[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vm / vmg / vr / vrpg / vst / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / pw / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / vt / wsg / wsr / x / xs] [Settings] [Search] [Mobile] [Home]
Board
Settings Mobile Home
/diy/ - Do It Yourself

[Advertise on 4chan]

Name
Options
Comment
Verification
4chan Pass users can bypass this verification. [Learn More] [Login]
File
  • Please read the Rules and FAQ before posting.
  • There are 132 posters in this thread.

08/21/20New boards added: /vrpg/, /vmg/, /vst/ and /vm/
05/04/17New trial board added: /bant/ - International/Random
10/04/16New board for 4chan Pass users: /vip/ - Very Important Posts
[Hide] [Show All]


Janitor acceptance emails will be sent out over the coming weeks. Make sure to check your spam box!


[Advertise on 4chan]


File: bocote.jpg (134 KB, 600x600)
134 KB
134 KB JPG
Bocote edition

Welcome to /wwg/! Here we discuss the working of wood and the tools and techniques used to do so. General carpentry question such as framing/decking/general construction might get a better response in /qtddtot/ or /sqt/.

>essential /wwg/ books

Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking, gives you everything you need and shows you how to do it multiple ways, from hand tools to power tools and gives you the knowledge to determine which is best, and then he teaches you how to apply what you learned. The PDF of the second book can be found in the usual places, but the other two are MIA.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1561588261

Christopher Schwarz tells you everything you need to know about planes and saws, and their use
Handplane Essentials
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1440332983
Handsaw Essentials
Best to find this one in PDF from the usual sources, out of print and pricey!

Chris Pye wrote the book on carving, and keeps on writing them.
https://www.chrispye-woodcarving.com/

The eastern tradtion, Japanese Woodworking Tools: Their Tradition, Spirit and Use by Toshio Odate
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0941936465

Leonard Lee The Complete Guide to Sharpening, how to sharpen most everything.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1561581259

Bob Flexner - Finishing 101, covers the common stuff, his other books cover the uncommon and go into more depth
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1440308454/

Illustrated Cabinet Making by Bill Hylton, learn to design furniture that won't fall apart
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1565233697/

>essential /wwg/ tv
https://www.pbs.org/show/woodwrights-shop/
https://www.newyankee.com/

Previous thread: >>2164499
>>
I've always wanted to get into woodworking and now I am at a point where I can. I want to get into it to make personal handmade gifts for friends and family (and just as a hobby). Realistically, how long would it take me to go from absolute zero to being able to make such gifts?
>>
I used a butane torch to try to disinfect one of my chisels to dig a splinter out with, but I got it too hot and the metal discolored a little. is it ruined now? I think it got to around 450 degrees based on the color.
>>
File: Bottle Openers.jpg (156 KB, 852x740)
156 KB
156 KB JPG
>>2191973
1 day for these. Depends on the gift, of course. What are you planning to make?
>>
>>2191973
>Realistically, how long would it take me to go from absolute zero to being able to make such gifts?
Depending on the gift, anywhere from zero seconds to a lifetime; if the gift is wooden blocks for a toddler all you need is a saw and some sandpaper and if the gift is a Louis XIV armoire you need a full workshop, apprentices and a source for materials that are currently illegal to import.
>>
Has anyone here ever adjusted the infeed & outfeed tables on a jointer? I discovered that the infeed and outfeed are not parallel planes. This is making it impossible to get nice straight flat edges on long heavy boards.

Has anyone does this adjustment on a 220 V delta jointer? Any pointers or pitfalls?
>>
File: 20210826_082537.jpg (435 KB, 935x1834)
435 KB
435 KB JPG
Show me your spoons
i did it without a template, so unfortunately not symmetrical
>>
I've got an idea for a business sign, in which I cut the logo out of a panel of wood, then make a box with that panel as the face, and then put LEDs on the back of that panel facing into the box to give it a lit kind of effect.
How much would this be to make it 8x10 or some shit? What's the cheapest "business sign size" I can buy to do this, and how can I join everything to actually fit properly and look good as fuck?
You can literally give me a jargonized comma separated list of shit to do and I'll research it from there.
>>
>>2192218
>>2192224
I haven't thought about specifics yet. Anything from small decorative boxes to cutting boards to full pieces of furniture. I'd like to make a Chess set for myself in the future. I know I'd have to build up my skill set and tool set to make more complex things.
>>
>>2192329
Wood weathers so fast. If the box is deep enough and placed so that the sun doesn't beat down on the actual interior panel sign, the inside can last a while if you do some maintenance every couple years. The outside will fade and split pretty quick. Maybe you can at least clad the exterior of the box in aluminum to mitigate that. Aside from that, make the box big enough to account for some LED light strips. Not the tape strips, but the stuff you put under a counter, you can probably even find these weather sealed for an outdoor bar or something. Mount those to the inside of the box edges and then use a nailgun to shoot some finish trim around the front so you can't see the light bars. You might even shoot some strips of wood on the inside of that as a rim to hide the light bars from cursory inspection from the side.
>>
>>2192334
>small decorative boxes to cutting boards to full pieces of furniture. I'd like to make a Chess set for myself in the future. I know I'd have to build up my skill set and tool set to make more complex things.

For general purpose woodworking the following list of hand tools is plenty to get started and most of these are available used but perfectly functional much more cheaply than new production. With these tools you could build anything from a ring box to a king-size bed.
Starting kit
>Bench with vise, ideally a woodworking bench
>Cross-cut saw
>Rip saw
>Dovetail/Tenon saw (10"-12" blade)
>Set of bench chisels
>Jack plane
>Mortising chisels
>Square (it's worth shelling out for a Starrett IMO)
>Sharpening stones/strop/etc.
>Hammer
>Mallet
>Nails
>Clamps
>Pencil
>Marking knife
>Glue
>Sharpening stones
>Sandpaper
>Straight edge (24"+)
>Varnish/paint/wax/etc.

Recommended and generally inexpensive
>Card scraper*
>Card scraper burnisher
>Mitre box
>Spokeshave
>Rabbet plane
>Rounded moulding planes
>Chip carving knife
>Honing guide
>Winding sticks*
>Shooting board*

Recommended and potentially relatively costly
>MOAR PLANES (smoothing plane, jointing plane, fillister plane, shoulder plane, router plane, moulding planes)
>MOAR CLAMPS
>Better workbench
>Paring chisels
>Other specialty chisels
>Carving tools
>Sticking board*
*You can make these yourself

When it comes to drills you can either go with a cordless electric driver (recommended if you're going to be using fasteners) or hand-powered. Hand-powered drills are cheap and fun to use but are very much drills and not drivers.

As far as larger power tools go, I can't really help you there.
>>
File: 20210825_153727.jpg (2.38 MB, 4000x3000)
2.38 MB
2.38 MB JPG
pretty much finished my box from the other thread
>>
File: 20210825_153853.jpg (2.48 MB, 4000x3000)
2.48 MB
2.48 MB JPG
>>2192984
going to start some new stuff
>>
>>2192984
>>2192985
Nice
>>
>>2191784

My brother is about to have another kid and I'm thinking of making some wooden toys for him. Is there a good website with ideas for wooden toys for children?
>>
>>2192863
Thanks for the comprehensive list, anon. I really appreciate it. I'm gonna start browsing for used tools and see what I can find.
>>
File: PXL_20210821_060911149.jpg (3.08 MB, 4032x3024)
3.08 MB
3.08 MB JPG
>>2192984
>>2192985


Looks good, I've been eagerly following your progress.
>>
File: PXL_20210824_215957903.jpg (3.21 MB, 4032x3024)
3.21 MB
3.21 MB JPG
>>2193208
I'm the box maker
>>
Is Tage Frid's book the go-to for beginners?
>>
>>2193120
Do your research on what to buy new as opposed to old. A few things make much more sense to buy used (especially planes) but most other old tools, while often performing just as well, often need a bit of TLC and some are basically only of special interest to collectors or LARPers - there's no fucking point in spending $60 on an antique card scraper and an antique burnisher when you can get an entire assortment of new cards and a new burnisher for <$25.
>>
File: silkykatana.jpg (382 KB, 928x628)
382 KB
382 KB JPG
I need a "hand"saw for felling birch trees. I presume it should be crosscut and sufficient in length.

As an /out/ist i have seen this saw but fuck me i'm not spending 170$ on a single crosscut blade.
>>
>>2193994
Compact collapsable or fullsize?
>>
I want to create my own workbench for both woodworking and some electronics. I drew up the following design made out of aluminium profiles (black, red, green) with two wood tops (blue). The profiles are 45mm each. The black are the main table, the red are mounted below the top frame so that the wood (same thickness, so top is flush) can be screwed on to it. The green ones are for additional rigidity. The idea would be that you can use clamps that ride in the profiles as replacement for a vise. Does that all make sense? Measurements are in mm.
>>
File: drawing.png (41 KB, 983x605)
41 KB
41 KB PNG
forgot pic
>>
File: 20210828_172101_50.jpg (1.23 MB, 2016x1512)
1.23 MB
1.23 MB JPG
>>2194130

Check this out

https://youtu.be/6A4iHVVnDHo

It's a pretty slick design.

Also, mostly finished with this red cedar frame. It's a fun wood to work with but apt to tear out. I hand sanded inside edges to give it a little more rustic look, and to cover up tearouts around knots. It's a mitered half lap arrangement, but the mirror going in it is quite heavy so I added some walnut "splines" at the corner to add another point of contact for glue and I did put a screw through each tenon from the back.

I cut a 1/4" ply backer, I'm going to use clear silicone to attach, and I have some of those little glass holding clamps the will line the back of it so I think it will be secure. I've never done a mirror frame near as large as this and I'd rather not be woken up one night by a piece of cedar cracking in half and breaking the mirror. It's probably overkill though.
>>
>>2194130
I build my own "bench", a elevated work surface screwed on a half ton welding table.
After a year of working with that i can assure you, all designs without a proper tail vise are lacking. If id have a penny for every time i wanted tail vise, i'd be retired
>>
>>2193044
I would be interested as well
>>
>>2191973
If you enjoy precision crafts like painting and a little bit of math and problem solving, then you'll probably fall right into it. There's some physicality which is nice. If you don't have patience or adaptability then you're in for a tough time.
>>
File: 20210828_211817.jpg (3.04 MB, 4032x3024)
3.04 MB
3.04 MB JPG
>>2194140

In place. That's a heavy fucking mirror. I hung it on two french cleats so I don't think it's going anywhere.
>>
>>2191784

i'm making a walnut slab table, and filled most of the cracks with food grade epoxy after cleaning up all of the wood. sanded it down and now I'm gonna fill the cracks that didn't get filled and sand those down. then i'm going to seal it with arm n seal satin. I was going to do tung oil but someone said try both on a test piece. Since this thing is going in my kitchen nook I'm hoping it'll turn out ok.
>>
File: sanding3.jpg (1006 KB, 1600x1200)
1006 KB
1006 KB JPG
>>2194537
pic related
>>
Looks like it's pretty flat but that looks like a good job for a diy router sled IMO
>>
>>2194539
>surgical mask as a dust mask
>belt sander without dust extraction
>using a fan to clear dust
even the talented 10th is retarded, this isnt surprising at all.
>>
Show me your figurines
>>
>>2194798

if I'm on this site then you know I'm not one of the most intelligent black people. that should be a given. thanks for your concern about masking up. I'll be doing that.
>>
>>2195178
I get these half faces free from work. All you need are p100 cartridges and they last till its tough to breath. Theyre cheap too
>>
I never done any wood working before, but I want to make this instrument. How much money do you think I would have to sink to create this, equipment access is no issue
>>
>>2195953
forgot to link what im talking about
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_90hjuduWZ0
>>
>>2193994
looks like average pruning saw xxl
>>
>>2195953
>>2195955
the woodworking on this is going to be the cheapest part
maybe 100-200
the expensive shit will be the EBow, instrument parts, electronics, microphones, and mixing equipment
>>
Made a box for a parent of my kids' friends at school. Her daughters and my son's are all the same age and besties.
>>
File: PXL_20210831_020011629.jpg (3.32 MB, 4032x3024)
3.32 MB
3.32 MB JPG
>>2196505
>>
I have a solid wood ikea table top, the gerton, it's beech wood. It hasn't been sealed with anything as far as I know, I didn't put anything on it after buying it.

My dumbass wife keeps putting something on certain spots of it, I think her over ear headphones that have hair product absorbed into the fabric ear cups. You can kind of see grease/oil marks on the surface of the table, and if you set down a piece of paper it'll get stained with grease/oil spots.

Is there a way to dry out the wood or extract whatever has soaked into it? I like the natural look and don't really want to seal the top of it if I can avoid it, and if I did seal it I'd rather not seal in her stains. Any suggestions on what I can do?
>>
>>2194798
give the guy some credit, usually I just pull my shirt up over my nose,
>>
I want to make a dining table for 8 people as my first big project. It looks simple enough at first glance, is there something easy to miss when making them?
>>
hi lads, I got myself some wood carving tools and will try to carve something
any good tutorials on sharpening and using them?
>>
File: wood_comb.jpg (46 KB, 640x517)
46 KB
46 KB JPG
How would one make a comb like pic related from wood? Every time I try it breaks, as I cannot make the teeth this thin.
>>
>>2196829
Divorce your wife.
>>
Does adding sand to glue really do anything?
>>
>>2197829
that comb is made of antler
>>
>>2197829
That comb is made out of antler. And, cut some hard wood and carve the teeth along the grain, not across it.
>>
>>2197829
laser cut wood

>>2196829
buy a sander and refinish it
>>
File: PXL_20210903_033055254.jpg (3.75 MB, 4032x3024)
3.75 MB
3.75 MB JPG
Rubbin my wood with shellac
>>
>>2194314
lookin good
>>
File: 1626286639710.jpg (91 KB, 460x460)
91 KB
91 KB JPG
How many coats of gel stain should you use? It looks alright with 1 but some places say they always need 2 or more. It is general finishes.
>>
>>2196829
try mineral spirits
>>
>>2197830
She has big mommy milkers though.

>>2197942
What if it goes way too far down into the wood though? Would I just have to start sanding and hope for the best?

>>2198586
What would that do?
>>
>>2197900
I have noticed.

>>2197940
That may be a good idea

>>2197942
Sadly don't have a lazor and no time to build one

>>2198641
Well if that is your desire than divorce may not be an option. Exile her from the workshop.
Mineral Oil might seal the pores but I would think it would stain a lot / change the color. I know it was done earlier and it worked, but good luck getting rid of mineral oil stained wood.
>>
>>2197787
Metal worker here. The sharpening depends on the tool form, for example, a U-Shape is harder to sharpen than a I-shape. Keep a (big) cup of water next to it: too much heat while grinding and the properties of the steel will change, rendering the tools unusable.
Always grind, dip in water, grind some more and keep it nice and cool. Take your time while grinding.
"Reverse" L-shaped attachments on the grinding wheel can help guide it correctly.
>>
>>2197787
>wood carving tools
Whetstone only. No grinders at all.
>>
>>2198576
1 if it looks fine to you. 2 at max according to general finishes guide on their website.
>>
nice gen. also bocote is king.

i got a bunch of olive wood, whats the best finish for this? i want natural, because the grain is awesome and convoluted, dotn want that gaudy "varnish" look.

also how do finish bocote? to me just sanded looks pretty awesome already, but i guess i have to curate it or something.

got some bog oak slices, dont know what to do with them so they look proper, its a weird wood, dont even know if its wood, its like coal.
>>
Where my cocobolo bros @
>>
I don't get chisel autism and brand loyalty.

Beyond the quality of the steel in an individual chisel, everything else seems fairly pointless- even the sharpest factory chisel will dull with relative quickness, and will need to be touched up. From that point on the behavior of the chisel would be governed by the ability of the user to sharpen the chisel.

I bought a set of narex chisels recently and they're perfectly fine but they're no different in actual use from my no name ones or marples... they're just a simple sharp wedge I smack with a mallet or use to clean up edges.
>>
File: 20210905_192600.jpg (3.33 MB, 4032x3024)
3.33 MB
3.33 MB JPG
Also my local hardwood store sells their pallets of off cuts. I paid $150 and this is just the walnut from that pallet alone, I have double this amount of maple, half this amount of cherry, a shitload of red and qs white oak, and some small pieces of bocote and purple heart. I need to start selling end grain cutting boards to dumb hipsters because I could probably make a hundred of the things.
>>
>>2200562
holy shit americans get the good shit. i buy 1/8 slices of exotic wood and get scalped out the ass.
>>
>>2200562

Whaaat the fuuuck. your pallets are made of walnut? All we get here is this shitty fast growing pine.
>>
>>2200675

i misread. even if it's the offcuts I could do so much with that.
>>
>>2200370
i've always wondered if you could just buy the cheapest chinesium chisels and then case-hardening them yourself like this guy did to get a really high carbon steel.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_Mp1fNzIT8
>>
>>2197488
probably some onions zoomer who's touched wood "in theory" on reddit and late at night underneath his covers.
>>
File: 20210906_102222.jpg (3.04 MB, 4032x3024)
3.04 MB
3.04 MB JPG
>>2200632

Lots of good deals in the states my dude. If I wasn't a total gear queer for tools all my playing with wood would pay for itself. This is the rest of that pallet, except for some of the largest pieces of maple and poplar I put out in my lumber shed. The best part is the vast majority is s2s so I just rip another edge on it and it's good to go.

I'm not a professional by any means and just do it for fun, but my mother is a teacher and once the other teachers saw stuff like wooden cutouts of the state or a sports ball team, they were all about that. I can charge $50 for a scrolled cutout of my state with some pinterest level paint doodles on it and only have about $0.50 in the wood for it. Even better when they want something like coasters or name plate holders or something. I understand the frustration of professionals who want to make cool furniture and shit but they make 90% of their profit on cutting boards. I've probably already made $500 off this $150 pallet and I haven't even put a dent in it.
>>
File: 649033958.jpg (697 KB, 1200x1600)
697 KB
697 KB JPG
>>2200831

I think I posted this last thread but this is an example of the stuff that 30 something white women go crazy for. A simple glue up, a few passes through the planer, some quality time with a jigsaw or bandsaw and a chisel, and a $1 tube of hobby lobby acrylic paint. Bam, $50, and compared to what people charge on etsy, everyone feels like they got a deal.
>>
File: 20210830_075338.jpg (3.81 MB, 4032x3024)
3.81 MB
3.81 MB JPG
>>2200836

In terms of more practical projects, I made crown molding out of poplar to use in two or my bathrooms. After I took down the popcorn ceiling, the truly awful taping job was exposed. I knew and know nothing of crown and between out of level ceilings and my own ignorance did a fairly poor job with the scarf joints, so today I'm going to make little decorative "clips" that will be nailed over the joints. I was intelligent enough (a first for me) to space the joints roughly equidistant from each other so if I'm lucky it will look intentional, and not like a patch job.
>>
File: 20210904_004043.jpg (3.07 MB, 4032x3024)
3.07 MB
3.07 MB JPG
>>2200840

Bathroom one
>>
File: 20210904_170225.jpg (2.45 MB, 4032x3024)
2.45 MB
2.45 MB JPG
>>2200841

Bathroom 2, which came out a lot rougher.

Regardless I think my coverup will be effective if it works like I think it will. Due to what is no doubt a poor job setting consistent molding angles across the entire room I'm sure each piece will need a bit of hand fitting.

On the plus side, it's like $60 of poplar in total. A lot cheaper than buying molding, and I would have fucked that up too. I should have made it thinner and lighter though- its 5/8" thick and that was unwieldy for me to put up for longer spans.
>>
>>2200843

Note this one isn't quite as bad as it looks... i had some drydex in the nail holes and along the joints and it's still wet in that picture so it stands out. It's a bad job but it isn't that bad.
>>
>>2200370
some lines have half assed ground or even polished backs with sunken corners.
flattening those is a pain in the butt, wide ones take forever

also this must be an american thing
most hobby woodworkers i know dont have two from the same brand, a lot antiques from great great gramps still in use
New i buy MHG, stainless and coffin nail hard
All professionals here use company supplied "format", those are rebrand MHG
>>
>>2200840
>scarf joints
You just have to sand until it looks right. Part of trim carpentry is just working at one thing until it's right. It's easier to sand for half an hour when you're on the clock vs if you're doing subcontracting or touching up your own beat up place.
>>
>>2200985

I went back over them and touched up the paint on the joints. They're still noticeable if you turn the lights on and look but it's not nearly so bad now. I might leave it for the time being- I can always cover the joints since I did plan ahead to do so, but sometimes some little fuckups arent so bad to look at... and it's likely nobody else would pay any attention.

I'll probably need to make sure its adequately caulked when it gets cold and shrinks a bit anyway so if I'm not happy with it then I'll go back over it.
>>
>>2200747
Idk sounds more boomer to me. That’s the sort of thing my dad wood do along with “I have eye glasses so I don’t need safety goggles.”
>>
>want to do some cabinets
>thinking of oak
>check stores
>too expensive
>think of gelstaining plywood
>check for plywood
>out of stock in 3 local stores

Uuuh.
>>
>>2201563
it's time to take the metalpill and stop playing with dead trees.
>>
>>2192274
how did you make anon? just a carving knife or what? I find it difficult to carve out the spoon part.
>>
File: shoehorn.jpg (87 KB, 395x1257)
87 KB
87 KB JPG
>>2201628
no knife, dont have one (yet)
I started with a rectangular blank, wood is a pear branch.
the spoon hollow was roughed with a wide and a narrow gouge.
the handle waste was cut off with saw and chisel, then the outside shaping was done with spokeshave and a japanese sculpturers rasp (20€ well worth it)
For the hollow cleaning i filed a 5 and 10mm radius on a cardscraper.
Scraper left a rough finish, so i sanded it afterwards, watered and sanded with scotchbright like ultrafine pads, 3 times before applying raw oil
now it is smooth as a baby butt, true joy for the hands

now that is a fuckload of tools involved, im sure this could be done with quite a lot less, but i wanted to try out my new gouge and rasp.
>>
File: ikea.png (59 KB, 730x881)
59 KB
59 KB PNG
So is higher quality MDF my best choice for building a bookshelf? Seems normal wood and ply will both warp on their own. Im thinking of building something similar to those ikea cubes but kind of massive, its going to take up an entire wall and honestly be packed with books.
>>
>>2201709

MDF is very heavy and way more likely to sag than plywood over an unsupported span.
>>
>>2201722
im still thinking of having the cube design, i thought if the pieces arent very long, even fully loaded they shant sag when filled. However my conclusion may be in error for I only suppose this to be so based on cabinetary I've seen in contemporary housing. Ply and solid wood would be more likely to warp which simply will no do as I plan to leave this book case alone for decades to come.
>>
File: cabinet1.jpg (299 KB, 1254x1890)
299 KB
299 KB JPG
I made a cabinet.
>>
>>2201727

I'm not really sure why you think ply or wood would be so inadequate. You are correct that MDF is very stable, but if you're using appropriately dry wood and you don't intend to leave it in flood conditions, it just doesn't seem like much of a problem.

I'm not suggesting MDF is useless either, but it is seen as the decidedly less luxioruous choice for a reason. It's also a dusty mess to cut large amounts of, and holds screws relatively poorly.
>>
>>2201772
>, but if you're using appropriately dry wood and you don't intend to leave it in flood conditions, it just doesn't seem like much of a problem.
idk if i can even get good quality wood where I am. Everything is super fucking expensive at the lumber yards and big box is just pine and some jarrah. I've tried asking around but people tend to be tight lipped about their sources
>>
File: PXL_20210907_185138187.jpg (3.62 MB, 4032x3024)
3.62 MB
3.62 MB JPG
Made a box for kiddos' friends at school.
>>
File: PXL_20210907_185133600.jpg (3.71 MB, 3024x4032)
3.71 MB
3.71 MB JPG
>>2201794
It's walnut, cherry, poplar and coated with home made garnet shellac.
>>
File: PXL_20210907_185215967.jpg (3.87 MB, 3024x4032)
3.87 MB
3.87 MB JPG
Working on this resawn cedar box with continuous grain from left to right. It's got just two coats of shellac

Cedar tears out like crazy.
>>
File: PXL_20210907_185236410.jpg (3.9 MB, 3024x4032)
3.9 MB
3.9 MB JPG
Rubbing some other pieces.


These are leftover scraps from house projects, I have a few thousand bf of walnut, pop, cherry and cedar
>>
>>2201794
>>2201795
>>2201799

Based boxchad
>>
>>2201801
nice work dan
>>
File: black_oak_lozenge_1.jpg (1.3 MB, 3900x2500)
1.3 MB
1.3 MB JPG
I also made a box.
>>
>>2201691
very nice. I just saw a rectangle of wood to where it looks like a square at the end of a smaller rectangle then carve the rest with mora. Granted the ones I made are nothing compared to yours. I have to invest in some more tools.
>>
>>2201691
>>2201946
btw why did you wash it so much? Just for a perfect coat of oil?
>>
I want to make a black glossy table top. Is there a way to do it with wood, mdf, melamine?
>>
>>2201993

Sure, doable with any of those. MDF would be a solid option for that.

There is probably a video specific to tabletops, but watch how this guy gets a glossy finish on these subwoofer cabs.

https://youtu.be/vgXw8yl8sJs

Tldr get ready to sand
>>
>>2202012
Is there a way without expoxy?
>>
>>2201901
Nice work. Your carving is exceptional.
>>
>>2201756

that's cool, how you do the door? By hand or CNC?
>>
File: PXL_20210908_043930662.jpg (3.59 MB, 3024x4032)
3.59 MB
3.59 MB JPG
Big box of walnut. Used a 9 inch wide board at 2/4, rough sawn, mitered, and a thicker 6inch wide doubled for bottom of the box, which is visible. Will sand and polish again tomorrow night.
>>
File: PXL_20210908_043913486.jpg (2.19 MB, 3516x2216)
2.19 MB
2.19 MB JPG
Other box almost ready, poplar, cherry bottom and wgpoodalnut top
>>
>>2201993
I literally just tested in on melamine, it was glossy and the paint stayed on. Fuck sake, wasted a day.
>>
File: 20210515_142714_w.jpg (327 KB, 1287x1438)
327 KB
327 KB JPG
>>2202093
>>2202099
Thank you. I do everything by hand. This is my tool chest.
>>
>>2201946
>nothing compared to yours.
mate, those are my first shitty attempts, something to practice.
think the image quality hides the defects
those forms are also easy to sand, that does a lot too the finishing touch.
i watered the spoon excessive because the last thing i want on a spoon is fiberes coming back

now that carver guy itt is a god with a knife
>>2202055
french polish, requires severe autism
>>
I applied satin wipe on poly to a project and on its 2nd coat after drying for 24 hours there is a spot where it has a cloudy grey apperance. It is only in one spot. Will sanding and another coat fix this? IDK what went wrong.
>>
File: PXL_20210908_193654399.jpg (3.57 MB, 4032x3024)
3.57 MB
3.57 MB JPG
Big box just under a foot square at about 9 inches deep.
>>
>>2202273
beautiful
>>
>>2202477

Was it dusty or was that part of the project possibly dirty or dusty?

Buff and reapply, shouldn't take long. Try making your own wipe on poly by just cutting oil based poly with mineral spirits. I do 50/50 and on really hot days you can get several thin coats on in an hour and apply it with a rag or (lint free!) cloth.
>>
>>2202273
jesus christ man...I aspire to be half as talented as you someday
>>
I.. don't like veneers
>>
>>2202629
I do the diy wipe on. I got some 600 grit and will do another coat tomorrow when it is warmer. I think poly does not like my garage in the upper 50s.
>>
File: white_oak_arcading_1.jpg (762 KB, 1008x756)
762 KB
762 KB JPG
>>2202655
Anyone can do this. A year ago I had never cut a dovetail, and I only started carving last December. Covid was the greatest thing that ever happened to me.
>>
>>2202629
>>2202733
I do this but with shellac, mostly bc it's not off gassing around kiddos, I do like the durability of poly but shellac is pretty, less toxic, and smooth as glass
>>
>>2202655

Fuck talent, I want to have as much patience as it takes to get that done.
>>
I bought a used Jet 15" mini lathe from a very skilled woodturner who is quitting due to medical issues today for $150. I've never turned anything before but I'm looking forward to trying.

It's in good used condition, the guy told me he used it for classroom demonstrations and at craft shows due to the relatively small size making it portable (he also had a 5HP powermatic and a rikon 220).

I guess I can do small cups, bowls, and pens. Pens might be fun. I bought a cheapo live center for the tail stock. He gave me a steb center to go with it. His advice was to buy the harbor freight 8 piece HSS tool set to try things out, and to upgrade down the road if I like it.

I'm interested in learning about this. It doesnt seem that "hard", but like there is a lot of touch and instinct to it when I watch really skilled people doing it. Those guys doing impressive segmented bowls and such put a lot of work into it, for sure.
>>
File: 20210909_112302.jpg (2.43 MB, 4032x3024)
2.43 MB
2.43 MB JPG
>>2202828

Pic related, used but he demonstrated it for me and it runs smooth and quietly. Given that the current equivalent model is over $500 I think I did alright.
>>
>>2202828
Lucky! Keep in touch with that dude, he did you a heck of a kindness.
>>
>>2191784
>The PDF of the second book can be found in the usual places
What are the best methods for finding materials like this online?
>>
File: Damn near perfect.jpg (61 KB, 478x345)
61 KB
61 KB JPG
>>2202718
Don't bother working with vaneers like that. Each side of a vaneer should be hidden in some way, for example slotted into a rebate.

>>2201756
>>2202273
>>2202785
If it weren't for this I'd call you a liar. Really skilled and patient. How old are you? How do you have so much free time?

>>2203506
leet
>>
Has anyone cut wild bamboo before? How do you make sure it dries with minimal splitting?
Asking as I have some growing nearby and I was thinking of experimenting with it during lockdown
>>
File: 20210906_081149.jpg (2.54 MB, 2834x4111)
2.54 MB
2.54 MB JPG
>>2204303
Each of those panels took me about 6 hours but the real time sink was dimensioning all the wood by hand from rough sawn boards. I'm almost 30 and when they told me to stop coming into the office in last year I realized I could fuck off most of the day while still accomplishing all my work. It won't last forever, but these past two years have been a godsend. Now I have to decide whether to get injected and keep my job or let them fire me, lose my income, and try to make a living doing stuff like this in my one-car garage.

Anyway here's the tool chest update. Burnt oak and maple cabinet to get it up off the floor.
>>
>>2204316

Remote work is so nice when you don't have to play office politics
>>
>>2204316
Test the market right now before you make your on the backfoot making your descision.
You probably know this but in general, if it sells too quickly the price is too low, if it takes too long to sell the price is too high.
>>
>>2194539
that walnut slab is going to be beautiful. Please post an update when you get it finished.

Where did you get the live-edge slab? Did you have to pay a lot for it?
>>
>>2196507
looks nice, but your grain lines in the black walnut are not running parallel. You've are at least 20 degrees off. Try to get those lines more parallel next time around.

Also you left circular-saw marks on the left side of the maple in your picture.

Other than those two things, the box looks really nice. I like the finish you chose.
Practice practice practice.
>>
>>2200562
you got a good deal on that wood, bro.
>>
>>2194539
lol are u me? i got a few of those (not fucking walnut) that just popped up after a flood
>>
File: Photo0188.jpg (462 KB, 1600x1200)
462 KB
462 KB JPG
>>
File: Photo0071.jpg (502 KB, 1600x1200)
502 KB
502 KB JPG
>>
File: Photo0187.jpg (326 KB, 1600x1200)
326 KB
326 KB JPG
>>
File: Photo0148.jpg (131 KB, 800x600)
131 KB
131 KB JPG
>>
File: Photo0149.jpg (245 KB, 1200x1600)
245 KB
245 KB JPG
>>
>>2204647
looks great
want to build a chest soon, will take this for some inspiration
>>
File: Photo0147.jpg (156 KB, 800x600)
156 KB
156 KB JPG
>>2204651
another one, nearly the same
>>
>>2204654
did you glue the feet and lid?
>>
>>2204656
no, just screw
>>
File: 20210911_171029.jpg (2.72 MB, 4032x3024)
2.72 MB
2.72 MB JPG
Turned a 1.25" block of oak on my new lathe just to find out how the different tools work. That was fun. I don't have any projects on hand to do but I can see this being entertaining.

Sanding is addictive. It's amazing how much material gets removed at 3800 rpm.
>>
File: 20210911_172423.jpg (2.77 MB, 4032x3024)
2.77 MB
2.77 MB JPG
Staining is pretty fun too. Neat how you just touch a pad to the piece and watch it saturate and buff itself.

I've done a small bit of metalwork but this certainly feels- and is- much more freeform. I need to get a chuck or faceplate so I can do stuff other than on center turning. I don't have much use for dowels but I could have fun making cups or bowls.
>>
>>2204401
Thanks, it's nice of you to notice and I appreciate the feedback.

I didn't want to cut the walnut down anymore and it has crazy grain bc it's figured stuff we throw out at the mill. The lumber grader throws out just about anything with knots or wild grain.

I had cut that into a thin slice, planed it and started on a small kids bookcase, my wife changed her mind, so I split the panel for something else and cut that board in half and glued it together bc it was already ripped super tight. The fucker warped when it hit the ac indoors.

Sawmarks are my laziness. Let my buddy borrow the planer 3 months ago he let me borrow a bunch of nail guns, saws, etc so here we are.
>>
>>2204646
Bist DU ein typ?
>>
>>2204647
Siehst aus mir als deutsche wohnzimmer...
>>
>>2204401
>>2204934
Also, it's cherry. We cut like 20 pieces wrong when the new guy was sawing ties, I kept all the heart slats, those pieces 4/4 to 1/4 that come off when the saw is misaligned. It's fucking sweet. I filled my cherry stock for years in a few days.
>>
hey
ignorant me scrubbed up some not really ever been cleaned cabinets for a place trying to sell.
oak veneer plywood, with some light red/orange stain
cleaning the years of gunk off with basically a sponge left the wood pale where i cleaned
i think im gonna clean the whole carcass an all the doors - how to get it all looking good and even again?
>>
How difficult is it to make dado cuts on a router table? My lelwalt construction table saw cant use dado blades, am considering getting a router table over a new table saw
>>
>>2205267

Not hard, but make sure you have a good depth gauge or other good positive stop to set it as a consistent dado between multiple cuts as a cut of any size will need multiple passes most likely. Get several decent quality featherboards as if you go too fast or your router speed isn't right it can "climb" on the bit and make an erratic cut.

Alternatively you could just use an edge guide with your router and make your dados that way. A router table is very nice to have though.

Buy a high quality bit.
>>
>>2205273

I guess it's worth adding if you'll be doing grooves, dadoes, or rabbets in panels at some point you might as well get a better table saw or design yourself to edge guide router work. A router table will serve you fine for most things but unless you build the most fuckhuge table around it won't do you much good for panels.
>>
File: 1486725929373.jpg (50 KB, 372x554)
50 KB
50 KB JPG
where can I get blueprints for different pieces of furniture?
I want inspiration and learn about different styles and construction methods.
>>
File: 1625543729353.jpg (305 KB, 2048x1152)
305 KB
305 KB JPG
I have a set of gravers (sharp chisels made for engraving) but I don't have any handles, how do I make them without a lathe?
>>
>>2205498
octagonal?
>>
>>2205498

Cut a square blank

Set table saw to 45 degrees

Make it octagonal

Alternative, router with a round over and you'll get oval grips
>>
>>2201709
Put books in closed shelving like cabinets. Dusting sucks.
>>
File: PXL_20210913_122858728.jpg (2.94 MB, 1452x1935)
2.94 MB
2.94 MB JPG
How to reframe an old shed door? Hinges are sagging and I want to affix the door to some more solid wood. And would 2x4s be what I want? Failing that: is there something else I can do to bolster it?

1/2
>>
File: PXL_20210913_123142166.jpg (2.37 MB, 1452x1935)
2.37 MB
2.37 MB JPG
>>2206013
Here's the inside. Best guess is the shed was originally built sometime before 1927 and has seen repairs of various quality over the years.

2/2
>>
>>2206015
Fucking hell.
Material doesn't matter much if you splosh it with 2 coats of oil paint. Does it need to be strong? If not, make a hallow door out of some sheet goods and a the frame out of some pine.
>>
>>2192984
>>2192985
Fucking asshole. That's so nice.
>>
>>2193994
Silky is the gold standard for trail crews.
>>
File: PXL_20210913_174658769.jpg (2.24 MB, 1935x1452)
2.24 MB
2.24 MB JPG
>>2206740
It needs to get only the most basic seal against the weather (I have colored caulk), be somewhat original looking from the exterior and be able to last longer than me with continued repairs. This means I want to prioritize preserving the original wood as much as possible.

It's an absolutely amazing space and I want to give it all the love it deserves. It even has a loft I managed to pull probably a couple thousand pounds of wood out of including original antique solid oak doors from the accompanying farmhouse and a box of old timey candid photos of old relatives around the farmhouse and even posing in front of the shed.

The thing even has a brick chimney and from what I can tell almost all of the wood is original. It's nuts because the integrity of everything structural is totally solid. The floors don't even creak.
>>
File: PXL_20210913_175445711.jpg (2.88 MB, 2390x1793)
2.88 MB
2.88 MB JPG
>>2206740
>>2206797

Dirty loft as viewed from below.
>>
File: PXL_20210913_221227680.jpg (2.82 MB, 2390x1793)
2.82 MB
2.82 MB JPG
>>2206740
>>2206797
>>2206798
And the loft once the unused wood and junk was removed and eighty years of mouse shit swept out. Notice the corn which is older than living memory.
>>
thoughts on tiktoks woodworking tips?
>>
File: PXL_20210914_174424846.jpg (3.41 MB, 3024x3331)
3.41 MB
3.41 MB JPG
Building anew a frame for kiddos swing at school. I did it for free because no it's a non profit. Still need to add screws and new chains.
>>
>>2207209

Any adult using tiktok should he shot
>>
>>2205480
that's easy! just google what you're looking for.
>>
>>2207235
>stained wood before cutting it
>doesnt drive screws flush
>asymetrical bracing
>single screws on the top
>never bothered to measure anything before cutting
I'm going to laugh when this crumples under the 30lb load a kid will put on it, and that top beam falls down and splits their head open and you get sued for negligence. you did an embarassingly bad job
>>
>>2206015
How to fix sagging door:
Step 1. completely remove the existing diagonal piece in this photo.
Step 2. use a ratchet strap to straighten the door by looping it around the door on the long diagonal (bottom left and upper right in your pic).
Step 3. Adjust the door so it is square. Measure both diagonals - they must be the same. Alternatively, if your door opening is not square, adjust the door with the ratchet strap until the door perfectly fits your building's opening.
Step 4. install a new diagonal member where the old one was. Be sure to fasten the diagonal member to each and every vertical board of this door.
Step 5. Remove the ratchet strap.

protip:
If you live in a northern climate, Satan will will blow his wintry load into your building through all the cracks, covering every surface with a miniature snow drift, thereby causing all of your tools to rust faster than an Dodge pickup.
>>
>>2206797
that is a beautiful shed, dude. You should weatherproof it, then fill it exclusively with hand tools for woodworking. Become the woodwright shop. Would also be a great crack shack for getting high.
>>
>>2207235
This looks so fucking weak dude. You should have 4 times as many screws supporting the top beam. Think: what happens if one of the screws fails? where does the beam go? Does it crush a kid?

Either fix this thing, or take out a multi-million dollar insurance policy on yourself because this shit is going to fall apart in a few years.
>>
>>2207289
That's it half done, it has six braces, not pictured, 3 coats of spar, which took 3 days, no stain friend, and it has structural lags at 3/8" x 6). I did pull ups on it. The old swing did collapse and the kids were fine.

It won't be ready until Friday, when I put a final coat of spar on to seal it.

No need to be upset that I can afford to give my kids' school free lumber and labor.
>>
>>2207305
Did no one see the I need to add a few more screws? It has 4 lags and will get 4 more tomorrow.
>>
>>2207305
>>2207289
Previous swing ad two lags,one one each side, mine will have 4. I don't see think either of you have ever bought or built a porch swing. This thing is 4x as strong with modern materials.
>>
>>2207309
>structural lags at 3/8"
it sure as shit doesnt have that in your picture

>afford to give my kids' school free lumber and labor
thats a funny way of saying you're not only incompetent but also unemployed
>>
>>2207300
I will absolutely do this. I've gotten so wrapped up cleaning the damn shed though that it'll be a bit. And yes, I'm in VT but thankfully everything seems pretty well sealed.
>>2207303
Thanks, man. I'm working my ass off emptying and cleaning it. Got it gutted down to the original wood today. It's nuts because the new wooden additions were substantially weaker that the wood that was a hundred years older. I had a stripped deck screw holding a new 2x4 to a rough cut beam and after fifteen minutes fucking with it I actually pulled the intact screw straight through the fucking 2x4 without developing so much as a wiggle in the beam.

The whole thing is 12'x16' with a loft so I'll have lots of room. I'm so excited.
>>
File: master_ALF473.jpg (3.13 MB, 3200x3200)
3.13 MB
3.13 MB JPG
>>2207312
Old swing was like this but with a 5/16 carriage bolt and made from 2x4 with a post on top.

This has two lags, mine has 4 and will have 8 tomorrow
>>
>>2207320
considering they did a far better job with bracing and actually bothered to measure things before they started cutting, I would be fine with this. yours is still going to crumple under the weight of a child you salty retarded boomerino

>mine has 4 and will have 8 tomorrow
thats a funny way of saying you know you fucked up and somehow think if you just keep on driving screws in to it, that will make up for the lack of bracing
>>
File: PXL_20210906_184532307.jpg (3.16 MB, 4032x3024)
3.16 MB
3.16 MB JPG
>>2207313
It does friend, you just don't see that those are grk RSS screws in the top. This is a 3/8 next to a no 10.

It's okay friend, no need to be angry, I can recognize lags, frame, create, be generous, an engaged dad, and love my neighbor with my spare time. Don't define yourself by negato and destructive attitudes.
>>
>>2207323
Are you still angry friend? Your lack of reading comprehension must have hurt your social development. It says right in my first post that I intend to add more screws. The six braces are drying after the final coat of spar. It takes one day per coat with thee total being ideal for 3-5 years of uv protection.

The frame is outside the kiddos' fence at school bc it's not ready--as my post made clear. You should consider an adult literacy course. There are fine programs to help you reintegrate into society.

There's no need to feel ashamed of your disability.
>>
>>2207332
you can add all the screws you want, it wont fix the lack of bracing

>reddit spacing
you have to go back
>>
>>2207326
Oh, and pick related are oak shutters I made for the new neighbors.
>>
File: PXL_20210913_115814437.jpg (1.62 MB, 2210x2458)
1.62 MB
1.62 MB JPG
>>2207335
Do you do wood working? Because your reading abilities rule out lots of more skilled positions.

I made new poplar legs, from 8/4 material, for a bench built by another parent 10 years ago. They had used 4 inch 5/16 rss and kameleon grk screws.

I will also rebuild the other bench next weekend if I clear my inbox.
>>
File: PXL_20210911_171559003.jpg (3.8 MB, 3024x4032)
3.8 MB
3.8 MB JPG
>>2207342
Termites are the old legs.
>>
>>2207332
>>2207335

I'm not adding the braces until we move the swing into position where I do the final squaring and leveling.

We installed commercial playground equipment last year and followed the same procedure as per the directions.
>>
File: 20210915_201922.jpg (861 KB, 2000x1500)
861 KB
861 KB JPG
>>2206787
>>2193208
>>2193042
thanks boys.
I put it under my janked out desk
>>
File: 20210912_125039.jpg (1.74 MB, 4000x3000)
1.74 MB
1.74 MB JPG
new toolbox Im working on for my ute, keep on making dumb design mistakes on this one
>>
>>2207350
>final squaring
you make things square before you start bolting it together you tard. pic related sure as shit wasnt properly aligned, because it is quite clear you dont own any clamps
>>
>>2207350
>>2207533
and just like pic related. measure never cut twice huh?
>>
>>2207533
>>2207534
Someone is a little jealous!
>>
File: PXL_20210914_174248567~2.jpg (2.93 MB, 2604x2921)
2.93 MB
2.93 MB JPG
>>2207534
>>2207533
You couldn't recognize the rss lag screws because you don't do this kind of work. I can imagine you can't see these clamps too. You can't recognize spar on air dried cedar. You thought it was stain and not spar urethane because your frame of reference is limited to the steamed sapwood they sell at big box stores.

Measuring is my favorite part, I dimensioned all of this lumber myself.

That's a true 4x4 I pulled from a 6x4. What have you created?
>>
>>2207582
you owning a couple of bar clamps and still manging to fuck up that badly only makes you look even worse.

>That's a true 4x4 I pulled from a 6x4
and you dont understand how dimensional lumber works either
>>
>>2204788
>>2202828

Checked.
Hello fellow beginner wood turner. I have no idea what I'm doing but also want to get a 4-jaw chuck as well as a reliable mt2 spur drive (that's a nice steb spur you got) and cupped live centers. I'm working with a Delta Milwaukee homecraft (1948) lathe, 1/3hp motor, with mostly there parts all 1in 8tpi mt2 attachments. pics later.
>>
>>2207582
No matter what you made it out of it looks like a shitty double a-frame made out of palletwood spray stained with "mahogany" colour.

Thats the long version, here comes the tldr:

Looks like crap bro
>>
File: PXL_20210911_102617906.jpg (2.87 MB, 4032x3024)
2.87 MB
2.87 MB JPG
>>2207632
>>2207864
Your ignorance astounds. It offers opportunities for others to see the limits of your knowledge.

My neighbor owns a sawmill and timber framing business. As a certified grader of American hardwoods, with his own grading stamp, I promise I've learned a bit about dimensioning and dimensional lumber.

You can't tell stain from urethane just as you can't identify structural screws.
>>
>>2207898
>My neighbor owns
oh shit, does your dad work at Nintendo too? Do you have Battle Toads?
>>
File: Screw Pull-out.png (157 KB, 1052x814)
157 KB
157 KB PNG
>>2207582
>cedar
>screws
oh noes you got too cocky there boomer, you should have been using bolts on cedar as its holding power is shit compared to things like even pine
>>
File: 1631745463224.png (439 KB, 991x954)
439 KB
439 KB PNG
>>2194798
>using a fan to clear dust

What's wrong with this?
>>
File: 2021-09-15_17h22_34.png (31 KB, 731x450)
31 KB
31 KB PNG
>>2207898

I'm not the guy you've been arguing with, but my 2 cents:
You've got an A-frame with screws that appear to the be in the configuration shown in the top right of my shitty picture. That's fine for a while since you have the benefit of the shear strength of a fresh screw, and the friction from a fresh joint being pulled together.
I'm guessing that after a while of being in use, the joint is going to loosen because the weight of the kids going back and forth is going to cyclically load that screw and fatigue the wood around the screw threads. Once the joint is no longer tight, you won't have friction force helping you out and the full load will act on the screw. Something like bending, shear, and tension all combined on a screw, which have a tendency to break in a brittle fashion instead of bending like nails.

Personally, I would have gone with a joint like what I've drawn in the bottom right that will carry most of the load on a shoulder. A single bolt through the entire assembly to keep it tight. On the off chance the joint relaxes, it's easy enough to tighten up.

Also, I'm assuming you're going to add some sort of cross brace to prevent racking, but on the off chance you aren't, you need a cross brace to prevent racking.
>>
>>2207966
it just blows dust around creating a mess when you should be using a dust extractor or shop vac to contain it. the belt sander has a fucking port to hook one up to.

>>2207974
>you need a cross brace to prevent racking
he isnt, i've been making fun of him the entire time about his shitty asymmetrical shitty bracing and this boomer thinks he is fine
>>
>>2207326
You are retarded. I hope your kids are severely injured.
>>
>>2207582
That looks really bad. You did a really shitty job. This looks like something I'd slap together at work as a temporary frame to hold something up. No one's impressed.
>>
How to clamp four pieces of 24"x96" plywood together for a combined thickness of 3"? Never laminated plywood before. Is there a specific clamp I should use and where should the clamps go?

Trying to make a top for a workbench.
>>
File: workbench1.png (140 KB, 1508x908)
140 KB
140 KB PNG
how's this look? I'm looking for feedback
>>
>>2208092
lots of them
>>
>>2207319
sometimes the older wood was stronger because it was virgin - the wood may have grown in dense forests before all our white grandfathers cut all the big 'ns down. Trees that grow in dense forests develop tighter growth rings which leads to superior strength wood. Lots of today's lumber is grown on tree farms where trees are grown as fast as possible, so growth rings are wider, so the lumber isn't a strong as the OG trees.

Looking at >>2206799 it looks like your loft decking may be oak, but it's hard to tell - would need to plane a section to get a good look at the grain...
>>
File: file.png (501 KB, 550x367)
501 KB
501 KB PNG
>>2208092
vacuum bag
or just put some heavy stuff on it
>>
File: workbench2.png (131 KB, 1428x778)
131 KB
131 KB PNG
>>2208104
ask for views.
only half of the drawers are displayed intentionally. side guide rails for drawers are missing.
dog holes, vice, are missing intentionlly, but will be added later.
>>
>>2207860

Cool deal. I haven't done much more than turn some dowels just to try and get a feel for the process. I find being limited to turning only on center with the spindle to be limited for the sort of things I like, but I've blown my discretionary funds for the month between a new laguna 1412, the lathe and some tooling, and a new ortur laser master 2 engraver. The lathe was unplanned but it spurred me on to but the engraver as I can make nice round coasters or possibly christmas ornaments, and I can engrave wooden tumblers (once I get gud enough to make them).

Provided my bandsaw and laser engraver get here soonish I'm going to try and make a lot of different projects. I'm going to use these learning attempts to make stuff to give away to my church for their fall auction... I think engraved cutting boards, coasters, festive napkin ring sets, and other similar kitchen and dining accoutrements will be popular and practical and give me a good chance to learn how to use this machinery.

It has been an expensive month though for sure, my fun money is pretty drained now and I'm always pretty strict on what I spend for toys and tools.
>>
File: 1.png (158 KB, 1297x891)
158 KB
158 KB PNG
>>2207901
I'm also an acquaintance of a VP from GRK. He gives me huge discounts on fasteners.

>>2207923
That's the incorrect data. Let me help you.
>>
>>2208005
You've been doing an excellent job of demonstrating your ignorance. You play the role of a clown so well you've become one.
>>
File: PXL_20210915_234033895.jpg (524 KB, 998x1330)
524 KB
524 KB JPG
>>2207974
Thanks for the ideas and you're certainly correct about the stresses from swinging. It won't have kids swinging so much as swaying on it. This is more of a place for the teachers to sit and the kids swing with them when they're taking a break.

I did make braces, I had not yet attached them. It has three on the sides, including one under the beam, and four angled.

I may have to remake the swing as well because it's fairly well rotted.
>>
File: PXL_20210915_232034109.jpg (482 KB, 1696x1272)
482 KB
482 KB JPG
>>2208186
I think it came out fairly well for a first swing.
>>
>>2208005
The dust extractor doesn't get all the dust, you need fans and ventilation retard.
>>
>>2208037
The other parents find it impressive. Sorry to hear that you do shit work at your place of business. They're lucky to have you.
>>
File: PXL_20210915_232045822.jpg (292 KB, 954x1272)
292 KB
292 KB JPG
>>2208037
I can feel your anger, my excellent A frame has caused some consternation amongst the poors.
>>
>>2208005
If your building skills are as developed as your vocabulary, I can't imagine the demand you have found for your services.

It's unlikely you've done anything more with your life than complain. There's lots of childless, angry, lowly individuals like you milling about the interwebs.
>>
>>2208104
I dont like benches without overhanging tail vise.
Be damn sure about what you do for workholding, some cannot be retrofit
>>
>>2208255
i was thinking leg face vice.
What's the overhang for?
thanks for the reply
>>
>>2208104
>>2208113
>no overhanging surfaces for clamping
>no visible workholding mechanisms
>pointless finger joints on the corners
>too wide to reach across comfortably
>not very long
Nice cabinet I guess.
>>
>>2208269
>i was thinking leg face vice
So you're going to slap a leg vise on a workbench that you've filled with drawers so you can no longer open the drawers?
>>
>>2208269
>What's the overhang for?
A vise jaw with no obstruction and open on 3 sides.
No real limitation in width or heigh
>>
>try to look up design for first real workbench
>million different kinds and everybody disagrees about everything
Fuck this, I'm just going to overbuild something simple half-custom and figure out what I really want later.
>>
>>2208182
>That''s the incorrect data. Let me help you
>Factored resistances for d.fir members
>d.fir
>o
>u
>g
>l
>a
>s
>
>f
>i
>r
You really are this retarded arent you. I was telling you, you were retarded for choosing to use screws with such a soft wood as cedar, and here you are confirming how retarded you are by bringing up another softwood which is 50% more dense than what you chose. Thank you for proving how incompetent you are once again.

>>2208186
>my swing set isnt a swing set
>>
>>2208346
>figure out what I really want later.
now you undertstand
If you can get your hands on a cheap, beat up antique bench, thats the way forward.
>>
>>2208346
>>2208461
If you don't know what you want, why would you design your own bench rather than picking an existing design and then modifying it as you go?

Like this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcq1LQq08lk
>>
I'm designing a box, and I would like to add pseudo-columns to its corners, as in pic related. Cutting slightly into the surface to give the impression of greater depth, and curving around the edge, with a miter joint running through the semicircle. As I'd have to do this on all four corners and make the edges appear seamless, I don't want to have to do it by hand.
How can this be achieved? Are there router bits that can do this?

Note: I'm very inexperienced and only did a much simpler box with hand tools once, but I know someone with a workshop with all kinds of equipment, incl. CNC routers, I could ask to borrow.
>>
File: entwurf.png (3 KB, 289x257)
3 KB
3 KB PNG
>>2208588
forgot the pic
>>
>>2208104
The top could be thicker depending on the wood.
>>
>>2208418
You must find daily life a struggle with how difficult you find reading and writing. Do you make an x when you sign for your disability checks?
>>
>>2208593

That particular profile would be an unusual way to rout it. The more conventional way would be to instead use a round over bit to make your columns and form short bits of molding with them to go over the corners. It would be fairly simply to route a groove at the mitered corners and attach the new columns to the corners if you wanted them to stand out in that fashion, although most people would probably rather not cut into the corners that much due to the compromises to strength it may bring.

Honestly though the simplest way to come very close to your design if you really wanted your pillars inset would be to make the pillars with a round over bit, sort of like quarter round for baseboards, and assemble your box. Dress the corners on a tablesaw at a 45 degree angle, and then attach your columns to the corners... although it would weaken the box quite a bit I'm sure.
>>
I have a pretty retarded question. How do I cut a straight line with a jigsaw? Everytime I use it, my hand somehow goes at an angle and the result is an uneven abomination
>>
>>2208730
use a fence?
>>
>>2197864
The purpose is to enable the two pieces of wood grip in place rather than glide off position until the glue holds. Some people use rock salt.
>>
>>2208730
You could try to sandwhich it on both sides bu it is a tool that's better used on curved lines. A circular saw it much better for straight lines.
>>
File: entwurf2.png (6 KB, 577x512)
6 KB
6 KB PNG
>>2208656
Like this? Thanks, that's a good idea.
Could the weakness of the joint be mitigated by gluing a long, triangular piece to the inner corner, as highlighted in blue?
>>
File: Stick 01.jpg (3.93 MB, 5216x2934)
3.93 MB
3.93 MB JPG
Recently made a walking stick on the lathe, figure i'd share since why not. Here's the shank blank mounted.
>>
File: Stick 02.jpg (3.92 MB, 5216x2934)
3.92 MB
3.92 MB JPG
>>2209080
Mid way through roughing, steady rest put some serious work in.
>>
File: Stick 03.jpg (3.75 MB, 5216x2934)
3.75 MB
3.75 MB JPG
>>2209081
Took a while to sand down the mounting point for the ferrule, but fit perfectly.
>>
File: Stick 04.jpg (3.78 MB, 5216x2934)
3.78 MB
3.78 MB JPG
>>2209087
Really happy with how this part went.
>>
File: Stick 05.jpg (2.94 MB, 5216x2934)
2.94 MB
2.94 MB JPG
>>2209088
All parts turned and ready for final finish and assembly. African Blackwood feels so satisfying to work on for some reason.
>>
File: Stick 06.jpg (3.85 MB, 2934x5216)
3.85 MB
3.85 MB JPG
>>2209090
Finished at last, now to disappear into the countryside and test it out.
>>
>>2209098
Bonus shot of it next to my grandfather's stick that I used as a rough guide / inspiration. This concludes my TED talk.
>>
File: Stick 07.jpg (2.53 MB, 2934x5216)
2.53 MB
2.53 MB JPG
>>2209101
Would help if I remembered the image.
>>
>>2209090
>African Blackwood feels so satisfying to work on for some reason.
Yeah, my gf says that.
>>
>>2209105
oh you :^)
>>
>>2194539

Awesome
Every time I see one of those for sale and some trendy shop, they are much smaller and OUTRAGEOUSLY expensive. I wish you the best of luck!
>>
>>2204316

I'm not an expert but branding etc is so much of the game. But if you make a quality product you may be able to survive off of it...Who knows
What a kick in the pants to get into to wood working when the price of wood went up 1000x lol
>>
>>2208956

I dont see why not. You might consider doing splines to stiffen the corners instead of the interior brace but there is no reason that wouldn't work.
>>
>>2209179

Other than plywood I didn't see much change locally in wood I would actually use. It was kind of funny when rough poplar ended up being about half the price of big box store 2x4x8s though.

I did still pay $90 a sheet for birch ply the other day but it was very high quality stuff so that isn't that weird
>>
File: unnamed.jpg (45 KB, 500x386)
45 KB
45 KB JPG
>>2194539
My neighbor does custom timber homes and uses a giant Makita grinder with a flap wheel smoothing out things he can't run in his 3ft planer. He uses the 9" model and just bought some really expensive metal carving wheels for it because the flaps were adding up.
>>
>>2208956
In traditional shaker furniture they do these a little farther out from the corner using secondary wood.
>>
File: PXL_20210918_024444327.jpg (669 KB, 1774x1330)
669 KB
669 KB JPG
My wife wants some light-colored, little bookcases for the boys' room and play room. I have some nice white oak that's hitting the right moisture content right now.

I'm laying out the case for one bookcase with a single piece of 4/4 white oak taken from the center of a 10ft tree. I wanted to do mitered ends but the boards are 11 inches wide and I'm not great at mitering on the table saw. After cutting each length to 31" I cut two rabbets in the top and will cut two more on the bottom tomorrow.

I intend to seal it with clear shellac and then finish it with a 2lb cut of garnet shellac I made last week.

So far the top and sides are square.
>>
>>2208588
>>2208593
>>2208956
I was reading Husserl one time and I came across this concept of Entwurfen and I was like, oh yeah, Entwurf, that makes sense. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/phenomenology-mg/

You Germans are so detail oriented.
>>
>>2204935
wie?, was für ne frage, ja
>>
>>2204936
>deutsche wohnzimmer
jup
>>
>>2209103
I want to be nice. There's room for improvement. I respect making one though, most people just jack off to the thought.
>>
>>2208191
I mean. This is pretty decent if you never did anything with wood before. I'd be satisfied. Do not go ahead and fool yourself into thinking that you are a carpenter now. This is fine, it's not pretty or anything, but if no-one gets hurt on the swing or whatever you did fine. Wouldn't stress it, wouldn't brag either.
>>
>>2204774
You could make oars, would require something other than the machine aswell. I would suggest mahogany and some other kind of wood to make it extra fancy looking. They look super dope and are super practical if you are ever stranded in a boat without any. Nevertheless I think it's a decent project since you get to use your machine but also have something else to do. Just glue shit together and get to work. Alternatively make the bars for a baby crib (??) or whatever its called. Remaining creative is the key to keeping interest, and the only thing better than success and perfection is being close to just that. Gl
>>
File: 20210918_130345.jpg (2.48 MB, 4032x3024)
2.48 MB
2.48 MB JPG
My new bandsaw arrived yesterday. Overall it seems very nicely made but I have a few criticisms.

1) its dropshipped from Laguna and they dont offer to upgrade to a residential truck style delivery. They dont warn or mention it or tell you who will deliver- I had one day of advance notice for a three hour delivery window on a weekday, and they arrived ten minutes after that window closed. The truck driver informed me he was not allowed to use my backyard to turn, so he dropped it at the street. My driveway is gravel, steep uphill, and about 200 yards long. Also it was 95 degrees and the pallet weighed 350 pounds. That was not fun to drag uphill on a dolley, as I could not solo lift it into the back of my truck. That's not specifically a laguna problem, but I would have paid the $30 upcharge so I didn't have to wait at the house and they could have just left it outside of my garage.

2) the mobility kit is massively overpriced and cheaply made. It's a shitty caster on the front and two very dinky hard plastic wheels on the rear. Cost was almost $170. Had I known how shitty it was I would have purchased a third party base. That said it functions reasonably well- but only one wheel is steerable. Compared to the comparable cost of the lower end sawstop mobility base that is similarly featured and it feels ten times worse. There is zero comparison to the quality of the sawstop industrial base, which although it costs twice as much, is my gold standard.

3) the insert plate is garbage. Its adjustable on 4 points for height to try and level it to the tabletop, but no matter what there is a mm or so of "lip" on the left and right sides of the plate. Additionally tightening the plate down causes it to buckle further.

Other than that, assembly was easy, adjustments were simple, blade changes aren't bad, and it cuts very well. The cut quality with a 3/4" woodslicer resaw blade is similar to that of a planer, so very acceptable- you could sand it and roll on.
>>
>>2209873
Thanks, I appreciate the criticism. It was a first try at doing it, so hopefully, i'll be able to take what I learned with this one and improve upon the next one.
>>
File: PXL_20210917_220445480.jpg (1.89 MB, 1756x1317)
1.89 MB
1.89 MB JPG
Making my first workbench. I've cut 2x4 sized mortises into 36" 4x4s to serve as legs and crossbars. I was going to buy two sheets of 3/4" thick 4'x8' plywood, rip each piece in half to 2'x8' and glue the four pieces together for a 3" thick 2'x8' top but I'm unsure of how to attach this most solidly to the frame I'm planning.

Also, general joinery question: when I put the 2x4s into my mortises am I just gluing them in or can I lag bolt them as well? I want the sturdiest bench possible. And I snug up the lag bolts last while the bench is already assembled so it settles correctly, right?
>>
>>2210386
And to add: my only power tools are a circular saw, random orbital sander and power drill.
>>
>>2209880
I framed houses for my family's licensed and bonded gc business, and I'll tell you this about carpenters: they work within acceptable tolerances. We used reciprocating saws, sledge hammers, and shimmed everything to get it close enough. This is a work of art compared to house framing carpentry. We never did spec houses, had a good reputation for quality, and fixed some horton spec houses for friends. Those carpenters do horror show shit like Scarfing load bearing studs and having excessively notched joists.

I diy for fun like most people here. Over educated people like me get to pretend for a few moments now and again that we can do the jobs of the lower orders. My work comes out better than the drunk trim carpenter who shows up hang some shitty mdf.
>>
File: 1630952235270.png (638 KB, 848x1036)
638 KB
638 KB PNG
What do you use to apply poly? A foam brush or a actual brush? I bought a brush specifically made for applying poly but would any brush work well?
>>
>>2210442
Two techniques flexner likes, other than spray,

Dilute poly 50/50 with mineral spirits VC and wipe on, it takes longer but looks great.

Get a white, china bristle, Wooster shortcuts work great, follow instructions on can.
>>
File: PXL_20210813_180312594.jpg (3.25 MB, 4032x3024)
3.25 MB
3.25 MB JPG
>>2210445
Low VOC mineral spirits,
>>
>>2210386
Or I guess I could lag bolt everything, crossbars and top, laterally and cut 1-1/2" mortises at the top of each leg, then rip and glue 8 2x8s for a four legged, 36" tall table with a 1.5" thick 24"x96" top. Would this be stable? I suppose I could easily add on middle legs after the fact if I felt unsure.
>>
>>2210445
Yeah i'll try to use the brush on it. Do you have to brush poly on with the grain or does it not matter?
>>
>>2210445

Wipe on poly all day every day, so easy and looks good.
>>
>>2210386
Do you think you will ever move to a different shop? If you do, would you take the bench with you, or just build a new one?
If you are going to leave this bench here permanently, I say dry fit it, make sure it is what you want, then glue it. Lag screws/bolts wouldn't hurt anything.

I like the 3" glue-laminated plywood top idea. That should be beefy. You could screw (and glue) your top to your frame from underneath with 3-6 inch construction screws. You just need to make your frame in a way where you can drive screws up into your top. Pre-drill holes for screws in frame so you don't get thread bridging. Probably don't need to pre-drill into the plywood.

I look forward to some pictures of your bench in your shop!
>>
>>2210472
It's a historic home that's been passed down through the family longer than living memory so this will always be my workbench and it will never leave the workshop.

For the plywood top: will rough and flaky edges be a concern? I want a hard square edge around most of the table and I don't want anything on the underside to interfere with clamp depth.

For the glue: my mortises have some slop and my workshop floors are uneven. Can I be dry fitting the whole thing upright to settle it, lag bolting to make it fast and then jamming those gaps full of glue like I'm working a caulking gun?
>>
Any advice on how to make a computer desk? I'm turning my walk-in closet into a home office
>>
>>2210707

What sort of tools do you have and how experienced are you?

On the low end, buy a butcher block top from lowes or home depot and build legs out of black iron pipe.
>>
File: 20210917_160405.jpg (2.5 MB, 2268x3513)
2.5 MB
2.5 MB JPG
I've recently started wood carving, i've made a few little things like pic related, what would be a good direction to go to become better at this? I feel as if I often gouge the wood or make cuts that don't create the shapes I'm after
>>
What's the best way to reinforce plywood?
I've got edges that are prone to damage, and also the risk of splitting across the board.

Trying thin batons, but this is really just a inefficient way of adding another layer to the ply
>>
>>2210758
I would use a set of gouges, these make neat cuts.
Often you profile a cube of wood and cut out large sections with a saw

Practice some stains to change the color of the wood.
Try some different kinds of wood
>>
>>2210768
What gouges and wood would you recommend, pictured I used bass wood
>>
>>2210771
Yo you just get a little set of them, some are curved, some have a corner, some are just a knife.

Bass wood is good to start with because of it's lack of grain, but with that softness comes difficulty polishing.
Harder woods will polish nicely.

Some wood discolors when heat is applied to it.
now if your dremmel isn't being used in light "passes" but rather you are digging into the wood with it it's going to generate too much heat and discolour your wood, you're also going to have a hard time controling depth.

If I wanted to do pic related I probably would have traced a profile onto each side of the wood, cut the block down with a hacksaw, used a file for just about everything and then added details with a gogue , then put some oil on it.
>>
>>2210771
>pictured I used bass wood

>>2210809
>If I wanted to do pic related

Pic related is what I think of your posting ability.
>>
>>2210809
Cheers! ordered a small set of them now, i'm trying to stay away from the dremmel method currently, I'd like this to be something I can do while camping just with my carving knife and maybe the recommended gouges, I'll research staining and other types of wood to try aswell, thankyou!
>>
>>2210020
what would actually happen?
sorry for the stupid question
>>
>>2211019
the impact seems like a good way to kill an expensive drill
>>
File: 20210919_134425.jpg (432 KB, 1789x1590)
432 KB
432 KB JPG
I'm building a desk, and I already have the top, but I wanna build the legs next. One of them is going to be a drawer/file cabinet setup. When it comes to having the desktop lay on top of the drawer, without regards as to what the other leg looks like, would any of the choices in pic related be better than the other? They aren't exactly to scale, but the planned dimensions are a width of about 18 inches, a depth of 30 inches to match the desk top, and a height of 28 inches. I want to make sure that it can support a heavy load without moving too much since my computer will be on that part of the desk.
>>
>>2210739
>tools
I have a power drill and other basic household equipment

>experience
I built a small roughly 6inch by 4 inch wooden box once
>>
>>2211608

With only a drill and no shaping tools you will be limited to constructing it from materials you purchase.

A butcher block top is not a bad idea and relatively inexpensive. The iron pipe would also be inexpensive and require you to only buy a suitable pipe wrench. Get them to cut it to length for you at the store.

Side benefit is that it's also very easily disassembled.

If you dont like the pipes you can buy plenty of steel legs off Amazon.
>>
>>2210447
sauce on the book?
>>
>>2211712
Bob flexner on finishing
>>
>>2210497
>this will always be my workbench
>I want a hard square edge around most of the table and I don't want anything on the underside to interfere with clamp depth.
When I build my forever-workbench, I think I'll make the top out of oak. That shit is hard af.
Do yourself a favor and search youtube for videos of wood working workbenches. There are so many different things to consider. Watch people using workbenches too. If this is going to be your forever workbench, take some time to thoughtfully design it.

The workbench is the largest, most useful, and most important jig in your workshop. Yes, it is a JIG. Most jigs are fixturing devices.

random thought: 2-layers of 3/4 plywood on bottom, then a layer of 1-inch oak boards on top of that. Care needs to be taken to avoid splitting the oak - it will shrink and expand with humidity whereas the plywood should remain dimensionally consistent in x-y directions.
>>
>>2210497
Joints should be glued before assembling. If you try to use your glue gun like a caulking gun, you are going to get really shitty results - the glue won't add much strength in that case - it's all about surface area.

If you want to tighten up your mortise and tennons, thin shims could be rammed into the mortise, be careful not to apply too much pressure or you will split the wood. You don't want a lot of slop in those joints - glue works best on two flat (or tightly-mating) surfaces.
>>
>>2211983
>glue gun
Wait, should I be using a glue gun?
>>
>>2212067
Not that other fella but no, the response was saying don't glue like you're caulking. There are a bunch of different glue applicators, the use of any of which is based on the specific task, glue type and personal preference. Wood glue from the bottle spread with your finger (or even your benis) would do most jobs if you were that way inclined.
>>
>>2211825
thanks, Anon
>>
>>2212067

A battery powered hot glue gun can be an awesome tool for temporary holds, I fucking love that $20 ryobi glue gun
>>
File: PXL_20210921_022125288.jpg (3.18 MB, 3024x4032)
3.18 MB
3.18 MB JPG
>>2212109
Np I love finishes
>>
>>2212067
> glue gun
lol there is no glue gun in woodworking - I just typed words without thinking. I meant to type "use your glue bottle like a caulking gun".
>>
File: PXL_20210921_031616584.jpg (3.33 MB, 4032x3024)
3.33 MB
3.33 MB JPG
I made a bookcase from 1 10ft oak board, cut into 32 inch lengths, and used rabbets and pins.

Shelves are cherry and walnut.

It's all covered in shellac.
>>
File: PXL_20210920_232252607.jpg (3.41 MB, 3024x4032)
3.41 MB
3.41 MB JPG
>>2212217
Also, pins are uneven bc I had3 and 4 year old helpers.
>>
>>2212219
looks legit.
>>
File: 20210922_103516.jpg (2.72 MB, 4032x3024)
2.72 MB
2.72 MB JPG
I put together an inexpensive diode laser engraver / "cutter" yesterday. I had a few premade 3d printed air assist options made for it but the company has slightly altered the design so I need to remix them a bit. But as an engraver it works great.
>>
File: 20210922_103526_80.jpg (2.61 MB, 3226x2419)
2.61 MB
2.61 MB JPG
>>2213360

The quality of the engraving is very good, and I have no idea what I'm doing. This is single pass at 50% power at 600 mm/s. I'll run some test grids and see what the best power is.
>>
File: PXL_20210923_042755770.jpg (2.83 MB, 4032x3024)
2.83 MB
2.83 MB JPG
I replaced a cheap piece of MDF with a chunk of cedar from my pile. I cut it to 32 inches, sanded it, hit it with shellac and put an Ogee on the edge.
>>
Speaking of bocote...will bocote take water based analine dye?
>>
File: PXL_20210923_042805684.jpg (2.62 MB, 4032x3024)
2.62 MB
2.62 MB JPG
It looks pinker than I expected
>>
>>2213360
>>2213361
Incredible quality. How much? Is it daunting to get it working properly?
>>
>>2213877

$310 for it shipped with their most powerful laser diode, $50 for the roller assembly to do tumblers and wineglasses.

Setup was fast, about 15 minutes to put it together and tension the belts. Its overall very simple, if you've ever touched a 3d printer you likely won't even need to look at the instructions.

Lightburn is paid software but they have a free trial. It's very easy to use so I'll buy it. You can import an image or vector, jog it to the location on screen, trace the engraved area at ultra low power to verify setup, and then press play. It's pretty simple.
>>
>>2213877
This guy lazily criticizes other projects while contributing nothing to woodworking. He does not create.
>>
File: 1601712669884.jpg (697 KB, 1728x867)
697 KB
697 KB JPG
Super basic shit but I could use some feedback on this planned project.

I need a table extension for large-scale tabletop games

Plan is a OSB sheet with a thick cork pinboard front glued and clamped down along the edges with with wooden corner panels.
The reinforcing planks will help with warping from humidity and hold it flush to the table edges.
The "upper" reinforcement will be also angled to form a big french cleat letting me hang it on my big bare-ass wall to double as an acoustic absorber and pinboard.

Are there some inherent flaws I missed besides it being unwieldy?

(please pardon the mix of imperial and metric, imperial is for game purposes only)
>>
>>2191784
If i want to clean unfinished wood, also from smells and whatever, what should i use?
Denatured alcohol? Isopropyl alcohol?
>>
>>2213988
Are you saying "this guy" as in me or the guy I was talking to?
>>
File: 20210923_113756.jpg (2.17 MB, 2016x1512)
2.17 MB
2.17 MB JPG
I jointed and planed the boards for my first woodworking project today lads. Wish me luck
>>
New thread?
>>
>>2214401
That edge jointing gave me a chubby.
>>
File: 20210923_200229.jpg (1.44 MB, 2419x1814)
1.44 MB
1.44 MB JPG
Top I've been working on. Oak planks were reclaimed off a 12ton tilt trailer, some rot. Brushed and put into mold, poured polyester resin(5 gal) then milled flat to expose wood. Then 6 coats of 2part acrylic urethane. Final sanding & buffing this weekend.
>>
>>2214407
Thanks breh, was nervous I was going to fuck it up
>>
>>2213820
it may become less pink and less red over time depending on the finish you used. Or maybe it is oxidation that dulls the bright pink/red colors... not sure...
>>
>>2214401
isn't making rectangular pieces of wood the best?

If there is a heavon, Jesus is turning slabs of wood into perfect rectangular prisms up there...
>>
>>2214493
Killer top, man. That is one sexy table. Did you finish the top with poured epoxy like a bar-top? Looks good. Would love to see where you install it.
>>
File: 1630702656821.jpg (173 KB, 1536x1161)
173 KB
173 KB JPG
>>2214528
>rectangle prisms
>not triangle prisms and pyramids
>>
>>2214529
Just used resin to fill grain, then used automotive clear coat over it.
>>
Any tips on using a jigsaw. Never done it before and am having trouble cutting on the lines I drew. Wood is pine 3/4 inch
>>
>>2214784

That's pretty thick. I'd try a better blade but cutting curves with a jigsaw in 3/4 stock isn't going to be the cleanest thing ever.
>>
File: 20210924_141339.jpg (545 KB, 756x1008)
545 KB
545 KB JPG
>>2214401
Update
>>
File: 1627616743433.gif (1.94 MB, 400x280)
1.94 MB
1.94 MB GIF
>decide to switch from a normal hammer for chiseling to a 28oz estwing ball peen
>mfw giant hunks of wood going left and right
I take back everything I ever said about chisels.





Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.