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I want to do some light machining with a standard dremel drill press, is this a bad idea? By "light" I mean making a small gear/replacement part or tapping a hole.
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>>1550562
I don't know how you can thread a hole with a Dremel, but it would take a while to just drill through something with that tiny motor.
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>>1550617
> thread a hole
Uh...
> make a small gear
Threading a hole is the least of op's problems!
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Yes it's a bad idea for light machining.
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>>1550562
kek - wtf do they even make that for?
OP, just get a standard drill mount, before you have to seek new definitions of 'light' - in Yurop? they come up in Aldi and shit for relative buttons.
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>>1550562
Not doable with even a full size drill press, trust me I know. Something that you think should be rigid is actually flexible as fuck when you apply mechanical forces to it in the wrong directions. All you will get is frustration and ruined metal, and broken plastic in the case of that dremel. I eventually got a real tabletop mini mill (sherline) and even those things flex to the point of being un-useable without extreme patience.
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>>1550562
No, this is not possible.
A dremel could be used for light surface / edge grinding, but that's all.
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a dremel is shit for any job that requires torque and small RPMs such as drilling and tapping holes

Honestly i dont know why they even advertise drills for the dremel
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>>1550562
There is no operation that you should be using a dremel for where such a press stand comes in handy. The similar ones for hand drills are also completely useless dogshit. Buy a cheap drill press and you'll at least be able to drill holes decently, if not mill or tap anything.
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Id say its worth a shot. you wouldn't be out that much money even if it didn't work.
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>>1550720
>Buy a cheap drill press and you'll at least be able to drill holes decently, if not mill or tap anything.


Unfortunately you won't be doing any of those... accurately any ways. You don't realize just how fucked tools have become due to the flood of cheap chinese shit until you start trying to machine things and then see how nothing is square.
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>>1550748
talkin bout IN COMPARISON TO fucking Dremel 'Press' anon. I doubt OP was looking for x-thousandth accuracy in the first place, and a cheep chink drill press / stand is still going to be orders of magnitude improvement, while comparable expenditure
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>>1550562
Depends on what material you are using. Balsa wood, foam, light plastic, thin wood? You'd probably be fine. Metal or thick wood? Forget about it, you'll be better off with a scroll saw. I have a Dremel 4000 and it's fun as fuck, but it has it's limitations. I usually just use it for cutting, grinding, and sanding stuff smooth. If you don't already have one I highly recommend getting one. It's one of my more used power tools, they are just so convenient and versatile in their use.
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>>1550753
>while comparable expenditure
In regards to what you get for your money, yes. But not even in terms of thousandths of an inch accuracy; you can put a drill in the chuck and look at the table from the side and visually see how out of square it is.
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>>1550562
not op. I have a foredom rotary tool, and was thinking of getting something similar.

could I put a through 1/8 in aluminum? or drill out a stuck screw?

www.foredom.net is a bit more baller than dremel
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>>1550656
>wtf do they even make that for?
drilling PCBs, for one. small drills want very high spindle speed, and very little feed pressure. it isn't good for much else.

Tap your holes by hand, and if you want to make a gear, use a file like they did in ancient times.
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>>1550697
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>>1551068
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>>1551070
>Tap holes on a drill press
Versatapper.
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I built a CNC machine that runs a Dremel, I carved some pretty intricate pine penises complete with nut sack and veins.

You could use it as a dildo for a baby.
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>>1550656
>>1551053
It's actually really useful for stuff like prop and model making. In addition to drilling, you can lower the head down to the bottom plate and use it with a side-cutting bit to cut small odd-shaped parts out of stock or put a sanding drum on it and use it as a mini spindle sander. You can also spin the head around and use it to hold the Dremel at various angles. I used to date a cosplayer who was really into "swordswoman" type characters and it was an invaluable tool for doing all the intricate little parts that go into fantasy armor and props.
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>>1550656
I use it to drill holes in PCBs
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>>1550748
I'm looking for advice on what to get/look for accuracy wise if anyone wants to pass knowledge. I have a cheap as free drill press with a power drill insert which is good enough for most stuff, I'm looking for something better for some precision stuff I'm thinking about doing.
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>>1551191
Supremely underrated comment
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>>1551307
>Supremely underrated comment

he mentioned penis, nut sack, and dildo. pretty much the trifecta for the 14 year old contingent of 4chan.
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>>1550748
I'm using a "good quality" stand, that you can mount you drill on.
Thin seems rock solid and does the job for light (5mm) drilling in sheet metal.
But you better pre drill and take it easy, cause as soon you apply any pressure the whole system flexes a lot and the drill runs off.
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>>1551325
Only a fool doesn't appreciate the value of homemade baby dildos. You probably can't molest worth a damn, and therefore can sweetly get the fuck out of my face. Thanks senpai
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>>1551288
Old American made drill presses are good. Generally, stuff made before 1970 is solid. Stuff made after 1970 can be hit or miss. VintageMachinery.org is a powerful resource. OWWM.org is also very helpful. Register, which is free, to unlock more forums.

Some good brands:

Delta/Rockwell
Atlas
Beaver (Canadian, of course)
Buffalo Forge
South Bend
Sprunger Brothers
Walker-Turner
Craftsman (a few different OEMs made for them)
Powermatic (old stuff good, new stuff Taiwanese)
Clausing (old stuff good, new stuff way out of your price range)
JC Penney (rebadged Rockwell/Delta)

Rockwell Delta had a sub-brand named Homecraft. They were good but were aimed at homeowners and were 'light duty' for their era. They blow away anything from Harbor Freight but don't snap up an 11-XXX series drill press (Homecraft) expecting it to be on par with a 15-XXX series or 17-XXX series (professional grade).

Montgomery Ward's house brand was Powr-Craft (like Sears Craftsman). Some of their stuff was good, some less so. Vintage Machinery has a list of OEMs based on the model numbers used so look them up.

There are many other companies that made decent drill presses but they are much harder to find than the above. Duro, AA Products, etc. Some are quite good. Do your research.

Crag's List is a great place to find stuff. Facebook Marketplace, while a colossal pain in the ass to use, is also a source. Check eBay for local actions (especially if they are local pickup only) as you can get lucky and get something good for cheap. There may also be local auction houses in your area to keep an eye on. Gumtree, if you are in the commonwealth, is also a great source. Estate sales are like mana from heaven. Disinterested kids/spouses selling 'crap' for cheap to get it out of the house. Shop sales, retirement/business liquidations, etc. are also good. If you hear of a local school liquidating their woodshop you better be there with bells on because they often had professional quality stuff.
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>>1551856
That helps a lot, thanks!
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>>1550748
>You don't realize just how fucked tools have become due to the flood of cheap chinese shit until you start trying to machine things and then see how nothing is square.

This is what happens when you buy cheap tools.
They dont make em like they used to, because people used to spend a whole paycheck on a drill press, not expect to pay the $200 for one nowadays.
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>>1552775
And when they did have cheap ones, they didn't last and were thrown away a long time ago. The quality tools last to be bought and sold today.
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>>1552840
oh, survivor bias
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>>1552855
There is some truth to it though. For example, I have a hard drive that is 10 years old (WD 1TB Caviar Black) and has been in constant use the entire time. That is almost unheard of for a hard drive to last that long. I work in tech and we have to replace our desktop hard drives at least every 5 years. If a drive lasts longer than that you start counting the days.

Meanwhile, my Delta Unisaw from 1951 that was used in a school shop its entire life up until I bought it is still cutting boards like a champ. Original motor too.
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>>1552953
>That is almost unheard of for a hard drive to last that long.
not anymore
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>>1552953

Comparing hard disk life to a table saw. Lordy.
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>>1552963
Uhh, your stats back me up. The average 'age' of most of those drives is 3-6 years (days divided by drive count). They don't have a single drive on that list that is nearly as old as my example. We all know its a bell curve anyway. Some drives fail right out of the gate, most fail in the middle, and some, the survivors, stretch ouch into the Y-axis forever.

>>1552976
We were talking about survivor bias. The thing does not matter, only if it lasts longer then its kin. Saying you have a car that is 30 years old might not seem like much but if it were a dog it would be a big deal. Similarly, saying you have a table saw that is pushing 70 and spent its life in a hard use environment is kind of a big deal. Show me a Harbor Freight table saw from even 30 years ago that is still going.
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>>1552953
post power-on hours faget
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>>1553301
CrystalDiskinfo says 47,451 hours. It will be coming up on 5 and a half years of power on time.
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>>1551068
>>1551070
The tangential load on the bearing is the least of your concerns. Literally the whole column of the press flexes when you start cutting so that you are always cutting at an angle even if your chuck was originally square with the bed by some miracle. No two passes are ever the same and the tool even digs itself in and pulls the chuck down to really fuck things up.
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>>1553320
This depends very much on the drill press. I have a DP-600 and the column weighs more than most modern drill presses. The quill also has a lock, so it doesn't move even if it bits into the work a little. Does that mean this replaces a mill? Fuck no. But can you mill was it? Sure. Don't go cutting gears with it or anything but you can do decent work if you know the limitations.
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>>1553315
Rookie numbers.



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