[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vm / vmg / vr / vrpg / vst / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Search] [Mobile] [Home]
Board
Settings Mobile Home
/diy/ - Do It Yourself

[Advertise on 4chan]


Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.


[Advertise on 4chan]


File: P1030198.jpg (2.42 MB, 4592x3448)
2.42 MB
2.42 MB JPG
Last thread died.

Wood working general

books
http://libgen.lc/ads.php?md5=9C8C3CC247FEA6A4BD9AE8B5595671BA
https://libgen.lc/ads.php?md5=7F00B42DDE54162D621EF61878CCD68E
http://libgen.lc/ads.php?md5=8D50056DB2FF1C4B5A4FFE7E2238F63C
>>
Imma ask about mitre saws here.

I think i want to gwt an aeg saw since they have good warranty and are cheap, can someone tell me the difference between these two apart from the included stand?

https://www.aegpowertools.com.au/products/details/1800w-254mm-dual-bevel-slide-compound-mitre-saw-ps254db
https://www.aegpowertools.com.au/products/details/2000w-254mm-mitre-saw-and-mobile-stand-combo-ps254sb-mcombo

In short im trying to find a sliding compound mitre for around $600 dollarydoos. The makita ones seem to get really bad reviews and im at a loss for comparing tools, there seems to be no actual comparisons between all brands and models unlike with most other products
>>
Apart from a square, what kind of marking tool do you guys often use?
>>
>>1952559
A pen
>>
>>1952549
Strange that they are priced the same, 2000w has more aluminum bits and a stand. Regardless It all comes down to fingering it. It all comes down to the best positive/accurate detents in miter adjustment and zero play in the sliding mechanism. I sold off both my bosch and dewalt because of that.
>>
>>1952579
Weird, i thought dewalt was the 100% emoji when it came to mitre saws.
I had a play around with the 1800w one and was impressed with the way it feels, but the 2000w seems to be new and wasnt on display
>>
I want to make decorative wood bases for my scale models, would basically be a square or rectangle with a decorative edge like a small lip at the top then a curve and then straight to the bottom. Pretty sure decorative edges have a name but can’t remember, cornice?
Is it viable at all to do this without a workshop?
All I have is drills and some portable wood cutting spinning disk thing which I’d probs be too afraid of using as well as a larger one which I def don’t want to use.
>>
>>1952586
Something like this?

Very easy with a small handheld router and the right bit.
>>
>>1952587
Yeah exactly that.
That sucks though, definitely do not have that tool but at least I know its name, thanks anon.
>>
>>1952586

>All I have is drills and some portable wood cutting spinning disk thing

Please stay very far away for any power tools.
>>
>>1952588
You could probs get away with a dremel
>>
I've been think about my my own door jamb, could I make this with an handheld router?
>>
>>1952559
steel ruler
trying to do more with the circle
>>
File: temp.jpg (2.18 MB, 3751x2007)
2.18 MB
2.18 MB JPG
>>1952446
I asked over an /EMT/, but I kinda doubt they'll know.
I'm making this for my father in law (I don't watch football, and I don't really give a shit about the Ravens). But anyways I ran this on my mill as a test, with some old pine (I assume) wood from a cabinet door, and it came out decent, but feathery.
I want to make it out of a nicer wood anyway, but I'm not sure what would machine nicely. Any suggestions?
>>
>>1952588
you could get some premilled molding or trim stock and use it for borders
>>
>>1953572
Yes you can step up hardness for a finer resolution but it won't solve the underlying issue. Wood fibers vary in Direction, thickness and they just sometimes want to split - which is hard for a machine to account for. With MDF its not a problem but it looks cheap (epoxy, seal and paint). If I were doing this I would go over it with a carving knife and gouges to clean up the marks but then again I am insane.
>>
Are the dangers of pallet wood real? Ive got so many pallets and no idea what to do with them. I was thinking of making a potato grower and lining it with heshin or something.
>>
>>1952446
The links for the books aren't working can someone tell me the titles of the books?
>>
File: 893453456795685.jpg (2.22 MB, 2440x1498)
2.22 MB
2.22 MB JPG
>>1954183
>Understanding Wood Finishing: How to Select and Apply the Right Finish. Bob Flexner.
>Japanese Woodworking Tools: Their Tradition, Spirit and Use. Toshio Odate
>The Anarchist's Tool Chest. Christopher Schwarz (anything published by 'lost art press' is an heirloom book)
3 traditionalist woodworkers/authors that have spent decades working out frustrations and write about their solutions.
others: Eric Sloane books, more of a coffee table book that is a historical record with lots of pictures.
>>
>>1952446
Just started thinking about all this. I need to make some book shelves and re-doing my mantle. Is their a common set of tools to consider, besides a miter saw and the like. Just found out about coping saws, wish I eould have know about them for doing base boards...
>>
>>1953742
>If I were doing this I would go over it with a carving knife and gouges to clean up the marks
I was going to try and clean it up a bit with an exacto knife and fine grit sandpaper.
>>
>>1954183
Yes they are, click the "GET" on the top
>>
I'm looking to make my own stains but online resources only have a handful of recipes:
> Tobacco, water and ammonia
> Black walnut hulls and water
> Vinegar and 0000 steel wool (optionally also tea for tannins)
> Brewed coffee

Are these sufficient or could anyone recommend other resources?
>>
>>1954295
hey anon did you mod that blockplane or is that stock?
wooden wedge instead of screw seems like a nice idea for making them actual usable
>>
Im gonna build a planter out of pallet wood. No idea where im going to put it, but im going to do it regardless
>>
File: chooopsticks.jpg (507 KB, 1643x923)
507 KB
507 KB JPG
>>1954910
Stanley 103 block, very small iron at 1" 1/8 wide. Its a pencil sharpener mostly. The wedge was a mod from the previous owner. Honestly I had to look it up, looks like they came with a screw adjustment.

Chopsticks unrelated but recent project.
>>
>>1955283
i might steal this idea for my 130 as those screw adjuster are garbage
>>
Do some of you anons have experience with animal glue?
specifically mold prevention.
I read one could spike the mix with vodka and store it in a closed container without it going bad, but never seen it mentioned somewhere else
>>
i cut a large plywood sheet to the wrong size, whats the best way to take off 5mm off one side?
>>
Any diy methods of darkening wood with natural ingredients? I read about vinegar and tea or coffee but the results look grey and I want something brown. I have carved a set of chess figures and need to make one half of them dark, preferably brown and don't like the look of most of the finishs I have seen yet. There has to be something that preserves the natural look and feel of the wood while still making it darker, right? Using linseed oil on the white pieces btw and it is basswood
>>
>>1957304
char them a bit with a heat gun
obviously test on a piece of scrap first
>>
I’m working on a bunch of bottle openers to pair with a homebrew I’m making for Christmas. I haven’t messed around with my lathe too much, but I’m having fun with it.
My biggest problem, I’m realizing, is that I have no idea how to finish the handles so that they have a smooth, professional finish. Does anyone have any suggestions as to where to start?
>>
>>1952446
So I've never really used a table saw before, but I did the other day. It seemed straightforward enough. I was cutting an 8-inch long piece of wood about 2 inches wide off of a bigger piece of plywood. I set the blade to higher than the thickness of the wood, aligned the fence. And turned the machine on. I used a scrap piece of wood to push the wood through the spinning blade. I used my left hand to steady the wood as it went through. Near the end of the cutting, the saw suddenly threw the piece I was cutting across the shop! Scared the fuck out of me and now I don't want to use it again.
What did I do wrong?
>>
>>1958208
you didn't do anything wrong. kick-back depends on several variables, density of wood, knots, sharpness of blade, alignment of fence to blade, etc. best plan is prepare for kick-back and know where your hands and body are going to be when it happens, diy on anon.
>>
File: 343246723452352.jpg (108 KB, 1081x921)
108 KB
108 KB JPG
>>1958208
>Near the end of the cutting
I understand and this is normal but can be mitigated. On the attached pic see side [A] and [B], when first starting the cut we have positive control downward on the table, laterally against the fence and the forward control to feed it through the blade. However at the END of the cut there is no way to put all those three pressures on part [A] against the fence, only onto the table and to feed it through with our push sticks. This [A] part can rotate if wants as it falls off the table to or if we put any wobbly forces on part [B]. If our wood on part [A] is ever wider that the distance between the fence and the blade (due to rotation or wood imperfections) we will either get burn marks or a projectile launched from a 5000rpm disc. Best advice when using a fence is to cut with wood that has a freshly jointed edge (factory plywood edge) and one planed surface facing the table. There are many push stick designs (like the grr-gripper and diy variants) out there but I have arrived at simple flat board, handle, and sacrificial lip to safely feed saws. As >>1958247 said no wrong doing here, alignment, and prepare for kickback sometimes. Not apologizing for a blog post, I enjoy keeping my fingers, intact abdomen, and wish others the same.
>>
>>1958208
Did you have a riving knife or splitter?
>>
>>1958116
Before you part them off/take them off the lathe, hit them with sandpaper, then with a few drops of the finish of your choice (just enough to coat). Pull up some YouTube vids.
>>
>>1958116
while they are an the lathe, you can spin them up sort of burnish them with a handful of wood shavings
>>
File: unknown.png (57 KB, 1953x1019)
57 KB
57 KB PNG
I've been woodworking a bit and started practicing some joints recently, and decided to make a console table. I'm not too bothered about how clean the joints are (They're cheap pine and will be painted black afterwards), but does this look like a decent enough design to have a go at? Not sure if I fucked up any of the measurements or something slipped my mind. The slab on top is gonna be a giant chunk of varnished oak I got my hands on.
>>
File: s-l1600 (1).jpg (162 KB, 1000x1000)
162 KB
162 KB JPG
I'm looking to get a router. Mainly I would just be doing edges on boxes and picture frames, maybe doing advanced sign carving eventually. Does it make more sense to get babby's first router like pic related first or is it better to just invest in a combo plunge/fixed base router instead? Eventually I would like to have a router table as well. I was looking at cheap stuff on eBay, but it doesn't look like there are any plunge trim routers. In what sort of situation would it be better to use a trim router -vs- a full-sized router?
>>
I'm gonna buy an 8" benchtop jointer and nothing you do or say will talk me out of it.
>>
>>1958886
That is a laminate trimmer. They are not as versatile as a general-purpose and generally have less power but have higher RPM. For trimming laminate/veneers they are great. For things like carving letters or edges of the wood, they are okay if you are taking shallow passes but they shouldn't be used for more serial tasks like large routing, dados, dovetails, etc.

If you aren't opposed to buying used they are a common item for sale. Older models are heavier and lack things like soft start but they get the job done. I have a positively antique 1.5 HP Stanley that has wooden handles and came in a metal suitcase-sized box and it has served me very well. As long as the motor spins, the bearings are good, and the power cord isn't shot there isn't much else to worry about.
>>
>>1958116
Back when I had a lathe I would rub candles or canning wax or whatever on the piece while it was running, then put a strip of cloth behind and run it back and forth. The friction melts the wax so it soaks in good.
For "professional" though you probably just dip it in a can of polyurethane or something.
>>
>>1958886
If your only going to get one get a plunge. They work better on a table too.
>>
>>1958886
If you have a Lidl where you are, which sells it: they have a full-sized plunge router with a selection of bits for around 30 bucks.
>>
>>1958247
>>1958378
Thanks for the explanations. Makes me want to just use my circular saw instead. The fence I was using was the one for the table, but it's kind of old and probably never been cleaned before, I'll clean it up before my next attempt. Kind of scary to think this can just happen but I'll try and be careful.

>>1958385
No, it's just the bare blade. I've only ever seen pictures of those before, I'm guessing I can just buy one and attach it. Certainly something to consider, although I'm not sure how the boss would feel about me buying accessories for his table saw...
>>
>>1959287
If it didn't come with one (old ones didn't have them) then it probably has no way to attach a riving knife. Making a splitter would be the way to go. Also, make him pay you for making it. Don't spend your money to add safety features that he should have already had.
>>
>>1957304
Best dyes on the market use fine soluble grains that completely dissolve into alcohol free of particulates almost transparently. The alcohols can be lacquer thinner, acetone, and odorless mineral spirits, maybe denatured alcohol. These magical color dye grains can't be found in the house but look for alcohol inks, the stuff for small crafts and nail salons use (not mica powders). Fabric dye and inkjet inks may be other options but I don't know their solubility.
>>
possibly wrong thread but I have a long winter ahead of me and I want to learn a new skill, does anyone have any links or books on carving that they could post? I want to eventually try and do something like pic related.
>>
>>1956617
Skill saw and a clamped straightedge if it’s too big for your tablesaw
>>
File: mill.jpg (253 KB, 1140x641)
253 KB
253 KB JPG
With the ABSURD excess of spruce wood in germany I am considering milling logs into planks and stuff like that.

I've seen portable mills for about 4 grand, but what do you reckon I should focus on to make the most of this temporary opportunity? What short good book would you recommend on the topic of refining logs?
>>
>>1959630
download a shitton of youtube videos on the subject if you're planning to be offgrid. With carving it helps to be able it see the teacher demonstrate different techniques.

next, like any other hobby you gotta tool up. A set of V gouges, a good carving knife (small and easy to choke up on), spoon gouges/hooked knives, possibly a bandsaw for cutting blanks. a shitton of sandpaper.
>>
>>1960569
Hows the competition in your area?
Wet Softwood is worth next to nothing on the market, the only people who bother making planks are farmers and landowners that either know a guy with a portable mill or a cheaper sawmill.

Before the rona hit, a lot of the logs got basically dumped to china
>>
File: index(15).jpg (252 KB, 1280x960)
252 KB
252 KB JPG
Whats a good high character wood like olive that has larger planks?
>>
File: 234537334253.jpg (1.18 MB, 2160x1528)
1.18 MB
1.18 MB JPG
>>1959443 (You)
>>1957304
For giggles I made a stain out of sὂy sauce and lacquer thinner; left is untreated ash, middle is two generous coats of minwax walnut penetrating stain, right is one coat of the sὂy/thinner. The spectacular color was a surprise and it I think it outweighs the downsides for small projects:
>Doesn't dissolve 100% and pigments/particles will saturate pores (ash was a poor choice of wood here)
>it could go rancid or develop mold
>doesn't dry as fast and might need a clean wipe with odorless mineral spirits.
Keeping a jar of it for things like handles.
>>
>>1961118
I suggest mixing in a biocide.
>>
>>1961106
A given piece of wood's character comes from how, when and where it was grown. Did it get bent while growing? Did it survive mold, wildfire or fungus? Were nails or screws placed in it? Where on the tree is the piece from, near a crotch, near the crown, the roots?
>>
I need to make a foregrip and stock for a home made break action 12ga. The actual shotgun receiver and barrel are finished, so I have something I can reference to hand fit the stock to. Im a machinist/fabricator by trade so the metal stuff was the easy part. How should I go about this? Trace it out of a hardwood blank, band saw, chisel(?), File then sand? I also have to make machining cuts on both pieces so workholding an egg shaped part sounds somewhat difficult. How do I not fuck this up
>>
>>1961103
Okay, I can buy land to dry wood on.

Yeah got NOTHING to do with Chinas latest bioweapon. Its the Borkenkäfer in conjunction with climate change, which help it spread excessivly. This is the end for spruce trees in Europe. They preemptivly cut down all spruce trees because its hopeless. There's people litterally giving away entire logs of spruce wood because they cannot get rid of it. Others are selling neatly cut logs for 15 bucks a solid cubic meter.
>>
>>1961422
They dump them to china because they are at least paying a bit better than our saturated market.
Everyone who needs construction lumber has filled their halls after lothar and the draught a couple years back

Keep your eyes open for furniture grade ash, they too are goner
>>
Íf I could get actual advice on how to make a profit from free spruce logs, please
>>
>>1952549
Hey bud I've got the 2000w, pretty sure it's the older model that Bunnings cleared a few months back.

Mines been ok, just kept tuning it over time and it's pretty good now considering the price.
>>
>>1961574
What sort of tuning have you needed to do? It hasnt fallen out of alignment constantly or something has it?
>>
File: wood.jpg (120 KB, 434x1044)
120 KB
120 KB JPG
How is this looking for a starters workshop? I want to start by building a small desk. Ive only got a small 12x16' shed to work in.
>>
>>1954379
How bigs the bookshelf going to be? Id say a jointer and thicknesser would be musts if its a large bookshelf, everything else can be done with a simple pull saw
>>
File: PANO_20201127_133400.vr.jpg (643 KB, 4052x1686)
643 KB
643 KB JPG
R8 my dad's shop
>>
>>1961533
look into building guitars, it seems pretty common for the tops of acoustics
>>
>>1962724
Mid-tier Taiwanese tools. Sad workbench. Flatpack cabinets (shame). 3/10.
>>
>>1963136
he made the cabinets himself and the workbench in the back is 4x6 solid cherry
>>
Text only but I started to build a desk today. Bought a gum 1200x600 and a few lengths of pine for the legs, using no screws or dowel joints to connect it, only castle joints and good quality wood glue. Legs and supports are cut, just gotta finish up the big castles. Had no issues with the one way lap joints, but im a bit worried the castle joints might get fucked up because im using a 70x70 piece of pine. Tell me if this is the smartest way to do it without a table saw (and with only a jigsaw, miter saw and hand saw)
1. Mark it up
2. Drill 2 holes going all the way through the cross section and then depth holes through the center.
3. Jigsaw from the crosssection holes out
4. chisel the rest.
>>
>>1962724
solid 9.5/10 OP.. only deduct is for open wall area lacking pinup calendars and direct lighting at tools..
>>
File: Mahogany Guard.jpg (822 KB, 1832x1635)
822 KB
822 KB JPG
I bought this pre-made because I'm a lazy piece of shit and it came with a tung oil finish. I had wanted to hit it with stain or danish oil myself.

My question is, what is the best way to remove the tung oil? I am torn between sanding and a lacquer thinner but I'm worried that either one will fuck it up in one way or another.
>>
>>1963140
I think he's talking about the thickness of the top.
>>
>>1963303
Oils permanent bro, youre either going to have to sand it for days (read destroy it) or paint it. Seems like it would be an easy job for a jig saw or router
>>
>>1963303
as another anon indicates oils are permanent, you'll have to sand to a depth/thinness that the piece is not usable. you could try heavy wash with lacquer thinner and cleansing thoroughly with naptha several cycles but thats a long shot. suggest you order another piece natural or diy one.
>>
>>1952446
>Wood working general
Do you guys sometimes model your ideas in CAD or in any other way before starting working? What software or hardware (pencils/rulers etc.) do you use for this?
>>
>>1964379
Sketchup seems popular, i prefer sraw out design by hand but i should learn sketchup now that im doing cabinetry
>>
>>1964379
I use https://www.freecadweb.org/ without special hardware. It helps to avoid stupid mistakes by forcing you to think your design through beforehand. It’s also a great way of getting a first impression of your project’s proportions.
>>
File: bla3.png (20 KB, 703x739)
20 KB
20 KB PNG
Is there any rule of thumb about the appropriate length of dowels (red lines) in a situation like pic related? There will be some downward force applied to the protruding cylinder (it’s a hanging rail meant to hold 2–3 jackets). The overall width is 563 mm, the vertical bars are 40 mm in diameter.
>>
File: DSC05411.jpg (1.04 MB, 2560x1707)
1.04 MB
1.04 MB JPG
Wood work beginner here, just tried something new (to me) with my cheap track saw by cutting shallow grooves for shelves to slide into & it actually worked!

I'm finding I spend a lot of time painstakingly squaring up the track before each cut & then I have to be careful that the kick when the saw spins up doesn't knock the track away from square. Should I just buy the square adapter the bolts into the bottom of the track, or is there a better approach? I have to do this in my kitchen, so I can't rig up a permanent setup with the track on a floating hinge fixed at 90 degrees or anything, because I have to pack everything away after I'm done.

https://www.screwfix.com/p/triton-ttsts-plunge-saw-track-t-square-320mm/6316R?tc=MC3&ds_kid=92700055262507123&ds_rl=1244066&gclid=Cj0KCQiAqo3-BRDoARIsAE5vnaKGrS6kz-4HzoUhGHhv6QbEG_4ZufqCeY_PL4WPbjsQD0WbE19ZwX4aArBaEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
>>
I found a vintage power planer, it's a Black&Decker with 1.5mm fixed planing depth. Is the adjustable depth a necessary feature or will this one be enough? I intend to use it for carpentry and flattening beams and slabs where hand planing is too much work
>>
>>1964474
Check it. Make your sides one piece,. Make it big enough to cut in half and have both sides. While it's still one piece cut grooves. Then split in half. Better accuracy and half the saw alignment time.
>>
File: IMG_20201128_111307.jpg (210 KB, 1343x1007)
210 KB
210 KB JPG
>>1964529
Yeah, that's what I did.
>>
>>1964474
>or is there a better approach?
Use a router?
>>
>>1964542
I'm talking about using the track saw in general, not just that specific scenario of cutting lots of grooves in one work piece.
>>
>>1964487
My high school shop had a fixed depth planer from decades ago. My projects didn't suffer for it, but you may want to build a planer sled if your intention is face joint with it.
>>
>>1964578
I was talking about a handheld planer
>>
Never been to WWG before but I wanted to see how bad or good I fucked up. I just bought a WEN planer and a jointer as well as a ryobi table saw. I have several small home projects to complete (workbench with vice, dining table, pergola, homemade squat rack, shed, etc.) and thought it would be cheaper to just do it myself. Did I fuck up massively?
>>
Hey guys, I don't really know anything about woodworking. I want a block of white birch. I'd like it to weigh about 2.5 lbs and be about six inches wide.
If you wanted to get a piece like that online: where would you go for that?
(I'm not American so it's not native here, all my google results are for birch plywood and shite.)
>>
>>1964435
>>1964446
Thank you. I found some cool plugins for these.

Sketchup has a house builder plugin that can do detailed wood framing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ex61yzzartA

FreeCAD has a wood working plugin which generates a spreadsheet consisting of all quantities and dimensions used in your project.
https://github.com/JeromeL63/Wood-Frame
>>
File: Capture.png (25 KB, 954x933)
25 KB
25 KB PNG
>>1952446
Looking to do some cabinets, European style out of a red oak plywood.

Anyone have experience using stain instead of mineral spirits with polyurethane?
>>
>>1964732
The ryobi table saw is a bit of a fuck up because its your centerpeice, but as long as you know what youre doing it shouls be fine
If youre omly going to stain going to a really high grit (2k) will yield an amazing finish but with a piece that large it will take forever. Preserve the beauty of the wood imo, stains are over used.
>>
>>1961812
Nah it's been solid, I bought it about 6 years ago but just never really spent the proper time getting it to cut true seeing as I was mostly just using it as a rough docking saw. About a year ago I set it properly to do some moulding work and it's been great. Made a zero clearance insert and fence plus a new blade and it's a pretty damn accurate saw now.

The dust collection is absolutely shit though.
>>
>>1965303
I went ahead and bought one over the weekend, really happy with it so far, everything was aligned properly and the included blade seems to be good quality, ill probably return the extra blade i bought for it. I sort of agree about the dust colection, im considering plugging a shop vac into the collection port
>>
I always fear tripping into the tablesaw and having it go through my chest
>>
Will cleaning paraffin-impregnated maple with alcohol harm the wood or wax in any way?
>>
File: 143913282807.jpg (30 KB, 504x577)
30 KB
30 KB JPG
I thought i would ask here.
I am currently riveting bronze rivets thrugh a wooden sword handle.Im not used to bronze being harder to deform compared to copper and one rivet head is giving me trouble.

Im trying to mushroom it to fill the hole ive drilled for it yet as im working it flat the other side is digging into the wood and im worried the wood is goint to crack as it looks like thats whats happening.All i can think to do is fill the head down on the side im working but id still need to hammer it more to fill the hole.Is there anything i can do to prevent it cracking?
>>
Fulltime woodworker here and I have question for all the guys that are new to woodworking.

Why do the majority seem to just slap 2x4's together with pocket holes and try to sell it as "rustic furniture"? It looks like dog shit and you're making pennies after materials and time.
>>
>>1963140
He made cabinets himself and thats how the look? Might as well been flatpack my guy.

And the workbench is built in a way that lets people know he doesn't do dick with handtools, its just a place to put shit on.

Buying a sawstop does not a good worker make.
>>
>>1966589
I'd say the thousands of dollars of machines would let people know that he's probably not mainly using hand tools.
>>
>>1954410
That'll do it. A 600g will get you smooth without eating material away.
>>
>>1966586
I have never drilled a pocket hole.
>>1966589
Who tf cares if hes using hand tools or not.
>>
>>1966255
Always check and clear trip hazards, no matter what tool you're using
I frequently fake the motion I'll be doing with the tool off to make sure nothing will fuck me up
>>
File: 1603226440459.png (184 KB, 481x481)
184 KB
184 KB PNG
I started woodworking at a trade school about a month ago, have not made anything yet but the classes are really intense.
Wish me luck because it seems I will have to hang out here for the rest of my life
>>
>>1966762
How have you not made anything yet? Even in my highschool woodwork class we were making stuff by the second lesson
>>
>>1966770
Right now we're seeing the anatomy of the wood and stuff like their density, properties, use, how it grows and stuff like that, if it wasn't for the classes being through google meet I bet they had made us smell it too.
we've touched on how it's dried but next time we will go indepth about it.
>>
>>1966611
There is a limit to machine only tooling when doing high level woodworking.

There are certain levels of finish quality you can’t reach without handtooling. These details are what differentiate a $5,000 dining table from a $15,000 one.
>>
>>1966810
ok and? ops father clearly just has a hobby shop. i doubt very much he's making $15000 let alone $5000 tables, heck idk how those ridiculous price points could differ, and im using an 19th century heirloom as my table
>>
>>1966602
>You don't need to be an architect to sell a house print. Many house prints will conflict with themselves as you work through each cross-section. They're going to know which parts of the design the builder is going to demand be followed exactly and which will need to be tuned up.
How true is this? Who usually makes house prints? I thought this often was the carpenter himself? Is this a scam of sorts, getting the customer to pay for useless prints which the carpenter has to spend a lot of time correcting anyways?
>>
File: file.png (1.64 MB, 727x768)
1.64 MB
1.64 MB PNG
so, what is your excuse for not owning one of these puppies?
>>
>>1966579
Not really a wood issue here imo. But set your rivet with more lighter taps with the ball side of a ball peen hammer. Heavier hits upset further down the rivet, which expands in the hole in the wood and cracks it. You want to isolate most of the expansion in the end so it doesn't do this. I've done this successfully in basket strips using aluminum solid rivets and a relatively small and light ball peen. Dunno how bronze behaves though it should work.
>>
>>1963303
Think of it this way, you now have a template/router edge guide to bang out as many of this part as you please.
>>
>>1967247
Thanks i'll keep this in mind next time.
>>
>>1967166
Because they are fucking stupid
>>
>>1967492
if bronze works like copper it should anneal if you heat it red and quench it, you might not even need to quench, just heat it and let it cool like aluminum
>>
>>1967503
is that poorfag jealousy i hear?
You should work on that son.
>>
>>1952446
anyone has nice reading about glue-less, nail-less carpentry? like japanese houses and stuff. I want to make a table but I am not sure if I am on the right track
>>
>>1967785
Im making a table right now with no nails and its stable without glue. I guess you could call it japanese since im using a japanese saw?
This is how im making the frame. As you can see theres a bit of space for the frame to be pushed further into the leg and then im going to put the table top in. Im finding it slightly annoying to build because i dont have a table saw so the "castle" joint tookp forever to cut, oh well theres only one more castle joint to make because the other two legs will slot in differently
>>
>>1967792
damn that joint is too much for me rn, I will try to come up with an easier one. My only other projects were a small chair and a articulated desk lamp
>>
>>1967840
>damn that joint is too much for me rn, I will try to come up with an easier one. My only other projects were a small chair and a articulated desk lamp
nah bro go at it. I mean this is my first project since i did woodwork in school years ago and im doing it without a table saw. In fact i tried using a jigsaw but it wasnt a great fit so im using a pull saw now. or idk, maybe theyre actually difficult im not sure, its just a bit time consuming
>>
>>1967166
I'm not a mason.
>>
File: IMG_9650.jpg (854 KB, 1390x1574)
854 KB
854 KB JPG
How are hardwood floors prepped and sealed?
I had an old scrap piece of flooring and some time to kill so i sanded off the top layer of gray, then applied two coats of a stain and then a coat of clear gloss poly, but it looks like wall triim and not smooth like flooring. did I not sand enough?
>>
>>1968411
You sanded incorrectly. Different parts of the wood grain have different hardnesses. In your image, the softer parts of the wood have had more material removed than the harder parts. You should have planed the wood down and only performed a light sanding. You sanded much too much and with improper technique, which is why you ended up with a poor finish.
>>
File: IMG_9668.jpg (1.32 MB, 3264x2448)
1.32 MB
1.32 MB JPG
>>1968612
thanks, it was a little exercise to see if i could do it and i couldnt lol. heres the other side untouched, so i will have to try it agian
>>
bump
>>
File: 71lLWjGWNRL._AC_SL1500_.jpg (144 KB, 1500x1157)
144 KB
144 KB JPG
>>1952446
I'm wanting to build a small shelf with pullout drawers for my shop. The drawers are going to be about 3"x3" but I'm not sure how deep. I'm going for simple as possible, so no drawer hardware.
In order to make this shelf work well and look good, I've realized I need to have exact cuts in my wood. Luckily, I have a table saw to use. Unfortunately, there is no sled, so I need to build one. I'm pretty sure the table is a Rigid and it has the miter slots with tabs on the top.
I was just going to buy some miter bars, but it seems like they won't be compatible with my table. How do I go about building some that will work? Do I just take a piece of wood, cut it to how wide and deep the slot is, and use a router to take off the corners so it will fit? I was hopi g for something plastic or metal that I could buy because it is really humid where I live and I don't want to have to fuck with the bars after they are installed on the sled.
>pic related, zeroplay miter bars i cant use
>>
File: Cases.jpg (542 KB, 3600x1720)
542 KB
542 KB JPG
>>1971239
The drawers are going to be like this, but there will be three rows of 4 (or 4 rows of 3, I haven't decided) and the drawers will probably be 1 foot or so deep. But you can see why I need the cuts to line up exactly (I'm sure you all already understand the necessity of straight cuts).
I'm planning on just using rabbet joints for the corners. It doesn't need to be fancy, it just has to hold these little packs of pins for locks.
>pic related, muh inspirstion
>>
File: hole.jpg (18 KB, 525x417)
18 KB
18 KB JPG
OK this might be retarded but how do I make a hole with an angle?
https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/tipstechniques/wedged-mortise-tenon
>>
>>1971714
Set up a bevel gauge as a guide? How good does the angle have to be?
>>
>>1971789
I want to do what that link did, but they just say "cut matching hole". Sorry if this is stupid but I am just starting out.
>>
>>1971840
Make the wedge first. Then place it next to where you need to chisel. You can now use the wedge to visually angle your chisel when you are chopping the angled side. Err on the side of a more horizontal angle. You can always go back in and pare more off to refine it. Dunno if you know, but you also don't want to take a big chop near your starting line or pressure on the bevel will shove the chisel into and possibly past your line. Progressively chop deeper as you move along the mortise. You probably need to make several chops at the angle before you can set the chisel more vertically for the rest of the chops to the straight walled side.
>>
File: carpenter.jpg (51 KB, 417x280)
51 KB
51 KB JPG
>>1971849
>>1971849
thanks fren. I am still learning about transfering angles and measurements and making stuff properly.
>>
File: table.jpg (6 KB, 250x187)
6 KB
6 KB JPG
I posted a thread but thought I might have more luck in /wwg/ so I'm reposting here, sorry for the spam
I’ve worked in a woodshop for almost 4 years. During the last year I’ve had skin irritations, dry eyes, clogged sinuses, and breathing problems. I know it’s from the sawdust (redwood specifically) because it coincides perfectly with the times I work. Is there any way to reverse this? Anybody here develop a sawdust allergy?
And yes I wear a breathing mask 99% of the time. Pic is a table I made
>>
>>1972108
Doctor here, are you wearing a proper respirator during this work? Seems like it may be the solution you want
>>
File: mask.jpg (47 KB, 1024x1024)
47 KB
47 KB JPG
>>1972122
I used to wear an N95 mask but switched last year to a proper respirator when I started having problems.
>>
when you're finishing wood with an oil like boiled linseed or tung oil how do you avoid streaks on your final coat?

>>1963821
>>1964263
soak it with citristrip and most of it should scrape off with a plastic blade or a credit card. you will still probably have to sand it.
>>
>>1972108
>>1972136
some people have allergy to the sap or something else in the tree. I have mild allergy to Brazilian Pepper Tree sap.
>>
>>1972338
https://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/wood-allergies-and-toxicity/
>>
>>1972338
>>1972339
Also Pau ferro (no idea how it is called in english makes me feel like shit every time I have to use it. My recommendation to you is to try to get a respirator and cover your eyes as well. Anti-histamines help with some of the symptoms but if you have allergy you have allergy and that is it I guess. It sucks
>>
Any beginners woodworking projects you guys would recommend? I plan on spending some Christmas money on chisels, tools etc and would maybe be looking for a starter kit unless those are all garbage.
Just looking for some small handcrafts to get me used to working with wood, haven't done any crafts like that since highschool woodshop which I miss dearly
>>
>>1972548
>box
>mallet
>small bench (to reach shelves, change your boots, idk)
>vise
>practice making joints of several kinds
>>
>>1972553
I assumed that practicing some joinery would be the most useful start. Unfortunately I live in an apartment so my workspace is limited, but I do have an uninsulated back storage room I can clear out
Cold as tits in the winter but coffee and cigarettes always help with that
>>
>>1972548
Beginner projects that are easy are boxes and model trucks. Everyone should build a truck.
What do you mean by starter pack?
>>
>>1972565
By starter pack I meant a decent beginners set of chisels, other loose ends like a vise, mallet, etc I probably have at my grandfather's old house up north. He built boats so he has tons of old wooden vises, clamps, though I've yet to find a set of chisels amongst his treasures
>>
>>1972567
Ah. If you have chisels you can torture yourself and make dados by hand, or do some morts
>>
>>1967785
Take a look at these:

https://b-ok.org/book/5642923/e76abe

https://b-ok.org/book/5642925/79482b
>>
Test
>>
File: workshop.jpg (1.03 MB, 2259x1271)
1.03 MB
1.03 MB JPG
I got a Dewalt planar on Amazon for $500 (basically ~$180 off because it came with the folding extensions and an extra set of blades). Been wanting one for a very long time and I feel like once I get a bench Jointer I'll have a proper shop set up. I've been working on organizing / creating a workspace in my garage for a few months now, the miter saw stand I am just about done building. Don't ask me why I used expensive ass walnut on a plywood and 2x4 / 2x6 shop storage unit, but I wanted to use my planar badly so I ended up spending $140 on Walnut just to plane it to 3/4 (it was 7/8" stock) and use it for my drawers.

Pretty dumb but I just finished putting some danish oil on it and I don't think I'm going to do any further finishing since it's just going to sit in my garage.

The planer though is amazing, very simple to set up, very easy to use and I was able to get dead on 3/4" thickness with ease.

Only other thing I really need to make my shop better is a proper outfeed and assembly table which I'm going to design and build next.

I'm really satisfied with my miter saw stand, I used it quite a few times already and the kreg fence rails I bought for it work spectacularly for accurate, easy and repeatable cuts. Was pretty easy to get it all installed and aligned with my miter saw too. The one thing I hate is this Matebo saw I got has really poor dust collection.

I plan on building some furniture for my house once I get everything set up properly.
>>
>>1973701
Thats sick, what stuff are you building?
>>
>>1973761
Thanks, I'm planning on a few things, some glass display cabinets made out of cherry or oak to display our growing collection of minerals, as well as remodelling some cabinets in my house. I also want to build some stuff like a coffee table and various other furniture that I'll design.
>>
>>1973765
Go forth and conquer. Im really digging the mitre saw table, it looks a so fresh but i dont see dust management?
>>
Excuse me, folks, but I have a couple of questions. I'm no a poster on this board at all, and for the most part I'm more orientated towards learning metal work. (I'm trying to get into the business of making live steam engine models because that's a real passion of mine)

Now I'm looking to start building a small model railway layout. It's going to be a layout consisting of 2 or 3 sections of 3x2 plywood board for the surface, with an aged pine (as I'm lead to believe it's strong) under frame to act as cross bracing to keep it good 'n' strong. The idea is to stream my modelling while I'm on paid leave from work, and I wanna do something for myself and entertain people in so
doing.

Now here's my conundrum - I don't have much space and I want to store and maybe even transport it in a collapsed state. To do this I've pretty much come to the conclusion of making the boards stack. I'll do this with the aide of lengths of wood with threaded bar on the ends. Now I know there's metal threaded female fittings to go into the wood, but I don't know what they're called.

Any advice for a simpleton would be greatly appreciated too, thank you for your help, lads.
>>
If you are like me and want to add a small 1/8th inlay or even use a trim router on a cnc with a small 1/8th end mill he's a guide on how to put an ER11 collet on a Makita RT0701C trim router or any clone.
Put it in put a bit in it tighten.
Don't listen to anyone who buys an adapter.
>>
File: 474654654.jpg (29 KB, 593x355)
29 KB
29 KB JPG
>>1966586
im relative new to this but i swore myself to never do 2x4 or rely on spax
rather get my inspiration from 19th century shit
>>1967785
wood nails and pegged tenon
euro furniture relied heavy on those as it made for stable joints and the furniture could be
disassembled
>>1973900
looks like their called T nut
>>
>>1967166
Sixth Reg Co A. Conn Vol

April 2nd 1862

Dear Mother,

Thought I would write to you again so I have commited to write. I am well and hope these few lines may find you enjoying good health and may the Blessing of God attend you.

Have not much news to write so you must excuse much news for this time. I wrote a letter to Chris about a week ago. I suppose she has received it before this time. When I wrote her we were encamped about four miles from here on this island and we moved down here to do Guard and Picket Duty and unload Vessels and Boats that bring provisions for the soldiers. This place is called Coopers Landing. Our quarters are on a negro plantation belonging to Union man by the name of Stoddard. He stayed here till the day after we took Hilton Head the Rebels retreating to Savannah by this way would not let his stay but hurried him off with them. He is in Savannah now. All of this Island is owned by Union People who had to flee with the Rebels to save their lives. There is six of our Companies up to headquarters two of our Companies at Mud Island and two companies here. We have to work very hard on Guard either Picket or home guard every other day. We expect to hear the Booming of Cannon soon on Fort Pulaski. We are expecting the Gun Boats up from Hilton Head every day to be ready to go into action and they have two Batteries on Tybee Island, two on an island in front of the Fort with eight mortars each. Those on Tybee have ten mortars to throw shells into the fort. It is only one mile and a half from Tybee Battery to the Fort and Six Gun Boats and two sloops of war, Wabash and Susquehannah. I guess it will not be so hard work after all to conquer them. After we take Fort Pulaski (if we meet with success) we have 3 small Batteries and Fort Jackson to take and then comes Savannah. In less than a month you will hear that Savannah is taken.
>>
>>1958116
one thing you could do as well is use linseed oil and thin wood glue while you're still turning it. coat the piece in oil on a slow turn and then go over it with the glue, let it all dry, sand it lightly, and repeat one last time
>>
https://www.inhergarage.com/blog/diy-toy-box

Link aside, how would you improve upon this design? Something seems a little off to me.
>>
>>1952446
This seems like the best place to ask. I want to make a custom stock for a gun and have rudimentary wood working skills. Has anyone here done such a project? Any advice that I won't find in some generic guide?
>>
File: 20201211_225124.jpg (3.07 MB, 4032x3024)
3.07 MB
3.07 MB JPG
Babbys first scroll saw
>>
>>1966586
Hello fellow full timer. Are you self employed or work for a company? What kind of stuff do you make? Where are you based? What's your salary?

I'll provide my answers to give the noobs a bit more of an idea about what a career in woodworking can look like (custom high end furniture making specifically).

I work in a company with 5 other furniture makers, 1 metal worker, 1 metal finisher, 1 wood finisher, 1 foreman, and 3 sales/designers/owners. Based in Brooklyn, NY.

It's a production shop (high volume, fast turn around), we make high end furniture for private and commercial clients. Note: fast turn around doesn't necessarily mean low quality if you're a skilled maker.
I rarely make the same piece twice and have a lot of freedom with how I want to go about building things, provided they match the spec sheet.

I've been with the company 1.5 years and make 72k, I expect if I stay with the company I'd top out around 80k providing I don't take on any additional responsibilities.
>>
File: PXL_20201213_063951915~2.jpg (2.07 MB, 2641x2780)
2.07 MB
2.07 MB JPG
Hi /wwg/ I'm making these crosses out of 2x4's as Christmas gifts for the religious people in my family. Besides glue, what else can I use to ensure that they are snugly fastened together? Pocket screws on the back maybe? Square piece of plywood on the rear with a screw into each piece?

Or will glue be enough? I'm thinking these will be mounted on a wall after I finish them with some stain or paint.
>>
File: 202389_inset1_xl.jpg (80 KB, 920x920)
80 KB
80 KB JPG
>>1952559
Making saddle. So much better than a square for marking, keeps the sides perfectly inline. Cover to think of it, makes a nice cheap Xmas present.
>>
>>1976001
Mortise and tenor or make the cross out of three pieces and have that touching cut
>>
>>1976116
I was really hoping you'd just tell me wood glue was enough as I have no idea how to do mortise and tenon and already cut the wood
>>
>>1976001
Using your artistic licence with the proportions of the cross eh?

Easiest way to ensure long term snugness/strength is adding plywood/screws as you suggested. Bonus points if you make the plywood recessed. Extra bonus points if you figure out how to cut the 'mortice' on a table saw or chopsaw.
>>
>>1976121
Honestly, for end grain pine, gorilla glue works very well and will expand to fill in any gaps in your joints. It will expand out from the seams though, so you'll have a bit of clean up work once it's cured.
>>
>>1976123
>>1976126
Let's just say that I'm not that great at math. Here's another one. I glued this one together already and it feels pretty solid.

Will probably go the route of just adding wood and screws to the back. How would you achieve the first bonus point of making a recessed area to put the reinforcement wood in? I don't have a router if that's what would do it.
>>
Don't know if this goes here, but I wanna get into wood carving. Any good resources on techniques and projects to start with? Can I just do with a carving knife to begin with and get more tools as need arises?
>>
>>1976132
Why wouldn't glue be enough? What kind of stress is this going through being hung on a wall? Cabinets are made with glue and some pin nails. The glue is stronger than the wood once dried. Am I missing something?
>>
>>1976194
I'm just a very new autistic beginner and just want to double check with 4chan before doing just about anything
>>
>>1958116
Looks like you sprayed them down with poly? Been a few years since I messed around on my dad's lathe but I know we tried to do the bulk of our finishing while the workpiece was still on the lathe. Normally take things through the grits from 200 to 2000(sanding goes fast on the lathe) tgen hit em with a few progressively finer grades of synthetic wool. After the wool, grab a handful of clean shavings from your piece and press them into the your work while it's turning. The natural oil adds a light polish and the friction has a burnishing effect. As for applying a finish, friction polish was our go to, think the brand we used was mylands. Always preferred friction polish over poly since it was cured right after you applied it so it didn't pick up any dust and stayed smooth.
>>
>>1976121
Of course glue will be enough, you asked what else ypu can do.
>>
>>1976132
If you drill some holes into the end of the 2x4 before you cut the miters on the end, you could jam some dowels with glue in there before fitting it together. Might be tricky getting it to line up.
>>
>>1976237
Just make the holes oversize to allow for any misalignment, and fill with glue when you stick the dowels in.
>>
>>1976194
glue sucks ass on butt jointed end grain
the wood will suck in the glue so there is not much left on the joint itself.
professionals use lamellos on those miter joints, they stabilize it with long on long grain glue joint
>>
https://1lib.us/book/5484299/a22160
perhaps of interest
>>
>>1976344
I understand that but I just have a hard time believing this wont last if it's just hanging around assuming enough glue was used.
>>
File: gugug.png (21 KB, 1287x607)
21 KB
21 KB PNG
>>1976500
It will last. The worst that will happen is the joints will open up or potentially crack as humidity changes.

For something ornamental like this end grain gluing is fine.

>>1976132
To cut away the material to allow you to add a plywood patch (unnecessary in this circumstance) you could run the pointy end back and forth over a table saw using a crosscut sled or miter gauge. You'd end up with a square mortise on the back of your cross.
>>
>>1976139
You should try woodworking general on /diy/
>>
>>1957304
Vinegar and nails or start smoking tobacco.
>>
I'm in process of building cabinets for the shop and like any beginner I bought Home Depot 3/4 pine. Of course it was bowed out. I picked the flattest one I could. The carcass of the wall cabinets are glued up but there not very square due to the bowing in middle of the sides.

Trying to combat this I have pipe clamps and ratchet straps on them to try and flatten them. Is there anything else I should be doing and how long this should take to flatten? The worst bow out is about 1/4 of an inch and I'm afraid if I put the doors on it's going to look really obvious. It's still the beginning era of my wood working but I'm somewhat proud of this build and don't want it to look like total shit when it's done.
>>
>>1973911
brainlet here getting into cnc milling (got a shapeoko 3 with a makita router), but why, could you elaborate?
i have those high precision collets carbide3d sells they seem to fit
>>
>>1976902
Youre not going to get the bow out
>>
>>1961890

That's more than I've got honestly, but you can pull off some good projects with enough time, even if you don't have a ton of tools.
>>
How does shellac work? Am I supposed to put a coat on, sand it with fine sandpaper, put more coats on, repeat till it's as thick as I want it?
>>
>>1977320
Ive nearly finished the desk too
>>
>>1977275
serves me right for going to HD I suppose.
>>
>>1977689
Most wood wil do this, you need to square your wood
>>
>>1977997
Maybe so but this wood was visibly warped from the get go and figured I could make it work. The cabs are 36 tall and frameless so the middle is the worst offender. They're for the garage so hopefully when its all said and done it's nothing to offensive to look at.
>>
>>1978011
Incorporate the bowing into the "design". If anyone asks.
>>
File: DSC_0009-01.jpg (1.84 MB, 4032x2268)
1.84 MB
1.84 MB JPG
>>1952559
A marking gauge, ruler, yardstick, chalk twine, two kinds of square, and whatever knife is closest to hand.
I use a pencil for rough work, but a knife makes a nice track for my chisel.
>>1964379
I sketch a couple concepts, then make a scale drawing to calculate materials. Pencil and 1cm graph notebook, ruler and triangle, compass.
>>1966586
Because ikea has raised successive generations of low expectation morons. Not that I would sell a piece without real joinery (assuming I sell at all), but I could see it.

I've never used oil (walnut) alone to finish a piece. Do I sand between coats, or just burnish after each application dries?
I hope for heavy use, this is a gift for my future mother in law.
>>
This is my milled maple and dark walnut stained ravens logo (it's a gift).
I don't know shit about woodworking or staining, but the milling part went alright, and overall I think it turned out okay.
I couldn't sand it well enough to remove the machining paths, but in person they're not that noticeable until you're real close, so I'm not bovvered.
>>
>>1978112
Well done, anon.
Maple is a beautiful wood all its own, especially with a nice shiny clear coat. But if staining is really what you want to do, maple can be a bit blotchy, as you can see. Best to have some sort of light sealer coat before the stain next time, that'll help it apply more evenly.
But these are just little things. Overall, well done.
>>
File: IMG_20201215_202111142.jpg (874 KB, 1488x1488)
874 KB
874 KB JPG
>>1978119
Thanks. I spent a fair few hours cleaning up the piece after the milling, because I cut with the grain and ended up with a lot of feathery bits sticking off, which apparently with a harder wood are tougher than I thought they'd be. A practice piece made out of a cheap pine cabinet drawer was less feathery and easier to clean.
But I fucked up staining that one, so here we are. I should've cut against the grain, live and learn.
The maple is flat on the back, but still has the milling strokes visible and I actually quite like the way it looks when it stained. Hopefully this quick shitty pic illustrates that.
>>
>>1952671
Yes
>>
Any good starting tips/projects for someone getting into woodworking?
Maybe recommendations for a good starter set of chisels
I don't want to make anything in particular, I just miss working with wood from highschool woodshop
>>
Why is Japanese woodworking so overrated?
>>
>>1978739
It's good but most of the current hype is just because it is novel. My conspiracy theory is that it is pushed by magazines to make people buy double the amount of tools (eastern and western).
>>
>>1978748
>>1978739
It's been a meme in woodworking since Nakashima gained popularity in the 60's/70's.

I think Asian culture, especially in Japan and korea still values true craftsmanship. As a result, there's a higher proportion of skilled makers who are making a living producing higher end products.

There's a big market in the US to sell jap tools. It's easy for advertisers to play on the mysticism and exotic aspects of nipponese woodworking to hobbyists who get hard-ons looking at their tools.
>>
>>1957304
Iron buffing depends on the tannins in the wood. It turns oak black for example. But generally I find most woods get a dingy grey. I like gel stains for cheaper woods that take regular stains poorly. I like dye when I want autism color control and layering in the wood figuring.

Linseed will yellow. Just wax it.
>>
Why is wood so FUCKING expensive right now
>>
>>1979717
I'm thinking of making a jointer jig on my table saw so that I can finally use all of my old barn boards, as well as just pick shit up off the side of the road
>>
>>1979717
>oooh god I got time off from work from teh coof I gotta renovate my house by adding a new deck to improve my property value with my extra spare time oooooooOooOOOOOFFFUuuuuuuUUCkkk I'm cOnSROOOOOCTINGGGGGGGGF
>>
File: lumbermarket.png (28 KB, 771x522)
28 KB
28 KB PNG
REEEEEEEEEEEEE
>>
>>1979728
Does it ever go back down?
>>
>>1979729
Goes up with easy, slow to go down
>>
>>1979729
It'll go down as soon as you make a large purchase on lumber you can't return.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61Q6wWu5ziY
>>
I don’t usually do much nice wood working but I made this soap dish for a friend what do u think :3
>>
>>1979717
Can't remember if it was in Oregon or Canada but two major high volume sawmills burned down from wildfires, as well as all their inventory, drying inventory, and all the standing timber screwing everyone over for the next 20 years.
>>
File: fukthisgayearth.png (1.61 MB, 960x698)
1.61 MB
1.61 MB PNG
>>1979785
No wonder you could see that shit from spess.
It's decided then. Gonna salvage construction waste for bored housewives. Rip fine joinery.
>>
>>1952446
Are woodworking classes at colleges any good for learning the basics? Family member wants to enroll in one, but I’m not sure on its quality.
>>
>>1979868
I imagine at the very least it will cover the basics.
>>
forgot to turn on my dust filter while sanding on the lathe today. inhaled a shit ton of wood dust. can still feel it in my throat hours later. am i going to /diy/ bros?
>>
>>1981210
Too late now, but you should probably wear a dust mask next time. And by next time, I mean next life.
>>
>>1979776
won't that swell up and rot?
>>
File: DSC_0010-01.jpg (1.32 MB, 2268x4032)
1.32 MB
1.32 MB JPG
>>1978091
Went with three burnished coats.
Next project: Alder walking stick for my mother. I happened to have it laying around, and it gets stronger when wet. Should I finish with BLO, or do this walnut oil for its hardening properties?
Would coffee make a nice stain for this? I was going to pattern it like a sparrow hawk, stain the wings, head, and stripes.
>>
File: PXL_20201221_221549261.jpg (246 KB, 1131x848)
246 KB
246 KB JPG
Shat this one out at work recently.
>>
My father recently left his long time job and I want to get him something so he can jump into woodworking. The only tools he's really lacking are a plane of any kind and a band saw. Should I get him a book on woodworking and a hand plane or is that even needed to get started?
>>
>>1983194
Personally i think woodwork books are a thing of the past. A good plane should easily be an expensive enough gift that you dont need to bulk up the exchange
>>1983139
How did you machine the corner? Looks interesting
>>
>>1983214
It's a bent lamination from 13 pieces of 1/8" plywood. Only for the corner and two inches of flat either side, the rest is mdf, joined to the corner with dominos. Then it was edged in solid and veneered in a bag press.
>>
>>1983214
Depends on the guy's style. Some people prefer having a book to reference as they try something, instead of a noisy video with smarmy narration.
>>
>>1983216
Wow, seems pretty fake for the design then
>>1983229
Sure, every video is like that.
>>
>>1983139
How do I make curved wood like that? I kinda want to make my own Eames chair
>>
>>1983236
What do you mean by fake for the design?

>>1983241
Eames chairs are made in heated presses. Layers of veneer/plywood go in, the press forms them to shape and simultaneously heats the parts to cure the glue quicker.

It's possible to do it yourself, but it's pretty advanced stuff. Plus then you'd have the upholstery to deal with.
>>
File: PXL_20201222_154516534.jpg (2.03 MB, 2592x1944)
2.03 MB
2.03 MB JPG
Hello wwg I asked a question about gluing these crosses together earlier in the thread and finally finished them. Here they are almost finished. Any ideas how I can enhance them? Also what would be the best type of hanging hardware?
>>
>>1983481

They're done leave them alone, looks good. Use picture hanging hardware
>>
>>1983486
Thanks man. I also put this together. Any idea how I should hang it? Will two large D-hooks on the rear top outer left and right edges work?
>>
>>1983498
Forgot to mention, the plan is to put mugs on it so it won't be light. Also, the person I made it for has fricking plaster walls.
>>
can someone recommend wetstones for sharpening plane irons.
>>
>>1983498
>>1983501
I'd say you should do a more rigid connection otherwise you risk dropping mugs every time you use it. Maybe glue and pin a flat strip on the back on the top and bottom so you can nail or screw it directly into the guy's wall. Get a stud finder.

>>1983509
What's your budget? The woodworkers of yesteryear got by with relatively coarse natural stones and produced great work. That being said it is also true that diamond stones never need to be flattened and cut way faster. And modern synthetic stones can guarantee a grit size and sharpness/self sharpening grit.
>>
>>1983352
Well, forget that I guess
>>
>>1983523
i can probably spend 100 for everything
>>
I'm just gonna drop what I'm working on since I need a url for it. Note to self and everyone, oak is bad for carving
>>
What can I do with these tools?
4x Axis CNC Machine
3x Axis CNC Machine, with carousel tool changer
CNC Lathe
I have to learn to use them and I'm almost a complete noob at woodworking.
I can do CAD and vector drawing.
What should I start with?
>>
Oh man there are so many good deals on tools now even local craigslist sellers are practically giving stuff away. Kinda bummed that I have to pass it all up to spend any spare cash this month on a dust collector and air filtration which are not on sale. Future me will be thankful. Protect your lungs.
>>
>>1984551
make swastikas and sell them on etsy as hindu relics.
>>
My father got me a set of Irwin hand chisels, are they good chisels? Also my mother got me some clamps.
>>
>>1976121
you could try setting up a jig and drilling holes and then connecting everything with dowels and glue. hopefully you set those on fire in someone's yard.
>>
>>1986030
as long as they hold an edge and aren't super thick they should be fine, but knowing irwin...
>>
>>1983139
Very nice anon
>>
File: Wood damage.jpg (135 KB, 807x605)
135 KB
135 KB JPG
Your favorite way to remove damage in wood?

Pic related is a box I want to stain and reuse, but it's got this logo burned on each side and several staple indents around it. My gut says to fill them with putty and sand flat, but that's going to look terrible once stained. Ideas?
>>
>>1967165
It's up to the builders and buyers when they're doing custom homes. I'm not familiar with where they purchase and choose the prints. It's not so much a scam, but every step in the home building process can put problems in the hands of the next guy. So small problems can compound if they're not managed.
>>
>>1986719
Plane. Simply remove a mm at a time, until the effected area is clear. Or cut it up and make a slightly smaller box.
Or incorporate the defects into your design. A part of working wood is showing the history of a piece.
>>
>>1986522
They say Made in UK on the box, so idk, they also look like some stanleys I saw
>>
>>1952446
I recently got a router. I was playing around with it today with two bits: the 90 degree carving bit and a Roman ogee bit. Both bits seemed to burn the wood and I'm not sure why. Is it because I was going to slow or maybe the bits were dull? They were just a cheapo kit off of Amazon I think. The wood wasn't anything fancy, just some plywood so maybe that had something to do with it?
>>
Bought a thickness planer on a sale. Not sure if I want to keep it as it is an impulse buy.

Convince me otherwise friends
>>
>>1987669
Theyre nearly useless on their own. You need a jointer to go along with it
>>
>>1987737
You could rig a sled for it. Or hand plane/tape shims for a true first side then flip it and skim cut that first side. You'd have to resort to this eventually since jointers for the given price range are generally narrower than the capacity of a planer for some reason.
>>
>>1987752
I have a jointing jig for my table saw, but as space allows I may get a real one eventually.
>>
>Be me, complete fucking woodworking noob with a new loft bed
>Built in ladder sucks ass, prebuilt side stairs start at $300
>Buy Yellow pine 2x12s, have hardware store cut them up
>Borrow drills, woodscrews, and Elmer's wood glue
>Put it together like this online plan I found, sand it, and spraypaint it
Anything obvious I'm missing? Do I need clamps for the glue if I'm gonna immediately put screws in it too? Will the hardware store bitch about cutting a bunch of 10 inch pieces? How many screws should I use for each joint(planning on 3)? Best low/no budget tips to drill straight?
>>
>>1987757
It is very nice to have, not going to lie, and when it is not being used, it is a passable table unlike a thickness planer.
>>
>>1987761
The joints are going to be weak on the left. Do you have any way to cut a groove for the boards to sit in so it is not relying on the shear strength of the screws/glue? You don't need to clamp if you have screws to provide clamping. Dunno if you know but if you put some salt in the glue after you apply it, it provides some grip so things aren't as squirrly as you are trying to drive in that first screw. The best top for drilling straight is to have something square to visually compare it to.
>>
>>1987761
>Do I need clamps for the glue if I'm gonna immediately put screws in it too
No, there's no point in the clamps in that scenario; the clamps merely serve to hold the pieces in close contact while the glue cures... your screws will do the same thing

>Will the hardware store bitch about cutting a bunch of 10 inch pieces?
Well, assuming it's Lowe's/Home Depot or similar, it's their job to cut it however you want, and they get paid hourly to do so. But they will probably be annoyed and might give you a shitty look.... These stores try to discourage people from taking advantage of these services by making you wait FOREVER sometimes to get stuff like wood cut, carpet cut, or keys made.

>How many screws should I use for each joint(planning on 3)? Best low/no budget tips to drill straight?
3 screws is plenty, but use something stronger than a drywall screw, like a #9 in a reasonable length. You should pre-drill the holes to reduce the chance of splitting, at least on the ones that are going to be driven horizontally at the left hand side of the drawing (parallel to the grain of the wood)

One last thing is that if you had a 20$ chinese jigsaw, you could easily cut a single sheet of plywood into 2 side panels that you could attach which would drastically increase the strength and rigidity of the structure, it might be totally fine without it though too. Even a single 2x4 applied diagonally one the side(or sides) would really stiffen it up a good bit.

As it is drawn, it looks like this thing might rack a good bit as you move on it
>>
>>1987761
There's no guarantee that the monkey cutting your lumber at home depot is going to get everything to spec. You could have pieces that are 1/8" to 1/4" off in length. I recall that they usually allow up to three cuts per piece of lumber you buy.

>>1987792
I wouldn't worry about this too much. Let's say you are using 3 screws across each level on the back side - that should support your weight easily, especially in this configuration where your boards are all distributing their weight over each step below them. You could also consider nails for this. They're easier to use than you think. And use a driver instead of a drill if you can.

>Spray paint
Unless you have spray painted other furniture before, I don't recommend this. Sanding it and leaving it as-is would look better than a drippy paint job. If you want to save money you can do no stain/paint or you can try a soap finish. No joke it's just soap flakes rubbed into the wood. It isn't as permanent, but if feels silky smooth. Also get a carpenters square or speed square and a level so that you don't end up with crooked stairs.
>>
Thanks for helping

>>1987792
>Do you have any way to cut a groove for the boards to sit in
I think I have a hand plane somewhere, but I was hoping not to as that would probably add twice the time to the project
>salt in the glue
neat

>>1987800
>#9 in a reasonable length
I have five pounds of #8x3" 'Coarse Thread' and 30ish #10x3.5" 'General Purpose', with drilled holes before hand
>a single 2x4 applied diagonally one the side
Might do that over the plywood because they're suppose to have a use as shelving as well. Was additionally planning on buying a bunch of metal hanging strap to both secure the loft bed to studs in the wall and to this for stability

>>1987814
>usually allow up to three cuts per piece of lumber you buy.
Ah fug. At least that'll let me get it into my car
>I wouldn't worry about this too much.
oh good
>And use a driver instead of a drill if you can.
Can you expand on this? I was planning on using a power drill with drill bits and driver bits
>Spray paint
That's a good point. Will avoid for now.
>>
File: IMG_20201228_223844.jpg (2.05 MB, 3268x4017)
2.05 MB
2.05 MB JPG
>>1987641
Here's a pic so you guys can see what I'm talking about.
>>
>>1988707
Try taking lighter passes increasing the depth with each time and moving much much slower. I even do this with even $100 carbide bits.
>>
>>1988707
too much speed moving through a router cut will burn wood contributes to this as well. density of a wood figures in too. suggest to practice cuts into scrap piece to get bit depth and move speed right
>>
>>1988764
>>1988778
Alright, thanks for the tips. I'll try that in a few days. It was like a storm of wood dust while I was using it, I'm going to have to figure out some sort of system to fix that. Which I'm guessing will just be the shop vac tube with a weight or something near the workpiece. Should I do 1/2 depth passes or 1/4 depth?
What type of wood do you guys prefer to use a router on? I want to make some picture frames and signs.
>>
Any ideas how to make the end an even level?
Was cut by circular saw but in two parts which made 2 uneven levels
>>
>>1958712
will wobble side to side yyo need some diagonal bracing lad. triangles.
>>
What size is the depth adjustment bolt on most hand planes? I need to fix the thread on the knob because one side won't go all the way in. I was just at a hardware store and tried every size bolt they have and nothing worked?
>>
>>1988707
Roman ogee is normally a route you see on trimwork like baseboard. I use a 1/16" straight bit a lot for carving out inlays, a 1/2" roundover for speaker cabinet edges, and flush cut bits come in handy all the time when you're using a pattern or just want two things to be the same.

There's kind of a tempo to sending the router through the material to prevent burning. I also don't like to hog the entire amount of material out in one pass. With plywood it's very easy to blow out the veneer surface layer, so it's interesting you haven't run into this.

You can do box joints and doves with some practice and the right jig. Good luck and stay on it.
>>
>>1990105
Vintage stanleys?b 9/32 24tpi reverse threaded. You'll find more taps/die sets than available rods.
>>
>>1990202
what should i do to fix this? new knob?
>>
>>1952579
Isn't that true of all miter saws? They're more for rough and finish carpentry, where tolerances are +/- 1/16 in because it will get puttied and painted anyway?
>>
>>1959287
Not to be a safety fag but i wouldn't use a saw without a splitter. Doesnt get in the way and it's cheap insurance against a nasty injury. I also play guitar and want to keep all 10 fingers.
>>
>>1954379
I'd get a router or at least circ saw to cut the dadoes for the shelves. Then rip it in half to get the two sides of the shelving. If we're talking free standing and not built in that is.

That australian boomer dude on twitter had a pretty good video series about making a bookshelf, and he showed how to do each step with multiple different tools. Like for cutting dadoes he did it with a hand tool router, saw and chisel, power router and i think a table saw.
>>
>>1990211
What threads are woobly? the rod or knob? If its a brass knob it should take a crude re-threading from the steel threaded rod (anti-clockwise to tighten). A donor plane with missing Iron/broken tote is about the same cost as some single use taps and 9/32 thread repair files.
>>
>>1990322
the front threads on the knob, the bolt is fine, i can thread it backwards its just not long enough to get it to the front of the knob to try and fixing the threading. I just bought 8 planes from estate sale so I'll combine parts. probably get the threading bit down the road. thanks
>>
File: Snapchat-206937457~2.jpg (306 KB, 1920x1080)
306 KB
306 KB JPG
Question similar to >>1972108

I have an outdoor cat who loves hanging out with me in the garage. I'm getting a bunch of new saws and tools as a late Christmas gift which means I can finally get into woodworking. Should I be worried about her being around all the saw dust and such? Pic related, her inspecting a new workbench I also got for Christmas
>>
>>1990260
I'm going to get one. The damn thing shot another piece of wood out today, luckily it was a small one and missed me.
>>
>>1990503
The power equipment might be loud enough to scare her away when it's on. But think of her tiny little lungs and imagine all that dust. Maybe you should invest in a simple dust collection system.
>>
File: Snapchat-357354666.jpg (771 KB, 1152x2170)
771 KB
771 KB JPG
>>1990503
The dust will kill her or end her life sooner than it should. There are retards that put 'free animal bedding' all the time on CL and FBMP. A girls parents who I rode horses with used some for about 6 months and it put their horse into collick and killed it. Wood shavings are fine for animals for dust will kill em
>>
>>1990515
>>1990519
Thanks for the replies. She trusts me enough to stick around when I use a jigsaw and power washer so she'd probably be right around the dust. I definitely don't wanna do any harm to her, she's a great guard cat who attacks meth heads that snoop around
>>
so i made a home gym (metal fabricator, so this is were I might have gone wrong) Laid a floor in a gravel floor barn of 2x18mm OSB boards on top of each other, with a 18mm sheet of Plywood on top of that, all screwed together. Drilled thru all that and put a M8/14mmOD shield anchor in the wood and used it to clamp the squat rack to the wood. Have I majorly dun fucked up? it all seems to be holding ok but I read now shield anchors are meant to be for brickwork?
>>
>>1990552
Take the Paul Sellers pill and use hand tools. Then you only have to shoo her away occasionally when you are sanding, which you should only have to do the minimum amount of after getting things close with chisels/planes/spokeshaves. Sawing by hand produces coarser saw dust that is not airborne.
>>
>>1986719
I’ve read if you mix the woods sawdust in with some wood glue it stains just like the rest of the wood
>>
>>1989717
Plane probably best bet. Or some serious sanding on a belt sander
>>
>>1952588
you can get a small trim router for like 60 bucks
the one makita sells is like 130 but tons of other ppl sell it under different names
Harbor Freight sells it as Baldwin brand I think for 60 bucks
or look on CL, there are usually routers on CL for cheap
>>
>>1953572
African Mahogany is reasonably cheap and would be less fibrous
A cheap dense exotic is a wood called Padauk, it's very similar in feel to Indian Rosewood but a lot cheaper. It gives off nasty cheeto orange dust that can cause lung irritation though so use a mask, that would give very very high resolution.
>>
>>1958886
Best router for doing substantial work is the Triton MOF001 or the one up from it
Its about 225 and has everything in one unit, it has a built in router table lift, it can switch between plunge and fixed base without changing bases, has a micro adjust, rack and pinion to ease into plunge cuts, single wrench collet, and the on/off is at your finger tip so you can have both hands on the handles at startup, dual depth stops, legit soft start, is quiet (as far as routers go). I had the ubiquitous Bosch EVS 1617 before and the Triton blows it out of the water, the Bosch was a piece of shit compared to it.
>>
>>1990866
>Sawing by hand produces coarser saw dust that is not airborne
I dunno man, whenever I cut more than a few inches with the weeb saw without a dust mask I feel like shit for a day or so.
>>
>>1952446
I ask this in The Machinist thread, but nobody replied to me, so maybe you guys can give me some insight...
I want to make a small tray out of a piece of brass, say 4"x6". If I use a piece that is maybe 3/4" thick, is it possible to use a standard router to carve out the middle if the tray, say 1/4“ deep with an edge of maybe 1/2“? If this is possible, what kind of bit should I use? I was thinking maybe a core box bit. What type of material should the bit be made out of?
>>
>>1991072
HSS aluminum down cut spiral. On amyzon. 20 clams
>>
>>1991037
wat. Really? That has not been my experience, though I mainly use western style saws (I do own a ryoba and a dozuki and occasionally use them). At the very least, when you hand saw, the dust isn't being thrown at 1000's of rpm.
>>
>>1991128
Great, thanks for the info. I already bought "uxcell 1/2-Inch Diameter Bottom Cleaning Router Bit 1/4-Inch Shank" thinking it would work, but I'm guessing the CNC bit is probably better. I don't have either of these bits so I'll just get them both and use the flat one on wood and the down-cut one on brass.
>>
>>1991128
downcut will push the chips into the pocket
upcut will evacuate the chips

>uxcell 1/2-Inch Diameter Bottom Cleaning Router Bit 1/4-Inch Shank

this wont work, you have no way of moving downwards into the pocket

you want something like this
https://www.amazon.com/SpeTool-Flutes-inches-Carbide-Coated/dp/B07NWGM4DJ/ref=sr_1_19?dchild=1&keywords=upcut+2+flute&qid=1609526798&s=hi&sr=1-19

that said, routing metal by hand is extremely sketchy, I wouldn't try it unless I had a very ridgid setup with the work clamped very tightly and a substantial router sled jig setup.
>>
>>1991602
also, you still have to drill to depth with that upcut and then rout
I wouldn't try this unless you know what you are doing, potential for it throwing the router at you with a very sharp bit going 20000 rpm is high.
>>
File: Photo0130.jpg (68 KB, 800x600)
68 KB
68 KB JPG
recycling
>>
File: d8.jpg (27 KB, 660x660)
27 KB
27 KB JPG
>>1991683
>recycling
>>
File: 20210101_133736.jpg (3.28 MB, 4032x3024)
3.28 MB
3.28 MB JPG
I made a box from paulownia. It holds delicate objects.
>>
>>1991762
Where did you get paulownia?
I've been trying to find an online vendor for 4/4-8/4 stock and can't.
>>
File: 20210101_133804.jpg (3.37 MB, 4032x3024)
3.37 MB
3.37 MB JPG
>>1991762
Local guy had a couple boards. Never looked online.
>>
File: PXL_20210102_181714235.jpg (1.05 MB, 1457x2592)
1.05 MB
1.05 MB JPG
Retard here. Built this whole big dumb thing and it has a slight wobble.

How to remove wobble?
>>
Whoa, it's a collectors item guys, I guess it really is worth the money even with it being fucking broken.
>>
>>1992658
take it off the mat
>>
>>1991762
I love the dovetails and scribe marking.
I don't even want to consider the time investment if that's hand carved.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZvcK1unHfs
>>
>>1993394
>complete condition
Minus the whole side of the plane that broke off.
>>
>>1993511
>handle is in better shape than most
>you can see 2 breakages and all the pieces are different colors
>>
>>1993495
It wobbles off the mat.. that was just where it was when I took the pic of it
>>
>>1991037
It probably depends on the kerf and cutting depth per pass. All my power tools hog out at least an entire 1/8". The dust is finer the more teeth the blades have, like the finish cutting blades. If you're using a hand tool or bandsaw with a lower profile then you should get much less dust. Just make yourself a dust collection system.
>>
>>1993394
That's a piece of shit. Do not buy. There are way more in better condition than that.
>>
>>1993540
Find a flat surface. Take some coins or shims and figure out which leg is high. Measure the shim height. Cut that measurement out of the three other legs.

I've had bolt together prefab wayfair kitchen furniture wobble. I had to loosen the fasteners, twist the piece, and refasten. Wood isn't a perfect medium, so it requires finesse from time to time.
>>
File: vroomer.jpg (20 KB, 300x285)
20 KB
20 KB JPG
I just want a 18 gauge brad nailer that burries the head below the surface and doesn't leave marks.
>>
I’m looking to build a simple workbench/desk (for my ‘shop’) and found this drawing online

The idea is to build 3 of them to put next to each other, and rearrange them when I need more space or a bigger surface. One will hold the drill press, vice and miter saw.

The surface will be 15mm or 18mm plywood.
The uprights and main joists (the ones visible in the picture) will be made out of 33x89 beams (1.3” x 3.5”), the three supports under the surface out of 33x56 (1.3” x 2.2”) beams.
Work surface is 1220x610 (4’ x 2’) for each, height 1m (3’)

Thoughts about the design/dimensions? Will it be sturdy enough with just long wood screws? Add some dowels between the uprights maybe?
Also can I simply remove one of the front lower horizontal joists so that I can put a chair/my feet underneath?
>>
>>1975326
That's adorable. Good work.
>>
Couple years ago i wanted to get in to woodworking, went and bought a bunch of stuff. Of course i made a workbench first, just out of lowes garbage lumber. But once i wanted to make something nice and started trying to find actual nice wood i was completely turned off at how expensive it all is. How do you source quality wood with spending so much?
>>
>>1994808
Don't get anything other than dimensional pine/fir/spruce from the big box stores and be picky about knots, which are the most annoying thing. Plenty of good furniture was made from soft wood. Your main competition know is fake wood so frankly that is more authentic anyway. The other option is a lumber yard depending on their policies and your transportation. Theoretically you would get higher grade (less knots, straighter grain, etc) wood this way and for cheaper to boot. As far as hard wood, buy at a store for hard wood and hope for the best. Shit is just kind of expensive. Some people salvage wood from old furniture but with how good veneering got, it is a bit of a gamble as it may just be pine under that anyway.
>>
>>1994760
You are right to be suspicious Everything on your bench can be 20mm plywood.
>>
>>1994760
>The idea is to build 3 of them to put next to each other, and rearrange them when I need more space or a bigger surface.
One thing I saw recently you might consider is from this video, at the 11 minute mark
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EA1jeViV4l8
Basically, the legs are sturdy enough and the table top is just screwed on, so you can take it apart, and then have three slightly smaller sets of legs that you can have three tables side by side that all stack neatly when not using the whole thing. Don't know if it's gonna be as sturdy in wood as steel, but should be pretty good. And you can definitely skimp on one set of horizontal joints if you have a cross beam on the other side.
>>
I have a hatchet like this and want to make a wooden handle for it. What would be the best way to do this? Sorry if noob question, will literally be the first time making anything with wood
>>
>>1994943
But can I put 5mm diameter wood screws in the edges of 20mm ply without it splitting? Also can’t accurately cut them length wise as I don’t have a table saw
>>
Scrolling past this thread and seeing "wwg" makes me think of a new general called "wcgw" or What Could Go Wrong general.
>>
23/32" (((3/4in))) garbo plywood $37
15/32" (((1/2in))) hardwood plywood $49.99 + tip

Why can't they make lumber to actual thickness? My dado and router sets are exact measurements. Plywood should be too.
>>
>>1996320
Because metric unfortunately.
>>
>>1996320
They make router bits sized for plywood thicknesses like those.
>>
Making a dust collection system with a shop vac and a bucket. Looking online, some of the cyclones to put on top are really expensive (like $150 CAD for the kit). Some are way cheaper, and as a baseline I could always just run the vacuum through a bucket without a cyclone. Is it worth it for a good cyclone? Was looking at the Dust Deputy



Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.