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Sewing Thread: post your sewing related questions here.

Sewing noob here. Pic related is an issue I'm running into, the material is 4 way stretch nylon. When sewing the binding to the panel it keeps getting pulled right, throwing everything off and forcing me to either lift the foot multiple times to realign, or just ruining it and making me restart. What could be the issues here - am I using the wrong type of foot? Should I use lighter foot pressure? Thanks, all help is appreciated
>>
>>10817921
this is just how that type of fabric behaves.
The easiest solution I can think of is to just pin everything, baste it by hand, remove pins, then go over it with the machine.
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>>10817923
I played with the foot pressure and found that lighter pressure results in the binding being fed straight, but now it's skipping stitches. I will try changing the needle and using tissue paper backing next
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>>10817958
good luck anon, and yes a tissue paper backing could help.
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>>10817958
Get a stretch needle, I also had a problem with skipped stitches on fabric like that in the past and the needle solved it.
>>
>>10817921
Get a walking foot ASAP. You don't need to get the expensive brand name ones (JoAnn will have $40 Singer/Brother feet which are a total scam), a cheapo one off Amazon will work well enough. It's nearly essential for stretch fabrics, and I honestly use mine on all sorts of fabric.

Also follow >>10817963 advice
>>
Some progress! To get to this point I changed out my older 90/14 jersey needle for a new 80/12 jersey needle, and I attached my cheapo walking foot (I had removed this before to have more access to the back of the fabric to help pull it through the needle). I basted the binding to the panel first, then folded it over and zig zagged it into place. I didn't pin anything in place this time so I imagine that contributed to the messiness, I'll try pinning it next time.

Question: my machine (kenmore 1251) doesn't seem to have a way to adjust the needle position left or right, the needle is always centered. That means if I try to line the fabric up so it sews closer to the edge, that the fabric is only passing under one side of the dogs. How should I adjust for this?
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>>10818225
serious question. why on earth are you trying to sew this when you clearly have no idea what you're doing. you need to practice first. i have no idea why no one else is telling you that. you're just wasting this material. the type of fabric you're using is meant for a serger, and is intermediate to advanced to sew on a regular machine.
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>>10818229
The fastest way to get to your destination is in a straight line, anon. The material is inexpensive and I'm doing this for fun, difficulty can be overcome with trial and error.
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>>10818225
>>10817921
A couple of things if all you've got is a regular sewing machine, anon:

- stabilize the fabric. Tissue paper. Water-soluble stabilizer. Tissue paper on both sides. You need to stabilize it somehow and make it act like a regular, stiff fabric until you remove it from the machine.

- a zigzag stitch will work better than straight. Straight pushes the fabric and causes it to warp especially if you don't have a walking foot. Legit no one will notice or care if you use a zigzag finish vs. straight stitch at this tier of sewing.

- pin perpendicular to where you're sewing. This is like one of the weirdest mistakes I keep seeing. Pinning straight may seem to save you time/pins but the fabric will slide with the pressure of the foot and feed dogs.

- get the proper needle, get the walking foot, play with stitch lengths, etc.

- for the love of god please stabilize the fabric
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>>10818324
Thanks for the tips! Pinning perpendicular definitely helped in this most recent go, it looks much neater than my previous attempts. Looks like I keep skipping a stitch here and there so I'm sure using tissue backing will help with that. So far the things that have helped most are:
- walking foot
- new jersey needle
- using plenty of pins
- starting the thread out on a piece of paper towel then using that to pull the stretch material through the foot for the first couple inches

Also I've found if I go slow and controlled enough I can more or less control how close to the edge I sew, so maybe I don't need to be able to adjust needle position after all.

Overall I'm happy with progress! A little more practicing and I'll attempt my first piece I think
>>
>>10818248
this type of fabric isn't the way to learn. jesus you're dense.
>>
>>10818324
I have been sewing for a number of years now.
But I have never thought of using tissu paper to stabilize jersey fabric.
Then again, I avoid using jersey. It's a pain in the ass.

I'll considere it next time.Thanks anon.
>>
>for the love of god please stabilize the fabric

I've been using Elmer's School Glue for this. Never could get pins to work with spandex.
>Glue seams together
>Let it dry
>Sew (zigzag or stretch stitch)
>wash out glue with warm water

Takes a while, but I get good straight seams on spandex fabrics.
>>
So I was considering a Brother CS5055 to get started, is there a better choice in that range?

I did sort of want to find something where using a pedal is option because it feels like it would be less of a split of my focus. Tried before years ago and getting the speed right with the pedal was my issue.
>>
Does anyone have any good patterns for cutsews or cardigans? I most work with wovens and i just have a sewing machine and some ball point needles, would i really need a walking foot for knits?
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>>10817921
You need a stretch needle and double sided iron on interfacing on the inside inside will help, make sure to use low heat since it's nylon.
>>
is a singer 4452 a decent sewing machine for beginners? my dad is donating his to me since he doesn't use it but I have no idea how to sew yet. I'm planning on making clothing and maybe the occasional cosplay or plushie with it. would it be ok for those uses?
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>>10821255
I dont have that exact model but i have a singer 4423 which i think is basically the same except it has less stitch options. As a beginner myself I found this sewing machine to be pretty easy to use, so I would say yeah, what helped me learn how to use it was a playlist of youtube videos made for it, i found a playlist by the same channel specifically for the singer heavy duty 4452: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLri6UA9U9QAJ6Ud7zTJNTAXSsDzkMJ-XX
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hi, /n/ here. this machine is at my local thrift store for $40. I read the faq in the stupid questions thread and it says new singer is shit but iunno what year this machine is.
model is singer 5830c.

I'm going to have to go back with a power cord to see if it even runs. also after I left I realized I didn't notice a foot pedal, you need that, right? maybe it's there or I can get an aftermarket one?

quick search for the model didn't reveal much. any opinions or experience?

in return if you have questions about bikes I should be able to answer them
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>>10821373
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>>10821374
looks like there's a plate missing in previous picture?

thanks
>>
>>10821290
ok that's good to know, I probably won't be using most of the stitch options to start out anyways. thanks anon, that playlist is very thorough
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>>10821374
Yes anon, there should be a cover there as thats where your bobbin goes and you dont want your fabric catching there. Are you able to remove that piece on the lower left? Many machines have storage there for tools, needles, feet and parts in there and it may have been put there so it wouldnt be out. I don't think this is a good investment for $40 though, it was probably donated for a reason.
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>>10821373
it's definitely 1990s or earlier. I can only find that it started being manufactured in the 1930s. if there is anything wrong with it you unfortunately may not be able to find the right parts to fix it
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>>10821400
I did lift the part in the rear with the little dip to lift it and there were a bunch of bobbins. I don't remember seeing the plate in there but you're right it looks like the lower left is also a compartment, I'll check for it.

>>10821409
>may not be able to find the right parts to fix it
ah, shit.

do I need a foot pedal? I thought I took a picture of the ports but there was a standard power port and then a round one I assume was the jack to a foot pedal. maybe it's a standard interchangeable jack? I'll go back to check the power and try to find the plate and pedal but if there's no pedal it's only worth it if it can easily be replaced, no?
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>>10821431
some sewing machines you are able to use without a foot pedal, I don't know if that's true for the 5830c. having a foot pedal just makes things a lot easier. a lot of singers have 3 prong pedals iirc, you would need to compare photos from product listings of replacement pedals (like pic related) to where it plugs into the machine just to be sure it'll match up.
>>
>>10821457
h., there was a 3prong jack in back of it that I assumed was for power, I'll have to look closer, thanks
>>
>>10821461
usually the foot pedal has the power cord attached to it like pic related.
>>
>>10821397
No problem :3. Also, as a beginner with sewing, be sure to research different types of fabric and which type of needle and what size you should use for them, thats really important. Also, i recommend starting sewing stuff with wovens first, because wovens are more rigid and easier to work with than knits. By the way, the brand of the sewing machine needles doesnt matter in terms of compatibility, so you dont need singer brand needles for your machine, just make sure that theyre sewing machine needles and not hand sewing needles, you can tell them apart because the hole on sewing machine needles is on the bottom, whereas the hole on hand sewing needles is on the top. Last tip, if you have any soap bars, you can use the slivers as a diy fabric marking tool, which is really handy
>>
>>10821373
This looks very similar, but more modern than my Singer and fortunately my local repair shop has never had trouble finding parts for it if it needed something fixed. My biggest issue has been finding sewing machine feet that fit.
>>10821374
The foot style is the 1mm ‘old model’ which is something you have to keep in mind when buying new feet. The new model feet have a 5mm wide bar and are incompatible with your machine. Yeah it’s missing a plate, but I’ve seen replacements being sold. I’d link you the websites but I’m in Europe so I don’t know if that would be helpful. I found replacement parts by simply searching for Singer [model] [part] and double-checking on the shop’s page if they say it’s compatible with my model.
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>>10821476
oh, cool. good to know thanks
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>>10821495
great info, thank you!
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>>10821494
thank you for all the helpful tips and advice!
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>>10821627
Aw its nothin, if you ever run into trouble later on and this thread is up, reply to me and I might see it and Ill try to help
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>>10821374
wow that's annoying but you could get someone to just 3d print a new plate.
>>
I have picrel and love the print, but don't like the skirt shape. It's too tube-like like a lot of IW skirts, and I like a nice clean A shape.

I'm thinking about detaching the skirt and shortening it to give it a better shape. Will this work how I think it will, or am I missing something?
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I want to sew a cardigan with the little rounded cute edges like edges like on picrel, but i dont know how to create that, can anyone tell me how?
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>>10822046
you mean scallops?
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>>10822052
>Update
yeah i think thats the right word, how do i make scalloped edges on knits like in that baby cardigan?
>>
>>10822059
ntayrt, but scallops are typically made using a scallop stitch (which is thick like a satin stitch), some stabilizer, and fray check. I've never seen it on a knit fabric though, usually people do lettuce hems on knits. It doesn't seem impossible but probably a bitch and a half to do because you have to work with the stretch
>>
>>10822046
The scalloped edges on that are actually knitted in that shape, if you want to get that look on a regular cutsew you’d have to just buy some trim to sew on. There’s no way you could sew scallops that tiny on any fabric anyway.
>>
>>10821900
It's a gathered skirt, so it won't be a smooth A-line once it's shortened, it'll be more cupcakey. If you were to try and recut it into an A-line, the print isn't going to line up.

>>10821373
I wouldn't buy it with that many bits missing, honestly that's the sort of thing I'd expect to be given away for free. You'd have to spend money on parts to even see if it works, not worth it.

>>10821227
At minimum a roller foot is good. Unfortunately there aren't many patterns out there for lolita knits, but you could consider making one of the Otome no Sewing bolero jackets (not like the blazers) with knit fabric such as those in Volume 3 https://misscarolbelle.wordpress.com/2016/01/31/otome-no-sewingbook-3/
>>
>>10821900
I’m not sure why you think that shortening it will give it more of an A-line shape. You can iron down the pleats all the way towards the hem to ‘tame’ the shape a bit but if you want that iconic flared classic A-line you’d have to cut the entire skirt up into panels that will badly mess up the print, and even then you’d be constrained by the hem circumference and border print. Box pleated rectangle skirts are always a little tube-y when you stick too big of petticoat under them, that’s just how it is.

>>10822046
Like the other anon said, this kind of scalloped edge is created during the knitting process so you can’t exactly recreate this with cut & sewn knit fabric. If you don’t want to sew on a separate trim you can finish the edges by hand or machine with a shell tuck hem which looks like pic related.
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>>10822152
Oh my machine actually does have that stitch setting, i always wondered what that was for, i havent tried this yet but my sort of game plan was to use a corn starch spray and iron the knit fabric to stabilize it while working with it, i dont understand what the fray check would be for though, I thought only wovens frayed?
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>>10822160
i tried looking for a trim like that but all i could really find was scallop lace trim, do you know where I can get the kind of trim you're describing?
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>>10822280
nta but crocheted lace trim would probably look the closest. though, what kind of fabric are you using anyway? most cardigans are machine knitted, not cut sewn like jersey material. i'm really surprised no one has mentioned that yet.
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>>10822275
> I thought only wovens frayed?
Yes, the technique I was describing was only for wovens. I have no clue if it would work on knits (I'd be inclined to think it wouldn't since the stretch would distort the scallops). The other anon mentioned that they're knitted in that shape or have trim sewn on and that honestly makes more sense to me
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>>10822284
okay so, im gonna be using a the Simplicity 9272 B pattern for the cardigan, and i think ill go with an interlock wool knit, i dont really have much experience with knits or even the most knowledge but from what i remember reading interlock knits are more stable than other knits, i might also use like a double knit jersey or something like that
>>
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IW pattern crochet headdress update. finally added the bows. might add some charms later. matches my gray misty sky pretty well.
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>>10822419
looks awful.
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>>10822419
I love the bows, so cute!
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>>10822419
Anon I don't know how to better put this, but it looks tacky. I get that you followed a pattern but it doesn't look Japanese lolita at all. It looks like granda's doily with Christmas bows. It looks cute in its own way like it's suitable for children or dolls.
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>>10822443
this. her crochet work is way too tight and the ribbon looks terrible. 3 kinds of cheap grey ribbon look awful together. and she thinks an old IW crocheted rectangle headdress will match misty sky, that's the most insane part of it.
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>>10822177
more or less given up on it, but it's still confusing me. there is definitely no plate lurking in the compartment. it's just bobbins in there and I tried to get into the forward section like anon noted but the whole thing slides off along with the bobbin compartment so you can fit e.g. sleeves under the needle or something. the whole plastic thing slides off, there's no more hidden storage in there.
but there doesn't seem to be an outlet for a pedal anywhere. the 3 prong outlet seems to be only for power, it doesn't have the right shape for a pedal like in >>10821457
and there's definitely no pedal lurking around anywhere, I checked. but then that must mean it's a model that doesn't use a foot pedal like the anon I just linked said?

anyway, if I remember to bring a power cord next time I'll see if it powers up at least but yeah I think it's a bust
thanks everyone for the advice
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>>10822561
literally first result on google is an ebay listing with a photo of the foot pedal, you can see it's the kind with the pedal and power cord together and it plugs into that outlet.
>>
guys, im working on a rectangle skirt right now but im kind of stumped on what to do with the waistband this time around. So for context, ive made like 2 or so rectangle skirts using 1 inch wide elastic for the whole waistband, and it was that one method where you make the waistband casing by essentially hemming the top part of the rectangle fabric """tube""" and leaving some parts unstitched to insert the elastic in with a safety pin. The thing is, Im kinda annoyed with that now, because i find that the gathers move around due to the skirt being constructed like this, and sure I could top stitch the elastic waistband, but thats also annoying because its like kinda impossible to secure the gathers in the way i would want the finished garment to be, so basically, I wanna make a separate waistband casing and gather the skirt with a basting stitch. Id like to make it a shirred waistband skirt type of deal like how some brand skirts do, but im not sure if i should use multiple smaller elastics in channels or if i should use elastic thread (which ive never worked with before and im worried it wont gather it enough or even gather it too much), im also unsure how big to make the waistband casing too. I multiplied my waist circumference by 2.75 (yeah i know its usually by 3 ((well at least for old school gothic which is the substyle i wanna make)), i just wanted to test it out because before, i did 2.5, and its kind of meh so more fullness would be better)
>>
>>10822574
Anon your rambling is awful.

Please don't accidentally make it impossible to get into your skirt.

To make the gathering more evenly distributed, give the waistband a quick stretch after you put the skirt on and manually adjust as necessary. You can also try only make the backside elasticated.
>>
>>10822574
Seconding >>10822585
You can also sew lines of vertical stitching through the waistband and elastic after the elastic has been inserted to stop the fabric moving around as much. Two lines, one in each side seam for example, should be enough. Even if you don’t have a seam to stitch-in-the-ditch through it shouldn’t be too visible between the gathers.
>>
>>10822585
Lol sorry, i was kinda sleepy when I wrote my post. Im not worried about not getting into the skirt because im gonna make the waistband at least twice my waist, so it will definitely go over my hips. The manual adjustment thing is kinda what I hate though. I dont know how to do a half elastic waist, does it require a zipper?
>>
I just discovered this gash on a new and unworn BTSSB jsk. Another tear appeared (on the left) when I started investigating and very gently pulled the fabric. It’s almost as if the fabric is just falling apart and I’m not surge there’s a way for me to fix this without it being extreme obvious?
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>>10822620
The more you lock down the gathers, the more immobilized your waistband will be. It won't matter how large you make your waistband at some point when it's locked from stretching.

Yes you can have both elastic back and side zipper.

If you wanna do a zipper, you might as well make the waistband much more fitted.
>>
>>10822596
Ill test that out on my petticoat
>>
>>10822625
First step is investigating wtf is wrong with your dress. If it's all of the same fabric in the dress that wants to fall apart upon touch, you might as well put it away in a bag forever because there's no fixing that.

If it's just these tears, you can try mending by darning or decorative stitches, or ironing mending fabric or patches. All of these methods will be visible to some degree. For truly invisible mending, there's advanced techniques like kaketsugi that you'll likely need to take to a specialty shop for (and need to bring some matching fabric to weave into the gaps).
>>
I need to re-sew the waistband of a chiffon skirt but the material seems really flimsy. There's already some pulled threads in the skirt's waistline where the fabric gathers.

Is there a way I can re-sew this without making the pulls worse? I'm considering taking this to a local seamstress but I don't know if they'd fare much better.
>>
>>10822625
I had a old Comme des garçon top do exactly this same thing, the damage was the same long slash like holes. It was some cellulose crepe fabric. At first I wondered if moths were eating it but it lacked the tiny hole pattern you often see in bug related damage and continued disintegrating after I sealed it in a bag. Granted it was a couple decades old. I never figured out the cause.

If it isn’t bugs, the only thing I can guess is that the mill or factory treated the fabric with a chemical softener that’s causing some kind of slow degradation of the fabric.
>>
>>10822631
I tried other random sections and they seem fine. Going to try the iron on mending fabric today, thanks for the suggestion!

>>10822658
It thankfully is not bugs. I inspected my other dresses and did not see any evidence of bites/damage. If the latter is the case, should I separate it from my other dresses? And should I worry about further damage even after washing?
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>>10817921
How do I add an organza lining to a lolita skirt?
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>>10822712
Look up a tutorial for basics of making organza lining. Baste it to the waist seam allowance of the skirt if it's unlined or between the lining and shell (or somewhere where your stitching will be invisible/hidden from the outside).try on the skirt and check for puffiness/drape, and sew it down if you like it.
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>>10822574
I would recommend 1 inch elastic. For the waist band cut a strip of fabric 2.5 inches wide by your hip measurement plus 10 inches. So if your hips are 40 inches, make the strip 50 inches by 2.5 inches. Fold the strip in half with the good side facing out. Sew it down with a .25 inch seam allowance. Thread the elastic through. You can now sew the waistband into a tube. Gather the top of your rectangle skirt. Sew the top of the skirt to the waistband piece. The raw edge of the waist band should be facing up. I would serge this seam if you have a serger. You can iron the seam allowance down towards the skirt and topstitch. This way will allow you to get it on with no issues and the gathers won't bunch up all in one place.

Side note, before you gather the skirt place pins at every quarter of the skirt and the waist band. After you pull the basting thread you match up the pins on the skirt and waist band and this helps you get your gathering evenly spaced. For gathering you can also do a wide zig zag stitch over dental floss. You just pull the floss like you would the basting stitch.
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>>10822730
Oh interesting, by inserting the elastic in the waistband casing before sewing it on the top of skirt, this prevents unpredictable gathering from sewing the waistband first and then inserting the elastic. I think ill try this out, thank you
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>>10817921
If I used a stable knit fabric on a sewing pattern for a puff sleeve button up blouse intended for woven fabric, would I end up with a cute cutsew or an ugly monstrosity?
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>>10822843
You don't really need a shirt pattern. Just take a t shirt that fits you well and use it as a pattern. For puff sleeves trace your t shirt sleeve onto a piece of paper. It will be half a sleeve so fold it in half or trace it to get a whole sleeve. Mark vertical lines around every inch or 2cm on your sleeve pattern. Cut on those lines. Spread those pieces of paper so your sleeve will have doubled in volume. Trace sleeve on new piece of paper. Now you have a puff sleeve pattern. This is called the slash and spread method.

For making the shirt, sew the shoulder seams and then pin the sleeves into the arm hole. You'll need to gather it. Put a pin on each end and one in the middle. Put a pin in the middle of that, and then another and another until it's all pinned. Sew the sleeves in. Now pin the side seams together and then sew. You'll sew one side seam from the bottom of the shirt to the bottom of the sleeve. Hem the bottom of shirt, maybe add some lace. Hem the bottom of the sleeves with a hem wide enough to add elastic. Essentially you can use a wide rolled hem like a casing. Add some lace and then thread the elastic in. You can add a keyhole in the back to get it over your head. To draft a peter pan collar, you trace the top of the front and back neckline with the shoulder seams matched up. This is the top of the collar. Draw your prefered shape. Cut out two collars and sew right sides together. Turn and iron. Sew this to the shirt by pinning it to the inside of the shirt. Sew along the neckline and flip the collar so it lays on the outside of the shirt and hides the raw edge. Topstitch the collar. You can use a bit of bias tape to cover the raw edge of the key hole. Add a button to one side of the keyhole and a small loop of thin elastic to the other. Boom. Cutsew.
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>>10822780
If you want a different way of doing it, or prefer video instructions, I like this video. It gives you a skirt with a flat front and elastic in the back and pockets. The skirt in the video obviously isn't wide enough for lolita, but it's easy to add in your own measurements. You can also make the back waistband only wide enough to get over your hips, so half your hip measurement plus about 15 inches. Just make sure that between the front and back waistband you can still get it on. You'd gather the back of the skirt like the video shows for the front and sew it to the waistband as shown and still add the elastic as shown.

https://youtu.be/QIpXlW3pULw
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>>10823159
Im saving this, thank you
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>>10823189
too bad it's wrong.
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>>10823191
Huh? Whys it wrong?
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>>10823256
Because not only will this result in a poorly made item, to begin with, but it wouldn't make a proper cardigan. As someone already mentioned, cardigans are made by machine knitting the entire garment, not sewing, the only thing sewn on most of them is buttons or detailing made of other materials. Even the scalloped edging is done by machine knitting. Look at brand or normie cardigans you own and you'll see what I mean. Using jersey or some other knit fabric will just make a jacket or cutsew. A cardigan is a specific piece of clothing defined by the fabric, like dungarees, it's not just the item itself. Jackets, cardigans, boleros, they're all different pieces of clothing a skirt isn't a dress. You can't use the terms interchangeably.
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>>10823262
That post never mentioned cardigans, though. It was about making a cutsew.
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>>10822152
>>10822160
>>10822046
Buying separate trim would be the fastest but there are a few different options to create scallops. In this case since it's a knit I'd recommend scallop tucks
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>>10823327
Have you used a knit scallop trim before? If so, do you have any recommendations for good trim?
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>>10823262
ntayrt, but why didn't you just say that in your original comment instead of waiting for anon to reply and ask?
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>>10823262
That post was replying to someone asking if they could sew a blouse pattern with knit fabric…it doesn’t have anything to do with cardigans.
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>>10823352
no, it was a cutsew. anon probably responded to the wrong post.
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>>10822843
You’ll end up with a baggy cutsew with wobbly seams. Patterns for wovens have positive ease included whereas patterns for knits have zero or negative ease. Patterns for knits also have less curved armscyes and sleeve caps. Often the front and back armscyes in knit patterns are identical while in woven patterns they’re different. I’m not sure how to explain this (ESL) but with stretch fabrics it’s better to let the fabric do the shaping, whereas with wovens you have to make the seams curve properly around the body for the garment to fit. Patterns for knits don’t have darts for the same reason. It’s also more difficult to sew complex curves on a serger.
You can use an existing t-shirt as a pattern like the other anon suggested or look for a pattern designed for knits. ONS has several cutsew patterns with Peter Pan collars but I don’t think any of them have a front button closure, so you’d have to add that yourself. I’d recommend using special stretchy fusible interfacing for the button placket, neckline facing and maybe the cuffs.

>>10823328
Nayrt but I don’t think I’ve ever seen stretchy scallop trim of the kind you’re looking for anywhere, and I spend a lot of time looking at trims. You could use non-stretch trim and accept that whatever edge you sew it on is going to lose its stretch, or you can use the shell tuck hem. I have several (store-bought) knit tops and even a cardigan with the shell tuck hem and it looks really cute.
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>>10823374
Ah okay thanks, does this ease concept hold true with stable knits? I dont really care very much about making a button placket, I was just saying that as an example. Do you know which OnS mooks have cutsew pattern? Ive only really seen scans of the first 2 volumes of OnS online
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>>10823399
OnS book 3 has a cutsew pattern. This blog has a scan of it along with some other patterns and reviews of various OnS books. Definitely recommend this blog if you're interested in OnS.
https://misscarolbelle.wordpress.com/2016/01/31/otome-no-sewingbook-3/
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>>10822625
Dry rot
It happens when you don't wear or wash your clothes
Vintage T-shirt collectors know all about it
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>>10823686
dry rot happens for specific reasons, dumbass.
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>>10823684
Thank you thank you
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has anyone here ever worked with crystal organza? I want to know if the glitter "sheds" and gets everywhere
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>>10823799
Normal crystal organza doesn’t actually have glitter on it, the shimmer just comes from the filaments and how it’s woven.
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>>10823807
ah okay thank God i hate glitter getting all over the place
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OP back with some progress-
After adjusting the foot pressure, top thread tension, using a walking foot, and thoroughly pinning everything into place, I am now able to make nice garments with four way stretch fabric and binding. The only issue I have now is what you see in the picture - some loose threads only on certain parts. Is this because I'm pulling the fabric through when sewing these sections, thus stretching it out? Would increasing thread tension lessen this?
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>>10824527
Hey OP, welcome back. I'm happy that it's working out for you!!

If your stitching for the rest of the garment is working well, I wouldn't mess with the thread tension. It's more likely that you're not pulling with consistent force in some areas as you sew. You're either pulling too much or too little in those sections. I would do a couple of tests to check how much pull you should give your garment and then mark your machine at that length from the needle with some tape.
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>>10824527
My opinion is it's your tension. You shouldn't pull or push knits through at all. Let your sewing machine pull them through by itself. I'd try different tensions on scrap fabric. It's also possible that it's your needle. Are you using a stretch needle? A stretch needle size 12 is what I'd recommend. I've also had weird looking stitches when I accidentally put too small of a bobbin in. Potentially cheap thread can also cause issues. You might try a different brand if the problem persists.
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im a complete dumbass, and i've done like a billion polo shirt plackets but somehow cant figure out how to add a normal button band on a normal shirt. help. all the tutorials im finding are the fold over facing thing but my pattern doesnt account for that
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>>10824557
>>10824599
Thanks for the notes! Ok got some stuff to try out, I'll report back with what worked
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>>10823693
It's still dry rot. Retard
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>>10824615
nope.
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>>10824602
Are you just trying to add a normal button placket like on a button down the front blouse? Potentially you can make a rectangle for the placket. Cut two rectangles the length of your shirt by about 3.5 inches along with some interfacing for strength and stiffness. Fold each rectangle in halfwith wrong sides together and the interfacing sandwiched in between. Sew down one side with whatever seam allowance you want. Topstitch the folded side. Repeat for other rectangle. Then sew your rectangle to the blouse where the button placket needs to be. Do to both sides and add buttons and button holes. You can serge the seams if you have a serger or you can use a tight zigzag stitch. Hem the rectangles with the rest of the blouse. The collar/collar stand should finish the top. I wouldn't say this is the correct method of doing it, but if you're having problems this should work. You might want to round the outer edge of the top of both rectangles. Most blouse are like that.
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OP back again
The issue with >>10824527 turned out to be excess/inconsistent stretching of the fabric when I was pulling it through the foot. This time I just let the dogs pull it through (and very gentle pulling on the thicker overlaps) and it came out much better with no loose spots. I tried to get the stitch closer to the edge of the binding which resulted in it going over in a couple spots, but that's a skill factor rather than a technical issue so I have something to work on for next time. I'm happy though, now it's just a matter of getting better at sewing rather than worrying that there's something wrong with my machine :)
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does anyone here have any good patterns for a lolita blouse?
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>>10826943
If you have any of the lolita sewing books do they not have any blouse patterns you would consider to be good? Because the lolita sewing books would be the first place I would recommend.
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>>10826952
I dont own any physical mooks with patterns in them, I have a pdf of OnS volume 1 but i dont understand how to read the patterns in those cuz Im kinda stupid. Honestly it doesnt need to be a lolita blouse pattern per se, I could use a loliable button up blouse pattern and just alter it to have puff sleeves and a bottom ruffle etc.
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>>10826993
If you want pattern recommendations Burda Style 7136 is a nice plain blouse pattern you could alter. Burda 5981 looks like it could be cute with no alterations. It has a stand collar rather than a peter pan collar, but it has an option for a ruffle around the button placket. Just about any button up blouse pattern can work if you make the collar bigger and round the corners along with adding volume to the sleeves.
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>>10826999
Thanks
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what's the most professional looking stretch stitch that can be made with a home sewing machine? Ie. zig zag, straight stretch stitch, twin needle, etc
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>>10827805
Serging is generally considered the most professional. Fortunately you can fake serging with an overcast foot on a regular sewing machine. There are plenty of tutorials out there. For hems a lot of store bought items have the hems serged, turned under once and then top stitched with a twin needle. If you're using a twin needle on stretch fabric make sure to get a twin needle specifically for stretch fabric.

>>10825414
I'm glad you've got things working. I've been sewing for years and I still sometimes miss the edge. It's just a combination of practice and patience. I sometimes put a piece of washi tape on my sewing machine to mark the seam allowance to help me sew straight.
>>
How do you guys keep yourself motivated? Do you all actually like the feeling of sewing or do you distract yourslef through the sufferin?
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>>10828057
I genuinely enjoy sewing, but I can understand where you're coming from. I didn't realize how little time is actually spent at your machine and more spent bent over your table cutting, pinning, and ironing. It can really slow your momentum to have to crawl through the tasks that you hate before getting to the fun stuff. This video (https://youtu.be/c-2qCMEkm7c) helped me prepare to slog through those tasks as quick as efficiently as possible so I could get back to those more fun tasks.

In terms of pure motivation to do sewing of any kind though, I do a few different things:
1. I surround myself with inspiration from other creators really try to enjoy the process as part of the experience just as much as the finished product.
2. Try posting your progress. I know that no one is looking except my friends, family, and few online folks I happen to interact with, but it's so fun and rewarding. It helps me celebrate the small achievements. Plus, I get to look back on the moments. Someone dm'ed me that my tutorial helped them to make their own costume like a year ago and I've been riding that high ever since.
3. Pick your projects wisely. I chose projects within my skill level and that make me personally happy. I'm not doing this for anyone else.
4. Have flexible deadlines and take breaks. I want to enter contests or wear what I make at certain occasions, but I don't like the pressure that comes with it so if its not done in time, it gets worn next time. When motivation leaves me, I can put my project done without worry and come back to it when I'm ready. I know that I'll enjoy the end product so much more that way.
5. Allow yourself to take the easy road sometimes.
Although I do adore crafting and the absolute dedication to it, I'm not going to force myself to make, say, a white button down shirt when I can easily save my time and money by buying one. I'd rather spend that energy on the unique aspects instead.

I hope you find your spark again, truly.
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>>10828057
>>10828209
Right after sending that post I realized that the youtuber actually has a video on this specific topic too! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw2802DQnb4
Hope it helps.
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Does flexible, posable, and sewable plastic boning exist? Basically like wire but sewable and ironable
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>>10828255
rigilene is the closest thing i'm aware of. not posable like wire though.
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>>10827818
Thanks for the answers! From a process viewpoint, does using a twin needle not make much sense if I am also basting binding/piping to my garments before doing the finishing top stitch? It would be a lot of changing the needle I imagine. Thanks for the tip about the overcast foot, I hadn't seen that before.
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>>10828255
I'm not an expert on boning, but I'll tell you what I know. Lots of plastic boning comes with a fabric casing around it. If you're inserting boning that doesn't come with a casing, you make your own casing on the garment and then insert it. For instance you might fold over the seam allowance and sew it down to create a little tube where the boning can go. Thicker plastic boning does slightly form to your body with your body's heat as you wear it, but it will never be rigid. If you want more rigidity you can buy metal boning. I've never worked with it, but I believe it's still somewhat flexible. You really might want to just put wire in your costume.

>>10828276
You can probably skip the twin needle. Nine times out of ten the twin needle is only to be fancy. You can also just sew two lines of stitches. I wish you luck with the overcast foot if that's the route you choose.

>>10828057
Personally I really enjoy sewing, but I often get lazy and demotivated. I find having an end goal helps me to complete any kind of project. For cosplay that might be a cosplay contest or a photo shoot. Even the excitement of posting it online or sending friends progress photos helps. I do choose to buy some things rather than make them depending on how excited I am for the project and how expensive the item is. I personally find deadlines helpful as without them I'd never even start the project.
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>>10828268
I've used rigilene before and it has no posability, unfortunately.

>>10828277
I'm not in need of a casing, I am looking for something that can bend and be set like wire but still have the same springiness and strength without being metal, since metal has its own share of issues. Basically something I can iron and wash and pose repeatedly without issue, lightweight and easy to sew. I feel like there's a huge need for a product like this that isn't existing in the US.
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does anyone have any good, easy enough to understand resources for learning basic pattern drafting for pants, skirts, blouses, and dresses?
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>>10828404
I would suggest any pattern drafting book that focuses on these garments. You can get a better deal second hand so maybe ebay or second hand book shops. Some of them are very expensive new.
Also bodice drafting blocks can be found free online. You can make blouses and dresses with them, you just adjust the ease and the seam placement.
I don't know if there are any free resources for drafting pants.

https://youtu.be/ZYJXKh1_dSI

skirt drafting; https://mellysews.com/how-to-make-a-skirt-pattern-draft-a-skirt-sloper-or-block/

But I have to add that the basic skirt pattern will be of little use to you for lolita skirt and dress shapes unless you're doing a curved waist band, yoke or an A-line ungathered trapezoid shape pattern and want to make sure it fits over your hips. Most lolita skirts are rectangle shaped patterns or gathered trapezoid shape patterns.
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>>10828285
The only thing similar to what you're talking about that I know of is synthetic whale bone boning. This supplier says it can be shaped with a hot iron. I've not used it so I don't know how posable it is.
https://burnleyandtrowbridge.com/products/synthetic-whalebone-6-mm-x-1-5-mm-sold-by-the-yard?variant=31835060306007
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>>10828468
thanks, its not a problem for me because i already know how to make lolita skirts, i was just looking for how to make a blouse, along with just basic patternmaking knowledge
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>>10828546
I think you'll learn a lot with just the free resources alone. Good luck!
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>>10828552
thank you, thank you
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Knitting related question I dont know, of course
What is the stich progression to make socks round?

I started with 5 on the first row, is this correct or is there some special round darner/needle I need?
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>>10822649
When you say re-sew, do you mean re-attaching the waistband to the skirt after gathering it again? Unfortunately if you've gathered the chiffon directly using a long stitch in your sewing machine and then pulling that tight, then yeah, that tends to cause pulling - usually hand-gathering with a running stitch, zig-zag over a string or making painstaking tiny pleats works better.

>>10828255
No, plastic doesn't have those properties.
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I know I'm a little late to the party but I just wanted to give the basics of what you need to get started.
>What sewing machine should I use/purchase?
Any machine that can do a straight and zig-zag is sufficient. When purchasing look for one that has button-hole and button attachments.
>What else do I need?
A cutting wheel, fabric scissors and a self-healing cutting mat. Pins are also necessary.
>What should be my first project?
Don't start with something that you actually care about. My best suggestion is to start with a muslin suit. Button up shirt and pants with a zipper. This will teach you all the basics and you can see where things are going wrong.
>The machine does everything right?
Wrong. There are pieces that are better hand-stitched. This is a skill you'll need to learn even if you have a machine.
>How do I work with felt/nylon/spandex or any other 4-way stretch fabric
Check your manual. Each fabric requires different tension settings and may require special feet/needles to get the job done properly.

Hope that helps. Probably won't though.
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I want one of these but I tried on a friends and the straps are too short for me. I'm 5'9" and the waist part hits mid ribcage and looks weird. Do you think it would be too much of a pain to extend the straps and should I just make a replica?
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>>10828716
Assuming the straps attach to the waist in the back with buttons, you just sew a little extension to the end of the strap. Depending how much length you need, you might even be able to just move the buttons down a little.
If the straps are actually sewn into the waistband, then it's more work to alter but still less than making a whole new apron from scratch.
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I'm interested in mostly making my own accessories (headbows and wristcuffs, maybe sock toppers). Would it be fine to just handsew everything or should I bite the bullet and get a sewing machine?
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>>10828769
Hand sewing is obviously fine, it's just more time and effort. I bought my first sewing machine used for $25 on craigslist and I was happy with it, I upgraded for more stitch options
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>>10828769
You'll need to build your handsewing skill for those projects (and any sewing project desu) anyway, so start off with it and then build your desire for a machine over time. That way the investment will feel worth it. Most people do start off with secondhand machines to begin with. Mine was $50 off Facebook Marketplace.
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>>10828769
Do both, because you'll use both hand sewing and machine skills in this hobby. Get a basic but not crap sewing machine and upgrade later if you want to invest more into the hobby. Ask a friend or family member to show you the basics of possible, and there are tons of beginner-friendly resources available online and in your local library. Just remember, if you have a question about anything sewing, 10 other people have asked about it online before (with solutions)
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>>10828769
i used to handsew bows and it took me forever to do, machine sewing is way faster and easier
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>fabric online is sort of expensive
>trying to find cheaper sources
>look at local store that markets itself as a wholesale outlet
>everything is $40/yd for basic cotton prints
holy fuck my life why
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>>10829183
are there outdoor markets near you that sell fabrics? I'd try them, they often want to get rid of what's leftover on the roll, but also the type of person that frequents those markets tends to only want cheap prices so fabrics are typically quite cheap there anyway. Like between 5 and 10$ per yard. You can get sales for less, like 3$ a yard.
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I want to make a tartan skirt but Im having trouble sourcing fabric for it because in my searches, a lot of the results end up being flannel. I want to make it out of a red or purple, tartan or plaid print broadcloth that is medium weight (about 150 gsm or so). I also want to get a good deal because Im something of a bargain vulture. The closest I've gotten so far to what I want is on aliexpress, but Im hesitant to order from there for obvious reasons. I'd like the fabric to either be 100% cotton or a poly cotton blend.
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>>10829183
Do you have a jo-ann fabrics around you? Shop there - but only when they have 50% off sales, which is all the time. You may have to become a loyalty member for consistent coupons. Never buy anything full price from jo-ann besides cheap things like thread
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>>10829225
There is no loyalty membership, you just sign up for their email list or get their mobile app (I think they are slowly phasing out the paper coupons).
I dunno where that anon is shopping that everything is $40/yd, unless they wandered into Liberty London or something. You could straight up import fabric from Japan for less than that.
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>>10829210
Anon, pick 2: Fast, Cheap, Good

Unfortunately in the western world, the main people getting tartan/plaid is for the kilt/flannel shirt look, not school uniforms and cosplay. There is no magical source people are hiding from you.

If you want to be CHEAP, buy from AliExpress or take your time bargain hunting.

If you want it to be Good & Fast, custom-print it with a service like Spoonflower.

If you want it to be GOOD, check Japanese cosplay stores and see if they have a plaid you want. Chances are though they're probably sourcing the nicer stuff from China all the same.
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>>10829436
okay, thx
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>>10828716
Depends on your torso length and boob size. If your torso is so long pr your boobs are so large that the top of the heart will be around nip height to get the waist to sit on your waist, then it's worth making a properly fitting replica, otherwise straps are easy enough to extend regardless of how they're attached.
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I'm beginning to learn how to pattern draft a bodice block, do Lolita blouses use darts?
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>>10829550
Some do. Some use diamond darts, others just regular darts. Some use a shaping seam running from mid shoulder, over the bust point down to the waist. Others use a shaping seam coming from the arms eye, curving towards the bust point, then curving down towards the waist. I don't call these by name because several different terms for them exist and it makes it more confusing.

Also some brand blouses have shaping seams and darts.
Brand blouses don't typically have a large measurement difference between bust and waist so they are only shaped a little bit. You can get away with darts unless you have a large difference between bust and waist.
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>>10817921
I'm really new to this and I want to make good patterns for myself. However, I couldn't find a good solution for this. Where can I get really large paper rolls? Or let's say if I wanted to make something more sturdy like a thicker pattern, what kind of paper should I use?

Sorry if it's a dumb question, I really don't know what to look for.
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>>10829604
If you have a local paper, you can go to their offices and see if you can buy a roll of newsprint off of them for cheap. Sometimes they even give them away. Otherwise pads of newsprint from an art store are relatively cheap and come in fairly large dimensions. For something sturdier, art stores also sell big sheets of cardstock.
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>>10829653
Thank you, I'll check it out.
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>>10829604
>>10829653
I used newsprint and I recommend against this. The paper is thick/rough and the newsprint rubs off and stains surfaces and hands.

I recommend using spa/doctor paper if you're trying to be "cheap" but honestly using patterning paper meant for the job is so much easier. Get the gridded stuff like Tru-Grid that has 1-inch grids and you'll no longer be wildly guessing if your lines are right angles and perfectly parallel. Changed my life forever after I started using it.
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I have a bikini triangle top pattern that so far I've only made with 2 way stretch fabric, where the stretch goes horizontally. I got a new color fabric that they only had in 4 way stretch. Do I need to adjust the pattern to accommodate for the now vertical stretch - ie. make the pattern shorter?
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>>10829604
Ikea has a roll of brown butcher paper. I think Michael's does too. They're both marketed to kids, but they're great because they come with a roll that's easy to cut any length from. Some people use freezer paper. I personally like to use wrapping paper (like for gifts). That might sound silly, but most wrapping paper now comes with a 1in grid on the back of it and it's super easy to tell which side is the writing side and it's accessible everywhere and cheap as hell after a holiday.
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I just got a serger today, and i want to sew an organza (polyester, if that matters) petticoat. Is it okay to use my domestic sewing machine microtex needles on the serger? The organza edges fray like a bitch
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>>10829990
With fabrics that fray a lot a serged edge might just fall off and you might be better off double hemming instead. Some people also seal the cut edge with heat or even cut organza with a hot blade. I don't know if that is just a soldering iron or not.
There's else stabilisation tape that could help you sew organza.
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>>10829990
mine uses the same needles as my sewing machine. i think most home sergers do. it'll say in the manual for your machine though.
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>>10830017
way to show you have absolutely no idea what you're saying. do you even know what serging is for?
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>>10830027
You are confidently incorrect. I have a serger, I know what it's for, have been sewing for over a decade, attended fashion school, worked with industrial machines. The serged edge does sometimes come off on fabrics that fray a lot, that's why it's safer to use the widest setting but that's not always enough for a finish that will stay put. Organza needs special care anyway in order to work with it properly. Sometimes that means not using a serger at all. Double hems and french seams are a more reliable option.
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>>10830027
lel i've had it start pulling away once or twice while pre-shrinking and softening linen yardage in the machine. anon knows what's up.
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>>10830042
When working with organza, do I need a certain type of pin? All i have are regular pins for woven fabrics and ballpoint pins
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>>10830044
I have limited experience working with organza because I know how much of a nightmare it is to work with but also because no project I ever wanted to make used organza. I've encountered some articles online about sewing with organza, that would be my first stop.
For example;
https://theseamanmom.com/tips-for-sewing-with-organza/

This also seemed pretty legit
https://youtu.be/PyQ-1ACpjSM

A petticoat is probably the best first project for organza since it won't be showing anyway and there won't be any stress on the seams other than the weight of the fabric. I have a petticoat that combines organza and tulle and it's kept its poof up for a long time.

Using heat to seal edges;
https://sewguide.com/sewing-organza/
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>>10830042
I’ve made organza pettis before and I do a normal 4-thread overlock and then turn it under and stitch again with a regular straight stitch, instead of the serger “rolled hem” like in that pic, it’s not as pretty but I haven’t had any separation with that method.
For something that’s going to show though it’s definitely best to do french seams and a normal narrow hem because the overlocking is ugly.
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>>10830065
thanks anon.

This will come in handy when the times comes for me to make my own petticoat.
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>>10829920
>>10829767
>>10829653
Just to give an update, I found these 22x28in heavy weight grid boards (just the tag on the product, they're still business card level thing not really thick board) to make sturdy patterns. The nicest thing is I can push my pen against them and they won't deform.

Thank you all for your suggestions.
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>>10817921
I'm deathly afraid of sewing machines, how do you guys get over the anxiety of the needle stitching thread directly to your skin??
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>>10830188
The chances of that happening are virtually zero unless you intentionally shove your hand under the needle.
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>>10830188
It's the same as using a big knife in the kitchen. If you're practicing good skills, then you aren't ever in any danger. There's always some level of risk, but it's dramatically lower than you might think. You're actually more at risk of a broken needle lodging in your eye than getting your finger pierced.

If you ever watch a sewist work, you'll actually notice that their fingers aren't usually on the top of the machine. usually, they're loosely touching the fabric that's off of the edge of the machine to guide it in which is much too far to ever be at risk. You can even buy needle guards if you're that worried. Maybe taking some classes with an advanced sewist would ease your anxieties.
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>>10829903
It's best to make a mockup and test the amount of stretch in inches that the fabric gives to be sure first. If it stretches more than your 2-way fabric did, you might also have to account for more horizontal stretch too.
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>>10830188
even if you're stitching with your fingers close to the needle, it will never hurt you because the presser foot is there in between your finger and the needle, so youll be fine, if anything though, you should be more cautious about cutting fabric with scissors, ive accidentally snipped at my finger a bit because i was folding the fabric with my other hand trying to get a close cut
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Does anyone know where Lolita brands source their fabric from?
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I want to make a little dress for my Kumya and I wondered if anyone has done a pattern for it? I could probably work it out myself, but I thought I'd ask before I put in the effort
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>>10830188
I have been using a sewing machine since I was a kid. I did once manage to sew the very very tip of my finger (when I was in my early 20s) because I was rushing and slipped when I had my foot on the peddle. But honestly the injury was very minor even though the needle pierced my nail and just needed a plaster on for a day and then took a couple of weeks to heal (I'm massively squeamish and hate blood, but even I was fine after a couple of minutes). I wouldn't recommend it though, bent the arm of my machine and repairs cost nearly as much as a new machine!

Honestly, it's really hard to do, I'm just exceptionally clumsy. But I bet that even I could use a sewing machine every day for the rest of my life and never do it again.
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>>10830188
Follow basic safety procedures. Do not put your fingers in the path of sewing. Your fingers can get carried by the fabric and feed into the needle. Always have your fingers off to the sides and go SLOW until you have greater confidence and control. Always have you foot off the pedal when you're not actively using the machine, like if you stopped to change the thread or adjust the fabric placement.
Always keep your eye on the needle when it is in motion, don't look up and away at distractions without stopping the machine first. People saying it's impossible to hurt yourself are exaggerating the safety features. Like woodworking, it's very possible to get caught up in the constant flow and feed of the repetitive work and your fingers end up where they should not.
I've heard too many stories of moms trying to sew and their toddler suddenly bursts into the room and grabs something they shouldn't and the mom accidentally sews through their finger in that distracted moment
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I cut two different stretch fabrics into strips to use as binding, both pieces of equal length. I double fold both and sew them into straps. One strap turns out longer than the other. What is the factor at play here, the amount of stretch of the individual fabric? Can I predict this by just doing a stretch test whenever I use a new fabric, or do I need to sew a test strap from a set length? I can form a stretch multiple of my new fabric to my original fabric and determine new measurements based on that, right?
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>>10830900
commercial patterns have stretch percentage 'charts' on back of the envelope for this. shitty picture, just grabbed a quick example. factors at play are the amount of stretch, the amount of recovery (can usually take that to mean amount of spandex/lycra content; ribbing is where good recovery is more a structural than material matter), and operator technique.
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>>10830916
herp derp
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>>10830916
>>10830917
Thanks for the answer! I feel there should be a more math based approach to stretch straps though, right? For example, let's say I'm sewing a bikini top where the straps are double folded binding and the neck strap is sewn, not tied. The original fabric used for the neck strap stretches 100% the original length and the binding for the straps are 10" long. A different fabric I want to use stretches 125% the relaxed length. That neck strap still needs to be the same tightness when worn to function properly. Would I use the maximum stretched length of the original fabric as the base for determining the length of the new fabric? So the maximum stretched length of a relaxed 10" cut of fabric A is 20". For fabric B to have a maximum stretched length of 20" fabric B would have to have a relaxed cut length of 8.88" (20" / 2.25 = 8.88"). Does that make sense as a method to determine relaxed fabric length when using different stretch % fabrics as straps? I ask because it would be nice to be able to use whatever stretch % fabrics with the same pattern without having to hone in on the correct lengths through guess and check.
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>>10831416
sounds solid to me but maths aren't my strong suit
>>
Going back to the discussion about finishing the edges of organza, would using the rolled hem setting on a serger be fine? I think the point of it is to finish lightweight fabric like chiffon and organza right?
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>>10831896
Yeah, that'll work. Just do a few test pieces to get your stitch length and tension right
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>>10831930
thanks
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How do I calculate how long of an elastic to use for a puff sleeve? Is it something like arm circumference + 1 inch?
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>>10832426
>For
It's often a little less than your arm circumference so that the elastic can stretch. I typically hold the elastic up to my arm or waist or wherever and stretch it until it's comfortable and then mark that length. You can also use an elastic thread in the bobbin. I have a dress with puff sleeves with three rows of elastic done that way and it's super comfortable.
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>>10832437
Thank you!



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