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/diy/ - Do It Yourself

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Can you actually unfuck one of these nasty chink mini lathes?
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>>2101076
why would you buy that chink lathe when you can get a real man's lathe for the same price, unless you live in a cuck shed and drive some shitty nissan leaf,and not a real man's car.
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>>2101084
Space.
Other than that there are watchmaker's lathes but they don't cut thread, and those that do are scaringly expensive.
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>>2101076
>180mm
Atleast get 400mm diameter.

Bare minimum 500watt. Try to get 1kw.
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>>2101143
Read wrong sorry :^) 400width

Use your mill to make a custom tool holder.
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Are they really that terrible? I've had the urge to get a little lathe for a few years now, solely to support my scale modeling habit. I'm under no illusions of starting a machine shop, just to turn scale tank gun barrels and the like
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>>2101076
You could take it apart, scrape and true everything, upgrade the bearings, put in better feed screws and replace all the plastic parts with metal.

Or you could just buy a better quality used lathe for the same price.
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>>2101146
Sherline makes solid model making lathes and mills. but expect to pay premium.

https://www.sherline.com/
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>>2101076
> Can you actually unfuck one of these nasty chink mini lathes?
Sure, after many man hours and paying quadruple the asking price to do it.
And then in the end you still have a shittier lathe than if you would have bought something better in the first place.
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>>2101150
Isn't clickspring using one of these?
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>>2101150
>Sherline
She's selling lathes now? Golly, that girl gets into the oddest schemes, bless her heart!
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>>2101084
Where is a good place to look for a big boy lathe for similar price as OP's pic?
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>>2102621
auctions nigger, got a bridge port for 325
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>>2102623
Pic or larp
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>>2101174
Yea but he seems to work in brass a lot. Stainless or even tool steel would fuck this.
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>>2101150
Serious question:
I'm looking over their products and I'm thinking of pulling the trigger on one of their cnc full shop packages. (Next Gen Ultimate.)
I work electronics. It seems like that mill would be enough to do rapid PCB prototypes and custom one-off stuff. Connectors, adaptors, shit like that.
How capable is that lathe, you think, though? Certainly plastic/Delrin, brass, and bronze. Maybe aluminum and cast iron if you're careful. It would be able to make screws, nuts/bolts, thread adaptors, pins, and so on, wouldn't it? With the right tooling, of course.
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>>2102664
The working area is REALLY small. Sherlines are specialized tools for watchmaking and model making. We have a dedicated PCB router in a prototyping lab, so I'm guessing a good quality CNC router would work.
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>>2101076
You're better off slapping a lathe together out of scrap than messing with chinesium.
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>>2101076
Something like this would be much better.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/324593477407?hash=item4b9347671f:g:5IgAAOSw3KFgiBWP

>>2101112
>Other than that there are watchmaker's lathes but they don't cut thread

Are you really going to be single point threading that small of threads?
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>>2102687
That's the thing. I've been looking at piecing together my own kit for a while. I could build a god-tier PCB prototyping router for that kind of coin ($6k plus). But I don't want it to be just for that. Know what I mean? Because, while that work is my mainstay, I also need to be able to, say, clamp an ATCA front panel in one and be able to make a million LED holes, or maybe a piece of aluminum for a one-off right-angle bracket or something.

The mill says its working area is 13x11x5. Which is small, yes, but adequate for most things I do. (I have direct access to an actual Bridgeport at work, if the need ever arises. It's just such a pain to go into that part of the shop, set the thing up, go hunting for the tool I need only to find out I have to order it anyway...) Sherline offers an optional bigger table, too. Not that it would give you more travel, but certainly more room for fixturing.
The lathe is, I think, 8x16 or 8x17 or something. Mostly, I'd want that for cutting screws or nuts/bolts or whatever. The occasional pin.

I could see going the piece-a-kit-together route and making it myself. But then I'm in just as deep as far as cost, plus the time to do all the work to put it together and dial it in.

I don't know. I guess I'm just trying to justify blowing a bunch of money. Maybe I'll just start with a cheap Amazon router and see where that gets me.
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>>2102664
You could machine Hastaloy on it if you were careful enough with the right tools
it's just an annoying , frustrating and very long process
I can't speak for sherline lathes but they look to be miles ahead of any of these chinese lathes
Just in terms of quality of bearings and initial usablility the chinese ones are fucking junk


>>2101076

Sure you can make round parts but they're clunky, the lead screw carriage speed is WAY too fast to do any cutting - only good for screws and even then, good luck setting it up correctly

I used to have one, tore it down - changed the bearings , added bearings to the crosslide (which most models don't even have and thus feel like garbage) and it still wasn't any good

I ended up scoring a schaublin 102 complete with tooling that was being thrown away at the junkyard for the price of metal scrap
The SECOND you use an actual lathe you understand how crap these are

For info , there's a chap on youtube who has gone far beyond anything anyone has done with these
tore it down and essentially rebuilt it from scratch
every single bearing surface scraped to 0.01mm
And it visibly still doesn't cut as well as a small sized pro lathe
That should tell you
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVBC9Vzixtk&list=PLHRtJd1bD3IQU-A-CPBwys-tTM3wKMOGW
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>>2101146

Anecdotally:

I bought a 7x14 years ago. It was nice to have, but, really, that was more of a "mini-lathe vs. no lathe" thing. A couple years after that, I scored a 17" LeBlond, complete with chuck and QCTP for less than scrap price. Due to its much slower speed, it was really too big for the size of work I usually did. Despite that, I basically haven't used the mini since I got it. The LeBlond can take off so much more material per pass that it's far faster to get anything done on it, even if it takes longer to make a single pass. It also has a proper gear box for power feed/threading, which is something sorely missed on the mini.

The mini is currently sitting half converted to CNC on the bench. It works, but the reality is that, even as a CNC machine, I probably would almost never use it. I recently grabbed a 12" Graziano with a bad clutch(es) that I'm almost done cleaning/repairing. After that's done, I'm probably just going to put all the manual hardware back on the mini and sell it, along with the LeBlond. There's really no point in me keeping it anymore, and hasn't been for a while, really.

That being said, there's no way in hell you could get my 4500lb LeBlond or the 2200lb Graziano into an apartment or even a small, cramped workshop. If you're forced to stick with a smaller lathe for space reasons, I have some suggestions...
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>>2102710
>look to be miles ahead of any of these chinese lathes
That's another reason I'm looking at their kits. While buying a hunk of junk for $500-600 bucks or whatever, and building it into something usable offers some valuable learning experience to a beginner, I have things that I would want/need to do right out of the box, and if I have to do a bunch of fucking around, it's costing me more than just dollars in the end.
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>>2102726
(cont'd.)

First, bigger is better when it comes to machine tools. Rigidity matters, hugely, both for being able to take big, hogging cuts, and for minimal tool deflection when finishing. Get the biggest lathe you can manage. The medium-sized benchtop lathes (9" - 12" swing) are far better than the HF/Sieg/whatever 7" import minis. If you can figure out a way to get one, do it. They're generally not amazing lathes, but they solve a lot of the problems the minis have. The benchtops usually have sort of combination change gear boxes, with levers to select speeds, and belts or manually-swapped gears to alter the selection range. Not as convenient as the more complicated and expensive gear sets on the bigger, more expensive lathes, but it's close. Even just having at least a range of easily-selectable threads and feeds rather than having to change out gears *every single time* is an infinitely better situation. Combined with the rigidity advantage, it's a no-contest comparison. They're not even THAT much more expensive, generally.

Second, if you're really stuck with one of the 7x lathes specifically for some reason, expect to do some work on it. I got one of the nicest versions you could of the 7x14, and the fit and finish was still kind of crap. The chuck guard interferes with the tool post, preventing you from getting up close to the chuck. The gib on the compound is a huge issue, because it fits so badly in the ways that it causes the entire compound to rock forward under all but the slightest cutting forces. This greatly limits the already-limited cutting capacity, and tends to result in very poor finishing cuts in anything harder than plastic. The leadscrew mounts were poorly aligned, robbing a surprising amount of power from the motor and causing excessive wear.
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>>2102741
(cont'd. again, I guess)

There's plenty more that really should be fixed on them, from the radial ball bearings used in the headstock (though I think most of them now have proper angular roller bearings), to the saddle "gibs" on the bottom fitting so poorly they either do nothing or bind, to the plastic change gears stripping. Despite all this, the price makes the 7x import a popular lathe, and there are sites detailing improvements and modifications to it. Given that even the better variants really need work to get even a halfway decent machine out of them, I'd suggest getting the cheapest version of it you can find. It might not be as usable out of the box, but it won't actually be that much more (if any) work to get into decent shape.

Also, apparently there is (was?) some measurement shenanigans going on, and the 7x14 lathes are significantly longer than the 7x12 models. Check actual between-centers capacity, because you really need the extra length to accommodate larger, longer drills in the tailstock.

Tl;dr: The mini lathes should be considered a last-resort, semi-finished *kit* for anyone who simply cannot afford or fit a larger lathe. Do not buy them if you have any other options that aren't so clapped out they can't even turn a consistent diameter anymore.
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>>2102706
Subtract a third off the length of the lathe bed for clamps and such. I would look a Grizzly tools website to see if there is anything that meets your needs better.
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>>2102733
So I'm watching reviews on that Sherline setup. Seems pretty capable for what it is. I see people cutting steel on the lathe and shit, which surprises me. Brass, bronze, aluminum all day long. But steel?

But then I open the next video and this abomination is on the screen trying to sell me shit.

Man, I just don't know any more.
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>>2101076
Try "adventures with a very small lathe" on YouTube.
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>>2102837
is that some sort of tranny machinist ?
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>>2102888
I believe it is. At first, I thought it was just a rather unfortunate looking woman, but after watching the video, yes, 100% tranny.
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>>2102888
apparently it's not uncommon:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FyuG-B95PQs
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>>2101076
Op, don't bother with these. Instead, look into used lathes. Stuff like an emco compact 5 would be right up your alley (hobby sized lathes made in Austria, made to a very high standard of quality and not that expensive. For instance, I scored mine for 200 european roubles with tooling and a ton of accessories ).

If you want to buy a new one, look into taig or sherline if you are in the us, or proxxon if you're in Europe. These are all reputable manufacturers that don't sell chink garbage
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>>2101076
ruskii bro did it, but he has the tools and knowledge for it. Not sure how doable it is for an average human being

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4w-OHSqLpHo
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>>2103119
Last time I saw a machinist do that it was after his shop went bankrupt be cause he sucks at everything he's done in his life and did nothing but fritter away his inheritance.

>I'm uh having a midlife crisis
>58
>osha, irs, employees all after him for money he owes them
>goes get a sex change in asia, doesnt come back

Cant make it up, it's too dumb
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>>2103354
This, while it is a mini lathe, is not the same mini lathe as pictured in OP at all
they're more expensive and better than the OP one out of the box
you can easily tell because of the double V bed
If you can score one of these for cheap then they're not *too* bad
absolutely not on the same level as the 7x12/14 ones
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>>2101150
Grizzly has some small lathes that fit the description of a tool room lathe more than mini lathe. They're about as big as you could conceivably move into an apartment, it into your basement. G4000 and G0768. You still need to work at them to make them good, but you've got a lot less to unfuck then with a mini lathe.
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>>2102837
>Man, I just don't know any more

How about not worrying about what other people do?
That thing isn't shoving itself down your throat, it's merely existing. Why do you care?

You have to be an autist to be a machinist anyways. Trust me, I know. I'm a machinist and have worked in a handful of shops. Nobody is a well adjusted adult, if they were they would be selling insurance not splitting hairs and being anal over tolerances.
Not surprised there are tranmies in this lot
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>>2103549
>How about not worrying about what other people do?
That is some wonderful advice. Simple, yet profound. The world would be a much better place if everybody heeded your words. And yet, here you are - worrying about what other people do.

Strange, that.
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>>2102837
Literally just tell us what country you're in and your budget and we'll tell you whats worth it or not
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>>2104117
Budget isn't my problem. Space is. I need something small because A) it's what I have the room for, and B) I work on small shit. Table-top stuff. I don't need a 5,000 lathe to make the occasional screw or a full blown knee mill to make the occasional bracket. CNC is a must, as my primary focus would be prototyping circuit boards.
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>>2101146
>>2101150
Taig lathes also exist. Haven't used one myself but they're made in Arizona and seem alright.
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>>2103549

Shut the fuck up troon



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