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I just got my first sewing machine from a yard sale, a Singer 237. I oiled it and made sure everything is working, it just needs a new belt which I've already ordered. In the mean time I'd love to start learning. Anyone have a favorite youtuber who does beginner sewing tutorials? I'd like to sew for cosplay when I'm more proficient, but in the immediate future I'd like to concentrate on basic dress making and copying a couple of my favorite dresses that are starting to wear out. All advice is appreciated! Favorite thread, best material for practicing with, favorite patterns, etc.
>>
>>10740460
Also how useful is it to have a mannequin of my dimensions for dress making? Is it something that would greatly improve my experience starting out?
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>>10740461
It's definitely useful, but not necessary. If you have an easy/cheap way of getting it, sure, go ahead.
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My mom sews and she loves it, she makes clothes for herself. However she sucks at making the final touches, like sleaves, pockets, buttons, necks, etc. Any of you have some books or something that can help that in that regard?
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>>10740460
I taught myself to sew with Youtube too! Personally, I find it helpful to just surround yourself with sewing content so that you begin to osmosis the terminology, materials, and difficulty level of projects. Watching others' projects on youtube is a great way to do that. My personal faves are: sewstine, Morgan Donner, Bernadette Banner (ofc), Rachel Maksy, Coolirpa, Evelyn Wood, Loepsie, CaseyReneeCosplay, and The Stitchess. Once you watch one, you'll start to notice the inner-circle of costubers and eventually find more to subscribe to too. Whenever I need help with basic skills or troubleshooting though I turn to Professor Pincushion and Evelyn Wood.

> Favorite thread
Coats and Clark and Gutterman are the ones I see mentioned the most.

>best material for practicing with
Always muslin or 100% cotton.

>favorite patterns
Mood Fabrics has awesome free sewing patterns that are very stylish -- and even some costumes. Etsy has some great indie patterns as well. If you wanna get commercial patterns, look for the beginners lines. They're usually called "Sew Easy" or something. Also never buy commercial ones at full price. There's always a $1 pattern sale around the corner at Joann's.

One thing I wish I'd known at the start is that you can buy pattern packs with just a bunch of different sleeves (like picrel) instead of chasing several patterns just for their sleeves or a single minute detail that I needed. It's so much more cost effective.
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>>10740580
I have the Reader's Digest Complete Guide to Sewing, but there's so many similar books that you can choose from. Singer, Allison Smith, and Gertie Sews have some great lines of books too.
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>>10740461
No, you should wait until you're sure that you're into this hobby before committing to a dressform. It's definitely helpful, but it's a pretty penny, takes up space, and requires some pattern knowledge. Focus on your basic skills first and once you're comfortably upper level beginner or intermediate, then you'd benefit from one.
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>>10740605
thanks, appreciated
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>>10740602
Thank you so much! I checked out the first few channels and they look great. Good tip on the pattern packs too - that wouldn't have occurred to me

>>10740577
>>10740607
Ok, yes I should definitely attempt at least one full dress before further investment
>>
Professor Pin Cushion on YouTube is super helpful! She's been sewing/teaching for decades.
>>
I took a class at a local sewing shop. If you have trouble learning things from YouTube, I recommend it.
>>
Pattern drafting and sewing resources:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/d3z1814muvtxoyh/AADFuIAoYs9RYEkmaCEVNajDa?dl=0
>>
Currently teaching myself to sew off patterns, pick really simple things like dog coats and cushions to get your head around reading basic patterns.

The other thing i found really helpful is learning to copy your patterns onto baking paper so you don't have to cut out the tissue paper patterns especially if they are multisize just trace out the size you need and cut it out from that. Saves your patterns overall.

I'm learning to make shirts atm and it was invaluable tracing them out first.
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>>10740860
>>10740868
>>10741029
>>10741039
learn how to fucking reply.
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>>10741039
also holy shit this is the worst advice. they make blank pattern paper you autist.
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>>10741041
I'd rather someone post like they did and actual contribute instead of being a smarmy cunt like yourself who contributes nothing.
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>>10740460
Also, for learning how to sew stick to making small shit at first like children's clothes just so you can figure out the actual process without going through a ton of fabric.
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>>10741092
You didn't post anything useful.
>>10741093
This is shit advice. Small clothing is harder to sew, and you're supposed use cheap practice fabrics. Kys.
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>>10741042
holy shit, it's almost like baking paper is a, cheaper and b, people usually have baking paper rather than pattern paper you autist.
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>>10741039
Why?? Patterns are so cheap when you get them on $1 sale, it's not worth the labor hours and effort to trace them. You should only be tracing if you're heavily modifying a pattern or the patterns was printed on heavyweight paper. Also why waste baking paper that's not meant for patterns? Dedicated pattern paper exist and it doesn't tear. You've got room for improvement yourself man
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>>10741127
People usually have toilet paper and it's cheaper, why aren't you using that?
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>>10741127
it's not. and it's not wide enough for anything but your shitty dog clothes. try making a coat or a cloak with a 15in wide sheet of crap.
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>>10741131
aluminum foil is much cheaper tho and everyone has it in their house!
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>>10741039
If you don't know anything, don't shit up the thread with your hot takes. There are tons of tutorials on how to use patterns, make cheap mock-ups and do so cheaply. And do you not realize that once you cut the pattern to size you simply need to save the extra pieces and tape them together if you want to size up?
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>>10741130
there can def be value to tracing patterns tho, for example, some historical patterns from indie companies are expensive. Or, you're using a mook like Otome no Sewing/cosplay magazine/Burda (if those still exist) that comes with a pattern page where many patterns are overlapped so cutting out one would destroy another.

But, to >>10741039 : I wouldn't use baking paper for that. You can buy swedish tracing paper on amazon and it's very very durable and not too expensive. And as for drafting papers, I buy rolls of craft paper or the brown wrapping paper for mailing packages. Pattern paper doesn't let you erase pencil very well so I draft on brown paper first and then trace it on pattern paper for the final pattern/safekeeping.
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>>10741130
>>10741166
omg I just saw the heavyweight paper bit you wrote, I totally missed it herp derp. I basically repeated half your post, sorry anon lmao
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>>10741166
they're talking about regular patterns though. otome no sewing isn't even on actual pattern paper to begin with so using them as is would be difficult to work with.
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>>10741122
You are a sad and pathetic individual. The hate you have inside will eat you up until the day you die.
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>>10741029
ntayrt, but this was extremely helpful. Thank you!!
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>>10741198
lmao you're so mad.
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>>10741093
While I understand your intention, it's best to work on simple easy projects that align with what you actually aim to make. So if OP wants to make their own clothing, it'd be better to make simple circle skirts or dresses than children's clothes.
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I am here because I want to learn how to sew clothes for camping and outdoors gear, as well as general everyday wear.
I respect the cosplay hustle though, and one day I think I'll jump in.
Hoping to learn alongside you all.
>>10741041
Except for you, insufferable loser.
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>>10741217
Leave, faggot.
>>
Monitoring this thread because I bit off more than I can chew for a first major project
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>>10741236
Damn son
My best advice to you right now is you put that project on hold and pick something simpler to work on to hone in your skills. By the time you get more experience under your belt and come back to your first big project, you'll probably realize you had no clue what you were doing and redo it a lot better.

But of course if you're close to finishing and you are able to laugh things off, just finish and wear it and look back in the future as how far you've come.
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>>10741245
A friend was gonna help me but he moved to the UK because of basically a once in a lifetime opportunity, so now I've just got a bunch of fabric, some patterns and some quick and dirty prototypes
So that's basically what I figured too, if I wanna get this done I need either a lot of practice or someone to help
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>>10741233
Feeling defensive? For being an insufferable loser? That's pretty pathetic dude.

Just admit your faults and work on them. See, I'm doing the same for my sewing skills :)
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>>10741217
You're welcome to stay, but /diy/ will occasionally have sewing threads specifically for your interests. It might be helpful to look there too!
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>>10741236
That's the #1 mistake I see beginners make -- speaking from experience. Don't worry, you'll get to a place where you can better judge what's in your wheelhouse once you get more practice.
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>>10741282
you're really upset. and really retarded. but moids always are.
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>>10741302
You're totally right, I forgot about /diy/, thank you very much! I'll keep an eye out in both circles for tips and tricks.

Thank you again.

Also, it was only directed at someone I thought was being mean, but I apologize for coming in here being rude. Take care anon.
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>>10741339
You're actually not welcome here. Fuck off and quit replying to bait every time. Enjoy your shitty baking paper patterns.
>>
There's slight comfort in seeing a lone aspie shit up an otherwise nice and productive thread by lashing out at internet ghosts for happy brain chemicals. Reminds me that I'm on 4chan.
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>>10741339
Happy to help! Also, don't worry lol. Like >>10741415 said, it's kind of board culture here to have some cattiness. You're all good.
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>>10741341
Nah he is. Stop trying to speak for others I can guarantee you shove "trans" sexy babies down the throats of your comm and out the lolitas who disagree to their parents.

I can bet 20 bucks you cover for predators at meets and stifle the minors from speaking out about what happens. I know people like you.
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>>10741490
>>10741478
>>10741415
this is a cringe level of samefagging holy shit. imagine thinking anyone would wk a scrote who suggested making dog clothes for practice...
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>>10741500
Seethe harder. At least two different people hate your ass
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>>10740460
practice making a french seam and draft a bodice block for yourself
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beginner here. how to sew in a straight line for hems? and how to cut off the excess fabric neatly afterwards without a serger
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My used Toyota RS2000 just stopped working 2 days before the con, for some reason doesn't go back from thread winding to normal operation
I feel I can just open the whole machine and figure somehow what happened, but I'm beyond frustrated
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>>10743002
Here's the mf
Unfortunately it's the only piece I'm not able to unscrew lol
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>>10742998
1. Pin and press the hem first
2. Use a smaller seam allowance or double fold so you enclose the raw edge. Are you only doing a single fold hem?

>>10741130
Most patterns are made to fit an average block, not a human, so I basically make my standard modifications to all my patterns and then will adjust further after a toile for tailored items, so nearly everything is traced (but I prefer to use midweight interfacing to paper)
If I wanted clothing that doesn't fit I'd just buy it at the store.
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>>10743021
Yeah, a single fold. I've never heard of a double fold before. I'll chekc out some vids. The ones I follow all do a single fold.
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>>10743049
single fold without a serger?
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>>10743021
The whole argument is that you don't need to preserve commercial patterns for future use by tracing them, retard.
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>>10743051
yeah, I follow this tutorial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJFBvZvScrk
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>>10743054
>>10742998
Your original question makes it sound like you're sewing your own hem, so the other anon responded to you with that in mind. However, what you're actually seeing in the video is that person "moving" the hem by using that trick. In other words the shirt's hem is already made. So to answer your question with this tutorial in mind:

>how to sew in a straight line
Practice. You can take the thread out of your machine and practice running the needle in a straight line using a piece of paper. Alternatively, you could line up the shirt to one of the seam guides on the throat plate of your machine (picrel). Typically you use these to measure the distance between the edge of your fabric and your seam line is going to be, but they also work for sewing in straight lines. Another option is to buy a magnetic seam guide
(https://www.amazon.com/Magnetic-Pieces-Magnet-Sewing-Machine/dp/B071Y5JCMD/ref=sr_1_3?crid=SHZDZSXINB41&keywords=seam+guide&qid=1647646581&sprefix=sewing+boo%2Caps%2C416&sr=8-3).

You just stick it onto the throat plate of your machine and it'll guide the fabric in (mostly) a straight line. That being said sewing in a straight line is a skill you'll want to keep working on as a beginner sewist.
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>>10743273
>>10742998
If I can add to this, you can use lined paper and follow the lines that are already there. but, when you're done, please switch your needle, as the paper is going to dull it and dull needles are prone to breaking. You don't want needle shards flying into your eyes at high speed.
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>>10743324
Yes, great addition!
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>>10743273
My cheap-o solution for sewing straight hems is to stick a piece of regular blue painter's tape on the needle plate of my machine as my guide. Even if the seam width I'm sewing has a guide marking on the machine it's a lot easier to follow the edge of the tape than the little groove in the metal.
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>>10742998
stare at the seam allowance and not the needle
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My machine came with this hemming foot so I'm giving it a try. Should I expect the back to be much cleaner than this? What do I adjust here to improve it, the thread tension?
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>>10744285
>Should I expect the back to be much cleaner than this?
Yes anon your stitches should be normal straight lines if you're using a straight stitch.
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>>10744287
>>10744285
To add onto what the other anon said, whenever you see that bunching happening to your stitches, just immediately rethread your top and bottom threads. If it's still happening, try adjusting the thread tension dial for the top or the tension screw on your bobbin case. If you need to do a quick youtube search for help, try the term "birdnesting".
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A few years ago when I was last active here, there was a mega of otome no sewing books. Does any anon still have resources for those?
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>>10748530
I don't, but I think you can find it in one of the old "Handmade Lolita" threads up in the archive. I might still be posted in the active one idk
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I typically recommend early sewers start with easy patterns like aprons, pillow cases (which you don’t really need a pattern for eventually) and pajama pants (very good). It might have changed but simplicity #1122 pajamas was good practice as there aren’t any notions involved except elastic. Also for starters stick to a cotton fabric (flannel the thickest) and poly thread like coats and Clark , you don’t need to be worried about working with something with spandex/stretch and needing a walking foot or dry cleaning only or something.
Joann used to have a really good pattern line called “kwik sew” that was simple projects like hats, gloves, tote bags, etc that was good practice. Also most (most) sewing shops have people there to help if you get stuck. I work for Joann and answer a few cosplay questions daily. It’s great to see people interested in the craft desu, I’m starting my first quilt this week which is exciting and scary.
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I'm a super noob to sewing. Would a pattern like the second to last on the right work?

https://i0.wp.com/aliceincosplayland.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/capes_and_cloaks_by_aliceincosplayland-dbhq353.jpg?resize=1024%2C582&ssl=1

I don't know where to find a pattern for this. I've tried hooded cloak and hooded robe patterns but haven't had much luck.
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>>10750984
If you don't mind having no use of your arms, then yes that would work. Otherwise something like this would be a good choice: Simplicity 1582 Teen's, Men's, and Women's Hooded Cape Costume Sewing Pattern.

>I don't know where to find a pattern for this
Amazon, Hobby Lobby, Ebay, Mercari, (some) Michael's, Etsy, CutSew, Joann's, Facebook Marketplace, your local fabric store, an estate sale, from your grandma, etc. etc.
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>>10740460
Good choice anon, great machine for straight stitch, all metal body, heavy as hell but will last you the rest of your life. You can also buy a new motor and foot pedal for it, I find the old one very on or off with mine so replaced it. This was my first machine and I still have it, but wanted a removable bed so bought an old kenmore that I adore and will never replace.

If you want a dress form you can also try making your own first to see how you like it, there's a handful of tutorials online.
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I'm starting to sew with fold over elastic, here's my third attempt - my machine only has straight stitch and zigzag. Should I expect the zigzag to be more uniform, or is this good enough? I'm finding that I have to constantly pull the elastic through since the dogs don't seem to move it through well enough (old machine, the dogs work fine for woven fabric). I assume my manual pulling is causing the inconsistent zigzag spacing.

Also what should I be doing when I reach one of the thicker overlaps when sewing? Currently when I reach one the bump will get trapped going into the foot, causing a few stitches to double-up before I stop sewing, raise the foot a little, and pull the bump under the foot.
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>>10740860
I second Professor Pin Cushion. They're great. If you're on YouTube look for the older sewists videos (compared to the young looking influencers.) You'll learn all the little things that will make sewing easier.
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>>10751462
>Should I expect the zigzag to be more uniform,
In general, all of your stitches should be mostly uniform because you want consistent tension on your fabric and gaps can cause holes.

>the dogs don't seem to move it through well enough
You could try a few things here. Tissue paper (like the kind for presents, not the kind you wipe your ass with) underneath the fabric can help it slide along more easily or a walking foot could even out the tug of the feed dogs to make it more consistent. Also make sure your manual tugging is consistent and not overstretching the elastic -- that could be a problem.

Another problem I'm noticing is that your stitch length is waaaaaay too short. Take a look at picrel. The stitches you're doing are more akin to a satin stitch which is used for a decorative border, not attaching elastic. You need it to still be able to move an flex when stretched.

>Also what should I be doing when I reach one of the thicker overlaps when sewing
You should try to reduce bulk in your seams before sewing on the elastic by cutting off excess and corners, but while actually sewing you want to use your hand crank only over the bumps. Yes, sometimes cranking, stopping, lifting the foot and inching the fabric forward, and repeating is your best move.
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The one rude autist aside, baking paper works decently well for tracing and isn't too expensive/hard to get, you could even get it at dollar stores or whatever. I just tape it together and it works alright.

Some other tips I wish I knew I started. Note I'm self taught, so some of these can seem kind of jerry-rigged:
1. Do not buy anything at JoAnn that isn't on sale or that doesn't have a coupon. Their app has a fuckton of coupons; use them.
2. Consider getting a cutting mat + rotary cutter. I find it to be way faster at cutting out fabric than using scissors. They usually sell em in kits (that also include a ruler; VERY useful) at JoAnns. Use coupon if you can.
3. A good source for cheap practice fabric is buying bedsheets from Goodwill. You can find em for about ~2-3 a sheet, and each one is several yards of fabric.
4. Do NOT buy cheap thread. Feeding issues are annoying and thread plays a huge difference. Coats & Clark and Gutterman are my mainstays and are sold basically everywhere. I bought one of those cheap sets off Amazon when I started and it sucked huge ass, consistent feeding issues. Switched to the 2 mentioned and smooth sailing.
5. Right needle for the right job. They matter and will make your life easier. Notably, if you're sewing anything knit or stretchy, you will probably want a ballpoint/stretch needle. Schmetz is the flag bearer for good needles.
6. Get a walking foot. Use it in literally 99% of cases that don't require a zipper foot/specialty foot. Enjoy way better feeding.
7. Iron as much as possible. Ironing creases and folds are a HUGE way to make your sewing look nicer. Use a cotton press cloth (just about any 100% cotton fabric piece, I use a bandana) in between the fabric and your iron to prevent it from burning/shining.
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>>10751545
This is a very excellent post, thank you.
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>>10751494
Thanks for the reply, I do have some packing tissue so I'll try that. Based on your picture it looks like my zigzags are too wide in addition to being spaced too shortly, is that right? And makes sense about cranking manually for the thick points.
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>>10751565
>my zigzags are too wide in addition to being spaced too short?
Correct. Yours don't have to be as small width-wise as the pic, but the length definitely should be more spaced out. Good luck!
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>>10751545
>kits that also include a ruler
nta, but are you talking about the clear 1-inch ruler? I have one already, so I just wanted to make sure there isn't some better ruler I could be using out there.
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>>10751584
nah, there's a fiskars set (just google "Fiskars Crafts 952301010 Rotary Sewing Cutting Set", that's the one I got) that includes a massive 6x24in clear ruler. I find it to be really nice for hems, pockets, seam allowances, and any time I need to make a straight line X inches away from an edge. It's my designated "long ruler"
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>>10751608
Oh, I see! Thanks, anon
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>>10751545
>4. Do NOT buy cheap thread. Feeding issues are annoying and thread plays a huge difference. Coats & Clark and Gutterman are my mainstays and are sold basically everywhere. I bought one of those cheap sets off Amazon when I started and it sucked huge ass, consistent feeding issues. Switched to the 2 mentioned and smooth sailing.
>5. Right needle for the right job. They matter and will make your life easier. Notably, if you're sewing anything knit or stretchy, you will probably want a ballpoint/stretch needle. Schmetz is the flag bearer for good needles.

Yooo, I'm gonna second these. Schmetz stretch needle is the only needle that got my machine to sew knit fabric properly, lol. Also, shitty thread can fuck up your machine bc it'll disintegrate and leave lint everywhere.

Also, I find steam works better for me when getting rid of wrinkles when I am ironing fabric. If you have an iron with a steam setting, you MUST use distilled water. do not use tapwater, ever, else the minerals will form flaky deposits and rain down from your iron like ash after a volcanic eruption (ask me how I know). A spray bottle + press cloth works decently as an alternative though.
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>>10751494
with your suggestions the stitching came out much better this time, thanks again! The back side also looks good sparing a couple loose stitches in some areas, could this be insufficient thread tension or still excess stretching of the elastic?
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>>10752088
Yes. More likely the elastic, if your tension is fine everywhere else.
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>>10752088
It's looking great, anon! I'm happy it helped. I agree with the other anon, it's probably the elastic. It wouldn't hurt to try running some lines of stitches on non-stretch fabric like cotton and check to see if your machine is still skipping stitches though. I could be an underlying problem.
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>>10741039
Is it not normal anywhere else to use pattern paper? I live in the Netherlands and we use it regularly here. It's this roll of see-through paper that you trace patterns on, because the patterns in the sewing magazines are all on top of each other (pic related). It's really cheap, and basically assumed to always be used. You can buy it in every fabric store.
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>>10752212
amazingly naïve post haha
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>>10752212
I have been wondering the same thing for years after reading about people online using baking paper, wrapping paper, construction paper… It’s only like €2,50 for a 10m roll, is super easy to use and is widely available. It’s also much stronger than the flimsy tissue paper that Big Three patterns are printed on so if you plan on using a pattern multiple times it’s definitely smarter to trace it. Whenever I read about people recommending wrapping paper or cutting out patterns from the sheets (even from OnS!) I feel like an alien.
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>>10752212
>>10752228
you'd be surprised how hard that shit is to find here. It was driving me up the wall. Years ago I was looking for pattern paper and there wasn't anything in local stores. I found something in Fabricland that was too fucking expensive for the purpose it was made for. I needed to copy some patterns from a friend and not have them fall apart so I went for it but it cost me like $4/m or something. Horrific.

I did end up finding something on amazon that's called swedish tracing paper, and it's both wonderful and not too expensive so I use that now. But, yeah.
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>>10752212
I haven't seen it commonly in Australia. I normally use lightweight non-woven interfacing to trace patterns.
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>>10752212
it's a pretty "niche" tool in the US; I know Pellon has a line of "pattern paper" but I used baking paper when I started out as well. It's the first thing that comes to mind when you think "I need translucent paper for tracing stuff", and it's pretty tough, too. Using a roll of some tracing paper now but it's pretty garbo quality, very rippable.
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I've always wanted to sew an A-line princess sleeve JSK, and I found this pattern for pretty cheap. I plan to omit the straps and make it straight across, then insert my own. Do you guys think the skirt is too narrow, or is this loliable?
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>>10753683
I looked up the pattern, and the bottom width is 3 times the waist. You're fine
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As a super newbie to sewing, how difficult would this dress be? Is there a word for the particular sort of dress she's wearing such that I could find a pattern to start with?
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>>10753683
It is loliable - but you can see from the pattern reviews that it will come out longer and slightly narrower than is typical for more recent lolita dresses. If you shorten it to the knee it looks like a regular dress - see the normie af photo attached.

These days, most lolita dresses seem to have a hem width closer to 300cm with a dress length more like 90-95cm, and fit a pattern size 8-12 (vs. this pattern which is more like 260-280cm width at 110cm length). It will be more similar to older classic dresses - you may notice when shopping second hand that on places like Wunderwelt, the A-line skirts of older dresses frequently look over-stuffed because they're using a full, cupcakey petticoat rather than a smaller A-line one. So if you were going for something that was more like old VM/MM/Millefleurs I would say you are fine, if you're looking for something more along the lines of Meta/Baby/AP I would consider doing a slash and spread on the skirt pieces.
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>>10753706
Do you have a photo where the arms aren't covering the dress?
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>>10753683
it will look awful because of the seamlines.
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>>10753743
Do you mean the princess seams anon is intentionally using the pattern for? Which exist in lots of lolita dresses?
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>>10753683
I've uses this pattern to make some Classic dresses. It's a great base for A-line I found that adjusting the skirt length and adding in a bit more fullness to each panel past the waist worked very well.
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>>10753749
they're not placed where princess seams would be on the skirt because it's shaped differently.
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>>10753773
Except they are? The bodice seams are still within the usual variation you see in lolita-branded princess seamed dresses, and the skirt is still A-line, just not as full as most lolita dresses as mentioned by others so needs the panels to be widened
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>>10753730
Like this?
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For sewing a bralette with two way stretch fabric, I want the stretch direction to go vertically, right? Would it work at all if I had the stretch direction going horizontally? I’m trying to use a certain small piece of fabric I have that isn’t oriented ideally
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>>10753889
This is a gored mini dress, but unfortunately, I can't find a pattern for you, since all of them are either too flared or don't have enough gores. Maybe you can alter a mini dress pattern by cutting your desired panels?
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>>10753751
>>10753708
Thank you for your advice! I think I'll start off with a normie sundress and see if it would fit a petticoat before seeing if I need to slash and spread or not. I never adjusted a pattern, and this would be a fun project to start out with.
>>10753743
>>10753773
I'm basing my project off these -_-
https://lolibrary.org/items/mary-magdalene-tweed-rose-onepiece
https://lolibrary.org/items/victorian-maiden-heart-frill-jsk-0
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>>10753933
I'm very new to a lot of this terminology so please bear with me. How do you mean by gores? And the term panel is new to me, from what I'm reading they're just pieces of fabric that you sew on top of an existing pieces to give it accents/designs?
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>>10753963
Funny enough, I couldn't find the definition. I learned it through context. Gored skirts are made up of panels sewn up with vertical seams.
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>>10753975
Oh, so something like this?
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Yes.
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>>10753918
No, you want it to stretch horizontally because you'll be stretching it that way when you put it on over your head.
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>>10754008
ah makes sense, thank you
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>>10753984
I found a few patterns that are sort of in the general shape, but I have no experience with altering patterns so I don't know if I'm just shooting over my skillset or if I should just keep looking for patterns. I feel a bit intimidated by the project now, but am still motivated to give it a try.
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>>10754123
You can probably make a reasonable version of that cosplay but you might want to look up some pattern drafting resources so you understand how the dress shapes and seam lines are created, as your choice of patterns so far is all over the place and most will likely lead to the dress you make looking nothing like the picture.
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>>10753706
>>10753889
>how difficult would this dress be?
Not impossible, but all those seams put it somewhat above beginner level. I'd qualify it as intermediate just for the amount of sewing, but the shapes are simple so... begintermediate? Just make sure you give yourself enough time before the deadline to account for the learning curve.

>>10754123
(ntayrt) You're close, but just missing the mark. The top dress pattern doesn't have enough panels and is the wrong silhouette. The bottom dress is the wrong type of sleeve, ruffle, and base dress. Don't use either. I posted my suggestions in picrelated. Also, make a mockup -- it's worth the fuss early on so you don't waste your pretty expensive fabric.

Additionally here's some resources I found while looking for patterns:
>https://mpressivethreadzstudio.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/sewing-project-1-the-six-gore-skirt/
>https://www.theshapesoffabric.com/2018/04/22/lets-draft-some-panel-skirts/
>https://youtu.be/vp7AHzHvBhE
*Note about above: Pattern is included in the link's video description. You have to modify it slightly (it's easy dw) which is covered in the video.

Good luck!
>>
>>10754162
>>10754161
Thank you for the resources and feedback, friends. I'm sure I'll be back with more questions, but this should get me started!
>>
French curves and ship hull curves are amazing. Bedsheet anon and walking foot anon are right. For cotton trim, zigzag the ends and prewash like you do your fabric. I really like the Mood cotton sateen. Long quilting pins are the best for annoying lolita projects. Tailor's ham for the win.
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>>10754215
Best of luck!
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Sewing noob here who has only had experience making headdresses and lined bags. I'm attempting to decipher this GLB pattern (GLB 4), so far I've only been able to decipher the waist ties (and their little button thingies), and the waist band. This pattern also doesn't look like patterns of other skirts I've seen. What would each part be and what is the reason this skirt in particular consists of so many parts? Sorry for the spoonfeeding request; I can't read Japanese but i'd really like to make this.
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>>10754691
Ffs rotation.
This is the whole page
>>
You're better off using this is inspiration. If you look at it closely, the trim is different for the front panel than the rest, and I'm guessing that's why it's separate. It looks more like an A-line, but a loose one, than the regular rectangle skirt. But again, probably easier to just make your own pattern.
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>>10754691
Meant for this to be reply.

>>10754708
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>>10740460
Is the Textilepedia any good?
I’ve tried watching YouTube videos over and over about how to pick fabrics and fabric basics but it doesn’t seem to stick in my brain. I’m wondering if having a dedicated fabric reference might help me pick better options for my makes. This wouldn’t be my first reference book. I also have the Reader’s Digest: Complete Guide to sewing which has a small section on fabrics; but, I don’t find myself reaching for it often because the information is pretty general/overview-y
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>>10755007
*Meant to say “… help me pick better fabric choices in my makes”
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>>10751483
>look for the older sewists videos
I follow some younger seamstresses and yeah they're not good at explaining. I like what they make and their energy, but it isn't a place to learn. I actually signed up for Crafsty at the beginning of the year (found a coupon that made it $0.99 for the whole year) and learned SO MUCH about knit fabric from this cute older lady. She had great tips that completely make sense now. I've gone back to old knit projects and fixed them with my newfound knowledge.
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Help I'm trying to make a v-neck and the neck binding is confusing me. I've read and watched several tutorials so far on what to do but don't conceptually understand. I have it cut and sewn, but do not understand the "fold it in half" part.
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>>10757247
like this i think
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>>10757249
ignore stitches but i hope you can see how it's folded from this picture
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>>10755273
thanks for the tip, looks like it might be worth copping a year just to check it out. for anyone wondering, I used Honey (coupon clipping app) to cycle thru coupons, `a33573` gave me the $1 for the first year thing. I swear I'm not a shill.
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>>10740460
Nicole rudolph has a series of videos going over different fabric groupings and giving sort of basic explanation of what the terms mean, for example wool and different sub-types of wool fabric. It's got a historical focus to it but alot of modern fabrics still use the same name and she does usually clarify if the historic name for a type of fabric is different from the modern one.
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>>10754162
Working on this still and was wondering - how am I going to do the stars on the dress? I have no idea what that process would look like, would it just be different fabric entirely?
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>>10740460
Is there a good guide for adding elastic to a skirt?
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>>10758375
This is another anime clothing moment. Yes, you would use different fabric in the color you need, apply WonderUnder to adhere the two pieces of fabric together, then top stich the star down with a satin stitch and then add the seam lines going over it. Alternatively you can use heat transfer vinyl. In this case, I think the former option might look better tho.
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>>10758394
There's thousands of videos on the different methods on Youtube, anon. Were you having trouble looking for a particular method of doing it or something?
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>>10758375
Applique is probably the best/easiest way to do it
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I just found out about the existence of sewing cabinets that have built-in machine lifts. What's a fair price for these if I'm not going for the fancy ones?
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>>10761392
I've seen the small ones go for anywhere from $30 (people who don't care about deceased grandmother's sewing stuff or just need to clear it out) to nearly retail, depending on condition.
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I have to sew parts of a swimsuit together and I'm worried about how they naturally stretch when you wear them. Would holding the fabric tight while stretched out and sewing a zigzag work?
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>>10761436
get a dress form, pin the fabric and figure it out there instead of fucking it up by holding the fabric too tight or not tight enough
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>>10761436
You don't want to hold the fabric too tight while sewing because it'll fuck up the stitches and create a warped hem. You only need to slightly tug on it, no more than half or a full inch I'd say. The fabric's direction and degree of stretch, the type of thread you use, and the stitch you use have a bigger factor in your garment's ability to stretch than anything. If you're worried, try pinning your pieces together and slipping it onto your body. If it can't stretch at that stage, you need different fabric or an additional method of attachment (zipper, clasp, etc.).
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>>10761795
Very informative thank you!
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>>10761436
what >>10761795 said. you will also want a specific needle for stretchy fabric; either get a ball point or a stretch needle. I _highly_ recommend a walking foot; you can try to wing it without but I'm pretty sure it's not going to look good without one.
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>>10761837
Best of luck!

Also, I agree right back with what >>10761910
said!
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>>10761910
>tfw have had current sewing machine for 10+ years and just now starting to use the walking foot
I always thought it was just for quilting, but I didn't even use it when I made my two quilts lol That walking foot is amazing for knit fabric
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>>10757487
I got my deal from T-Mobile Tueadays and found extra savings on Hip2Save. Thought it was only valid at the beginning of the year so I'm glad you were able to still sign up!
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>>10762184
Be my wife???
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>>10762184
honestly I use it for literally all fabric and all use cases (except when I need a specialty foot like button hole or zipper). The ONE issue with it is that it takes up a lot of space and obscures the needle so fine sewing can get a lil dicey.
>>
How do you select fabrics beyond just color/texture/feel. Does anyone consider material? How do I find better fabrics, I haven't liked anything at Jo-ann's and all the other stores here just have quilting stuff.
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>>10768710
I consider the textile material, drape, and thickness of the fabric as well. Usually what the fabric feels and looks like are telling of what it's made of, so usually I don't have to search by any specific fiber composition. It's good to know though for iron settings and also an authentic touch if you're trying to be setting-accurate.
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>>10768710
As a fellow person who struggles with picking fabrics, a professional costume designer I follow recommended Claire Sheiffer's Fabric Sewing Guide. I found it for free on libgen as the hardcover costs $30-60. The recommender said it covers fabric terminology, types, recommended usages (ie what types of clothes to use it for), rec'd stitching and ironing settings, and wash care.
>>
>>10768716
>>10768736
A big thing I struggle with is that I can't really choose by feel, texture, drape, thickness, etc when I'm buying online. I could get samples probably? But that seems hit or miss and like it would double my turnaround time for most things. Also what online stores do you like?
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>>10768854
You're absolutely correct, whatever you see online just might not quite be what you envisioned even if the page lists the gsm, fiber content, and has a dozen photos. If accuracy is important, I recommend budgeting in the time for swatches from the seller.

I usually don't shop online because of the uncertainty factor (if I've never bought that specific fabric line before) and the monitor color discrepancy. The only colors I'm willing to buy "blind" online are black, white, and bright red/yellow. All other colors are way too big of a risk for being a shade off.

To get around that, what I've done is that I ordered swatch books for fabrics that I know for sure I'd use in a lot of cosplays so that I have every shade swatch ready from cosplay fabric specialty stores. It's saved me a lot of headache. This is Japan-only though, and no such magical cosplay fabric store exists in the US.

You can try the large fabric retailer stores online like Fabric.com, Mood fabrics, JoAnn, etc. There are tons of quilting fabric-focused stores as well. I also use Etsy to find smaller sellers and I usually try to find their own independent site off Etsy if I see something I like.

If you want something cheap and no time constraints... There's AliExpress yeeep.

Most of time I still end up going to a physical fabric store. I'd rather spend money toward gas than money toward shipping.
>>
On the subject of knitting machines:

A while ago I bought a Bond Incredible Sweater Machine for cheap. Like 75 bucks with all the attachments, the premium version, with the intention of making my own decorative sweaters similar to vintage fairy kei ones. This would be just for myself, not commercial purposes. I have no idea how to use a knitting machine and my attempts at hand knitting have all failed, I can only crochet by hand.

But with recent discussion about knitting machines on cgl and time I've considered getting a newer domestic knitting machine for the sake of knowing if something goes wrong that it's me and not the age or condition of the machine. I also get a stipend for personal enrichment from my employer every month. Would it be worth it to get a newer machine since it would basically be free, rather than trying to learn with an older gimmicky as-seen-on-TV product?

I feel torn as the Bond machine has a lot of resources online for it easily accessible, though they assume some knowledge I definitely don't have, from what I've seen.
>>
Just got this kenmore 1251 for $30 off marketplace, single owner who barely used it since she got it new. It's my first machine, I mostly want to use it for sewing stretch material and bathing suits. Think it'll keep me happy for a while? Are the available stitch types sufficient compared to modern standards? Here's the manual https://www.searspartsdirect.com/manual/195w62sst9-000582/kenmore-15812520-mechanical-sewing-machine-parts
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>>10769412
Probably not, because people who sew mostly stretch fabrics all end up wanting a serger. Stretch fabrics weren't as much a thing back in the day, so vintage machines tend not to be designed for them.
>>
I got a bias strip maker and I just tried to use it to make binding out of some stretch fabric. Even after ironing the strip doesn't want to hold the crease, can I do anything to make this easier? Maybe spray it with starch or something? Also I know for bias tape you want to cut the fabric on the bias because that gives it some stretch (for woven fabric), do I not need to cut stretch fabric on the bias since it already stretches?

Also does anyone have a small iron they really like? I'm using an old clothes iron and it's a little too large and unwieldy for this task I think
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>>10770374
forgot to attach image
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>>10770374
You just gotta straight up sew down the knit bias tape to the project, fold it over and stitch again. The knit property is what prevents it from wrinkling and folding with a bias tape maker. Those are meant for non-stretch fabric even if it gains a bit of stretch when cut on the bias.
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>>10740460
Newfag here, is this the place to discuss on making plush dolls, toy fabrics, pillows, etc?
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>>10770374
Why are you using a bias tape maker for stretch fabric? Stretch fabric...already stretches. The purpose of bias is to create stretch to ease around corners, all you need to do is cut a strip of your fabric with the most stretch in the lengthwise direction, and sew it on. Also, if you're using a knit fabric that doesn't crease easily then it's not going to magically create creases just because you iron it...
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>>10770480
Kind of. One anon asked a plush related question in the help thread (our most active thread) and it got 0 replies. This thread wouldn't be a bad place for it, but we used to run a craft thread which would be better suited for it. The only thing close to it atm is the handmade lolita thread -- which is only for lolita as you can imagine.
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>>10770390
thank you, I remember seeing that in some videos and it makes sense

>>10770887
I was thinking about it making my own fold over elastic, where it's a prefolded strip ready to use as binding. Like you and other anon said, there's a different and easier way
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>>10770908
>One anon asked a plush related question in the help thread (our most active thread) and it got 0 replies.
Damn...that sounds tough. With there's /ct/ [Crafting] board. Thanks though.
>>
Are there any tutorials how to make a jsk smaller (bust, waist)?
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>>10770972
It's very much like taking in a lined dress bodice. So you don't need a lolita specific tutorial.
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I’m looking at a pinnable dress form on marketplace, the waist size is perfect but the bust is one inch too big compared to me. How much will the one inch matter? Any chance I can adjust the bust size a bit? Those were the only two measurements provided, do I need to know other measurements to make sure it’ll work for me?
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>>10774654
If the bust was too small, you could pad it to fill it out and match your measurements, but if the bust is too big anything you pin on it will be too big for you.
It matters, esp for things like if your bodice has fitted cups etc.
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>>10774701
too bad, thank you
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>>10740460
I made this today. First time sewing. Just wanted to share it somewhere.
Some of the visible seams are ugly, but I think I managed to make something functional, which was fun. Button holes are apparently really hard to make nice.
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>>10777947
Can be worn both ways.
The button can be opened to release one sidefold if you need more space.
The cord is detachable on one side. The idea was to also add normal short handles, but I never did.
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>>10777947
hell yeah anon, congrats for finishing your first sewing project
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>>10778100
Thanks!
The local sewing shop is letting me use their machines for free, but this was so much fun I might even get my own at some point.
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>>10778131
what a nice sewing shop. sounds comfy
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>>10777947
Congrats!!! It's really cute, even moreso because it's your first.

Yeah buttonhole are a bitch. If you ever go for a sewing machine get one that has a ONE step buttonhole function.
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>>10777947
anon this fabric is so cute. Great first project. My first bag was kinda like this but I didn't have cute fabric hahaha.
Buttonholes are really annoying, yeah. Even more so on thick fabric, which I'm assuming yours is since it looks like canvas. My sewing machine has a buttonhole maker and I'm so thankful for it lol. You stick the button in and it automatically makes a perfect size hole for the button.
>>
Sorry for super-late reply

>>10778134
Yeah, it is! No else seems to be aware that it is an option, so I get to use sll the equipment all alone.

>>10778179
Oh shit, that's a thing??

>>10778203
Yeah, the fabric was really nice, so I felt I had to try making something out of it.
That sounds wonderful. I should check if one of the machines they have can do that next time.
I know they have some more advanced stuff and a couple of overlocks, but I haven't been brave enough to touch that yet.
>>
>>10777947
>>10777952
>The button can be opened to release one sidefold if you need more space.
Very clever!
>>
I'm looking for some good high quality cotton lace and petersham and cotton sateen ribbon supplier/shop, like the ones used by BABY, THE STARS SHINE BRIGHT brand that are not made exclusively for them.
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>>10754696
You can print just the pattern part, not real life sized but just on a piece of paper, cut it off and try to assemble just like a puzzle until it looks like the skirt on the model. Keep in mind that you'll have only half a skirt since this pattern should be cutted on a fold. You can print and cut 2 of each to make a paper tiny full skirt.
The first shape from left to right is half the skirt front detail, the second is the waist tie. The perfect retangle piece on the far right is the waist band. Bottom tiny rectangle is the waist tie attachement that you later sew a buttonhole. I don't know how to read japanese as well, I hope that helps a bit.
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Are there any file or archive with full scale gothic lolita bibles patterns for download and print? I could only find SOME of the patterns on the magazine scans. Ideally i want all of them, i have a personal archive of printable patterns myself that eventually are very useful.
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>>10780102
Cheeptrims?

>>10774654
Never go larger, always smaller - you can pad a dress form but you can't subtract.
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>>10777947
thats really cute fabric and well done!. i'd recommend giving the straps a press



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