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Welding General
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Why is FCAW advised against? I can't remember. I've only welded stick.
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I can weld flat stuff decently but I can't weld inside corners, every time I do I get bad welds, some sections are good but most have inclusions. With corners I mean stuff like fillet welds or welding two round pipes together, or welding round pipe to flat bar. I haven't found a detailed guide on this and I don't understand what I'm doing wrong, the pool seems ok
I use 6013
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>>1961559
Who saying that? The question to ask is what application you running.
FCAW is absolute shit for things like sheet metal, welding gaps, and open roots, all due to the high penetration delivered from FCAW. Sheet metal with FCAW can be done, you just have to either
>turn down wfs and volts and then run it faster
>changing wiresizes to less (i highly reccomend to never go less than .045 wire, i have always noticed that running the really small welding wires are generally really shitty compared to the good stuff made in .045+).
However the results are never great on sheet metal. If you're welding sheet metal, either get a good tig machine or a decent GMAW short arc (MIG) welder and make sure wire size can handle is .035+ (i perfer .045 and highly reccomend it)
Last thing that sucks about FCAW is spatter. If you have a project that gets fully painted, galvanized etc. avoid FCAW and swap over to either Pulsed Mig, Spray Mig (ONLY USE IF DUMMY THICC AND ALL WELDS ARE FLAT), or Metalcore. If your stuck with FCAW, no big deal, get some antispatter and spray on a small amount then weld and clean off all spatter (or use a grinder)
Now where fluxcore is going to dab on everything is on thick shit like buildings and as long as you are using 1/16 or less wire you can weld in all positions and get
>very good deposition rates
>very good penetration
>very cost effective using CO2 gas + the added benefit of extra penetration from CO2
Basically, if you have a project that has a bunch of thicc stuff that needs welding, swap over to FCAW. If you got a bunch of gaps that need to be bridged, plugging slots and holes, or are welding on thin metals. Swap over to GMAW
>>
If I can weld stick, can watching videos give me enough understanding to weld mig or is it completely different?
Any Aussies here that can recommend a good mig+tig welder and where to get it? I don't think bunnings even has a tig welder.
>>
>>1962331
the general skill of watching the molten puddle wet into the base metal is transferable to all types of welding. The puddle of MIG is only a little different because there's no slag.

You can definitely get a good idea from watching youtube videos. You'll also probably want to combine that with a lot of welding practice. Maybe run an entire small spool of wire to get comfortable before doing any serious projects. The slag from stick welding can help give prettier weld bead profiles especially on vertical up welding whereas gravity tends to have a bigger effect on mig welds.

-Structural heavy fab GMAW welder

The place I work at used to run 1/16" dual shield and then late last year switched to .045" ER-70s6 with really fancy pulse spray Lincoln machines. Now they're trying to switch to 1/16" metalcore because with the solid wire, we have to remove the mill scale or the weld toes fuse in terribly. All the mill scale grinding wastes a shitload of man hours
>>
>>1961558
how do i into welding? im looking at buying a stick welder that runs off 120 and just going from there. any recommendations?
eventually I'd like to get into fabrication for automotive purposes
i think tot or ave said to start with stick because tig and mig are way easier so youd only have to hike the learning curve once instead of twice for mig/tig then stick. i mean I'm sure they all have their own difficulties but stick takes you the farthest (as far as learning) right?
>>
>>1961559
FCAW is the outdoor welded seismic code standard in California. AWS des. E71T-8-H16 aka NR232 when you buy wire from Lincoln electric. Runs stupidly hot to guarantee fusion and prevent any inclusions. Super thick slag system to support the screaming hot puddle for 3G. You can punch a hole in the 1/4" backer bar of a AWS test in half a second if you don't know what you're doing.
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>>1961813
Why would you run CO2 with an FCAW machine? The flux is already in the wire.
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>>1962344
TIG is def harder than MIG or stick. More motions to coordinate. One hand with the tig torch, other hand with the filler wire, and one foot controlling the pedal. Stick is the simple carbon steel welding mainstay though. Good in all positions indoor or outdoor.

Getting started is pretty easy. Just get your welder and some 6013 electrodes and make some arcs and sparks. With basic 120 mains voltage you'll probably max your electrode size out at 3/32"
>>
>>1962353
Some wires are technically flux cored but still require shielding gas, typically CO2. These are commonly referred to as Dual-Shield.
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>>1962355
Also a good rule of thumb for suggested amps for stick welding is the decimal of the electrode thickness. 1/8" electrode is .125 inches so start at 125 amps. 3/32" is .093.
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>>1962344
Bigger is better as the little machines are severely limited. If you can manage a 240V machine (used transformer stick machines are often excellent and quite rugged) with appropriate adapter or plug to run off a stove or dryer outlet (if you must) and a long cord you'll be happier.
Stick is great for building shop equipment and if you get a decent DC machine you can run a scratch start TIG rig off that. We trained many pipe weldors that way using Idealarc 250s (large, heavy, possibly indestructible). I solve welder weight the way everyone else does, with a healthy cart. Scaffolding casters with large wheels are quite reasonable. If you don't have space then buy something smaller but if you do then industrial machines (download manual to ensure they'll run on single phase) can be great deals.
Welders are like machine tools in that users rapidly hit the limits of smol consumer units and get pissed off.
One overlooked and highly versatile option is oxy-acetylene and you'll want a torch anyway. Before TIG, OA performed all the welding that built classic WWII aircraft. No shore power required, it teaches puddle control wonderfully, and does everything TIG does. Jewelers use OA because it's better on thin/tiny work than TIG. Torches permit heating steel to bend it (highly useful to mechanics, I am one), heating stuck fasteners for easy removal, and cutting heavy stock with very little effort. Whatever you do, get a torch outfit. Used American brands are my preference as they're cheap to overhaul perpetually and rarely need it but a good new outfit is the Smith Toughcut. Throw the glasses in the trash and buy a Shade 5 Jackson face shield. Ours survived welding student use pretty well but we standardized on Victor because that's what they see in the field.
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I broke a small piece of the grey part on pic related. My guess is it's cast iron, but is there a way to be sure ? If so is there a way to tell what kind of cast iron it is ? And then what's the better way to weld it ? I understand cast iron is really hard to weld. Brazing ?
>>
>>1962353
I should've clarified that i run dual shield fluxcore. With dualshield fluxcore you have to have an externally supplied source of shielding gas to shield the weld pool. CO2 and 75ar-25CO2. Main difference being CO2 will be a bit more spattery and you need a bit more voltage to run correctly but you get a much hotter weld puddle and its cheap vs 75/25 which is far far more effecient and much less spattery. But you're not running with as hot of a weld puddle and its far more expensive.
Self shielded fluxcore is a whole different beast though and i see little point in self shielded unless you exclusively work outside and have A LOT to weld.
>>
Are those cheap chinese MIG inverter welders worth anything? They cost around 200 euro
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how the fuck do I git gud at welding tiny shit? I'm not a good welder and can barely lay a good bead on normal size stuff but I keep having to weld tiny shit for my job. the last one was this metal loop around 3/16 thick and 1/2 wide that had a screw through it. I thought the screw was just rusted stuck, but it was actually welded from the inside and not screwed at all. when I tried to unscrew it I just sheared it off below the weld penetration. I needed the it back where it was so my plan was to drill through the old weld and then stuff the screw back in the hole and weld it back up, but I couldn't do it right. I had everything clamped together and stuck my tungsten into the hole I drilled, but I couldn't get a puddle to form. the arc would either go into the hole and do nothing or jump outside and try to burn though the band.
>>
>>1963061
Sharp tip, clamp electrode to screw. Keep close to screw while starting?

Or maybe just braze it or loctite it in place
Unsure why a weld is necessary unless its keeping the band together too
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>>1963071
I didn't draw it but the screw was holding a second piece onto the band. I couldn't clamp the screw because it was inside the other piece.
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The storage thread got me thinking about organizers. I found this on google, the guy doesnt say what size angle and square he used.
Is this going to last long term, or does it need more bracing? What size material would you use?

I have a 110 flux core welder and havent really done much welding with it yet.
>>
>>1964342
if its welded with GOOD welds. its going to be able to hold up forever. get 10guage thickness though, that will help with a 110 FCAW welds better
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>>1962656
No, avoid them like the plague if you have anything to do with welding.
Used named brand > gook machine every time
I've changed like 10 welding companies and the ones with gook machines were always atrocious
>>
Sex
>>
I've had an AC stick welder for years but I just got a Hobart Handler 210MVP. 2018 model with cart, wire, spare parts, etc like new for $450. Other than a gas bottle anything I should pick up?

I was looking forward to replacing my stick welder entirely but now I'm reading welding cast iron is hard with a MIG. Gotten used to doing that with nickel rods on the stick.
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>>1964422
Daihen 350 inverters throw down some of the best Pulsed MIG i have ever used. Stuffs great
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>>1963061
Go fast. However fast you think you need to go? Go at least twice as fast as that. Use slightly more amps than you think you would, because your on/off time is going to be shorter as well. You're not looking to build up heat in the part, you want to put in as little heat outside the weld puddle as possible. The only way to do this is to use more initial heat to instantly melt the area you want to weld and then taper and turn the arc off before the heat soaks into the rest of the part.
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>>1961559
This is sad because she probably doesn't realize invisible portion of light still goes right through her eyelids
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>>1964869
Infrared does (though it's no longer focused to damaging intensity), but ultraviolet does not.
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>>1964863
how do I find the line between forming a puddle quickly and burning right through the part?
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>>1964912
Practice. Everything you do to thin parts just needs to be at a much faster rate than what you're used to. You need to modulate your arc with your pedal extremely quickly. You need to move extremely quickly. If you're concerned at not knowing "where" your quick puddle formation heat is at you need to do some tests and feel it out. I'm sorry I can't be more specific but welding 18g and thinner sheet metal or small intricate parts was my forte and like all welding it basically boils down to enough practice to build up an intuition that you can see/hear/feel out what you're doing.
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>spend lots of time welding 6013 and 7018
>start getting good, can start arcs smoothly in any position or situation
>welds look increasingly flawless

>buy a pack of 6010 out of curiosity since
>inverter welder is advertised as capable of using them
>hard as fuck
>can hardly start the arc, constantly sticking the rod
>arc is difficult to control
>welds look like shit, undercut everywhere
>arc strikes pockmark every test piece
>on top of all the difficulty, the smoke smells like burning dog shit

Is 6010 the final boss of welding? Why can't I get it right
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>>1965627
if you dont like the way 6010 smells you will never be good.
>>
How will I know when I should do full welds vs short welds bro?
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>>1965627
this is weird, 6010 rods are supposed to burn easy as fuck
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So ive been taking welding classes at community college and i've been doing great, but today for some reason everything was fucking up and it made me beyond frustrated

so i did some flux core with a miller mig/stick combo machine and it was fine. but i then i switched the wire to regular mig wire and everything went to hell. like i legit have no idea what the fuck was wrong. if i had the amperage too high, then no puddle would be formed, the wire would literally just burn a flame at the metal and make little metal pockmarks. if i tried to turn down the amperage, then there would be hardly a puddle formed, the weld would be cold as fuck. like i played around the settings over and over again and i have no idea what was wrong, because ive used this machine before with mig wire and it worked just fine. and its not like i was going extreme with the amperage, i was going around reasonable amounts and it just wouldnt weld. like thinking back i probably should have just turned it low then kept increasing it slowly while testing it out until it was good, but im still confused as to why all the sudden the machine just shat its pants and couldnt weld with mig wire.

and so i would take breaks with the mig machine, and practice my stick welding instead. and i can do stick pretty well. but the container for my rods had a hole accidentally burned into it from some slag, so the rods had been like, exposed to oxygen for a whole week, im worried if that fucked up the flux. they welded fine, but looking at the beads afterwards, there was a little bit of porosity. not a lot, but like just tiny little dimples. i used rods kept in the shop but for some reason when i was trying to practice vertical welding, they werent welding right. it was really frustrating and kinda ruined my day ngl. are my electrodes ruined or can i just like put em in the oven for awhile and put them in a sealed container? its practically a full container and it was like 45 bucks so i dont want them to be wasted
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>>1965896
Did you ask the instructor?
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>>1965915
ok so ironically, the instructor didnt show up cause he was resting from a surgery. so it was just like everyone show up and practice. he said there would be someone to watch us to make sure we arent just burning shit down but there was nobody like that
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Hey /wg/, I never welded in my life but I have a small project for a bathroom renovation that's going to need welding. What's the cheapest possible welding station I can buy that's not complete garbage? Nothing fancy just something that does the job.
And yes I'm aware I'll need other equipment too.
>>
>>1966518
You should ask someone with a welder and some experience to do it for you if it's just one project.

If you're interested in doing it yourself, just be sure that whatever you're welding doesn't need to look good or be strong because it's sure to be look like complete shit and have defects out the wazoo.
>>
>welding thread
>no sexy welds pics
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>>1966781
This.

>>1966518
If you're insistent on doing it yourself, you're going to need to figure out which method is best for the project. It's going to depend on what you're welding (is it load bearing, what material, are aesthetics critical), how much time you're willing to invest in learning, how much you're willing to spend on the equipment.

I started decades ago with AO welding and brazing. I always had a hard time with stick and MIG. Decided I wanted to learn TIG. TIG came to me much more easily than stick and mig. It all depends on the individual.
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>>1966796
Nothing sexy here, just some practice pieces I did with my new welder. Just learning how to weld stainless steel.

I'm waiting on an insulator for my CK17 so I can use my Fupa12 and stubbies without argon leaking.
>>
I am definitely not a pro, and don't "know what I am doing" when it comes to welding. For the last ten years I have been using a crappy 110v stick welder POS I got for $60. Over black friday I bought a harbor freight flux core wire welder I see shilled on blogs and youtube. Night and day difference. Now I want to see what welding with a proper gas shielded welder is like.
>>
>>1966781
>>1966811
Thanks anons. I think I want to go for a stick welder, they look the easiest for a beginner and least messy. The welds won't be visible so I don't really care about looks.
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How to git gud with TIG? I have a pretty good handle on stick and MIG, but I tried TIG for the first time the other day and it was disastrous. Handling the filler wire was sort of clunky because of the stiff gloves (should I invest in better ones specifically for TIG?) and I kept fucking up the electrode all the time

I wanna graduate to doing SS and aluminium someday but I think I should get an acceptable handle on steel first
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>>1966963
>Over black friday I bought a harbor freight flux core wire welder I see shilled on blogs and youtube. Night and day difference.

Which one, and what sort of welding did you get the good results on, like what wire and what gauge steel. I'm in the same position as you were and I can't go with a decent MIG so I might try flux core wire.
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>>1967022
practice just like everything else
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>>1966963
it's mostly the same as flux core just better visibility and no slag to fuck around with.
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>>1967049
honestly i'd go with a decent stick welder before flux core. to me there's just not much point buying a flux core machine. there's not enough benefits over stick aside from the learning curve. i'd suggest looking into Everlast. i have a couple of their welders and they've been pretty damn good for the money. they have a bad rep online but that's mostly because of Millers shills.
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>>1967083
>i'd go with a decent stick welder

I've had the Lincoln AC for several years, and I like it. I wish I'd known that DC was helpful to have, but rather than go with DC stick I'm looking at flux core because my impression is that it can handle lighter gauge steel better than stick, and some of my anticipated projects will involve welding sheet metal that will just blow through with stick, based on my attempts.
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>>1967022
Practice makes perfect (or better, at least). People tend to use different gloves for TIG welding, they're not so stiff. You should buy them.
There is also a tig pen, but I've never seen anyone use it, so I guess it's not that good.
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>>1966967
>Thanks anons. I think I want to go for a stick welder, they look the easiest for a beginner and least messy. The welds won't be visible so I don't really care about looks.

>Least messy

Only after years of experience. In the hands of a self taught novice it more often looks like a bomb went off. It's great to learn and for some stuff it's the more practical choice, but you're not working on farm equipment or a pipeline.

You still haven't answered what you are planning to weld. What material and what type of structure/item.
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>>1967120
yeah my stick is DC only but it really depends what you're doing. aluminum is better on AC but that's not something i'd stick weld anyway.

flux core does handle thin shit better but honestly i'd save up a bit and just get a MIG. even if you just start out using flux core wire you'd at least have the option to buy gas down the road and use solid wire.

you can get an Everlast 200amp for $499 or $650 for a bit better model. they are inverter based so pretty light to carry around and they tend to work better if you need to use it on 120v. downside to inverters is that often won't last a long as transformers but it's a decent trade off. to me it just doesn't make sense to spend money on a flux core machine when you could get a decent MIG for not much more especially when you'll probably end up with a MIG eventually anyway. i also wouldn't buy anything under 200amp
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>>1966967
MIG is literally just a metal hot glue gun, it doesn't get any easier. stick isn't that bad to learn but you defiantly won't pick it up as fast as MIG and you got to learn all the electrodes. chipping slag also kinda sucks.
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What are some cool welding projects I can do with my MP welder and plasma? I initially bought it to make go kart frames but have put that on hold for now so my equipment is just sitting there. I did plan to make a cool aluminum desk but that seems too basic. I discovered these car ramps today and would love to make them but since ive never welded anything structural or really anything other than basic hobby stuff so I am afraid that these will collapse on me.
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>>1967049
The green titamium easy flux welder. Opted because it was a DC inverter and everything I read said that was better. I just used the .030" wire that came with it. I haven't used it much since I got it last night and I just ran one bead to test it out. Looking forward to use it to make some garden tractor implements.

>>1967083
I would have opted for a proper stick welder but I dont have 220v in my garage and no practical way to wire it for 220v.
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>>1967466
find some food safe metal and make a giant barbecue smoker
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>>1961558
My TIG welding with filler is absolutely garbage and I can’t figure out why. I have the correct torch and filler angle, run at a mostly consistent speed, and I always see the machine to the right amperage. I’ll post some pictures of my welds tomorrow and if you guys could please tell me what I’m doing wrong that would be greatly appreciated
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>>1961558
i wanted to learn how to weld so i could make metal boxes for my hunting cameras. but it is too expensive and i would be a 110v noob.
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anyone have any good youtube videos for total beginners? I mean I have no knowledge of anything welding. I want to start welding stuff for my car project.
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>>1967627
What type of metal are you welding? How thick, what amperage, what thickness and type of filler? And what's the problem, burning, pitting, blow through, lumpy beads?
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>>1967673
There are some good YouTubers out there. You'll need to specify what type of welding first. The Fabrication Series is good for TIG. Weld.com's YouTube channel looks to tutorials for all the different processes. A lot of the channels focus on just one or two methods.
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>>1967678
mostly making stuff like bash bars and roll cages which I guess falls under fabrication. thanks ill check the fabrication series
>>
Is anyone from the UK here? Was wondering what the job markets like for welders as I'm looking to learn a trade.
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>>1967721
http://letmegooglethat.com/?q=is+welding+a+good+career+uk

http://letmegooglethat.com/?q=welding+jobs+uk

being independent is one of the skills you'll need to develop to make it in the trades mate
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>>1961558
Here’s my welds. I started out with fusion just to practice. 3/32” mild steel, 3/32 thoriated tungsten with a 12 degree angle, 120 amps, 5 seconds of post flow, and I press the pedal down about 4/5ths of the way
>>
>>1968094
Other side
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>>1968096
Top down view

1/2
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>>1968098
Other side

2/2
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And finally, my dog shit welds with 1/16” mild steel filler
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>>1961558
do some of the welds you have done keep you up at night lads?
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>>1967675
See >>1968094
>>1968096
>>1968098
>>1968101
>>1968103
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>>1968124
Looks like you're pausing your torch movement when you dab your filler. It all looks a bit cold and slow to me, this >>1968103 absolutely is cold. Up the amperage, increase your travel speed and try not to pause when dabbing or moving your torch hand. I recommend against wire brushing your practice pieces. It makes it hard to see the heat affected zone (HAZ) which is useful in judging your travel speed and amperage. I'm new to this as well but these are the same things I dealt with at the start.
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>>1968155
>Up the amperage, increase your travel speed and try not to pause when dabbing or moving your torch hand.
Do you recommend I press the pedal down all the way, or increase the amperage but keep the same amount of pressure on the pedal the same? And how wide should my puddle be?
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>>1968174
I generally set my amperage about 10 to 15A above what I expect I'll need. On .125" mild steel I'll set the max for about 135A. I haven't found that I need that extra very often. I've just started trying to weld aluminum and then there are times where I'll need to tap the pedal the rest of the way to break through some oxide but that may be in part because I'm not great with setting the AC balance. If your welder has an upslope feature either turn it off or set it real low. Get used to running without it first, it's great when you're starting right at the edge of a piece but learn to use the pedal for that first. As far as the pedal goes you'll get to the point where you really don't move your foot at all when welding mild steel. With stainless you'll pretty much slowly let off more and more as you go.

As for the size of the weld puddle, no clue if there's a decent rule of thumb. When I do a butt weld with mild steel I guess it's generally about one and a half to two times the width of the base metal. A butt joint I've found will have the smallest puddle and a fillet weld will be twice that. Lap joints and outside corners coming in in the middle. That varies based on pretty much every factor, type of metal, filler thickness, material thickness, amperage, travel speed, and supposedly the angle of the grind on the tungsten although I haven't noticed a difference with that. I just go by feel and I've gotten a lot better with it just by experimenting. Watch this video, it demonstrates amperage vs heat really well. youtu.be/IfJG4cMhIOc
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>>1968397
If you're practicing laying straight beads do it on two pieces. Lay a bead on one coupon, look it over for changes you might make and then grab the second cool piece for the next bead. Mild steel is more forgiving but laying multiple beads on a piece of metal that gets hotter and hotter with each pass changes how the exact same pass will turn out in consecutive passes. For the first pass, the metal is room temp, the second pass it's 300+ degrees... It's a big shift and may add some confusion with what you need to change. With aluminum and stainless steel it makes a huge difference. I would focus on penetration and watching the HAZ. The brown area on the piece of stainless in pic related (from the last post) is the edge of the heat affected zone. If I went slower it would quickly double in size.
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>>1968397
>>1968400
Thanks for the help man, I’ll try out the two coupon technique next time I’m in the shop. My fusion skills are acceptable to me but I just can’t get my filler skills down to save my life
>>
>>1968414
Sure thing. I started back in February with a cheap (s)Hitbox welder that I bought for less than $250. I hacked it to add post flow and a pedal but I just bought a Primeweld 225x and it's very different. Getting feeding filler will come with time. I'm still working on it. I've learned that it's best if I use filler that's just a little thinner than my base metal. Otherwise I have to wait for the pool to become large enough to melt it and then wait again for the puddle to warm back up. You look to be off to a good start though. I found that just laying beads on a coupon to be rather worthless. Welding actual joints of all sorts made the biggest difference for me. The only time I lay a bead outside of a joint is when I'm trying to figure out a rough amperage and feed rate for a new material or thickness than I'm used to.
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>>1968423
Do you know which joints require filler and which ones don’t? I’ve just been practicing lap joints with fusion but if running flats is useless like you said I might as well start progressing into filler joints
>>
Any advice for building a car trailer deck? Can I use 1/8" steel or 1/4" for framework?

I'm converting an old camper trailer to a car hauler. It has 8" C channel frame 68" wide. Trailer is 25 feet long the wood deck will be 96" wide. Most of the weight this trailer will ever see is from moving cars and pickup trucks (60" to 84" width) which will be right above, or near the C channel frame.

I already have 2x2x0.125 angle iron that I was thinking of using to build the frame for a wood deck. 16" on center. Do you think this is sufficient, or do I need to buy 0.25" angle iron?
>>
>>1968437
I meant that just running beads down the middle of a single piece isn't helpful practice. Lap joints are helpful but try some 1/8” stock with some 3/32" filler.

I generally stay away from fused welds. I haven't liked the results I've gotten. In general, my experience is that fused welds often either lack penetration or end up undercut. I've done some work with 16ga piecuts and I found the penetration was worse than if I use some .030" or .040" filler. Fused welds work ok on thin material as long the fit is absolutely perfect. If you can see light through a butt joint then dont try to fuse it, it's too likely that the base metal on both sides will bead and pull away from each other (see: gaping hole to fill). On lap joints it's alright but there I usually notice the metal on the backside cavitating/sucking back inward toward the weld on the other side, that may be me running too much amperage trying to make sure I have the needed penetration. On fillets or outside corners forget it.
>>
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>>1965627
Smells like breakfast you cretin
>>
>>1965884
Depends on who made the rod. I ran the toolroom at a welding school and we got quite a variety of donated filler plus what we paid for. Not all rods of the same number weld the same. It even varies within cheap brands like Washington Alloy.
Also depends on your welder OCV and who made that, too. Different machines can have very different arcs.
Good 6010 is less stillless pleasant to use than either 6013 or 7018. Our students were grateful to move to 7018 after we started them off on 6010.
>>
>>1965896
>its practically a full container and it was like 45 bucks so i dont want them to be wasted

ALWAYS mention the number of the rod. Since they're paid for I'd put them in the oven which certainly can't hurt and set to rod oven temp. Freshly baked rods weld much nicer (and warm out of a rod oven is best).
>>
>>1966518
Describe the project in detail. Details matter to process and machine (or torch, brazing is fun and you can undo mistakes much more easily by melting the braze).
>>
Any CWI dudes here? I saw someone ask the same question a few threads back, but at the time I was on a job site with an IP block so I couldn't respond.

>Class already paid for, but the session i signed up for cancelled because covid
>More classes happening, one is happening in my city in January
>Work has given me bullshit night shift work, and my grasp on time and, well, living is starting to slip, so I haven't really had any time to study the book
>Only 2 years spent in the field welding, and another 1.5 years going through school, but still feel woefully under prepared to take the test.
>However, from what I understand, veteran welders fail the test all the time, and I'm pretty good when it comes to scholarly stuff, so I'm hopeful.

It would certainly upgrade my standard of living. I'm not one to get nervous, but the 3k price tag and supposed ~35% passing rate is a bit unsettling
>>
>>1965896
Heavy fab structural welder here.

My guess is the polarity of the machine was set to DCEN (electrode negative) for the flux core because you want to put more heat into a cored wire. If you go to solid wire without switching the polarity to DCEP (electrode positive) to put the heat into the base metal, you'll get terrible fusion or awful wire burnback like you said you were getting.
>>
>>1968707
If it makes you feel any better, I know veteran welders who are absolutely dumb assholes.
Had a guy whose welded for 20 years. He was running pulse spray on our fancy lincoln machines and kept getting undercut. I had to tell him to turn down the heat to prevent the undercut and I've welded professionally for less than 2 years. Guy had to be trained like he'd never welded before.
>>
>>1968105
Nope, if she passes qc it's good enough for me.
>>
>>1968810
There are people with 20 years of experience, and then there are people with 1 year of experience 20 times
>>
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posting some of my welds. some pop cans welded together
>>
>>1969225
>>
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>>1969226
stainless sheet metal
>>
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>>1969228
and some alu
>>
>>1969225
>>1969226
>>1969228
>>1969229
Those welds are fucking mint, nice job
>>
>>1969225
what is the trick to welding very thin shit?
>>
>>1969269
see >>1964922
>>1964863

Welding thin is all about welding fast, imo. Unlike thicker steel (thick in this instance being 16g or thicker) where you slowly ramp up into your wet puddle and then do your thing at a comfortable pace, for sheet metal and stainless you have to have your amperage set to just hot enough to make the puddle you want almost immediately and then you start sprinting and placing down your bead. Speed is key. The alternative when you just cant make the speed is to place a heatsink behind where you're welding. Like copper or aluminum.
>>
>>1961589
dwell at the top, watch the puddle.
>>
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>>1962344
very happy with this little 120V DC stick / ~TIG welder I got off ebay for $175. The stick accessories are great - tweco 200A leads. Technically it can do lift-tig via a switch but there's no foot pedal so you always fuck the tungsten a little bit touching down. You can easily leave it in stick mode and scratch start TIG, feels similar to the higher OCV inverter TIG machines. Can do 3/32" stick no problem. Low range TIG resolution is pretty impressive as well.
>>
>>1969228
>>1969229
pulse?
>>
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>>1970092
Nope, my welds look worse when I use auto pulse. This is all straight arc and tapping wire in
>>
>>1970097
much respect,
nice dabs bro.
>>
Regarding >>1968461, is additive manufacturing possible just by welding?
>>
>>1970119
Technically yes but it is hilariously inefficient
>>
>>1970125
Do you mean by hand or even with a CNC table?
>>
>>1970190
In all regards. Theres a reason why metal sintering is how they do 3d metallic printing
>>
I live in a city apartment with no 220v plug. I want to make floor lamps out of brass and aluminum and such. Do I have a hope with a 120v welder?
>>
>>1970286
Brass you can solder or braze without a welder and still achieve a solid piece, a torch and filler is all you really need. Welding can be done with 110v but I suspect you may have problems with the power supply in an apartment, not to mention that using a welder or a torch in your apartment or patio will likely land you in real deep shit with the landlord. That's the level at which they probably skip the warnings and go straight to filing with the court for an eviction.
>>
>>1970190
>>1970119

3D printing only works because thermopolymers don't have a real melting point. They just slowly go from a solid to a liquid through a gradual decrease in hardness/viscosity. The fact that there are materials that have a forgiving temperature range in which they are highly viscous liquids is the reason 3D printing is possible in the first place.

Metals don't do that. They go from a solid to a watery liquid with a bunch of surface tension, more-or-less instantly. You can "print" things with a welder, as every hackjob garage welder (such as myself) knows, but this isn't useful beyond adding extremely basic features. Even then, any kind of good-looking finish or tolerance has to be of zero importance. What you get is an unshapely, uneven blob/wall of stress-laden metal. Anything you make this way that needs to look good or fit well requires machining afterward. At that point, casting is a more efficient means to a complete part.
>>
>>1970476

I should point out that you CAN make halfway decent parts this way, but they need relaxed expectations for surface finish and dimensional accuracy.

And, obviously, they can't be very small. At least, not without a specialized nozzle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au_zRPr1wr4
>>
>>1966817
Your the guy who posts a pic of your 9” cock and asks everyone if they think it’s too small.
>>
>>1970480
I feel like additive welding manufacturing is probably only worth it when it comes to massive parts where getting a piece of material large enough to machine down is cost prohibitive like fancy inconel type alloys. I'm a welder but a few years ago I used to work at a place that also machined gears and sprockets. They had an order for some 316L stainless gears and the raw round stock piece was about 36" long and 12" diameter. The head of the machine shop said it cost about $20,000. I could imagine inconel and hastelloy pieces that big or larger could be much more expensive.

Laser metal 3D printing/sintering probably has a massive advantage when it comes to microstructure and grain size though and those typically don't even need to be machined.
>>
>>1970286
A good inverter should have no problems. Mine can put out 150 amps for TIG from 120V-20A.
>>
>>1970286
if you end up going with tig or mig in your apartment, make sure you have some decent ventilation so your place doesn't fill with non breathable argon and carbon dioxide.
>>
>>1970523
There shouldn't be any carbon dioxide with TIG, and there is already more argon in the air in the apartment than would be used for welding. The concern with argon is filling up a confined space, and that's mostly an issue with purge setups. However, ventilation is still a good idea. TIG produces less fumes than other processes, but it's still a bad idea to breathe them.
>>
>>1970528
i only mentioned the CO2 if he was using 75/25 on a mig setup.
>>
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>>1970480
>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au_zRPr1wr4
Did that machine adjust the height based on the amount of resistance it encountered or was the vertical feed hard-coded?

>>1970512
>I feel like additive welding manufacturing is probably only worth it when it comes to massive parts where getting a piece of material large enough to machine down is cost prohibitive like fancy inconel type alloys.
Or combustion chambers with odd geometries.
>>
>>1970480
what about like this?
http://www.peacemakerspecialists.com/the-hammer/
>>
>>1962331
Buy Australian.
>>
ASSHOLES
how in the SHITTING FUCK
do I MIG WELD
UPSIDE DOWN
AAAAAAAAAAAÀAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
>>
Can somebody explain how to use a pole pig as a welder on a 230v single phase supply? I'm fed up of burning out welders and I hear stories that pole pigs never burn out. also what kva on the pole pig rating should i look for to weld 4mm sticks.
>>
What is the physics behind arc blow?
>>
>>1971670
magnets
>>
I'm a CWI. If you can afford it, do it. You can make some serious bread in the inspection world if you're self motivated. I went through Real Education for my class and test, and I can't recommend them enough if you're anywhere near the Gulf Coast. Be prepared to study your fucking ass off though. Their class is pretty intense. Like a couple of hours of homework every night after 8 hours of class every day, with probably 18 hours of homework to get through over the weekend. I came in well prepared, but I studied about an hour every day for a couple months before I took the test.
>>
>>1972111
was meant for
>>1968707
>>
Why do people recommend 309 for filler between stainless and carbon steels?
>>
>>1973032
From Esab:
In most cases when welding dissimilar metals or, more specifically, carbon to SS, we recommend you use a 309 filler metal because of its higher ferrite content. This higher ferrite content can minimize weld dilution and prevent weld cracking. The 309LSi has a low carbon content and a higher silicon content, hence the "LSi" in the designator. The lower carbon content is ideal for applications that have a risk of intergranular corrosion cracking. The higher silicon content serves as a deoxidizer and helps remove weld impurities and increase weld puddle fluidity.
Because you are welding carbon steel to SS, be some weld dilution from the sides of the joint will occur. The small amount of base material dilution in the weld metal will provide a better match to each of those respective base materials. You should not have difficulties welding on the ferritic side of the joint as stainless-to-stainless welding should fuse relatively well. If there are problems, check to ensure the welding machine is set up correctly with good work lead connections.
>>
OK weldanons, I want to learn to weld. Which type of welding is the easiest/best for a beginner, and what sort of equipment can I expect to purchase.

Additionally, I have terrible eyesight and in my previous attempts at welding have made finding my weld puddle challenging.
>>
>>1973086
What do you want to weld? A community college class will probably be money better spent, but you can definitely get a machine and teach yourself to weld if you really want to. But depending on what process you want to weld with, and what type of materials will be working with is what will determine what kind of machine you need.
>>
>>1973086
MIG. As for seeing you need a good helmet not some cheap $50 piece of shit. Lincoln 3350 or Miller digital elite.
>>
>>1973086
>Which type of welding is the easiest
MIG, at least with a decent machine. Cheapo ones can have stability issues.

>best for a beginner
Stick. Cheap machines can be decent, it builds skills applicable for other processes, and its versatility means that even if you go on to a nicer machine and other processes, that stick machine will still be there if you need to do something weird like welding cast iron.
>>
Im a manual, hands on old school machinist in a medium sized fab shop. I'm not a button monkey, I'm an actual machinist and have a reputation as one. How do I ask the welders to teach me? How do I ask HR? I want to get good at every type of metal fabrication and welding is next. So far i have been a CNC programmer, ran waterjets pressbrakes and 4axis cnc lasers surface grinders gear hobbers etc so I'm not just some random fucktard starting at absolute 0 knowledge
>>
>>1974474
I guess you can machine yourself a pair of balls and just ask someone to show you
>>
>>1970091
this is a discontinued $500 machine anon
i mean thanks I guess
>>
>>1970516
not that anon but i live in an apartment built in like the 50s or something and theres like only two outlets in my whole apartment that are grounded
what do
would those even support 20 amps? am i fucked without proper grounding?
>>
anyone have any suggestions on welding?
i want to start doing some welding work for my car, have done some welding at school and could weld plates together without them breaking.

welding work i want done is frame restoration, body panel restoration. fabbing/fixing exhausts.

seeing as getting a full stainless 3 inch line welded up would cost a thousand euros i thought id just get a welder and start doing some shit on my own, next to metal repairs my old cars desperately need
>>
The absolute cheapest way to get into welding it to do it with a bucket of salt water. Look up videos on "welding with water". You'll have to buy a few cables and you could use aluminum cans for electrodes.

You need to practice. There's no shortcut for practice. The books will tell you type rods to use and other essential stuff but you have to practice.
>>
>>1961813
I just welded an exhaust together with .035 flux and one of those shit tier hazard fraud MIGs. I had to set the amperage to min and WFS to 2. Even then I had to keep a fast puddle going or I would blow a hole through it. I closed the holes with lots of small tacks.
>>
Hey lads, I'm looking to start building working model steam locomotives.

One of the skills I'll need for this is silver solder/brazing with a torch. Now I know the theory of it, it's a lot of getting the work hot in the right place and capillary action. But what advice can you give me on learning this particular skill?

The soldering will be on a pressure vessel, so I want to do it right. I will of course be hydraulically testing the boilers before steaming them, but as I've not welded/brazed anything like this before, advice and warnings would be gratefully accepted. What tools/brands would be best for this, in your opinion, and which is the best way to learn?

Thank you.

(pic related, but not mine)
>>
>>1976156
>would those even support 20 amps?
Probably 15, but you should check the breaker. A good inverter can supply ~120A for TIG from a 120V-15A supply. That would be good for steel (it's hot enough to multi-pass thicker material), but it's low for anything but rather thin aluminum/copper alloys like the other anon wanted to do.

>am i fucked without proper grounding?
Maybe. The plugs are grounded, and a nice inverter of the sort I've been talking about will probably monitor the electrical supply for abnormalities. Mine automatically distinguishes between 15A and 20A circuits, and limits its output accordingly, though I've never tried it without a ground connection to see what it would do.
>>
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>>1976482
To answer your question, one would need to know the specs of the joint in order to give guidelines on the torch tip sizes. What plans are you using to build this engine? I am also curious as someone interested in building a steam engine myself.

Also, solder may not hold up in a high-pressure engine. A weld would be the strongest.
>>
I'm getting back into welding after many years of not doing it, mostly as a hobby but hope to make a little money at some point.
I'm looking at these two welders: Vulcan omni pro 220, or a hobart handler 190.
What do I buy?
I'm absolutely willing to buy a stick machine separate within the next year.
I mainly want mig and a spool gun.
Should I just buy the hobart, or get the Vulcan and pay extra for a spool gun?
I'm heavily leaning towards the hobart. I'm just hoping someone here has some insight on them. Their control settings are very strange imo.
>>
>>1977354
By that, I mean the hobart has kind of weird dial settings imo, not the Vulcan.
I'm hoping someone here can say which would be better
I'm actually leaning towards buying the hobart handler, then sometime next year buying the Vulcan stick only machine.
Their stick machine seems very solid.
>>
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How do I cut compound mitres with an abrassive saw on an angle iron?
>>
>>1977459
Just put an abrasive cutoff disk into a compound miter saw. You do have a miter saw right?
>>
>>1977475
Yeah. Aren't the RPM too fast for the disc? It's not a metal cutting disc, it's the cheap angle grinder kind.
>>
>>1977481
Yes they are. There are voltage regulators you can splice in line to adjust the RPM of a miter saw to sorta make it work, you won't have much torque but it will work. Look it up on youtube.
>>
>>1977106
I'll just be using the general method. It's more a proof of concept for something I'm experimenting with. The joints would be butt joints, I think the phrase is.

Silver solder is the method used by most engine manufacturers all the way up to large scale models. I'm sorry if this isn't very helpful, but right now I'm starting small and reasonably simple, using a freelance approach to the design. I believe some of the strength of the joints comes from having stays in the boiler, particularly in the firebox, on the water jacket and crownplate. I will be adding either 1 or 2 flues to the boiler, as I'd rather have an internally fired boiler.
>>
>>1965677
Do short welds when you think the piece might warp a lot. Like if you're welding some square tubing on a plate, a full weld might result in the plate becoming a bowl.
>>
>>1977106
Don't underestimate solder anon. Soldering isn't just melting some globs on the material and calling it a day, it can creep deep into the joints in a way that welds can't and the pressure needed to burst through that is just absurd.
>>
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>>1961558
I've got to do some stick welding on a container. A buddy of mine has a stick welder and some angle iron. He wants me to build him some shelves. Not a problem but I haven't done any stick welding in 10 years (I am an officefag nowadays and tig for fun/side jobs). I have some 7018 electrodes but I'm wondering if I'd be better off with something else. 6011/6013? What thickness would you recommend for this?
>>
>>1981313
How's your sheet metal work?
>>
>>1981368
F-fine? Why do you ask? This is a shipping container and 3/16ths angle
>>
>>1981436
If 7018 is what you got it'll definetely work for every joint you'll face but it might be a bit overkill. I'd say 1/8 is definetely the largest rod I'd try to weld on that. Don't make the mistake in assuming smaller rod will be easier to handle because you'll be welding on a lower amp setting, since you'd adding more material to the weld the weld and the rod burns off more slowly, it can actually become far easier to handle a bigger rod.
>>
>>1981436
The side panels are sheet metal. Kind of a bitch to weld anything to them with stick.
>>
just bought a 225 amp arc / stick welder from harbor freight for $80 (open box)

looks like im going to be learning how to weld frens!

I need to now make a cord, plan on using #6 THHN, SO cord with 50amp dryer plugs should be sufficient

also, that face shield that comes with the welder should be good enough for a beginner, no?

any good plans out there too for a diy fume extractor btw?
>>
>>1981728
Cheapest fume removal when doign stick is basically just placing a fan so it blow the fumes away. Stick is extremely wind resistant unlike TIG or MIG.
>>
>>1968105
No. Some of the welds I'm doing now would have drove younger me up the wall. But I learned not to care so much, because I'm welding with shitty damp electrodes, use shitty welder and weld on the dirty painted surfaces, where I can barely strike the arc sometimes.
Still, I long to quit this job sometime in the future and work in the place where I can be proud of my job. I just need more experience.
>>
>>1969226
>>1969228
>>1969229
Good stuff, mate.
>>
>>1973086
MIG/MAG is easier for beginners, but you should probably go for stick welding. It will be cheaper and more versatile.
If you have bad eyesight, get yourself a good helm. You can go for Lincoln, Miller, Speedglas and Optrel, depending on how much money you want to spend. Alternatively, you can use a simple helm with a mineral lenses, like gold coated Aulektro, the clarity is really damn good on them. You'll probably need cheater lenses as well. But if you'll go with ADF, then you should probably use green filters, since blue light is bad for eyesight. https://www.uvex-safety.com/blog/the-hazards-associated-with-blue-light-and-how-safety-spectacles-can-help/
>>
>>1981718
>>1981714
I do have a 90 amp flux core mig available but I figured that would be about as good as using caulk. Would it work for this?
>>
>>1962359
I’ve never heard that, going to have to remember that.
>>
>>1965627
I agree starting an arc with a fresh rod is harder for me too with 6010/6011 but you need to get good with that rod to weld through dirty or painted steel
>>
>>1981952
>but you need to get good with that rod to weld through dirty or painted steel

Why can't you just use a wire wheel to get rid of the paint or dirt?
>>
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Built a sled deck over the past week. Came out nice.
>>
>>1981952
Just get rid of the shit and it'll be easier to weld, have better strength and require less cleanup. I don't get the people who insist on welding painted or rusted metal, yeah sure YOU CAN but you can also park your car in and leave it unlocked and it'll probably be there when you come back.
>>
>>1982310
Don't leave your welding gear in an unlocked vehicle retard.
>>
>>1982316
Yeah that's kind of my point you fucking dumbass. You CAN leave your car unlocked, but its a stupid thing to do. Likewise you could have learned to read.
>>
>>1981903
>MIG/MAG is easier for beginners, but you should probably go for stick welding. It will be cheaper and more versatile.
>If you have bad eyesight, get yourself a good helm. You can go for Lincoln, Miller, Speedglas and Optrel, depending on how much money you want to spend. Alternatively, you can use a simple helm with a mineral lenses, like gold coated Aulektro, the clarity is really damn good on them. You'll probably need cheater lenses as well. But if you'll go with ADF, then you should probably use green filters, since blue light is bad for eyesight. https://www.uvex-safety.com/blog/the-hazards-associated-with-blue-light-and-how-safety-spectacles-can-help/

Would this helmet suffice for the price of $149?

https://www.harborfreight.com/welding/safety/arcsafe-auto-darkening-welding-helmet-63749.html

Or will I be just fine with this one for $50?

https://www.harborfreight.com/welding/safety/adjustable-shade-auto-darkening-welding-helmet-46092.html

t.near sighted anon
>>
>>1982333
I'm going to order one of these. With 4 sensors and a true color display it should do well with low amperage stuff. My current hood only has 2 sensors and when I'm running 40A or less while tig welding thin stainless it flickers in and off sometimes.
>>
>>1983323
First could be tecmen, based on fast arc detection and headgear. But tecmen tends to have more certification signs on ADF, stuff like COLTS and Din Certco.
Not sure about the other one.
You can also go for cheaper Lincoln or Miller.
>>1983323
Seems like a fine helmet, probably made by tecmen, just like Sentinel, but can't find it's tig rating. it doesn't look like a tig optimized helmet, since they tend to have more shade options, but for 40 amps it should be enough, most likely.
Also, number of sensors is irrelevant to low amp arc detection. What matters is tig rating. But having 4 of them is good, if your sensors can be obstructed during welding.
>>
Can you learn STICK welding on your own?
I have no way to get a mentor or anything, just a few youtube videos and online guides.
What's the basic set up for STICK welding my dudes?
>>
Why don't people stick weld after high school?
>>
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First ever TIG welds, what do you think /wg/?

> thought I had 220 when I bought practice material
>only have 110V
>steel too thick
>filler too thick

Just got thinner material, can't wait to try it.
>>
>>1983612
Whoops, first part meant for>>1982333
>>
>>1983930
The blueing means you don't have enough shielding gas. A perfect amount of gas should result in just a thin gray-ish discoloration line. Acceptable is light-straw color. Not that it really matters when practicing, but it's always good habit to practice perfect.

The bead in the middle (3d from right and/or left) looks promising!
>>
>>1983672
You can, but an instructor will (hopefully) give good pointers and advice when looking at your beads, which of course, you can't give yourself.
weldingtipsandtricks on youtube is great!

Basic set up;
Welder, angle grinder, sticks and plates.
I usually start with 90amps for 2.5mm rod, the rod lights up nicely and doesn't go out when too close.
Lower amperage (70<) will be difficult to light up, and goes out easily, but you will have to learn to work with lower amps when welding thin material and butt welds.

Go slow. Your pool should be almost round when moving your rod. If it starts to go beyond oval -shape or even gets a tail, you're moving too fast.
If your arc sparks a lot, your stick is too far away.
>>
>>1983987
based. Thanks my dude. I was going to get into some classes here but the rona fucked me up and now they are offering them "virtual" yeah fuck that, no way getting to learn welding virtually has any use.
>>
>>1967554
>food safe metal
He means tig welded 304 or 316 stainless. Never use aluminum
>>
>>1983980
Thanks for the tip! I'll up the gas.
>>
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Anyone own a Titanium 170 mig welder?

Yeah i know Harbor Freight...I've been scouring the local used market for a Miller for the past few months and haven't been finding much worth a damn. Can't keep looking forever, and spending $1k+ for my first welder seems like not the best idea.

I figure a $500 unit for learning on you can't really go wrong

https://www.harborfreight.com/welding/welders/mig-170-professional-welder-with-120240-volt-input-64805.html
>>
>>1984482
>Yeah i know Harbor Freight
This isnt 2007 anymore, all the old timers who claimed inverter welders suck and all import welders suck have long since died from lung cancer and melanoma.

Itll be fine as long as you use understand their actual capabilities, and dont try to go over.
If you run it at 120v you arent welding over 1/8 stock for instance.
Even full bore at 220, you arent welding over 3/8.
>>
>>1984482
Also I guess I should just say I have the Titanium Flux only 120 welder and it lays a pretty smooth bead (as smooth as you are gonna get with Fluxcore) and it surprised me with how well it worked for the price.
I mostly stick weld and needed to do some 20AWG work
>>
>>1961558
Why not just use bolts?
>>
>>1984549
Who says I dont weld bolts too?
>>
>>1970937
pretty much the same way you do it flat
>>
>>1984336
What gas do you use? Argon, for example, is heavier than air, and therefore sinks, and helium is lighter and rises. Knowing how your gas behaves is important when welding vertically to ensure proper shielding.
>>
>>1984510
>If you run it at 120v you arent welding over 1/8 stock for instance.
>Even full bore at 220, you arent welding over 3/8.
Good info. Only things i plan on welding are a basic squat rack, driveway gate, diy welding cart, etc

I don't know which guage metals would be ideal for these type projects
>>
oh shit a welding general. I've been a welder / fitter for seven years up and down the west coast. mostly shipyards but I find myself in fab shops and with general contractors from time to time. idk what there is to discuss here, but I can answer questions about welding or techniques for fitting metal together or taking metal apart
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>>1983672
Of course, most welding is you learning on your own. All you really need is a list of the standard welding joints, most of the weld defects with visual example and maybe a few pieces of advice from the internet. Then just learn the basic filet welds on 5/32nd as a start. Pick up an arc welder with about 150-200 amps, less will limit your rod size and more is overkill.
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>>1983813
The other methods either have higher rate of welding or involve less prep and cleanup, these things are however good education tools for a new welder. YOu need to learn how to do clean restarts, how to move when welding, how to position your arms, how to stand with your feet, how to not have you face in the smoke, how to clean up the work place after your done, how to treat your welding materials, how to get off shit from your welds so you can do another pass and so on.

Its not a joke that learning how to weld on MIG is doing yourself a major disservice.
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>>1961559
>>1962349
>>1961813
How come you can continue to weld with 6010 without cleaning slag, but they say you can't do it with fcaw?
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>>1961558
What can i make and sell that will make a lot of money?
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>>1986609
Fetish dungeon stuff.
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>>1986677
How bad is the competition?
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>>1986684
No clue. It's been brought up before though and it seems to fetch a high price. I expect it's a very limited market though and people often just get the stuff made out of painted 2x4s from Etsy.
>>
someone please design and give me a rough blueprint for a squat/benchpess rack and I will build it.
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>>1986803
If you can't even get an idea for one, you won't build it.
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>>1986810
I can and I will. Just thought I’d ask.
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>>1986824
Don't even ask, just do it!
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What do we think lads. In hindsight I would have just welded the two sides as they ate and had the crossmember bolted, way too much hassle drilling all the holes for what’s gonna be taken apart like 3 times ever.
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>>1985778
Is life good? People keep telling me every welder hates life and wishes they did something else.
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>>1989090
Depends on the weldor, but it's not a job for old men. Every mechanic, gearhead, machinist and millwright should know how to produce a decent weld though because versatility.
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>>1985778
Just made a flat bar bending jig. What's something I can make that sells or something interesting for myself?
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>>1989090
Being a welder often means you're the guy working on a project where each second pays. Long hours and weekend work pays well and on some projects there's always more to do. Its easy to get overworked and also work away from home for extended periods of time.
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>>1965627
If you're on a inverter machine it may not have enough Open-circuit Voltage. I know some inverter types have a special setting or different DINSE connector for 6010 but if you're doesn't you may be out of luck. I think common OCV for 6010 is 80V and every other rod is 60ish Volts.
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>>1968810
The old guys love running hot as fuck because they can't see the fucking arc. Then they get mad when you tell them to run a colder pisser on their horizontal weld because the undercut won't pass QC
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I'm a woodworker and I just realised that I'm able to make cheap long clamps for panels since I can stick weld now.
Anyone have a good design that is batchable for a nooby? I think 4 will be enough for a while.
>>
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In an end of the world, no other options scenario, what's to stop you from using a plasma or carbon arc cutter on it?
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>>1993387
Specs: >>1992969
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>>1962422
>One overlooked and highly versatile option is oxy-acetylene
How much does an oxyfuel rig cost?
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>>1992465
can you post an example of th thing you're trying to make. "Long clamp" can mean a lot of things.
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>>1993387
Not a lot but you'll most likely destroy whatever is inside the safe before you can get it out. Only exception is things like gold, silver, etc.
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>>1993454
Its like 400 dollars for a set with small tanks. Compared to any other cutting or welding method its by far the cheapest rig. Only problem is that its not very good at anything other than steel, even stainless is of the table.
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>>1993981
Something like this seems to be the best design for panels. Is there a better one that requires welding? A lot of videos try to avoid welding for clamps like these since they are meant to be used by woodworkers. Since I can weld I assumed that would open more options for me when it comes to panel clamps.
>>
>>1994165
What exactly would "better" mean here? Are you looking to make it stronger or lighter? Maybe longer? Fewer parts? Cheaper? I mean it sounds more like you're looking to solve a problem you're anticipating rather than actually solve a problem you're having.
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>>1994315
Pretty much the second thing. I don't want to make a few of these only to find out I could have made something better.
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>>1994316
The problem is that you're prototyping and that means you'll make a tool, use it maybe once and then put it away. Ideally you'll want to try to think about the design you've made and improve on it whenever you run into a problem. Since its a prototype you can feel fine drilling holes, welding bits and bobs on it and abuse it in other ways.
>>
Can I get a recommendation on a good first arc welder? (just stick, none of that mig/tig shit)

It’s for my bro, he does maintenance and has been wanting to get into welding. I think he’d like to build a trailer eventually so hopefully something that’ll work for that kind of application.
>>
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I fabricated a few basic 5'x10' work tables (2" square steel tubing with mdf top) for my workplace (family business). The first part (seperate top and leg sections) welded up as planned, acceptably square & straight with minimal distortion. My original plan was to use gusset plates to bolt the top and leg sections together; my know-it-all boomer boss decided that was wrong and insisted I should instead weld them on. I argued against it mainly on the grounds of probable distortion occurring; he insisted heat/welding cannot bend steel (or at least the steel we were using?), so I lost the argument, said fuck it and did it "his way". Of course, it ended up distorted and now the ends of the table "sag"-down like pic related with something like a 0.5-1.5° angle. Not a huge deal but it irritates the fuck out of me and the gap between the top and frame at either end fucks with what I wanted to use them for. Anyway, at this point i figure i can get a "straight" top by drilling and tapping (or threaded insert) bunch of holes in the periphery of the tubing to use bolts to "level" it out, or use heat to try and reverse the distortion. Which option is more difficult?
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>>1994460
I'd say that almost any machine with a stick feature is good enough as long as you're just going for DC.
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>>1970937
drag instead of pushing
also it might seem counterproductive but higher amperage/wfs is your friend when doing overhead
>>
>>1996285
This anon knows what's good. Also, just for anyone else who might be having problems with their welding, post images of the welds. Typically its much easier to tell what you're doing wrong if you can see your shitty welds.
>>
is soldering sheet metal together worth it or not
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>>1996890
Depends entirely on what you're making and what joints you're going to solder. I think its an underrated method for a lot of hobby protect, same with brazing.
>>
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Reposting from /ohm/.

Noob here. Got a vacuum motor wired up and it runs. I got a dimmer from the vacuum too and it also works. Now I want to make use of them.
Trying to save my lungs from welding fumes. How difficult(dangerous?) would it be to make something like pic related? I already have the tube and and I can make the housing out of plywood, mdf, or aluminium sheet. I can buy a scuba mask. The biggest difference is I'll have the motor outside so I won't need to carry it or use a filter. I'm using this video as reference.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmNIEDDCqSk
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>>1997857
you taking stupid pills son?
>>
>>1997857
Skip the scuba mask. Just need filtered air to blow through the helmet.
Easy alternative is a floor fan blowing from behind you.
>>
>>1997857
And you're planning on converting your suba mask into a welding mask how exactly?

Either way, its not a good setup. Sure you'll have a respirator that pumps fresh air to your face and the pressure inside the mask will push away any fumes, but the mask will be tethered to the wall. Just walking across the room to get a tool will mean the hose can catch something. Even something as simply as knocking over a chair gets old extremely fast and having to worry about this kind of thing. Meanwhile all the fumes will still be in your shop and as soon as you take off the mask you'll breathe that stuff in.

It'd be a much better idea to use your vacuum pump and hose as a fume extractor instead. Just build an arm that holds the hose in place with some adjustable hinges on it and you can work without having to breathe fumes.
>>
>>1997924
I tried that but I move around and got sick of adjusting the fan.

>>1998103
I saw another vid where the guy combines the masks so they operate together. The hose will be off the floor with hooks, similar to power cables in factories. The fumes in the shop will be an issue, you're right about that. I guess I could just keep the mask on. I have a second vacuum motor so I could do both.
>>
>>1998319
Feel free to post your set up once you've made some progress. It sounds interesting even if I have my doubts.
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>>1998381
I can't progress on the papr until someone explains the dangers and which housing is safest. No one in the electronics general has answered me yet.
The extractor is a lot more straight forward.
>>
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>>1998416
The real danger is having fumes building up in your shop. You need to work on the ventilation in whatever space you are planning on using as a workshop before you start fucking around trying to make a homemade supplied air system. After you have ventilation to the point where you don't have a continuous buildup of fumes, look into making some type of fume extractor like pic related. If you have all that going on, and it's still not enough for you, just pay the money and buy an actual PAPR. Shit, even a 3M 1/2 mask with a P100 will protect you more than anything you'll be able to DIY, and it's already certified for that purpose. Don't play games with your fucking safety.
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>>1998640
b-b-buy my product..it's for your safety.
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>>1999308
Feel free to ask your doctor about the long term health problems associated with welding fumes.
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>>1999498
That's why making an extractor and using a mask is a good idea, don't need your $4k product outside of factory use.
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>>1999501
> look into making some type of fume extractor like pic related. I
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>>1962331
migwelding.uk probably covers Aussie equipment. What brands do you have there?
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>>1964576
My machinistbros love Crown Alloys wire for cast. Uses argon for shielding gas. I don't have any busted cast to try some on yet but it's been out for quite a while:

https://www.mig-welding.co.uk/forum/threads/9n-ford-tractor-exhaust-manifold-mig-welded.33931/
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>>1991697
Correct.
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>>1993387
I'd rather use my torches and a garden hose to protect any cash contents but I could gouge and cut with plasma until I got a hole then hose intermittently.
If I'm after metal then either would work (slower).
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>>1993998
OA will most certainly do stainless (and aluminum).
All the aircraft welding except a very little TIG ("Heliarc") during WWII was OA welded. It's great for sheet metal and small work which is why jewelers use it. Besides gas welding you can cut, solder, braze, torch bend and heat.

I collect and overhaul my own torches, regulators and other gear. They're inexpensive and insanely handy. Each brand has advantages but for widest range of equipment Victor is hard to beat, for US made quality Smith is top notch, Harris is common and tips are cheap, and Purox/Oxweld/Linde etc vintage torches probably have the best feel and ergonomics but it's close. All work well and I prefer older torches since they're basically immortal and can be overhauled via the local welding supply or online.
>>
I've got a chipped hammer head and a tig welder. Can I fix it? What filler rod or electrode (in case of stick welding) should I use. Preferably stick
I don't know if hammer heads are made of soft it hard steel.
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>>2000465
More pics

Don't think I misused the hammer... My third wolder slaves did that.
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>>2000467
More pics
I mean I did play em but like 10$ for 18 hours
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>>2000465

Throw that shit away and buy a new one, it'll be cheaper and safer.
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>>2000472
Ok..I too thought so.
Or maybe can I grind it into shape?
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>>1961558
Why does DIY fear the structural steel welding?
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>>2000512
They don't trust their own welds beyond a certain point.
>>
I know basically nothing about welding but I want to build my own roll cage/custom suspension for an off-road vehicle.
I am willing to dedicate years to this goal, is enrolling in a community college course for welding a good place to start?
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>>2000519
So you are all a bunch of pussies.
Farmers have been welding more unsafe shit that making a two store home.
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>>2001009
Yes.
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>>1993387
Because I'd just go in the side w a 7" angle grinder
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>>2001178
Is there another way? Turns out they only offer classes during work hours.
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>>2002383
If you're in the US check if there is an ABC (associated builders and contractors) https://www.abc.org/ near you. I went to welding school through them and it was 6pm-9pm 2 nights a week, and it was cheap, like $200 a semester when I went in 2017.
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>>1961558
Anyone have experience with robotic welding? My shop mass produces one simple thing, and the welding is really simple. Wondering if a robot could help me get a few guys off the welding line and doing more fit ups.
>>
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Would it be possible to weld a metal tube to my music stand's adjustable tube?

Tl;DR bought a music stand, it's a bit short, I need my music at an eye level - I'm 180 cm.
For now I put paving slabs under it (pls no laughing)

But I was wondering if it would be possible to buy a metal tube with the same diameter then just weld those two together? Then paint it black.
Where do they even sell these?
Is it doable for a person who never welded before? We still have my dad's welding equipment in our garage, so that's not an issue.

Or should I just keep using the....slabs.
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>>2001009
What i'm saying applies to my area, but i see no reason why you would not find anything similar around you. Look up trade schools or courses, those often happen in the evenings and weekends (a lot of their students have regular jobs), going through a welding course in one of those will give you sound basis and an idea what you need to learn next. Mind that in making a rollcage one of the most popular methods is TIG (high strength steel is technologically demanding, especially with heat control), and tig courses may not be cheap. Don't do the dumb thing and try to mig up a cage from mild construction steel, that shit is probably more dangerous than having no cage.
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>>2004099
Not sure how the back is assembled but for 90% it would be easier to just replace the top tube with a longet one. That's most likely a thin walled tube, tricky to weld up right, impossible to do if you have no experience really.
>>
>>2004095
Sounds like the ideal job to be automated. The advantage of a robot is that one guy can operate two of them at the same time and also doesn't need to be particularly skilled to do so. I'd contacting a company like Motoman directly and see what their thoughts are.





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