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no idea what to put in a general OP edition
What are all up to?
for me, this weekend I'll probably be starting a new beer batch and as I'm slowly progressing towards all grain I ask you this:
do i need to sterilize the cloth i use to hold the brewery spent grains when i rinse them or is it being clean enough since it will boil later?
>>
>>2072185
It's not a bad idea to sterilise the cloth because it doesn't take much time/effort but unless you have some hardcore harmful microbes then they would all be boiled and killed anyway
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>>2072287
my autism tells me that even if I sterilize it by dunking it in boiling water it'll contaminate itself while drying locking me in an endless loop of insanitation
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>>2072298
Don't sterilise it then dry it, sterilise it and immediately use it
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>>2072306
will do
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>>2072185
Making mead for the first time
One on the left is my control with three pounds of honey, red star Champaign yeast, yeast nutrient
One on the right is the same but with lemon zest and some black tea
The control was the first bottle and overflowed with foam so I left more room in the lemon mead
Thing is the control looks a lot more foamy with darker colored foam than the lemon
Should I be worried or is this alright?
Both are bubbling fine
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>>2072333
thought the black tea leaves were bugs
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>>2072350
Haha i hope not
Kept it as sanitary as I could with the cleaning solution
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>>2072333
>Should I be worried or is this alright?

Not at all, sounds like the one on the left has a nice Krausen on top which is a good sign. The addition of lemon zest on the left have added some terpenes (tasty volatile chemicals) that just dissipate the Krausen. It's still likely a perfectly healthy brew, nothing to worry about at all.

Really like the idea of the black tea and the lemon zest together. Sounds refreshing.
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>>2072470
Thanks for the help, got the recipe from these guys https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=j3Am3w6Xv4Q and thought to try it out myself after a good aging
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>>2072185
No need to sterilize hot side equipment. But you should obvs clean it after use.

Has anyone made ginger beer before? I picked up a bunch of ginger on sale today. I'm planning to scale a recipe up to 5 gallons and do a natural fermentation.
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Apfelwein. ~$29, an hour of work and ~1 month of patience later. Much less yeasty, very slight effervescence, rather hard, quite clean. Taste is disgusting because I'm a wimp.

Thank you to the people who responded to my inquiries leading up to this batch.
>>
Wzf
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>>2073260
Looks really good, the colour is appealing and you can see the effervescence on top. Nice work
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>>2073266
pic related

Yeah, it's the best of the four batches I've been involved with, despite being storebought juice rather than apples or wild berries. Probably because I was more methodical about sugar amount/pacing, and allowed it to clarify more. Neglected that last step in the past because I thought you NEEDED to add fining agents to make a clear, polished-looking product. Was also paranoid that letting something age in a caroboy on top of the sediment would affect flavor adversely. Will not make these mistakes again.
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>>2073284
>Was also paranoid that letting something age in a caroboy on top of the sediment would affect flavor adversely.
This is way overblown desu.
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>>2073310
My (former) concern regarding the sediment was overblown? If so, that's... what I'm saying.
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>>2073330
Yeah i agree with you. I shouldn't generalise because maybe it's an actual concern for some brews but i don't really notice a difference even if it has been months.
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>>2073332
Definitely isn't a concern when merely maximizing ABV with some EC-1128 and whatever fruit juice is on hand. For some methodically polished product it might be. Agreed.
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>>2072185
People made beer for a long, long time before they had any idea about sterilization or even microbiology. As long as you keep everything reasonably clean before the boil and half-assed sterile after, you're golden. I used to brew with two other dudes in a dirty garage while tanked and we made some awesome beers, never had a problem with contamination. If your yeast has a good head start and takes over quickly it'll kill everything else with the alcohol.
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>>2073373
This. If brewing is a hobby for you and it's fun to fine tune every step, then sterilize. If you're trying to brew some special shit, sterilize. If not, don't hyperventilate over it. I've NEVER sterilized anything, just used hot water and elbow grease, and I've never had any issues.
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>>2073437
You ever use brett or any other diastaticus yeasts?
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>>2073284
>>2073310

Yeah unless you're fermenting 500 gallon batches in conical fermenters then it's unlikely your yeast are under enough strain to quickly start producing crazy off flavours
>>
Found a forest completely overrun with riverbank grapes. Would it be beneficial to put those little spike fertilizers underneath a few to get more berries? This year will be my first time with wild grape.
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>>2075347
Might be worth asking the /hgm/ on /out/
>>
Started a batch of pear cider today, although i forgot to take pics
>>
I never did and never had any problems.
>>
I'm thinking of getting into homebrewing and buying this starter kit, does it look good and is it good value? I think I'll try the red ale recipe pack to start
https://www.thehopandgrain.com.au/product/5lstarterkit/
Keep in mind that $50 AUD might be more like $40-35 USD because of currency differences and GST

Also can I get a quick rundown on sanitation? I'm currently collecting beer bottles for bottling but I'm wondering what I have to do to sanitise them for each brew. Also wondering if "crown seals" are a universal cap for all bottles, the bottles I'm collecting are twist tops if it matters
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>>2075988
It's not that bad a deal, really. You can find those demijohns everywhere in the UK secondhand, I got one for 50p at a recycle shop, it just needed a good clean, they're £8 new. The other stuff besides the ingredients probably costs about £10. The cost of those ingredients is negligible but to try and find hopped wort in such small amounts and I suppose that is their selling point.

One of the benefits of brewing smaller volumes is that you can move them around easily. This is especially useful when it gets too warm or too cold in the place where you're keeping them. Moving 5 gallons around is tricky and risky (if you spill it) but you get 5 gallons at the end of it obviously.

>Also can I get a quick rundown on sanitation?
I'd recommend getting some sanitiser powder like VWP or equivalent to soak your equipment in after you've cleaned it. Once the equipment is sanitised, just rinse it until you no longer smell the cleaning agent and it should be fine to use. I'd also recommend you get a bottle brush that is large enough to reach into the demijohn because there will be a lot of crud on the side after you finish brewing.

I don't think you will be able to use crimp top bottle caps with twist top bottles although I might be wrong. I just don't think it will seal very well. Grolsh swing tops might be better to collect.
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>>2075988
>$50 AUD
if you take the red ale it's 60 AUD and it's also sold separately for 20 AUD, although the description of what's actually included is lacking. You're paying 40 AUD for the following (prices from the same website):
a 5L glass carboy(20 AUD), an airlock(4 AUD), a bung(4-10 AUD, depending on size), a syphoning hose (2.5-5 AUD per meter), a sanitiser sachet (probably sodium percabonate, 7.5-13 AUD per kg), and a priming sugar measure (3 AUD).
Most of the prices seems ok to me, except for the carboy. Over here you''ll probably pay half of that but I've no actual idea about Australian prices (although I'm often told they're fucked up) and I'm in another part of the world where they're commonly used for both oil and wine.
I'd say you should take a look around some hardware store or something like that to see if you can find some of those thing for a lower price (the hose should be food-safe), for the carboy you could even buy a full one to reuse once you're emptied it.
>I'm currently collecting beer bottles for bottling but I'm wondering what I have to do to sanitise them for each brew.
to sanitize them I wash them thoroughly using hot water, bleach, dish soap (like a drop or so, otherwise you'll use more water to get rid of the foam than to actually wash the bottles) and a bottle brush if by looking it them I can see some residues. I also use a bottle rinser sometimes, with sodium percarbonate in the water.
>Also wondering if "crown seals" are a universal cap for all bottles, the bottles I'm collecting are twist tops if it matters.
Over here there's two sizes of crown caps 26 and 29 mm and afaik they do not fit on twist cap bottles as they require the edge shown in pic to latch on.
>>
>>2075988
>I'm thinking of getting into homebrewing and buying this starter kit, does it look good and is it good value?

Value seems okay to start out but honestly, you could probably buy all this separately for less money.

> I think I'll try the red ale recipe pack to start
Good choice

>Also can I get a quick rundown on sanitation?

I use starsan/chemsan which is handy because it comes as a small bottle of concentrate which you dilute with water so it doesn't take up much space. Sanitise everything including your hands. It's less important for stuff that's getting boiled but it doesn't hurt to get into the habit of good sanitation throughout. A daft thing new homebrewers can sometimes forget is if you are, for example, dry hopping and using a hop bag, this needs to be sanitised too. Clean down your equipment thoroughly afterwards, you don't want to spend your next brewday afterwards trying to clean mould out of the corner of something.

> currently collecting beer bottles for bottling but I'm wondering what I have to do to sanitise them for each brew.
I dunk these in hot water with some soda crystals (which costs under a dollar for 1-2kg) because this helps deep clean the bottles but also gets the label to slide right off without having to even peel it.

>Also wondering if "crown seals" are a universal cap for all bottles
No, the bottles for twist tops and crowns are different. Some homebrewer have used crown seals on them and claim to have had no problems. Other homebrewers claim you can't get a good seal on them which risks ruining your beer and since the bottleneck is thinner glass, if mistakes are made during priming, you're more likely to end up with exploding bottles. I've never tried so I cannot offer any advice one way or the other.
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>>2072185
I'm thinking about making a viking blood mead(honey+cherry juice), 5l batch buth I've been too lazy to look up a recipe, a cherry wine seems like it would be fun and tasty as well.
>>
Last year I made loads of cider and perry from my own trees. A few weeks ago I started experimenting with flavours using store-bought juice. I'm bottling a vanilla+saffron+cinnamon+black tea perry coming weekend. I hope the flavors survive
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>>2076256
>It's not that bad a deal, really. You can find those demijohns everywhere in the UK secondhand, I got one for 50p at a recycle shop, it just needed a good clean, they're £8 new. The other stuff besides the ingredients probably costs about £10.
Thanks, yeah I suppose I'm paying a bit of a premium but it's worth it for the convenience, I can't get stuff delivered to my place normally so it's easy to just pick it up in person
>The cost of those ingredients is negligible but to try and find hopped wort in such small amounts and I suppose that is their selling point.
That's what I think two, I'd probably only buy 1-2 more of their starter kits and then buy in bulk if I get into it. It even says in the description
>Once you’ve mastered the process with a brew or two using our refill kits, you can move on to formulating your own house brews – feel free to ask us for tips or for a full run down attend one of our intermediate brewing classes.

>One of the benefits of brewing smaller volumes is that you can move them around easily. This is especially useful when it gets too warm or too cold in the place where you're keeping them. Moving 5 gallons around is tricky and risky (if you spill it) but you get 5 gallons at the end of it obviously.
Yeah also I would feel ridiculous fucking up like a 20L homebrew, also I don't trust myself having that much alcohol lying around lol. I'd rather brew in smaller quantities
>I'd also recommend you get a bottle brush that is large enough to reach into the demijohn because there will be a lot of crud on the side after you finish brewing.
Should I get a brush for the beer bottles themselves or is it not really worth it since they don't collect crud?
>I just don't think it will seal very well.
Yeah this is my worry too, I'm just going to seal them with a hand tamper and hammer as well so it could be a pain. Pic related are the bottles I'm collecting, though I've only got four so I'll buy a difference case next time
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>>2076258
>if you take the red ale it's 60 AUD and it's also sold separately for 20 AUD, although the description of what's actually included is lacking.
the list of extract kits is here
https://www.thehopandgrain.com.au/product-category/5l-extract-kits/
And here's the red ale description
>A perfect beer for Autumn and Winter, balanced malt profile and bitterness while maintaining a dry finish.
For some reason though it has the least detail of all the beers, for example here's the pale ale
>A full-flavoured pale ale with a fresh citrus aroma. Recipe contains malt extract, crystal & carapils malts, Magnum & Galaxy hops.
I don't know much about different beers to be honest, I'm tentatively going with the red ale because I'm worried the others will end up being too fruity and sweet which I can't stand, is going with the red ale a safe bet? Says it's good for colder weather too which is what we're heading into in Australia
>to sanitize them I wash them thoroughly using hot water, bleach, dish soap
Is bleach really necessary? Seems severe
>>2076269
Thanks for your advice too, seems important to get the right bottles so I'll get on that. Also wondering if you could give me a rundown on why you think the red ale is a good choice and if any of the other kits grab your attention
>>
What's the most exotic, weird or unusual alcohol you've made and was it good?
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>>2072185
>do i need to sterilize the cloth i use to hold the brewery spent grains when i rinse them
If you're talking about sparging then there should be no cloth to hold the grains, the grains hold themselves and make a filter. If you're talking abouit some weird cheese cloth thing to hold some hops for some faggy IPA technique then just boil the bag for a minute or two.
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>>2076986
He wants to use boil in a bag which doesn't use a lautering stage. Boil in a bag has nothing to do with IPA's or any other beer styles, it's mainly used for extract brewing.
>>
How much sugar is in a kg of malted grains? From searching around it seems to me that it is around just below 500g of sugar but I'm not sure since I can't find any hard data.
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>>2076855
yes, i saw that, what i meant is what you posted for the pale ale:
>Recipe contains malt extract, crystal & carapils malts, Magnum & Galaxy hops.
what's the item is actually composed of.
>I don't know much about different beers to be honest
I'm the same as you and that's the reason why i usually rely on IBU and EBC classification to figure out what the end product will be like, although in an E+G recipe you can vary it way more than in an simple extract recipe.
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>>2077243
One thing I don't really know is the different between IPAs and pale ales, I basically only drink pale ales but I don't like overly fruity/ sugary ones. I don't know if IPAs are generally more fruity or if they're more bitter/ malty?
Right now I'm thinking I'll get the red ale kit as well as the pale ale or IPA kit, here are the descriptors for both:
https://www.thehopandgrain.com.au/product/5lipaextractrecipe/
>A tasty full bodied IPA with a refreshing bitter finish. Recipe contains malt extract, crystal malt, Magnum & Cascade hops.
https://www.thehopandgrain.com.au/product/5lpalealeextractrecipe
>A full-flavoured pale ale with a fresh citrus aroma. Recipe contains malt extract, crystal & carapils malts, Magnum & Galaxy hops.
Which do you think sounds better if I'm trying to avoid a fruity sweetness? I'm more inclined to go with the pale ale because it's what I know, but the descriptor for the IPA sounds more like Cooper's Pale Ale, which is what I normally drink:
>This is the beer that inspired a new generation of ale drinkers. With its fruity and floral characters, balanced with a crisp bitterness, Coopers Pale Ale has a compelling flavour which is perfect for every occasion. Naturally fermented in the "Burton-upon-Trent" style, a secondary fermentation creates the trademark sediment that gives 'Pale' its fine cloudy appearance.
>>
How large of a fermenter can you use without having to worry about it getting warm enough to kill off the yeast? Can get my hands on some cheap 1000l IBC tanks
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>>2077175
>How much sugar is in a kg of malted grains?

Fermentable or non-fermentable sugars? Why do you want to know this? It varies from grain to grain and malt to malt but usually over 55% and up to 85%
>>
>homebrew general
I read no hebrew general
Fucking jews.
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>>2077257
If it's taller than 3 meters/10ft that's going to kill your yeast anyway. As for temp, depends what temp it's going to be held and your yeast tolerance is? Best advice I can offer is keep is in a cool space and pick an ale yeast with a higher tolerance?
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>>2077249
>Which do you think sounds better if I'm trying to avoid a fruity sweetness? I'm more inclined to go with the pale ale because it's what I know, but the descriptor for the IPA sounds more like Cooper's Pale Ale, which is what I normally drink:
Red ales have a slight fruitiness but it's from the malt so it's not overpowering or artificial. Pale ale will be closest to your Cooper's Pale Ale and the IPA will be quite a lot more bitter. Pale Ale is also easier to condition and stores for longer.
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>>2077309
>Red ales have a slight fruitiness but it's from the malt so it's not overpowering or artificial.
So is it malt that lends a fruitiness to the brew? I thought it was more hops, or is it both?
>Pale Ale is also easier to condition
What does that mean?
Generally I'm leaning towards the pale ale
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>>2077332
hops influence the bitterness
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>>2077175
Pale, generally 75-80%

Roast, generally 50-60%

Roasting reduces the fermentables.
>>
>>2077279
>>2077350
Cool. Fermentable. Wanted to figure out how much cheaper it is to use grains instead of sugar, maths is a hobby of mine when it comes to stuff like this and sometimes i get stuck on it for autism reasons.
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>>2077359
Depends on where you shop and what time of year it is. Places with cheap grains are generally pet food (horse food specifically) as they feed what's effectively corn flakes to horses as a staple.

If you're not distilling, I'd recommend brown or raw sugar (not white) as an addition to beers.
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>>2077332
>So is it malt that lends a fruitiness to the brew? I thought it was more hops, or is it both?
If you're asking if both hops and malt add fruitiness to a brew then both can yes.

>>Pale Ale is also easier to condition
>What does that mean?

Pale ales are less work
>>
>>2077359
Sugar is considerably cheaper because it is entirely fermentable and you don't need to spend as much money on equipment and energy to extract it and it's quicker. However sugars add pretty much no flavour or body. So if you're trying to push up the ABV without adding more malt or gravity then sugar is a good option for a small portion of your mash bill.
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>>2077373
>cheap grains are generally pet food
So, grains are actually separated and sold to different industries depending on their nutritional content. Animal feed wants high protein and brewers/distillers want a higher starch content. By swapping animal feed out for brewing grains your brewing efficiency will drop and you will not save as much money as it seems on the surface.
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>>2077359
Almost every malt has the extract potential listed in it's specifications. If your brew shop doesn't have this info then get a different brew shop.
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>>2077373
I can buy barley for 0,23usd per kg from a farmer so seems cheap enough.
I've thought about it, might try distilling some day.
Brown sugar seems a whole lot more expensive than white
>>2077402
If it's at 50% sugars in the grains i would be getting it at half of the cost of buying white sugar. The extra work would be worth it since i already do the work while doing another thing so wouldn't be going out of my way
>>2077405
Ic ic, i will have to ask the farmer or try
>>2077408
I don't buy from brew shops other than for the yeast and fermentation buckets
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>>2077412
>I can buy barley for 0,23usd per kg from a farmer so seems cheap enough.
Bro your barley needs to be malted or you will no sugars, no enzymes, no nothing.

>If it's at 50% sugars in the grains i would be getting it at half of the cost of buying white sugar.
50% sugars only really applies to your specialty grains, base malts will be ~80% which make up >60% of your grist.

>The extra work would be worth it
Fair enough

>I don't buy from brew shops other than for the yeast and fermentation buckets
Interesting, where do you get your malt and hops?
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>>2077426
>Bro your barley needs to be malted or you will no sugars, no enzymes, no nothing.
Malting them myself won't be an issue

>50% sugars only really applies to your specialty grains, base malts will be ~80% which make up >60% of your grist.
Ngl i don't know the terms well enough to understand that you mean

>Interesting, where do you get your malt and hops?
So far i have only made wine but i would grow the hops myself, maybe find some local varieties, grains would be malted by myself but bought from a farmer
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>>2076848
>Should I get a brush for the beer bottles themselves or is it not really worth it since they don't collect crud?

It might be useful but they can usually be just swished out with water easily enough. The dried yeast and tannins stick to the sides of the fermenter quite strongly so a decent brush to get at them is a necessity.

You might get away with the crimp tops on twisty bottles if you crimp hard enough. I'm not that familiar with twist tops though as they're pretty rare in the UK. Only Budweiser and Coors have them I think.
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>>2072185
First time brewer curious if there's any good beginner guides out there.
Have a small kit and looking to make a lager.
How good are the homebrew generals in the archives?
>>
>>2072185

>What are all up to?
Local pro-brewer (albeit for a really shitty brewery) gave me a bunch of hops to use. I got
>2oz Azacca Cryo
>2oz Idaho-7 Cryo
>2oz HBC 472

Just made an oatmeal stout today with HBC 472 since apparently it has a lot of vanilla/coconut/barrel aged notes in darker beers. Kept hearing that it also has a lot of fruity notes when people have used them in NEIPAs so kinda curious how it'll come out. Worst comes to worse, I drown out everything with coffee, vanilla and coco nibs.

Thinking about making a milkshake ipa this weekend since I made one a while ago that got a ton of rave reviews from friends and family.

May also try more lagers after finding out that W-34/70 can ferment fine just below room temperature and then lagering can be shortcut by gelatin + floating dip tube.
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>>2077697
I'm just going to buy another case of beer that has crown seals, as I said I've only collected four of the twist tops so far so it doesn't make much of a difference
>>
Havent been here in months but wanted to stop in and say thank you hbg. I have been brewing my own mead since around last march and have it pretty well down now. I wouldnt have been able to do it without you faggots.
>>
let's say I've been making some cider at my parents's country house, let's also say that i left it unattended and the temperature dropped below 15°C, listed as the lower limit for the yeast of the kit: is it fine, am I fucked or can I still fix it?
Also, for future reference, is there any way to evaluate if the the amount of CO2 produced by fermenting could be harmful to a person in the same space? I remember estimating the amount of CO2 by converting the added sugar to moles with Avogadro, and slamming the number in the fermeting reaction (sugar=>co2+alcohol) and then converting it back to grams, but how do I know if the amount of gas is dangerous?
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>>2078404
>is it fine, am I fucked or can I still fix it?
It's fine, just give it a swish and move it back into a tolerable temperature temperature

>is there any way to evaluate if the the amount of CO2 produced by fermenting could be harmful to a person in the same space? I remember estimating the amount of CO2 by converting the added sugar to moles with Avogadro, and slamming the number in the fermeting reaction (sugar=>co2+alcohol) and then converting it back to grams, but how do I know if the amount of gas is dangerous?

Honestly there would need to be a huge vat in a tiny room for it to affect you
>>
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Nice! I am a homebrewer also. Probably have done 16+ different brews. Have some Sake I need to transfer today. Going to let it sit in secondary for a few days to see if it helps with clarity. I use a metal honey filter and two stacked mesh*like filters.
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>>2078512
Cold crash it bro
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>>2078521
It's a 6gallon batch. Can't fit it in a fridge.
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>>2078512
Also have a 5gallon batch of Apfelwein I just started. Have 15~ Gallons of Apfelwein aging right now. More like 10 Gallons because I keep drinking it every so often.
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>>2078522
Would it help to leave it outside overnight?
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>>2078528
Ignorant question incoming, what is the difference between cider and apfelwein?
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>>2078539
Meh not enough to worry about it.
>>2078542
Only the alcohol percent. Think beer vs wine.
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Some info for any noobs. HIGHLY recommend doing 1 batch of Apfelwein and 1 batch of Sake.

Apfelwein = Easy as fuck even 4chan can do it. Apple Juice+Sugar+Yeast. Age for 3 months. Bottle. Age again for 3-6 months. Can take shots or drink on ice and add some 7up or sprite to sweeten.
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/threads/man-i-love-apfelwein.14860/

Sake. Hands down the most underrated homebrew. Shit is amazing and it taste better than any sake you have ever had hands down. It really gives off a "Fruit" like smell despite being just rice. The best thing about Sake is you are supposed to drink it fresh/young. So while your Apfelwein is fermenting/aging you can be drinking homemade Sake in 2-3 weeks.
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>>2078542
And to get a little more specific. Cider is usually "Sweet" where apfelwein is typically extremely dry. Apfelwein takes a little "getting used to" and often sneaks up on people. Most people I give it to like to drink it on ice with sprite.
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>>2078578
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/threads/man-i-love-apfelwein.14860/
>>
>>2078578
>It really gives off a "Fruit" like smell
last beer i had smelled way too fruity, especially bananas, I'll pass.
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>>2078587
It's sake not beer. And it's really hard to describe without trying it yourself. It's "Fruit like" but does not smell like any specific fruit. Just sweet a guess. Really good my man.
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>>2076965
During lockdown when the McDonalds closed, I got my hands on some of their crates of apple Topicana that were being thrown out. I immediately added the contents of all the tiny bottles to my biggest fermenter (23 litres) and brewed the lot. It made some really good cider, no word of a lie.
>>
>>2078633
Nice man. Come up.
>>
yo this shits MAD NASTY just buy a 40oz
>>
>>2078404
Yeast just goes to sleep unless frozen. Even then some may stay alive and just needs warmed up to get back on track
>>
>>2078522
Stick the bucket into a bucket filled with salty ice water and cover with a blanket.
>>
>>2078581
That is my mead right now it is slightly sweet but really dry and one glass hits hard
>>
>>2078825
N I G G E R
>>
>>2078633
Chad
>>
>>2078825
Only at first if you're unlucky, let it age properly at the right temperature and it can turn the nastiest undrinkable wine into something tasty and enjoyable
>>
>>2078522
Get a cheap old fridge on Craigslist/gumtree/Facebook and enjoy your new beer fridge
>>
If i was making 10l of barley wine and use 3,2kg of malted barley how much end product would you reckon I'd end up with? Since the grain ought to take up a fair bit of space, would end up around 17-19%
>>
>>2079251
>If i was making 10l of barley wine and use 3,2kg of malted barley how much end product would you reckon I'd end up with?

10L surely
>>
>>2079251
If you're only using 3.2kg of grain then like 3-4L?
>>
>>2079276
I mean liquid drinkable, 3.2kg grains and the rest water
>>2079279
Makes sense i guess, would take up a lot of space
>>
>>2079309
What are you talking about? Where are you putting 10L, in the mash tun, boil kettle or fermenter?
>>
>>2079395
The mash is in total 10l, 3,2kg of that is grains, once the fermentation is done ya remove the grain, how much liquid do ya reckon will be left
>>
>>2079396
>The mash is in total 10l
The mash or the mash tun?

>How much liquid do you reckon will be left?
Depends, how much strike water and how much sparge water are you using? Do you have a ballpark figure for your mash efficiency? How long is your boil?
>>
>>2079402
The one that is ready to ferment
>>
>>2079407
I'm trying to help you man but you need to lay off the smack
>>
>>2079410
I don't see what the problem is
>>
>>2079414
How could you
>>
>>2079417
Why did you do this anon?
>>
>>2079407
You don't ferment in a mash tun
>>
>>2079421
So i remove the grains before the fermentation? Speak american, I've only done wine in the past
>>
>>2079438
> Speak american, I've only done wine in the past
Ahhhhhhhhh that explains it

>So i remove the grains before the fermentation?

Yes. So get all your equipment and ingredients santised and ready. Preheat your mashing vessel with hot water, then empty before use. I'm going to assume you have a mash tun and a boil kettle.

So first you're going to mash, you're going to add hot "strike" water to your grains. If you want a single infusion (the most straight forward type of mash) then heat the water to roughly 75-80°c/167-176°F which, when added to room temperature grains should come out around 67°c/153°F. Don't get it hotter than this or you will denature the enzymes in the grain which you need to extract the sugar for you. Stir the 'mash' thoroughly so there are no cold or hot spots. Leave it alone for at least half an hour to an hour but no longer than 2 hours. Do not disturb the mash tun by moving or shaking it for the last 20 minutes. Take a jug and pour out a couple of litres of 'wort' and gently pour this back over your grains, this will get rid of loose grains and help seal your grain bed. About 20 minutes before you're mashing is done, heat up your 'sparge' water. I'd Google batch sparging to get a quick run down. Start pouring into your boil kettle (it can be handy to take a gravity sample once your kettle is full).

Bring your wort to the boil in the boil kettle. As it comes to the boil give it a really good stir so it doesn't boil over. Once it has come to the boil, people usually let it boil for an hour. Add any bittering hops Do not leave the lid on (or you end up with DMS).

About 20 minutes from the end of your boil, prep your yeast. You're probably going to have some hop additions around here.

Chill your wort. Take a gravity sample. Once it hits 20°c/68°F then add to your fermenter along with your yeast.

1/2
>>
>>2079438
For barley wine it can help to add a 'decoction step' in your mash. Might seem daunting but it's very straightforward.

Hop additions will be worth looking into, do you have hops yet or still looking into it?

There are calculators you can use online to help you work out how much strike/sparge water you will need to end up with the right volume for your boil kettle and fermenter.

Double check the hardness of your water, if you have a pH meter then get it abused during your brewday. Take gravity samples at each stage and always record them.

I've thrown a bunch of info at you so I'll stop now. I've probably explained it really badly so just ask if there's stuff that doesn't make sense.
>>
>>2072185
i'm 18 and idk if I should continue graphic design or start a welding business btw idk how to weld I'm gonna cry idk what to do
>>
>>2079464
all that jargon, no wonder it scares so many people off.
sad part is everything you said made sense, anybody looking in will be wtf
>>
>>2079471
>>>/adv/
>>
>>2078578
Any recommended guides on making sake?
>>
>>2072185
Latter-day saint (mormon) anon here. I don't drink but have been seriously thinking about being some root beer. Anyone done this and have any tips/recipes?
>>
>>2079464
>>2079466
So warm it to convert the starch
Boil it to make sure everything gets extracted?
Why no longer than 2h?
I think i understand it, still looking into hops but i think my friend has a lot growing in his garden that i can take.
>>
>>2079716
The only reason I included jargon was so that he could go and Google it and read about it. Can't describe every part of the process to the nth without making far too many posts but he can go and research it to whatever degree he wants to. Plus he makes wine, he's not going to be scared off by a couple of boring words
>>
>>2079861
>So warm it to convert the starch
Yeah exactly, there's a couple different starches going on that like different temperatures but if you aim for 66°c/151°F then that should be a sweet spot for hitting them all.

>Boil it to make sure everything gets extracted?
So after the grain and hot water has been mashed, you let the 'wort' pour out from the bottom of your mashing vessel. The reason is that the grain all settled into a 'grainbed' which is just a natural filter. Pic is a basic homebrew mash tun, the tap is at the bottom so that you can pour out all the wort without disrupting the grain bed.

You're mainly boiling it to sterilise it and reduce the volume of water.

>Why no longer than 2h?
To be honest the extract efficiency drops pretty sharply after about 45 minutes. If you were making a light beer I wouldn't bother with more than an hour however since you're making a high gravity beer I'd let it try and extract as much sugar as possible but conversion after the 2 hour mark isn't worth the time.

> my friend has a lot growing in his garden that i can take.

That's really cool, if he happens to know the varietal then it's worth giving it a quickly Google just so you can see how strong they are (in hops this is measured in 'alpha acids') if he's unsure, you can always make a cup of hop tea and then you'll have a sense of flavours/aromas/bitterness.
>>
>>2079862
i get alot of guys asking how to do it and the jargon scares them off.
So i keep it simple for them, got quite a few blokes into grain brewing and they have not looked back.
Now they tell me im doing shit wrong lol, there is no wrong in making beer (within reason) just different
>>
>>2079878
>i get alot of guys asking how to do it and the jargon scares them off. So i keep it simple for them, got quite a few blokes into grain brewing and they have not looked back.
I take your point but I don't personally agree. If I was chatting about this over a beer with a buddy our chat would be very different but I'm trying to give the guy info so he can go and target any searches and get the info relevant to him.

>Now they tell me im doing shit wrong lol, there is no wrong in making beer (within reason) just different
Again, I don't personally agree. There's definitely more than one way to skin a cat and every approach has its benefits and drawbacks. I think it's about being informed so that you can make the right decisions for your setup and goals which puts you in control of any experimentation and ultimately helps you brew better beer.
>>
>>2079880
i get what your saying and it will help him to no end for finding stuff online and he has a good foot in the door from the wine making.
been brewing long enough to know how i like to brew and i do take advice but, its kinda funny guys giving advice after doing maybe 3-5 brews like they are experts.
They still havent had a yeast die, get tainted or better yet just make a shit flavoured brew that you tip on the lawn
>>
>>2079885
>its kinda funny guys giving advice after doing maybe 3-5 brews like they are experts.
That's true. They find out one of the many, many ways to do things and can become a bit preachy about the virtues of their one method. Although it can be handy if they have a go with some equipment/malt/hops/whatever that you haven't played with yet. And I love it when someone you got into home-brewing shares a great beer they've made with you
>>
>>2079895
i hate galaxy hops and i mean hate. Passionfruit can can suck my dick and kiss my arse, but some how a mate i got into grain brewing makes it work and he makes some top beers with it.
Its kind of funny all he did was can lagers before, now he only ever seems to churn out browns and sweet beers. Even his lagers these days are brown.
but that suits me fine im mad keen into sweet stouts/porters and Saisons
>>
>>2079865
>which is just a natural filter
Noice, was trying to think of what to use for that but this makes things easier.
I
Thanke for the info anon, helped a bunch
>>
I remember stories of people here tracking down old gardens in 5he middle of nowhere just to find types of old hops that had been lost
>>
>>2079897
>i hate galaxy hops and i mean hate.
To be fair I've definitely had more bad beers with galaxy than good although they seem a good supporting act for beers with strata hops.

> im mad keen into sweet stouts/porters and Saisons
I'm right there with you. Currently conditioning an Irish Dry Stout and an American Sweet Stout (with a little Tonka) so I can abuse my new cask handpump. I have a saison aging on some muscat grapes but I only made a couple of gallons incase it didn't work but now it's really good and I wish I had ten times as much and I regret my life choices.
>>
>>2079906
i switched to sticklebract in my stout, maybe harder to get in the US as its a NZ hop and my beers got so much better. I can go past nottingham yeast for stouts. It just works well for me.
i got out of using cacao nibs and the brew shop sells a dutched choc which is so much easier to deal with.
I did a mid strength with verdant IPA yeast but its not as good as the nottingham.
im currently working on a philly sour with lime and 1kg of strawberries, never used the yeast before as its hard to get in Aus but its a pain in the ass and is stuck at .011 before the strawberries where added, might give it another week and just bottle it
> I have a saison aging on some muscat grapes
sounds not bad at all. do you run equanots with that or are you trying to get the peppery flavour out of it?
>>
>>2079909
> sticklebract in my stout
What were you using before and how did the switch improve it? I'm UK side and you're right they don't seem to be widely available here

>nottingham yeast for stouts
It's so good for those high gravity beers, it just tears through so fast. Recently did a SMASH barley wine with chevalier malt and phoenix hops which came out at 14.5% and Nottingham ripped through it in about 2 1/2 days.

>philly sour with lime and 1kg of strawberries stuck at .011 before the strawberries where added, might give it another week and just bottle it
Fair, what FG were you going for? Sounds like a good summer beer. Not worth repitching at this point I take it?

>> I have a saison aging on some muscat >do you run equanots with that or are you trying to get the peppery flavour out of it?
I did have a chunk of peppery and spicy notes after primary because I'd used some rye and belle saison yeast but in secondary I bretted it and racked it onto some 'tutti frutti' grapes so it just became very fruity, appley, grapey and farmhouses with no pepper just a tiny bit of spice on the back end. Used Nelson Sauvin hops, it's very winey. Going to have to rebrew it soon.
>>
>>2079904
imagine how satisfying it would be to come across that though
>>
>>2080251
They found 54 old ones in Sweden suitable for making beer with but they're only selling 4 of them, the rest are getting stored in a gene vault
>>
>>2080368
There was a law in Sweden between 1462 and 1860 where they had to grow it to some extent, but after the law was disposed of a lot of them stopped, so a cultural group or agency a couple of years ago shared a map of where these gardens were and told people to go out and look around the areas
>>
Any good home brew discords around? I tried joining one a long while ago. But the invite expired.
>>
>>2080101
I was using east kent goldings, northern brewer, us goldings. not all at once but i have done a few to get it right. Beats me how, it tastes better it just seemed to mesh better overall

>SMASH barley wine with chevalier malt and phoenix hops
seems like not a hope in hell of getting that hop here. sounds like a nice barley wine. Nottingham is such a crutch for me, good result, always makes a beer taste great and when im stuck on what yeast its a go to. Then i can ruin it from there being stupid

>what FG were you going for
was going for around .006 but its close enough for me. i tried it in the brew shop they had done it on a tin and used fake lime and strawberries, but you could tell it had potential. So i took it did it on a 4kg of vienna (cause i am hung up on vienna too) added 500g flaked corn and 150g carapills for head retention.

>Used Nelson Sauvin hops
that sounds like a damn nice saison. also sounds hard to replicate for a second crack.
i did a great hazy citra saison recently and damn easy drinking for a 10% beer

What temp do you do your saisons at? i have been doing them at 22-24 degrees trying to bring that spice note forward
>>
>>2079834
Bump
Everything I'm seeing is indicating that it's actually a pretty difficult process.
>>
>>2072333
I've been meaning to try making mead after I found a recipe and realized it's pretty damn easy + the wine I made from last season turned out pretty mediocre. Definitely gonna look into it some more this weekend; pretty sure I have literally all the equipment and ingredients needed already.
>>
>>2080584
>I was using east kent goldings, northern brewer, us goldings.
Could be the IBU's- goldings are around 4-6% alpha acids and stickleback is about 13-14%- so it might be balancing out a better level of bitterness??

>>SMASH barley wine with chevalier malt and phoenix hops
>seems like not a hope in hell of getting that hop here.
Phoenix was a bittering hop so you're right. Only managed to get chevalier last year, it was only resurrected a few years ago so this beer is really about making a very traditional english barleywine that shows off the malt.

>was going for around .006 but its close enough for me.
very fair, if you're adding more sugar from the fruit you'll likely hit it anyway.

>So i took it did it on a 4kg of vienna (cause i am hung up on vienna too) added 500g flaked corn and 150g carapills for head retention.
Vienna and carapils are great, definitely malts to keep on hand. Not used flaked corn yet, do you taste it much in beers like this?

>that sounds like a damn nice saison. also sounds hard to replicate for a second crack
Absolutely, no chance I'll make the exact same one again so just going to brew each season and use whichever grapes are in season, add that to what's left of the previous batch. Plan to keep it going for a few years and see how the culture changes.

>i did a great hazy citra saison recently and damn easy drinking for a 10% beer
I've stopped using citra over the last couple years, definitely have their place but it's a hop that seem to have a huge variance year to year and grower to grower. More often than not there's so little citrus or fruit to them. Although that could easily be a local issue. Find myself leaning towards simcoe for saisons and something like hallertau for pale ales.


>What temp do you do your saisons at? i have been doing them at 22-24 degrees trying to bring that spice note forward
They ferment in a room between 17-19, after Day 1 they crawl up to 22-26 by themselves which brings out that spice well
>>
>>2080696
Same here, it seems like if you have the equipment you might as well have a crack at it. There's an apiary about 3 miles from me that makes heather honey but it's closed for 3 weeks cause we're in lockdown for now sadly
>>
>>2080553
Also interested in any homebrew discords
>>
>>2080903
flaked corn/maize brings out those dry notes even more adds alittle sweetness, but mainly that dryness to the beer that you sometimes lose when you use something other than nottingham.
Dont use it as a base it will end up like a crappy yank mainstream beer without flavour.

Also need to know what it the secrete you poms use to make your localised budwisser taste good. the stuff from murica and the locally made stuff here is shit. We sometimes get it at Aldi in 4 pack cans
>>
>>2077429

Malting barley looks easy but is a complex process of control and precision that maltsters make look easy.

You could do it by steeping your barley in water for a few days (cycling it daily) to clean off rat shit, dust, and whatever else comes with it. Then allow it to germinate where you turn that daily as well for (3-4 days) because you want the carbohydrates and enzymes to become available. Then you want to kiln to stop the germination, you can do that in a clothes drier where you put your germinated grains in a pillow case and dry it out that way. You can rotate pillow cases if it gets too hot.

Your malt won't come out like a professional maltsters would, but you will get something that allows you to make beer.
>>
>>2080553
>>2080940

If you are interested in mead, then the mead hall is quite good.

9XnxDJQ3

We do branch off into other brews as well.
>>
54 litres of skeeter pee fermented dry, bottled in 375ml beer bottles for convenient drinking/gifting, and tastes phenomenal. Added 2kg of mixed berries for colour and it worked spectacularly. Looks like raspberry lemonade in colour, and tastes a bit like it too. I opted for 6 bottles of lemon juice instead of 9 like the traditional recipe suggests, and I like it more this way as a session drink. Lemon flavour with a slight acidic tang, rather than the full on citric acid assault of traditional skeeter pee.
>>
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>>2081800
Here's how it looks in the bottle. Still has to clarify but I was too impatient after 6 weeks in primary and secondary.
>>
Just spent an hour and a half cleaning up a broken carboy that was full. Brew on cement floors guys, this could have been a disaster.
>>
>>2081800
is skeeter pee made as per the recipe good -- just lemon juice, no fruit?
>>
>>2082012
Honestly not sure, but the overwhelming flavour of this wine is lemon, and it's so good I'm making another batch tomorrow. Even just a couple pounds of berries is fine, it was really only added for colour.
>>
>>2076733
Cherry wine tastes how I imagined wine would taste as a child. It's phenomenal.
>>
>>2076965
Pork and beans wine. It was exactly as awful as you'd imagine.
>>
>>2072185
What's the equipment I need to get to make beer and mead? What would you recommend? Looking for cheap stuff, maybe make 2 gallons at a time.
>>
>>2082570
depends on what sort of beer you want to make.
Tin shit all you will need is a container and a airlock right up to this
https://www.kegland.com.au/27l-fermzilla-conical-pressure-brewing-kit.html
You can do your secondary or not, then just pressurize the vessel and start drinking
>>
>>2082677
Conical fermentor? 2008 called and they want their equipment back
>>
I've done sone ginger ale and left to ferment on fridge
the taste is as expected, except for it being sour as fuck, if I add just a bit of sugar later on it taste just fine and bubbly
is there any trick to this, how do you guys make it easier to taste if any sugar gets fermented away?
>>
>>2083220
Get a hydrometer
>>
My gin-making experiments were successful. My initial attempts to infuse already-distilled spirit with flavors from difference spices (70% juniper, 10% clove, 10% mint, 5% cinammon, 5% peppercorn) just didn't taste right. However, when I put the same mix in between the reflux and secondary condenser it goes down very smoothly at 75% alcohol. Interestingly it started out green-colored (presumably from the mint) but turned an amber-brown as time went on.
>>
>>2083248
already have one....
>>
Anyone know why my homebrew cider smells like farts?

It doesn't taste like it though
>>
>>2082731
>offered no insight on what to use, and throw monkey shit
fuck off retard, offer advice or go fuck yourself
>>
>>2083670
afaik the smell in farts is caused by a sulphur gas produced by bacteria in your bowel, so I'd say you have some of them in you cider as well
>>
>>2083670
>Anyone know why my homebrew cider smells like farts?

Like the other anon said it will be a sulfur compound. If the smell goes away as it's aged then it's probably just Hydrogen sulfide which is produced by the yeast breaking down some amino acids, totally normal. Let it sit in secondary for a few days and the carbon dioxide will help it volatile off.
It could also be mercaptan which can be cause by yeast autolysis or a possible bacterial infection. I don't have a suggestion to get rid of this unfortunately.
There are other sulfur compounds out there but from your description and brew these two sound the most likely.
>>
>>2083220
Ferment it at a lower temperature which will give the yeast more time to do its thing as the lacto bacteria is slowed down, so it shouldn't end up as tart although it will take a little longer.

Take hydrometer readings at the start and end and that will tell you if sugar is being broken down.
>>
>>2083750
Unfortunately I have already bottled it...

It's fine if you just pour it out the bottle and then tip it from glass to glass a few times. Guess I will leave it to bulk age with an airlock next time. Or would it be possible to to use a whip degasser?
>>
>>2083765
Sounds like Hydrogen Sulfide to me

> use a whip degasser
I'm not convinced this would be a good idea. It might help remove the sulfides faster but it will probably introduce a little oxygen which is not ideal. There may be If it were me I'd let it age a little and just sample weekly or twice weekly to see if it's disappeared.
>>
>>2083770
Aging seems like the less effort option anyway I guess.
>>
>>2083753
thanks anon I already did this, I left one day outside and moved to the fridge for a couple of weeks
my point is, why does the hydrometer matters if you leave the ale stored, it will consume all sugar anyway, even if priming the bottle afterwards
the only way I know to stop fermentation is pasteurization, and its not so trivial to do for something bottled and with possible high carbonation

anyway, it could be that I used too much ginger or left it heat up too much in the "wort" making process
>>
>>2072185
Retard here.
Could you get botulism from homebrewing?
I got a juice dunk which I added some sugar and yeast to (poor man's wine).
How do I know that I won't die/become a vegetable?
Should it been kept in roomtemperature or ~(5-8)C?
>>
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so my yeast washing trial seems to be working reasonably good
pic related is the old one, I got just a little bit from that a let it mature again, after about a week in the fridge the liquid has a very nice fragrance to it, I'm now separating it again in preparation for a brew
my question is, can I use the clearer part of liquid to kickstart the brew?

my problem is also that even then I have very little yeast cake and it apparently mix to easily with the trub (because afterall this is not the same as a full barrel trub)
>>
>>2084062
The high sugar content and ethanol will prevent the growth of Clostridia so you're safe. In the lab you need cooked meat broth and strict anaerobic conditions to grow them so I doubt they'd survive in a juice drink. Additionally, the huge number of yeast cells you're adding should outcompete anything else for nutrients quite easily.

With regards to temperature, I usually start off cool at around 10C so the fermentation doesn't get too carried away and blow the air lock/spill out then I gradually increase the temperature to about 20C and keep it there until bubbling has almost stopped.
>>
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Mead 18%.
Currently aging for 3months.
I also have a "ale strength" Mead in a 20L drum fermenting... Hopefully. It's a little slow to get going.
I have previously brewed Mead with a variety of honey's. My favorite so far is Mead made from eucalyptus tree honey.
>>
>>2084093
Thinking about setting some aside and freeze distilling it
>>
>>2084062
i'd also say that ph and alcohol content wiil probably prevent you from producing your own homemade botox
>>
>>2084089
>>2084108
Well that was what I thought but I just wanted someone elses opinion on it that is more experienced.
Thank you Anon, I shall drink my wine in your name.
>>
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>>2084079
this is what I mean

left was the container it was on, in other words my starter
the liquid it was chilling on for a liquid went to the right glass (very fresh nice taste)
the second glass from the water took liquid from the first washing
next I added even more water and some other trubs from other drinks that were finished
let it sit for half to and full hour, and pour the milky liquid into the second container which is currently storing my yeast,
I'm gonna let it rest for a day and see how clean it turned out

but what I was wondering is if the rightmost glass could be used to kickstart fermentation on another wort, like it is very clear, but probably still has some live yeast around
another thing I did not manage to do, is discard that most clearer part of the top of the liquid, but I guess it can be done again after most of the yeast settles to the bottom
>>
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also I done fucked up, I think
mashed apple for cider, added just some water I could properly mix it,
I was filtering the mash (after having it cooked) but it didn't even fill to half the bottle

I was wondering about this already, so I'd figure I just test it out, afterall its more nutrient and more sugars right?
tho I can see a problem is gonna be taking that out later...
is it doable if you use a fermenting bucket and flow limiter? I've seen some anons using raw fruit curing together with the brew, so how do you guys do in that case?
>>
>>2078578
Bonus points if you freeze distill the Apfelwein to upgrade it to poor man's Applejack
>>
Alcohol is for degenerate faggots.
>>
>>2072185
About to make an all grain Irish red ale. I made an American Pale ale partial extract partial grain and that turned out awesome. I got myself a sexy diffuser for my 8 gallon kettle so I can mash my grains with ease.
>>
>>2076256
To avoid temperature fluctuations I kept my Carboy in the most stable room in the house wrapped in a thermal sleeping blanket, I'm gonna get one of those jackets with a temperature controller gas exchanger to make lagering easy.
>>
>>2084529
Unlike regular faggots like you who consume only cocks and huel.
>>
>>2084275
so this is a bit of a mixed bag
the fermentation started and bubbling like crazy
however, it seems that the jelly like density of the mash doesn't let the bubbles go up,
so in turn the whole thing expands and the most dense mash stays on top, it ends up going into the airlock

also, my theory that as fermentation progress the mash ends up getting more loose, as breakdown from sugar and nutrients, it all becomes more "soluble", so maybe this could be a better idea for a bucket, though I'm not sure it could be pretty bad to clog up the drain
>>
Anyone ever brewed a beer with mint instead of hops? I'm tempted to try it.
>>
>>2085072
Don't need to, that will be rotten. Mint is packed full of volatile chemicals, all you're going to taste in the beer is decaying vegetal matter.
>>
>>2084966
I'm sure you've already realise that for next time your bottle needs more headspace
>>
>>2077993
Update: floating dip tube + gelatin does make a super quick and super clear lager
>>
>>2085901
But how does it taste????
>>
Has anyone ever got a sore throat from their home brew mead? Why does this happen





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