a hard time keeping the humidity in the 20% range.
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>>2227582
> pibble
>>
>>2235249
>fireplace
That's the main reason it's so dry. Great source of heat and comfy AF but since moving to a house with natural gas my skin and eyes have thanked me.

We used to throw pots of water on the top of our wood stove as well. I don't recall it ever boiling, though. Grab a humidifier and get that shit to 40%.

If you're mildly poor about it: shower with the door open instead of the vent fan, open your dishwasher to dry, let water get cold before pouring it into the wastewater system (baths, kitchen wash water, pasta water, etc). Costs 0 extra takes no real extra effort but you'll actually notice the difference.

If you're not poor about it: seal your damn house. It's dry because you're sucking in the dry air from outside, made worse by the fire sucking in a lot of it. This is the actual reason furnaces tend to work better for humidity: heat transfer to indoor air instead of sucking up and exhausting the indoor air (which necessarily sucks in the outdoor air).





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