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Old thread saging >>10439162
Is it a craft? Does it use needles, fibers, and/or fabric? It's probably allowed here.
For all other crafts see >>10458855
>>
Anon with a stuck screw in my machine’s throat plate here. Thank you to the anons who gave me suggestions in the last thread. I tried the rubber band trick but things would not budge. I applied more WD-40 from different angles which might have helped, but ultimately I ended up removing the top cover of my machine so that my mini screwdriver could fit and it worked! I expected much more dust than I actually found so I’m relieved. Thanks for the help! You saved me $$$ that I would’ve had to spend at the repair shop. Thanks for the help!
>>
Anyone know of an archive that has readable scans of GLB patterns?
>>
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I'm a little slow and new to crochet is someone willing to help me make sense of this pattern?
I understand what stitches it's asking for and how to do them (chain and single crochet) but I don't understand where it's telling me to put them.
I just finished step 3/third photo which is 16 single crochet, and I don't understand what step 4/four photo is telling me to do. The instructions are
>*Ch 2, 1 sc into next stitch, repeat from * to end of round. (16 chain loops)
Is it telling me to do one chain into a stitch from my last row, "float" one chain stitch, and then do my next one into the next stitch from the previous row?
>>
>>10472270
so at the beginning of the round, make 2 chains (yarn over the hook and pull through, yarn over the hook and pull through). you'll have two little chain stitches between your hook and your work now.

then single crochet into the first stitch of the last round you completed. repeat that! i think your confusion stems from what "ch2" means, because you don't chain INTO a stitch; you're just making a chain, like you do when you begin a crochet project.

if that doesn't help i'll pick up my hook n yarn and show you.
>>
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>>10472280
That explanation actually helped a lot anon, thank you! It may not be very pretty but it's starting to resemble the photos. It's one of those mesh produce bags and I'm using jute twine, I thought it would be a good first project and I'm finding twine easier to work with than yarn because of how tightly it's twisted
>>
>>10472289
yay! happy to help anon, lookin good.

ITT are we only supposed to post like... /cgl/ related projects? i'm an avid knitter/crochet(-er?) but i've avoided posting 'cuz i wasn't sure if y'all would actually want to see my work. i remember checking /diy/ hoping there'd be needlework generals but no luck.
>>
>>10472295
I'd say post whatever, /fa/ and /diy/ seem to not have any interest in these sorts of crafts and this is probably the only board these sorts of threads can survive on
>>
>>10472295
you can pretend it's for an OC cosplay
>>
>>10472295
I’d like to see your work! Knit and crochet garments and accessories are pretty relevant to certain Jfashion styles like mori and natural kei so I think you’ll be fine.
>>
>>10472295
please post, I'm a tailor (better word than "sewer") and knitting/crocheting is dope af. From what I can tell, /cgl/ is the board for sewing related stuff (which includes knit/crochet) so go on ahead.
>>
she posted a headdress diy video on YT, looks easy enough
>>
I'm sewing an exposed waistband to my bloomers because nobody's gonna see it. Should my thread tension be higher or lower?
>>
>>10473067
Higher or lower than what? That depends on the thickness of your elastic. I hope you're using zig zag stitch. Why not just make a casing? It's easier imo
>>
Any of you gulls have recommendations for books regarding pattern drafting? I never really formally learned, only made patterns from garments I owned. I'm mostly interested in menswear because I usually crossplay but I won't turn up my nose at a book focused on womenswear because the basic techniques are the same.
>>
Sewing beginner here. Where should I buy fabric from?
>>
>>10476301
That depends where you live and what you're looking for. It's always best to see your fabric in person but I know local selections can be crappy (I only have a Joann's near me). If you're more specific about what you're looking for, I'm sure we could point you in the right direction.
I'm a bit of a snob and don't like synthetics so I buy silk from Dharma Trading, general fabrics from Mood, and leather from Hide House or Tandy Leather (if you're lucky, there's one near you. I try buy my hides in person even though my local Tandy is 50 miles away because leather is so imperfect)
>>
>>10476324
I just want decent 100% cotton fabric. Solid colors is fine but I'd like to find fabric with nice designs, preferrably Japanese-inspired in some way. I know that's vague but I barely know what I'm looking for aside from 100% cotton; I just know that I haven't found anything that I particularly care for while searching around the Internet.
>>
>>10476334
You should learn a little more about fabrics first. Knit vs woven, pile and nap, different weaves like twill, plain, and satin.
If you purchase a commerical pattern, the envelope should tell you what fabrics it's designed for
>>
>>10476301
If you're in a major city there's a chance that there may be some sort of fabric/garment/fashion district where you can go around and see things in person. Otherwise Joann or Walmart has selections in person you can examine and look at. (assuming you're in the US)

Being able to touch and see how fabrics behave is pretty important as a foundation to sewing or else you're kind of blindly guessing when you buy things online to start out with.
>>
>>10476360
How do I find out if there's one of those districts near me? I live near Phoenix.
>>
>>10476363
Different anon, but a simple google search should tell you. For example the LA Fashion district is searchable on a google map even though it is not technically a location.
>>
>>10473067
lower. bear in mind i'm assuming you've tried everything else and are still popping stitches. also bear in mind the need remains for the stitch to be balanced; once you can stretch without any popping, keep it held taut, flip it over, and inspect the stitchline because if the threads look neat on top but derpy on the underside while the seam is under tension then it's only a matter of time. in that case you'll wanna back off on the top tension adjustment just a smidge and loosen the bobbin tension. remember a little goes a long way, particularly on bobbin tension adjustments.

>>10474733
picrelated. found a pdf copy of it a while back, if you want i'll see if i can dig up the link
>>
>>10476334
>lawn, batiste, cambric, voile, crepe, gauze, double gauze, percale, chambray, gingham, eyelet, dobby, pique, poplin, broadcloth, shirting, oxford cloth, sateen, twill, flannel, suede cloth, gabardine, velveteen, corduroy, french terry, doubleknit, interlock, sweatshirting, jersey, rib knit, sweater knit
precede any of the above with the word cotton and there's your fabric name to use as a search term. note that list isn't exhaustive, items are grouped roughly by similar weights/weaves, and order goes (also roughly) from likelihood of relevance (we mind reader nao) to likelihood of pissing you off on a sewing machine.

>>10476363
place called SAS Fabrics on east indian looks promising. i'd go there and have a wander around.
>apparel-weight printed cotton
mention that's what you're looking for to the sales staff
>>
>>10476301
Your local op shop. If you're a raw beginner and have no-one to help or guide you as you learn, your first few projects are likely to be practice ones and you aren't necessarily going to be able to save them if they go wrong. Practice on old sheet fabric while you're learning, and then start looking for nice cottons to use.
>>
Best place for good quality lace? Is taobao worth it or am I taking a risk? I'm located in canada and there aren't any carried in nearby stores. I'm planning on picking up some chemical and torchon in multiple sizes and colours, but am nervous as taobao has questionable quality. Is torchon less of a risk than chemical?
>>
>>10477890
I was fine with aliexpress venise lace, which is probably the same as what is sold on taobao - just more convenient to find things with the app.
>>
>>10477890

Taobao is my main source, and pretty decent on the whole, given you already know what you'd looking for, and if you check customer's feedback photos. The only thing I have to warn is there are very rare cases where the venise lace is made of shiny polyester thread, but out of all my purchases I only came across one where it was so plasticky I didn't want to sew it to the dress.

If you're not comfortable with that, kuboriki (on rakuten) is the source old egl used to recommend, but I think they source their lace from all over, including taobao, so I think there's not that much difference.
>>
If you use a cad program to make your patterns, which one(s) do you use? It's something I've wanted to do for a while
>>
Would anyone happen to know what these kinds of beads(?) they used for the eyes are called?
>>
>>10478577
Try "czech glass"
>>
>>10471944
That is a VERY cute Miku, thank you for posting
>>
>>10478499
inkscape
>>
>>10474733
I swear this needs to be at the start of every thread.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/d3z1814muvtxoyh/AADFuIAoYs9RYEkmaCEVNajDa?dl=0
>>
>>10480092
Honestly, that's always been one of the things that surprises me in how /cgl/ runs generals compared to other boards; while the Taobao generals start with a list of applicable links, not many others do.
>>
>>10480216
I've been wondering why we don't have a more thorough sticky. So many simple resources have to be regurgitated every thread.
>>
>>10480334
I'll add this to the next thread I start, I made this one and the last one
>>
>>10480339
Also add the link to the Otome no Sewing scans. That gets asked for/linked most threads.
>>
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will post this in help thread
I've been brainstorming a Goku cosplay. I wanna either do a tunic shirt for his blue shirt or something like pic related. Is there any sleeveless gi/tunic looking sewing patterns?
>>
>>10474733
If you're at all into Victorian era women's clothing, you can get a free pdf of "The Keystone Jacket and Dress cutter" on archive.org.
>>
>>10480339
Thanks, anon
>>
>>10480596
Look through McCall's and Simplicity catalogs. If you have no luck there, head to etsy.
>>
>>10480596
Anon I think you can adapt this pattern by removing the sleeves. If you want it to be as tight as the photos though, you might need to do some fiddling with the fit
http://www.dr-cos.info/fp-jinbei.html
Also, for other gulls, I've been collecting useful patterns for cosplay and jfash on Pinterest (all either free or patterns where the preview is enough to give you a good block to start from). It's not much right now, but here's my autistically organized cosplay sewing board. There may be some other patterns in here you'll find useful
https://pin.it/3J5Edo0
>>
>>10480855
I give you kiss, anon. This is great thank you
>>
>>10480855
Origina anon here, this is awesome. t hanks
>>
how do you do a hem on a serger?
>>
So I now have access to an industrial walking foot machine. I'm hoping to sew clear vinyl with it. If anyone else has used an industrial walking foot with "sticky" fabrics like vinyl, did you just use the walking foot as is? Clear tape on the bottom? A special plastic/roller foot? I see all these tips for sewing it on domestic machines but nothing about industrials
>>10481834
Can you be more specific? Do you mean coverstitch? Not all sergers are capable of coverstiching
>>
>>10481834
Like a rolled hem? Your manual should have instructions.

>>10483007
Fashion-incubator has some tips on industrial machines including using silicone spray for 'grabby' fabrics, with the takeaway being 'industrial machines feed fabric in MUCH better than domestics, but you may need to adjust your feed based on material choice'
>>
>>10483243
Thank you, I will check that out. I do have some silicone spray hanging around somewhere I will try. The "hopping" motion of industrial walking feet seems like it would cut down on most of the "grabbiness" of vinyl and similar fabrics but I felt like I was missing a piece of that puzzle
>>
>>10483007
>>10483243
i think coverstitch is what i meant, yes. my machine doesn't do it but blind hem stitching it all worked well and i rather like the appearance.
>>
Hey, anon who mentioned blacksmithing from the last thread here.
I've recently also taken up welding, which has the same rule of no synthetic materials because it's a fire hazard. I wanted to make wool and silk undershirts to wear underneath my jacket and out of an abundance of caution I do not feel comfortable using polyester thread to serge these.
I know the reason you're not supposed to use cotton in a serger is because of how much lint it produces, but my other options (kevlar, nomex, or silk) are all very expensive, especially if I'm buying four cones to use on an overlocker. Should I bite the bullet and shell out? Or can I make cotton work without too much shredding and lint?
>>
Would stretch pleather work for a bunny suit? I have a decent amount left from a previous project and I'm not sure if it's worth to attempt it.
>>
>>10483830
I don't see why not, the stretch should help the fit look better too
>>
>>10483835
Thanks!
>>
>>10483830
Yes but most fabrics only stretch along one axis so be mindful of that if yours is
>>
>>10483513
Why are you serging? There are other ways to finish a seam....
>>
>>10484023
Its a knit and that's the fastest way
>>
>>10484220
Stretch stitch or zig zag in cotton on your regular machine, then. It's not that difficult.
>>
>>10476363
This reply is a bit late but I'm also near Phoenix. SAS sucks unless you're making a quince or prom dress, idk why all the locals recommend it. You're best off ordering online or taking a trip to LA
>>
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Does anyone know what kind of fabric is being used for the face and hair? According to the commissioner, this is their material list:
>I use polar, minky, cotton, fleece and faux leather for the most.
I have an embroidery machine so I'd love to go into plushmaking, but I'm not sure what materials to use and looking it up doesn't give me results beyond felt plushies.
Thank you in advance!
>>
>>10485697
Face and hair are minky, dress and bonnet are fleece
>>
>>10485697
it's minky but it looks like shit since it's still has raw edges.it will roll up eventually as it is in the pic. most good plush makers will use felt or wool or something similar that doesn't have stretch for the hair.
>>
>>10485701
>>10485704
Thank you so much (and also for the advice!) As for the minky, is there a specific term I should look up regarding it? I'm assuming it's smooth minky specifically, but I'm not sure if there's any characteristics I should look for beyond that.
>>
>>10483513
Are they really that expensive though? I feel like they tend to be cheaper for the amount cause it's generally to do one task and it won't be seen like topstitching. Wait to see if some goes on sale and buy it in the most neutral gray. You can also use regular sewing thread spindles in a pinch depending on your machine setup.
>>
Any suggestions for easy projects? I'm a total newb to lolita and sewing, right now I'm planning to sew myself some bloomers and old school knee socks
>>
>>10486086
Bows, rosettes, attaching ribbons, etc.
>>
>>10486086
Have you got a sewing machine yet?
>>
>>10486241
Yea, I've used it a bit, but only simple stuff like taking in clothes, miniskirts, and masks
>>
>>10486260
Different anon, but it sounds like you can move to medium-beginner or second level beginner projects like a tiered skirt, petticoat, or maybe a simple blouse. Wrist cuffs could be a cute and easy project.
>>
>>10486086
Gathered rectangle skirt.
>>
is there a single solid introduction to machine sewing tools and their uses? im trying to figure out what bits of kit i need and what i dont for what im trying to do, as well as what i should spend on them.
>>
>>10490474
Tools for machine upkeep like oil and screwdrivers or sewing tools like a seam ripper and stuff?
>>
>>10490477
sewing tools, ive got oil and stuff handy if i need to maintain it
>>
>>10490474
>>10490508
>>10490508
In general, sewing tools are categorized either by level (beginner, intermed, etc) or by function (pattern drafting, garment construction, utility projects, etc). So what would benefit you most will depend on what you would like to make and how you want to make it. If you search "beginner sewing supplies" on youtube, you'll find tons of videos. Generally they all cover the same basic supplies but you'll find a lil variation among them depending on what the person is crafting with them. Most people sew for daily wear garment construction so you'll likely find videos on that unless you add a modifying word to your search.

I have the Reader's Digest: Complete Guide to sewing and it has a great splash page for sewing tools and their uses. It's much the same content you'll find in the videos, but if you'd prefer an easy reference I'd suggest obtaining a pdf of it online. I got the newer physical copy for like $7 but it's easy enough to find free online too. Or other books like it.
>>
>>10490525
if it at all helps, my goal is mens tailoring and garment construction. classic menswear and the like. i see a lot of tailors gravitate towards very specific brands and models of tools, but i dont really have the money to begin investing in expensive shears for example. theres also things like sewing machine feet. ive got a cheap machine, so it only came with one foot, and i know nothing about what sorts of feet i may need for it, or any other accessories. ive got a book that makes recommendations on basic stuff like threads and materials, chalk and the like, but nothing on brands of tools.

im a little skeptical of trusting youtube desu, given the huge discrepancies ive seen between amateur home dress makers, more experienced ones, and professional tailors. having a single solid reference on this would also help, as an overview approach tends to be more useful i find when getting into something than 10 videos that may miss out something important.
>>
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on a related note, of these stitches which if any are better for finishing edges? alas, i dont own a serger and likely wont for the foreseeable future.
>>
>>10477890
Yes, worth if it's from a vetted store. I get lace from laces.taobao.com. Beautiful mesh embroidered lace, some nearly identical to what brand dresses use, and it costs me less than scratchy raschel lace would at Fabricland.
>>
>>10490566
The only branded tool that is important is shears anyway, and in the range you can afford there's probably not much difference. Presser feet are mostly sold by the machine manufacturers or you can get aftermarket ones, probably a zipper foot is the only other one I use frequently aside from the regular foot. Otherwise, you just need thread, needles (brand not important unless you're going for the most budget knock off ones possible, in which case don't), pins, a seam ripper (try to get one with a decent handle rather than the shitty tiny ones you see everywhere, as there is likely a lot of seam unpicking in your future), possibly the tiny snips that are good for trimming threads.
>>
>>10490674
can you recommend me any good names in quality shears that might not appear on a generic top 5 list? gives me things to look for on ebay.

are all presser feet brands equal?
>>
>>10490692
Bearing in mind that I'm left handed and take what I can get, I'm currently onto my second pair of entry level Mundial 8.5" ones which tend to last about 5 years with casual sewing before needing replacing or resharpening. Both of my pairs were gifts which is why I haven't upgraded, but I liked the feel of my friend's Gingher ones which will probably be my next pair. If you are doing menswear, you may want longer blades.

With presser feet I have literally never looked at the brand, but I tend to buy in person from sewing shops which have a refund policy rather than taking my chances on ebay
>>
>>10490647
I have these stitches in my machine and if your fabric crumbles a lot they will not save it for long time
I recommend french seam for thin fabrics. For others fabrics I usually use flat felled seam, it looks good and easy to do but you'll have one additional stitching on face. Another options are clean finish edge or hong kong or bias tape bound.
Hope I helped you a little. Link where I've got all names of stitches https://www.peekaboopages.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Finish-a-Seam-434x650-1-434x650.png
>>
>>10490963
Damn wrong link
https://www.peekaboopages.com/2015/01/eleven-ways-finish-seam.html
>>
>>10490963
>>10490967
hong kongs look nice for the sorts of things im considering, my interests are primarily in harder to obtain ready to wear off the rack materials like linen and corduroy.

>>10490754
that suits me fine as im a leftie too in that regard. thanks for the tip.
>>
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What should I look for in a sewing machine if I wanna start sewing my own clothes?
I already have a household machine that can do most things but not very well. I was looking into getting a semi-industrial sewing machine because of the high stitch quality and longevity but most of them only do straight stitching. Is it necessary do you think to have a machine that can do many types of stitching keeping in mind the fact that I do have one, albeit not a very good one that can do those types of stitches. I was looking into getting a Juki especially but if you have any other suggestions please let me know.
>>
>>10493689

I usually look for how quiet a machine is for domestic ones and of the ones I've heard in person babylock is the quietest as well as I've seen some people mod the motor on their Jukis to makes them almost silent. You really only technically need a straight and zigzag stitch for a lot of basic sewing.
>>
>>10493694
Yeah, that's what I was wondering I guess. I'm not sure how much use I would have for a machine that can do many different types of stitching. Zigzag would be nice but as I mentioned, I already have a domestic one I could use for that.
>>
is it worth getting an old straight stitch only electric sewing machine? theres a Novum brand machine near me for all of £10, looks to have everything with it, but theres no labelled stitching patterns and i cant exactly ask to see it working.
>>
>>10493710
Maybe you should look into an overlock machine instead then
>>
>>10493735
Maybe, I'm not familiar enough with sewing machines so I would have to look into it more. It seems as if overlock machines are more specialized though, no?
>>
>>10493732
i should mention i have one of those cheap ebay plastic sewing machines rn which sort of works and can do a bunch of stitches, but it struggles on 4 layers of shirt fabric.
>>
>>10493689
Industrial machines only do one stitch is because they generally are designed for production lines/factories. If you want to do things like buttonholes and have nice finished edges then you need to think about also getting an overlocker (or enclosing every seam) as well as either a buttonhole machine or hoping your domestic machine will fill that gap. You may be better off upgrading to a more robust domestic machine rather than an industrial, most people who only sew for themselves manage just fine on a decent domestic machine.

>>10493732
I'd look at the cost of servicing and repairs first. Old machine parts can be a bitch to find
>>
I’m just getting into hand embroidery and am interested in making a stitch sampler. Does anybody have any recommendations for patterns online that would appeal to weeby/lolita interests?
>>
I’ve seen people bring up buying lace off taobao, but what about aliexpress? Is it the same stock? Are there any stores that are particularly reliable?
>>
>>10494490
dont buy from china, you wont be getting your shipments any time soon.
>>
>>10494881
That's good advice, but that really didn't answer their question. They were asking about the quality of the lace.
>>
>>10494881
How come? I’ve been stuff from ali with no problem over the past few months
>>
>>10494983
ive had stuff just not leave the warehouse because of delays. its a roll of the dice as to whether your shipment will be dispatched or not.
>>
>>10494881
>>10494992
there haven't been delays for months
>>
>>10493689
If your household machine can't do things very well why not replace that instead? I have an old vintage all metal machine that does 12 stitches with a free arm and it's all I need for the rest of my life. I recently got a serger to complement it and I'm pretty set.
>>
>>10490566
>>10490692
>>10490980
>shears
seconding Gingher
>machine needles
top pick: Organ, runner up: John James (both of which are better made, less costly, and longer lasting than Schmetz)
>hand needles
John James
>oil
Tri-Flow
>presser feet
if there's a brand name attached at all, it'll typically be that of the sewing machine, e.g. Singer, Bernina. their presser feet are made in the same factories that the unbranded ones come out of. the grade of chinesium used is probably lower, QC is probably more lax, but you really can't tell much difference in use and the unbranded ones sell for a fraction of the cost. i'd advise you get one of those sets of a bunch of em; you'll get a feel for which ones you find useful and you can always upgrade individual feet later should the need arise
>seam ripper
if you can sharpen or set the teeth on a handsaw, then and only then consider investing in a high quality seam ripper; otherwise treat these as consumables and buy them cheaply in bulk
>french/hip curve rules
Fairgate
>tailor's ham and sleeve board or sleeve roll
can make these yourself if you're so inclined (recommended)
>thread
top pick: Gutermann (make damn sure the spools say made in germany, there was a short-lived made in mexico experiment that went exactly as well as you'd expect), runner up: Mettler Metrosene, adequate: Coats & Clark
>chalk
Clover
>pins, thread snips, tweezers, pipe cleaners, pattern weights
any
>>
>>10496081
NAYRT but adding some opinions as well
>Clover-branded stuff
Clover has really good quality notions in general, and is much much better quality than Dritz (which is probably the most popular brand that I see sold around) in practically every regard. I have a really nice tape measure, chalk, and fabric marker from there and they're all awesome
>pattern weights
These are probably the biggest scam around, they're always extremely expensive and limited in amount. A common suggestion is buying washers, but the issue is that they're frequently not heavy enough to hold a pattern down. I recommend going down to a hardware store and seeing what sorts of weights are on sale; I personally bought these metal squares that had magnets on them, so I can just stick a bunch of them together to weigh more.
>machine needles
I haven't tried Organ or John James, but stay far away from Singer and Dritz branded machine needles. Schmetz has treated me well, but Singer and Dritz are pure garbage.
>>
>>10496620
>clover vs dritz
spot on, yeah. clover is japanese made and it shows. dritz is basically on par with craftsman -- built its reputation over decades, solidified its position as a household name, then went full retard and dove headlong into cheap chinese trash territory. dritz got bought by prym last year though which iirc is a german company, so that's (potentially at least) bretty gud news.
>the biggest scam around
kek that's not even its final form. get a load of this:
https://www.amazon.com/Fasturn-Fabric-Turners-Crown-Tubes/dp/B00DK0Z43K/
sixty feckin dollars for some wee tubing offcuts and pokey sticks. people are out of their damn minds i swear. you can accomplish the same by taking apart a mechanical pencil and sanding smooth a bamboo skewer. works a treat btw, can highly recommend. anyway. re: pattern weights, that's clever with the magnets. first ones i made were little fabric donuts filled with sand. worked fine but a bit unwieldy. ended up finding a box of 100 2" fender washers on sale for a few bucks, wrapped them together four at a time with electrical tape, and now i've got 14 pattern weights living in two compact tidy stacks next to my cutting mat that are super quick to deploy/recall. happy days.
>needles
give organ a try next time you run out, you'll not be disappointed. they're japanese made as well. john james is an old-as-dirt english company who i can't say enough good things about. schmetz imo is a ripoff. premium price tag for middling quality.


tell me about the clover marking pen you mentioned?
>>
>>10497079
>dritz got bought by prym
Different anon, but holy shit you just solved a connundrum I was having today. I went to Joanns and picked up some sewing notions because I had a coupon of my total purchase of Dritz items. But when I looked at my receipt, I saw Prym. The discount looks like it was still taken off, but I couldn't figure out for the life of me what the hell it meant and why it didn't say Dritz. I guess Joann's computers aren't updated. Thank you for that nugget of info I didn't know I needed.
>>
Any suggestions for fleece projects? I have a yard and a half because of my local mom & pop's 1 yard minimum (the extra yard was because of a stain on the fabric so they gave me the rest of the 1/2 yard for free) and I only needed a fat quarter of it for a project. Or should I see it? I'm not really interested in a kigu.
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>>10497090
hah nice, happy to be of help. if i had to guess, i'd say they're probably trying to get the now-old stock moved out the door so they can bring in the new inventory that'll have "prym" added to the packaging somewhere
>>
>>10497093
Plushies
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>>10497656
Funny, that's what I originally bought the fleece for. I guess making more won't hurt. Thanks, anon
>>
>>10497093
*Should I sell it
>>
>>10497093
fleece bloomers for the winter?
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>>10497079
Hopefully dritz improves their quality! They're the most prominent at Joann's. And will definitely look into buying those needles; I get schmetz since that's the best Joann's stocks, but I might just cop off Amazon or something next time. Organ needles came with my Brother machine and they're pretty decent, and the price is fantastic too.

The clover marking pen was a generic blue water soluble one (https://www.clover-usa.com/en/marking-tools/244-water-soluble-marker-thick-point.html). I needed to trace some marks on some midweight wool (which my dritz pen wouldn't take) and it did the trick. It just worksTM.
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>>10497931
I love that idea! I have to make some cotton bloomers anyway, so I guess that counts as a mockup
>>
>>10496081
can i just buy any old pack of presser feet or should i be careful with it? this is the machine ive got. ebay.co.uk/itm/Electric-Sewing-Machine-Portable-Mini-12-Stitches-2-Speeds-Foot-Pedal-LED-UK/333767572529

ginger and fairgate stuff dont seem to be in supply here sadly, is there really much point in not just getting a cheap pack of plastic rules?

if i can find a sleeve board at my local boyes ill buy it, but if not ill just knock one up i guess.

thoughts on regal needles? i see them recommended on cutter and tailor forum

is it worth doing my first attempts at trousers in muslin cloth just to learn, or should i buy cheap linen from the store?

sorry it took me a bit to respond.
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>>10500704
>presser feet
compatibility-wise, you want snap on and/or low shank. picrelated. quality-wise, yes as a general rule always be careful. check buyer reviews and whatnot. if you think there's ever even a remote chance you'll have use for a walking foot, i'd recommend picking up this https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/15-11pcs-Sewing-Machine-Walking-Foot-Set-Feet-Kit-Sewing-Presser-Accessories-DIY/224083594927 and if not then go for one of the 32pc or 42pc sets. that'll get you p much all of what you're likely to find useful (except for a felling foot). also the "not for mini machines" note doesn't apply to yours; see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7gQvU1hSyo to confirm
>cheap plastic rules
get em. these too fall under the you-can-upgrade-the-useful-ones-later category. and in fact one advantage of the plastic ones over the metal is you can see through them which can def prove helpful. really just depends what your needs turn out to be.
>regal needles
never heard of them. worth trying. the made in japan part typically tends to be a good sign. the rec's from others on forums dedicated to specifically what you're looking to get into is also a bretty good sign. hell probably give them a go myself at some point, thanks for making me aware they exist.
>worth doing first attempts in muslin
yes. emphatically so. this is a yes now and it will still remain a yes long after you've gotten the hang of sewing; making a toile is best practice whenever you use a new pattern or draft for the first time. purpose is to refine the fit /before/ cutting into whatever fabric you've got earmarked for that particular garment. once you've gotten a pattern adjusted properly, you can skip the muslin step and just bang out as many additional versions of it as you please. at the risk of bombarding you with too much seemingly unrelated crap... two more incredibly useful, if somewhat unconventional, sewing supplies very worth keeping on hand: medical exam table paper and freezer paper.
>>
>>10500987
thank you. one other thing i have an interest in materials wise is mesh and lace fabrics for a project a friend has asked me to give a shot. what should i look for in lace and sheer materials if i want them to be comfortable for intimate wear?
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>>10501253
natural fibres. cotton, silk, viscose/rayon. beyond that, look with your hands if at all possible.
chiffon, georgette, batiste, voile, and gauze come to mind first for me but i tend to heavily favour the drapey, flowy, diaphanous type looks. if by intimate wear you mean something more figure-hugging, you'll likely want some amount of stretch introduced either by way of a blend that includes elastane or a knit construction like a tricot.
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>>10501253
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>>10501371
>>10501373
these are awesome, thanks anon!
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>>10501405
welcome. also have these if any interest:
>batting
>brocade
>cotton
>felted
>interfacing
>knit
>leather
>lining
>net
>nylon
>outerwear
>pile
>ribbed weave
>satin
>silk
>taffeta
>velvet
>wool
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>>10501486
nayrt but I'd like to see all of them
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>>10501540
sure, np
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>>10501725
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>>10501727
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>>10501728
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>>10501729
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>>10501730
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>>10501731
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>>10501732
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>>10501734
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>>10501735
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>>10501737
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>>10501738
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>>10501739
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>>10501741
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>>10501742
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>>10501744
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>>10501371
very body hugging. suffice to say it will sit directly against more sensitive skin, require a good bit of stretch for comfort, and will require some slightly detailed shaping with minimal risk of irritation from seams. im not sure what i want to look for in terms of sheer fabrics here.
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>>10501745
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>>10501747

>>10501746
look up "tricot". that's the stuff you're after. nylon > polyester. you'll also want a bit of cotton in some form lining the crotch if you're making panties.
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>>10501754
this stuff?
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Nylon-Denier-Tricot-fabric-Dance-stage-lingerie-black-or-white/373036885203

the cotton i may have to do without, but i dont think its needed in this case anyway. the way im thinking of doing things i will need to cut a wedge shape from one area so as to create a small cup, then stitch that together. looking at similar garments it almost seems like they did similar things with an overlocker for a neater result, but i dont have one of those sadly. im thinking my best alternative would be french seams.
>>
>>10501761
something like that yes, although the weight may be a touch heavy depending on the amount of sheerness you're wanting and the "slightly stretchy" line in the description would give me pause but then again it may actually be a boon in this instance. tricot is what stockings and pantyhose are made from, and what's used to line swimsuits. typically the stuff is just "stretchy", full stop. this listing may work out just fine though and at that price you wouldn't be out much if it doesn't so no harm giving it a shot. i'll tell you right now though that trying to french seam tricot on a regular machine is the sort of endeavour that'll make you want to chuck the bastard out a window in short order. set your stitch dial to number 10, drop the tension a smidge, anchor your machine to the table somehow, and stretch the fabric as you're sewing it. the advantage of the overlocker is not only the neater appearance but the fact that the seams themselves are able to stretch. there are various paths to attaining a stretchable seam with a regular machine but there's a definite limit there and more often than not you still end up popping a few stitches once the garment is in use.
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>>10501780
would you suggest any other fabric in particular, or any other techniques for making a cup shape in fabric? im going solely on what ive been able to piece together from existing garments ive gotten to look at.
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>>10501788
>would you suggest any other fabric in particular
probably but it'll help to know what you're actually looking to make. is it just a straight up bra? bodysuit? negligee? if you can find a picture of something similar, post it
>or any other techniques for making a cup shape in fabric?
darts, gathers, princess seams, panels, gores. there's various ways. give me a sec to look through some stuff and find what might be useful. picrelated for example is a woven satin fabric that doesn't stretch.
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>>10501805
if im gonna be honest, its underwear. i have a trans friend who requested something nice they can wear that doesnt have issues with them slipping out, theyre also the one who gifted me the machine so i plan on making it for them.
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>>10501807
welp. everything i've got will relate to either tiddies or heads so as for how to get the cup shape, this seems appropriate:
https://www.sewitlikeaman.com/pages/free-basic-jockstrap
and then regarding the choice of fabric ...maybe tissue jersey? idk my brain is kinda shutting down trying to process this one.
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>>10501807
better link
https://underwear.sew-ing.com/
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>>10501828
that simplifies it greatly, amazed i didnt think of that to begin with.

>tissue jersey
returns 0 results on ebay desu. i suppose i could always go with anything breathable and elasticated in a pinch, but the nicer it is for them the better. i suppose i could just elasticate the edges and use lace fabric for the bulk of it. looking at one of the example garments ive got it looks like a 2cm strip of waistband fabric was just folded over and zig zag stitched down to itself for all the edges.

>>10501853
thats handy, thanks
>>
What are some good online stores for US-based lace and trims? I usually order from Ali/Taobao but I don't feel like waiting right now. I'd prefer somewhere that doesn't have purchase minimums like Cheeptrims.
>>
Does anyone have more complete scans of OnS book 8? I bought book 7 from an ebay seller but the paper patterns are from book 8. I'm particularly interested in the cutsew(?) and would be grateful even for a snapshot of what it's supposed to look like and/or the instructions.
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>>10501855
this is tissue jersey. jersey is the most basic/simple knit constructions. most t-shirts are jersey. the 'tissue' modifier refers to the weight of it.
>it looks like a 2cm strip of waistband fabric was just folded over and zig zag stitched down to itself for all the edges.
aye, that stuff is called fold-over elastic. searching FOE on ebay should bring up loads of results.
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>>10501978
aah. not quite what im after desu, got a few tshirts made of the super thin stuff.

is fold over elastic sensible for this task?
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>>10501893
dharmatrading has a buttload of cotton lace trim in their clearance section rn. sewbizfabrics has great prices, a few gems, and the lady who runs it is a sweetheart but the selection is small and the website is a cocksucker and a half to navigate. ebay is hit or miss but generally worth at least a quick search. and four others i've got bookmarked but haven't ever ordered from: laceplace, patchworkpandatrims, farmhousefabrics, and mjtrim

>>10501980
>this task
>sensible
pick one and only one
bantz aside, yeah. underwear edges are exactly where you typically find the stuff
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>>10501725
Thank you anon!
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>>10501973
Replying to myself to add it's pattern 11 on pages 26-28 if that helps anyone help me!
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>>10500704
>is it worth doing my first attempts at trousers in muslin cloth just to learn, or should i buy cheap linen from the store?
You want to pick a fabric that is going to be the same weight as the fabric your project is going to be made in. Cheap linen is fine if you want to make linen pants, but muslin is always the first choice. It's just so easy to work with and pretty cheap, especially if you buy by the bolt.
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>>10501993
thanks, looking at that plus backed seems a touch more comfy feeling so ill go with that for them.

i have actually had some other thoughts tho and i was wondering if i could get your opinion on making a particular thing. the lass im making this for has a thing for astolfo for some reason, and i just spotted this. posting externally as its not quite SFW even tho it doesnt actually show any skin besides tummy and thighs.
https://files.catbox.moe/20q85o.jpg

my original thoughts were to make something nice and showy she can wear for her first pair like this but looking at the thing in the image i think she would appreciate those more. i take it a sheer satin or silk like material would likely look awful for this, and i would be best sticking with non-sheer.

i think i should be able to get the lacey bits and the fabric for that easy enough, ideally pre-gathered so i dont cock it up with my inexperienced hands. colour wise i suspect a muted red as per the photos would be nice, especially with her red hair. not sure on the main fabric though, i was thinking maybe an off white? but i could also see that being too much, and maybe pure white would be better.

sorry if im asking a ton of questions, i just want to make my friend a nice gift to thank her.
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so seeing as my washer overflowed last night and took out most of my day i spent the remainder of it hunting down trimmings for this little project and doing odd bits about the house. i sadly wasnt able to find any trimmings that were an exact match for the image so i figure its probably best to make my own. the body of the garment will be made from an ivory satin fabric because its cheap enough and wearable enough to see if the design needs improving in ways. the trimmings i will be making by gathering satin ribbons myself, using a 7cm one for the leg holes to achieve the curve shown in the image im trying to recreate, and probably a shorter one for the waistband. the waistband trimmings will be stitched between the outer fabric and an elasticated plush waistband, and the leg hole trimmings will be stitched directly to the leg opening. i think the waistband seems sensible enough, but im not quite so sure i like this way of doing the leg trimmings. it would be much easier to have a neater inside if i didnt have to gather and introduce a visual curve to them, or if i had some premade ones i could use, but alas i do not. anyone got any better ideas on this?
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>>10501973
>>10502199
found this:
https://i.warosu.org/cgl/thread/9421953#p9435149
and this:
https://misscarolbelle.wordpress.com/2016/02/02/otome-no-sewingbook-8/
either of those do it?

>>10501994
v welcome

>>10502622
>i was thinking maybe an off white? but i could also see that being too much,
too much in what regard? white would contrast with the red more starkly whereas off white would soften the colour combo
>sorry if im asking a ton of questions, i just want to make my friend a nice gift to thank
nah no worries lad. i admire the sentiment behind the gesture, quite a lot in fact, i just don't know how much of use i'm able to offer opinion-wise regarding this particular garment. i'll level with you - in its simplest terms the question i'm looking at amounts to "my m8 wants his balls to look fancy. how do?" and my answer to that ranges from "tie a leetle bow on them!" to "why?" to "you don't. they're balls. you just keep em comfy and don't let em overheat." point being that my opinion here on whether this or that colour would be better is gonna default to "no" and whether this or that material would look awful is gonna default to "yes"
>>10503168
right, this i can work with
>wasnt able to find any trimmings that were an exact match for the image so i figure its probably best to make my own
pleated edge elastic and/or ruffle edge elastic would get you there. the problem isn't so much finding trims which match the image, it's finding trims which would all match each other.
>gathering satin ribbon
that's how i'd approach it. roll of 2" satin ribbon and use that for all of it. wide enough to get the bow out of and can simply be cut narrower for the waist edge since it'll be sandwiched anyhow. do the legs like the waist, the elastic is needed in both areas. coax ribbon into mimic of circularity by stretching while steam pressing; staystitch; treat as flounce. fold ribbon like bias tape for the criss cross bits. slipstitch bow on.

how are your trousers coming along?
>>
Anyone here got any links to sewing pattern pdfs? I've got a thing for 18/19th century menswear. Also possibly a touch of middle ages.

Does stuff like that exist outside of actually purchasing the patterns, or does everyone just self draft?
>>
>>10503363
Historical garment patterns are both easy and hard to find. If you're looking for something you can print off of the internet for free, your chances of finding anything are pretty slim. If you don't mind upscaling patterns from books, then there's a plethora of choices on places like archive.org. For specific book titles, you might want to pop into the larp or any other historical-focused threads/boards. There are quite a few commercial patterns you can chose from as well. I believe they're mostly in McCall's catalog -- typically from historical sewists like Angela Clayton.
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>>10503340
>you don't
i dunno m8 ive seen some relatively fancy looking balls in the past

>coax ribbon into mimic of circularity by stretching while steam pressing
im not quite sure what you mean by this desu, got anything i can run through a search engine for an example?

the trousers have had a couple setbacks desu. got to reading some patterns and a book on drafting them but due to a cascade of retardation ive done little else but window shop and chat fabrics the last couple days, and basically got told if ive got a brain ill start with something more simple than my intended material. come start of next month ill place an order for enough linen to make 2 pairs of the closest i can get to a coffee grind brown. the pattern looks easy enough but i dont like doing anything unless i understand what im doing.
>>
>>10503436
>>10503340
nevermind ive just got up. thats a rather nicely put together image. im imagining the leg hole would still be rather messy on the inside though via that method.
>>
Thought I'd share a good vibe : ) I've been doing cross stitch recently and really enjoying myself! I hope to make some more nerdy pieces and share them here.
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>>10503445
Do you find cross stitch easier or harder than embroidery? I've been looking to get into it.
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>>10503453
nta, but my take is: cross-stitch is to embroidery as color-by-numbers is to drawing. you can still make cross-stitch challenging by using a shitton of colors, but I think on the whole it's simpler.
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>>10503445
I also recently picked cross stitch back up after not doing it for a while and it's so relaxing. I'm making my own patterns to hopefully develop into accessories for my Etsy shop so I'm getting some practice with pixel art too!
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>>10503445
That sounds so nice! I've always wanted to do embroidery and cross stitching but I have this bad habit of picking up too many hobbies and not focusing enough on each of them so I'm trying to stick with sewing for now.
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>>10503592
ntayrt, but this sounds so cute! I hope it all goes well.
>>
Speaking of embroidery, what are your thoughts on embroidered or painted jeans? I fucked up my favorite pair of jeans with caulk during a resin casting project and I'm having a hard time letting them go, so I was hoping to transform them into something wearable. But, I'm having a hard time thinking of anything that's actually wearable. They're medium wash jeans with fuzzy caulk stain just below the right pocket. I did flowers at first but.... it looked bad. Any thoughts?
>>
>>10503618
Thank you! If I get brave enough maybe I will post my shop instagram to the ig thread
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>>10503620
I've seen tons of cute patch jobs with embroidery. It helps to add more than you need to cover the stain so that it looks more like an intentional design feature than a cover-up.
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>>10503363
what >>10503380 said. here's some links to look through
https://pastebin.com/HeT6aLqy
if you (or anyone itt, offer's open to all) find one you want to try, point me to it and i'll upscale it in inkscape for you so you can print it out easily.

>>10503436
>looks easy enough but i dont like doing anything unless i understand what im doing.
wew iktf
>due to a cascade of retardation
iktf too. also great turn of phrase, that. ...also pls tell me you ran outta laundry detergent and poured liquid dish soap in your washing machine. and that you took pictures. pls.
>basically got told if ive got a brain ill start with something more simple than my intended material
meaning the satin? or this is in reference to linen??
>>10503440
cheers. leg hole would be nearly the same as waist. edge being flat rather than gathered would mean slightly less ribbon bulk sandwiched between the elastic and the fabric, and the trim wouldn't be going all the way round the opening. other than those two things, they'd be exactly the same. tell me how you're picturing it?
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>>10503738
no, the pipe clogged and the water came up out of the sink and flooded the kitchen, so i stayed up til 5am clearing up the mess and trying to save my nice clothes from rotting. i then crashed for 12 hours, and woke up to the news that my younger brother decided to quit a guaranteed entry into a well paying trade in an economic recession because hes homesick and upset about how hes being treat like a trainee, after having quit every single fucking thing hes ever tried, and spent the evening trying to convince him to do otherwise. i then slept expecting to have to give him the "grow the fuck up" talk but then at 9am without telling anyone he decided to stick it out. i have lost 3 days to dumb shit, and i am now going to bed at about 4am every morning. oh well, not like ive got anything better to do right now besides play vidya with the bf.

>meaning the satin? or this is in reference to linen??
the linen in this case

>tell me how you're picturing it?
im expecting in order to get a curve on the outside ill have a curve on the inside too, which i imagine i cant exactly entirely hide behind the elastic. you sure i should be using plush backed elastic on the leg holes?
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>>10503623
I like that idea, thanks anon. Maybe I can find a fabric that fits my fancy.
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>>10503453
easier, i think. like what >>10503562 said.

>>10503592
that's awesome anon!! i hope it goes well : )

>>10503614
honestly i can actually kind of relate to having too many hobbies yeah. good luck anon!
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would gauging/cartridge pleating a skirt be overkill for a skirt? I'm using heavy fabric
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>>10503899
I'd say don't. This pleating is good only for historic clothes and I can't imagine any other variants.
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>>10503899
Don't do it unless you're going for a directly historic inspired garment
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>>10503743
NAYRT but plush/lingerie elastic is better than using scratchy elastic or a non-stretch fabric right on the leg. If you're treating the ribbon like a flounce to edge the leg holes, the curve is flattened at the seam so should follow the shape of the leg hole. I think for a ribbon 7cm width you may not get the curve required for a flounce from steam-shaping it alone, so there would be some gathering as well (I would suggest pleating to get it to sit flatter underneath the elastic) and the bulk of that seam would be hidden under tricot-stitched lingerie elastic which you would use to stop the seam rubbing and also to fit the leg hole more closely as it sounds like you're using a woven fabric without stretch.
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>>10503743
awwww. at least if it had been dish soap you could've had reason to laugh about it. that all just sounds like it sucks.
>the linen in this case
really?? huh. i wonder why
as to the rest, exactly what >>10504599 said

>>10504599
is linen not typically considered to be fairly beginner friendly?
>>
I have tons of inherited fabric that I'm not gonna use. I want to sell it, but I don't know what type of fabric it is. It's also aged from god knows how many years of sitting in storage. Other than washing it, how should I go about identifying it and selling it?
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>>10504986
Linen is a bitch that will slip around and/or crease if you so much as look at it wrong
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>>10505051
unless you intend to do it all gently by hand you might be better off not washing it for two reasons. first, anything wool or silk stands a decent chance of being irreversibly damaged. second, any woven fabrics whose cut edges are still raw/unfinished will ravel which means you'll lose some length off of each one because those edges will then need to be trimmed away and neatened. that's best case scenario. worst case scenario is you put, say, 6 separate fabrics in the machine and return to a single huge wet blob of fabric that's all twisted around itself and bound up by a gorillion loosened threads which have tangled together into a mass of bullshit that's a pain in the dick to separate and can leave the fabric stretched to fug.

for identifying it, focus on whether it's a woven or knit, whether or not it stretches, whether or not it's sheer, whether it seems meant for apparel or home decor or quilting, and whether the fibre content is natural or synthetic or a blend. the first three are easy to work out. the fourth relies on having some familiarity with fabric unless it all came from one person and s/he mostly only did one kind of sewing. the last can be determined with a burn test.

also depends how you want to sell it too though. you can skip most of that if you'd rather sell it all at once instead of piece by piece.
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>>10505095
lmao. fair enough i suppose. though i don't quite get the slippery thing with it
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>>10505097
Oof yeah, there is like shit ton of it so I'll probably just describe it's condition in the listing.

That sounds like a good course of action. I'll try those steps to figure it out myself and then bring it back to this thread with pictures for a double check. I believe she sewed only womens' garments. They seem to be apparel fabrics, but I can't say for sure. Thanks for the help, anon!
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>>10505051
Some fabrics will be easy to identify by touch and appearance, trickier ones may require a burn test to help you at least determine if it's an organic or synthetic material.
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>>10505133
I have a feeling I know what kinds of fabric they are by touch, but I think a burn test would really help. I'm mostly worried about the off-white aging, but I guess that's up to the buyer to decide what to do with.
>>
>>10504599
i think this may be one of those things where i need it right in front of me to really make sense of it. i was also expecting to have to gather it by machine. in my mind the shape of the ruffle would naturally require more fabric extending in certain spots.

>>10504986
aye ive spent the bulk of the week trying not to be nocturnal kek.

linen im told is at least less of a bitch than corduroy. its also a lot cheaper.
>>
I'm looking to make a pair of bloomers for my first lolita sewing project, and I was wondering what sort of pattern adjustments I'd need to make to be sure they have space for large hips+butt. Can anyone point me towards some sort of guide?
>>
>>10505880
>what sort of pattern adjustments I'd need to make to be sure they have space for large hips+butt.
Wouldn't you just need to find or draft a pattern based on your measurements?
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>>10503899
I really like the look it gives but I would only use it for light fabric. For heavy fabric I think small knife pleats would do the job and hold better
>>
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>>10506536
I was figuring I'd have to draft a pattern, I was just wondering if someone had made a specific fat-ass bloomer drafting tutorial or if I'd need to mess around with the adjustments myself.
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>>10501993
Mjtrim is great, I've never ordered from them online but I shop at their irl store frequently
>>
does anyone have advice for mending a couple small holes in a windbreaker? i'm not sure what material it is exactly since the tag has long worn off, but i'm pretty sure it's nylon since it's vintage 90's. can i just sew it up with a whipstitch?
>>
>>10506752
Not exactly, when you mend a hole you want to use the method that's illustrated in the pic related. Since it's nylon, you may want to consider an iron on patch with some stitches to keep it steady? Don't quote me on that, but that's where my head is at with nylon.
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>>10506803
I dropped the pic like an idiot.
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>>10506676
Hm, I see what you're saying now. Sorry, I don't have any tutorials for you. If you're looking commercially for a base pattern, I suggest Mimi G though. Her patterns have a wide variety of fit, especially for curvy women, so it might help you draft a bloomer pattern from it. Sorry that I can't give you more help. Best of luck!
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>>10506804
oh, i hadn't thought about an iron-on patch! i'll look into that, the main thing i was worried about is how messy and out of place i think the repair is going to look just due to the nature of the material. thanks anon.
>>
>>10506824
Yeah, unfortunately you can't really get around that with mends and patches. Check out some visible mending tutorials on youtube or maybe consider putting a decorative patch on top of the mending patch. That might help it look nicer in the end.

If you're trying to hide the repair, you could try an invisible stitch or maybe some carefully applied hem tape. It really depends on how big and obvious the holes are though.

Anywho, whatever option you choose -- good luck.
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>>10506807
I'll check her out, thanks!
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>>10505880
http://www.antipope.org/feorag/gosurori/bloomers-pattern.pdf

This is based off drafting from your hip measurement.
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>>10471944
I want to sew teddy bears and functional teddy bear outdoor clothes and equipment. This means mohair for the bears, and stuff like leather, denim, nylon, and technical fabrics for the gear (shell jackets, backpacks, tents).

What should I look for in a basic machine? I imagine the challenge will be the thicker, tougher stuff like mohair, denim and leather, and possibly thinner stuff like tent fabric. Is this doable on a 200 USD budget at all?
>>
>>10507094
A $200 machine could maybe handle a couple layers of denim, or you might end up with jams and skipped stitches. I'd wait out and save up a little bit more before purchasing your machine if you are planning on sewing heavy duty fabrics. A better machine will be able to handle stretchy fabrics better, too. Also, don't forget to use good quality thread and the appropriate needle for the job.
>>
>>10507094
good luck synthetic fur is an abomination to sew.
I did it once. Never again.
I think they recomend using a special ceramic foot for that kind of fabric.
>>
how do you deal with your machine not having enough room to fit your fabric under your presser foot best?
>>
>>10507471
What's the situation here exactly, can you provide some context? Personally I bought a machine that has a high foot raise on it.
>>
>>10507471
copious swearing, trying different foot, trying serger instead, and partially hand stitching. trimming/beveling/pre-grading(?) the innermost layer to reduce the bulk met with some success but may not be viable in your case. trying to press it flatter by going full violence with the iron did nothing in my case but, again, ymmv. whatcha workin on?
>>
>>10507477
fixed foot height on this thing, taking something out pretty close to the hem and the waistband is thick as hell.

>>10507479
literally just taking the waist out on a pair of pants im trying to salvage. would you recommend machining without a foot? if not, what hand stitch would you suggest?
>>
>>10507481
>would you recommend machining without a foot?
i wouldn't but you've got me curious now. gonna go try it myself; will report back. are you able to lower the feed dogs on your machine? if so, try dropping them and see if that gives you enough clearance to get the work positioned under the foot, then you can re-engage the feed dogs and give it a go. or have you got a walking foot? that one may seem counterintuitive but if you can get it started feeding through it'll usually keep going. or a roller foot maybe? narrow zipper foot? for hand stitches, backstitch is good and strong for standard seams. is there any elastic involved here?
>>
>>10507552
no elastic but my thread is gutterman cotton thread and it is a seat seam.

foot wise ive got a bunch of them but its really jamming it in place with the smallest one ive got desu. the foot is at an angle. nothing else really adjusts.
>>
>>10507554
welp. good news for you on my end. sewing without a foot worked out way better than expected. gotta lower the presser foot (or lack thereof in this case) of course and feed the fabric through by hand yourself. going slow and working carefully you can get even, straight stitches. nifty. try it on scraps first of course but yeah - def give it a try.

>no elastic
good, that simplifies things immensely. backstitch is winrar if you gotta do it by hand.
>>
>>10507558
much appreciated, will give it a go if i decide to stay conscious after cleaning the house up a bit.

>winrar
thats the first time ive seen someone post that in fucking years
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>>10507565
wear glasses or something in case the needle breaks.

>thats the first time ive seen someone post that in fucking years
we taek stroll down memery lane nao
>>
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fuck

>>10507570
also fuck

i miss /f/
and newgrounds
and everything else before an overcentralised, over-normified internet reigned supreme
>>
>>10507572
did you leave the presser foot up? also
>test on scraps first
lel

>and everything else before an overcentralised, over-normified internet reigned supreme
yep.


oiio
>>
>>10507575
you are correct and i am in fact a fucking dickhead for not realising. trousers are close enough to scrap anyway desu.
>>
>>10507576
lmao it happens. gl
>>
>>10507130
There's the Singer Heavy Duty in that price range. Reviews are mixed - it handles the heavier stuff but quality is so-so and it often needs service.
>A better machine
How can I identify those suitable for heavy fabrics? They don't all have easy-to-sucker-in-buyers-names like the Singer...

>>10507176
From what I read they recommend a walking foot. Didn't see anything about ceramic feet...
>>
>>10508332
Don't bother with the Singer Heavy Duty, look for all metal gear machines from the 70's and earlier and you can't go wrong. You can find them on craigslist for way cheaper than $200, or if you want to take a gamble you can find them at salvation army for like $10 but they may require repairs. They will go through multiple layers of denim though no prob.

I've done a lot of homework and personally I would recommend an old Kenmore from the 70's. During that time they were being manufactured in japan in the same plant jaguars were being produced. The quality is very high which is why they're still being sought after all these years. Eventually Sears decided they wanted them to be cheaper to produce and the quality took a dip. I feel like very few people really know about this, mostly old retirees who collect them cause they're obsessed.

There's even a spreadsheet you can look through to get the specific model you want, or cross check with one you find as they all vary a bit: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/13fGnnr7oYXjzC1OQRsq2AaNGUUmtqNbC9BfyAOpxdFo/edit?usp=drivesdk

For example I really wanted a free arm for pants and sleeves so sought it out. I also wanted a low shank machine as it's easier to get sewing feet or just use an adapter for snap on feet. I spent so much time going down the rabbit hole to get the exact one for me it's ridiculous, but perseverance paid off. I ended up with a kenmore 1947 which has everything I need and is an absolute dream to sew on, haven't had any problems, it's so well made.

Best of luck, hope you find something awesome.
>>
>>10508497
Thanks for the advice! Will be reading up on used all metal machines.
>>
>>10508332
>How can I identify those suitable for heavy fabrics? They don't all have easy-to-sucker-in-buyers-names like the Singer...
Avoid cheap machines from Singer and Brother, which will have the issues >>10508497 described.

I got lucky with my machine - I have a Janome 4030QDC, which I got for $450 CAD with tax at a trade show back in 2012 (retailed at $600+ at the time IIRC). again, I got lucky because I went to this trade show with a relative for free in exchange for helping set up their booth, I don't think I would have been able to get a discount like this otherwise, and also usually you'd have to pay to get into the show to shop. I do swear by this machine for going through denim like butter. Fake fur, too. Handled 3" pile fur no problem, and Janome is a great brand overall. My machine is metal parts. Bernina and Husqvarna are two other brands I see praised for similar reasons. However they will set you back quite a bit. You can always look up past sewing machine threads here to see what specific machines people like and recommend. Cyber Monday is in two days so maybe something good will be on sale?

>>10508497's solution is one that will take you much longer and require a lot of patience, but it will definitely be cheaper (and probably more satisfying as well).
>>
>>10507094
If you really want to sew through everything, either an old Singer or a straight-stitch industrial may be worth looking at. However if you need to do buttonholes or finish edges, a newer domestic machine will have more versatility. I think for your $200, looking at dedicated groups about vintage singers may be worth your while so you know what to look for.
>>
I'm looking to draft my own cutsew patterns but I don't have any experience with knits. Can anyone recommend a fitted t-shirt pattern for me to use as a jumping off point? Everything I find on Google is just a little off. I don't mind paying, digital or paper doesn't matter either.
>>
>>10512945
You should make a pattern from a shirt that you already know fits you well. Just make sure to take note of the amount of stretch (ie how many inches) and which direction is stretches. There's some videos on youtube you can watch about how to do it. It's really simple. I recommend the one by Coolirpa
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>>10512981
Thank you for the suggestion but I can never get the sleeves right when I try this.
>>
>>10503453
Cross stitch is a subtype of embroidery. You're only using one stitch and it's generally done on stiff fabric called aida. More complicated surface embroidery uses lots of different stitches and can be done on any fabric. Personally I find cross stitch too boring and repetitive
>>
this might sound like an incredibly stupid question but how do i draw lengths of thread for hand sewing without it tangling on itself?
>>
>>10513399
Ah, same. Sleeves are my nemesis. Those you might want to make a mockup for, but the pattern should work for the rest of the shirt and at least take the bulk out of drafting.
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>>10513559
quick & easy fix: run it over beeswax

less quick tips:
>sew with a single thread instead of a double thread
real game changer, this. double is where you cut a length of thread, get it on the needle, tie the ends together, and use the resulting knot to anchor it in the fabric. single is where you skip tying the ends together, anchor only the standing end, and sew holding the needle right at the eye so as to keep it from sliding off the freely-hanging working end. only time i still use double thread method is sewing on buttons or making thread chain button loops.
>the end you've just cut from the rest of the spool is the one to thread through the needle eye and use as the working end
*note this makes certain assumptions about right vs left handedness and about Z vs S twisted yarns
>if you notice the thread has begun winding about itself as soon as the tension on it slackens, slide the needle to about the halfway point on the thread, pick the whole work up, and let the thread dangle straight down from the stitchline until the needle stops helicoptering
pay attention to how often this happens btw. for example i've come to expect it if i'm sewing a whipstitch or an overcast stitch but seldom otherwise. if you find it occurs rather frequently, refer back to the *note above in the previous point, and try doing the opposite of what i said to do there.
>cut shorter lengths of thread at a time
make things easier on yourself for now, you can go long as you please soon enough
>weaver's knot
useful timesaver that's stupid easy to learn to tie and will become muscle memory before you know it -- whenever you run out of thread midway through, join a new length to it and keep going https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNCpQiTd3zc
>slipknots
these form occasionally and are easily dealt with. if your thread gets stuck, 9 times out of 10 it's just slipknotted itself and a quick sharp tug on either end will pull the knot apart again and allow you to keep going
>>
>>10513756
Different anon, but this was really informative thank you
>>
What are some lolita-related items a beginner at sewing with a machine could make from scratch? a skirt?
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>>10513770
Skirt, rectangle headdress, tote bag, maybe cape.
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>>10513399
>>10513593
Get a bendable ruler to accurately measure the armscyes and sleep cap.
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>>10513946
^sleeve

No more fear of breaking your quilter's ruler or using string or some wonky method to measure fit. Always measure where you're going to sew, not the seam allowance. Sew sleeve to the bodice first, then sew up the side of the sleeve with the side of the bodice. This will remove a whole lot of hair-tearing ease issues.
>>
>>10513946
Why didn't I think of this! This is a game changer, thank you so much
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>>10471944
doubt i'll have much luck posting here but why the fuck dont my bobbins wind properly?? I have a brother cs6000i and i'm doing everything according the manual but it just wont wind evenly no matter what!!! It's driving me up the wall it's mostly a problem winding thicker threads.
>>
>>10514757
>it's mostly a problem winding thicker threads.
hmm. might be that the thread isn't getting fully seated between the tension discs. you know when you have a drink cup or like a round tupperware container or something where the lid can look like it's all the way on until you go to pick it up and it pops right off? and then you retrieve it, put it on again, find the spot along the rim where the lid isn't pushed down all the way, push down on that spot, and the little bastard pops up in a different spot? the thicker thread you're using may be sorta like the super-tight-fitting lids thing -- you need even pressure all the way round to get the lid seated properly, otherwise you'd just end up chasing that one spot along the rim over and over again. anyway, the little flat round silver button looking thing on the top left of the machine houses the tension discs for bobbin winding. when you go to wrap the thread around the little silver button thing, try holding the spool in place with your other hand so it can't spin freely and the thread can be kept taut.
>>
>>10514829
ok thanks! I thought it might have something to do with tension but wasn't sure what exactly.
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>>10513770
Bloomers, skirt, bows
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>>10514757
Are you putting the white cap thing over the spool and threading according to the diagram on the top of the machine? I've also noticed it tends to wind at the bottom more than the top, so I usually stick a finger under the thread to help it go up a little more so that the bobbin is more even.
>>
Where do you guys get cheap fabric? I live in NY and hit up the garment district and JoAnn regularly, and the prices are abusive as shit. It doesn't have to be amazing quality, but even mid tier stuff is usually at least $10 a yard, which adds up quick. Any suggestions?
>>
>>10518708

- Independent stores that get their stock at a massive discount. Drawback is that stuff is very hit or miss depending on what they can get in and usually they don't have an online presence (because everything is run bare-bones), but they be literally selling fabric remnants and discontinued notions for $1/yard or $0.25 a pack.

- Never pay full price for anything at JoAnn is what I've learned after working there (and even before then). They can sell just about anything at 60% off and still be making a profit.

- Weigh how much time vs. convenience means to you. You can score better deals if you shop around and wait for sales/coupons by spreading out gathering materials over months/years, but trade-off is that you'll be sort of bound to the project for a long time, by the end you might have already mentally moved on and wasted your investment in.
>>
>>10515038
Also: tote bags
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>>10518708
>I live in NY
go to metro textiles
>>
>>10519075
Hmm, I've been to the garment district a ton and I've never hit this store. I'll check it out tomorrow, thanks!

>>10518743
I usually get stuff on sale from JoAnn, but most of their good coupons are "XX% off a yard" which kind of limits it's use. I'll look closer at independent stores, ty

Also, unrelated to this, I'm going to be working on a male blazer for a costume. What's a good pattern to be working off? There's a ton out there, wanted to know if anyone had any good reccs. I was going to go for the Simplicity 8528, but the Burda 6871 also looks good.
>>
>>10519075
>>10519158
update: metro textiles is the shit, no idea how I never knew about it before today. Would've saved so much money
>>
I got my sewing machine this week, pic related.
I feel like screaming but so much to learn holy shit.
> mfw ruffler foot makes pretty ruffles
I swear I'm going to make a dress with a bajillion ruffles. This shit is amazing.
I'm still learning about fabrics, I saw a couple of you recommended joanne or metrotextiles, but are there any european sites that sell good fabric? Should I go to etsy?
Any other fabric asides from muslin which I could practice on? pls respond
>>
>>10519916
>Any other fabric asides from muslin which I could practice on?
Muslin is the best, but you can also use cotton from cheap bed sheets/linens. Ideally your practice fabric should be similar in weight and stretch as your real fabric. So if you're making leggings with lycra, you wouldn't use muslin but some cheap lycra with similar stretch for your mockup because muslin has no stretch. Muslin is a good stand in for any non-stretch fabric though.
>>
>>10519969
>if you're making leggings with lycra,
This is exactly why I ask, I got some very nice stretchy fabric to make some skirt, top + leggings and I'm not going to use muslin, I guess I got to hunt for some similar lycra.
I'm thinking of checking thrift stores and buying larger sized clothing to practice on as well.
Thanks for the tips.
>>
>>10519995
Oh I hit the nail on the head, cool. So when I talked about similar stretch, it means two things: the amount and direction. Direction is the easiest, just tug the fabric in a straight line horizontally and vertically. All fabrics will have some stretch along the 45 degree angle (or bias) so when testing, you must stretch in a straight line for the test to be accurate. There are 2 way and 4 way stretch fabrics. As the name suggests, some fabrics will only stretch in two directions (left and right OR up and down) while others will stretch in all directions (left, right, AND up & down).

You also need to know how much stretch a fabric has because they aren't all made with the same percentage of stretch. If you're using a commercial pattern, the back envelope will likely have a ruler printed on it for you to test the amount of inches a small swatch of fabric will have. You need to use the same percentage or inches of stretch between your practice and final fabric. If your final fabric isn't too expensive, just buying extra of it (in a same or different color) is fine.

Oh and yes, buying bigger clothes to practice tailoring or just using it for scrap fabric is one of the best kinds of beginner projects because 95% of the necessary sewing is already done for you.

Hope that helps, good luck!
>>
>>10519470
>metro textiles is the shit
lol if i ever have reason to go to ny again i'm bringing along an empty suitcase and heading there to fill it with fabric. first heard about them last year but i was immediately put off by their online prices. looked again about a month ago and the 50% off code brought things within my price range so i placed an order. ...and then two more shortly thereafter because 60% off promo codes and wew dat quality. thanks to them i've now got a growing selection of warm winter outerwear garments that actually fit me properly for the first time in my life.
>if you want the full blogpost there: lovely slim silk-lined knee-length wool coat, cosy af hooded thicc wool jacket, cuddly rayon tweed shawl collared cardigan type thing, WIP wool coat that needs reworked, haven't started yet with the boiled wool nor the jersey nor some of the jacketing, and the melton i got for a coat is beautifully drapey and so unbelievably fecking soft that i've decided to make a dress with it instead
the owner is super nice too. spoke with him over the phone and he was remarkably pleasant to deal with and very very helpful. i really like the place a lot. what all did you find there?

>>10519916
>are there any european sites that sell good fabric?
dunno any off the top of my head but i know i've come across a few. will have look around again later today or tomorrow and post some links for you if i can dig anything up.
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>>10519916
>are there any european sites that sell good fabric?

Only place I can think of is Atelier Brunette but they're limited in choice as their fabric caters to a higher end maker clientele. Their fabrics and matching notions though are gorgeous.

Stretchy fabric can be a pain to work with anon, I personally don't enjoy it, just don't get discouraged if you get a little frustrated. Be sure to serge the edges so they don't fray or over stretch.
>>
>try sewing button down shirt off pattern
>pattern asks for 3/8ths in seam allowance
>then, to make it into a flat felled seam on the shoulder sleeve

Am I just bad or is this way too narrow? I feel like there's no way to actually sew it when there's that little fabric there. Is there a better finish for a dress shirt? Trying to make it as legit as possible, but this seems like an absurdly narrow seam.
>>
>>10520590
3/8 inch is possible if you serged the raw edges and simply sewed them down. Otherwise I would modify it to 5/8 inch seam allowance so that the final flat fold will be 3/8 inch.
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>>10519916
ok got a bunch of links for you to check out. can't vouch for any of these euro places personally though so do bear that in mind.
https://pastebin.com/JtEdq389
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>>10520085
I've only shopped there irl but I was able to get a bunch of crepe de chine (I'm a silk painter) for $7 a yard.
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>>10520683
I ended up doing this, it came out ok, but then I realized I'm dumb as fuck and didn't tuck the shorter edge into the longer one when folding it over. Tried it again, came out perfect!
>>
>>10520018
I forgot to reply,sorry. Thank you very much for your tips, the stretchy fabric I got wasn't from a commercial pattern and it was fairly cheap (5$/meter) so I'll most likely make a smaller scale test before doing the whole thing.
Thrift shopping is literally a money saver, it's ridonculous how much nice stuff you can find for SO cheap.
>>10523648
god bless you anon, i'm making tea and will be browsing these.
>>10520169
thanks , bookmarked this one as well, i'll definitely find something useful here
I know stretchy fabric can be a pain but i really want to learn to work with it since some clothes I plan on making will require it. That and my weight fluctuates a lot so I can't always use nonstretch fabric for everything.
>>
Newfag here:
I had some issues with my sewing machine lately, but I have no idea on why.
The fabric I was sewing was some stretch jeans fabric from old pants that have ripped and my needle was a Schmetz jeans needle in size 90/14.
Sometimes it jammed, sometimes it just poked into the fabric and kept the upper thread above and the lower thread below the fabric without sewing them together.
The thread also sometimes snapped.
Later when I switched the needle and yarn to an universal needle in 90/14 from Singer it worked fine somehow.

What was my misstake?
>>
>>10525573
There are a ton of potential issues that can arise. The most common ones are
1.) Threading is incorrect. Rethread the machine and try again.
2.) Tension is incorrect. This is very, very common IMO, it's usually this for me. Play around with the tension and learn to see what incorrect tension looks like (the thicker the fabric, the lower the tension generally)
3.) Incorrect needle. This is especially important in tricky fabric, like denim or anything stretchy. The weird thing is, you sound like you were using the right needle.
4.) Feeding sucks. Again, tricky fabric, the dogs on the bottom (that pull the fabric forward) can sometimes not handle tricky fabric (stuff that is too thick or stretchy). For this, you'll need a walking foot (any cheap one will do). Ran into this issue when sewing lycra and learned then and there

These are some tips but hopefully others can contribute more.
>>
>>10525787
>1.) Threading is incorrect. Rethread the machine and try again.
Checked that, re-threaded it multiple times, didn't change anything.
>2.) Tension is incorrect. This is very, very common IMO, it's usually this for me. Play around with the tension and learn to see what incorrect tension looks like (the thicker the fabric, the lower the tension generally)
Tried out vastly different tensions, from realy low to realy high.
>3.) Incorrect needle. This is especially important in tricky fabric, like denim or anything stretchy. The weird thing is, you sound like you were using the right needle.
I did think about that, it could be that the denim needle on the kind of stretchy denim might have been the wrong choice and the universal needle just worked better.
>4.) Feeding sucks. Again, tricky fabric, the dogs on the bottom (that pull the fabric forward) can sometimes not handle tricky fabric (stuff that is too thick or stretchy). For this, you'll need a walking foot (any cheap one will do). Ran into this issue when sewing lycra and learned then and there
That wasn't actualy an issue, the fabric can stretch, but it's not like lycra, it takes some force to stretch it.
Just that stuff skinny jeans tend to be made from.
Surprisingly, I changed the cut on my cycling jersey with no issues.
At first I feared timing issues, but since it worked fine later I ruled that out.
Thank you for the information anyway.
>>
>>10525811
I think you're misunderstanding other anon's point with the walking foot. Most home machines aren't built to handle thicker fabrics regardless of whether it stretches, and a walking foot can help.
>>
>>10525831
The issue wasn't feeding, the fabric moved perfectlx fine an the fabric wasn't thick either.
My issue was that while the ffeding was fine and the needle had no issues poking through the fabric, it basicly just dragged the upper and lower thread along and sometimes jammed up.
>>
>>10525838
that's clearly a tension issue. when using stretch fabric tension is really really important.
>>
>>10525842
I'm just confused to have that issue at quite different levels of tensions.
>>
>>10525838
Try different thread maybe?
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>>10525846
Did you adjust your bobbin tension or just the top?
>>
not sure if this is the best place to ask
back in hs my teacher had a really nice spiral-bound book about fabric types with info like what garments they're best for, how to care for each fabric, and which sewing machine feet to use
does anyone have an idea of what book that was or know of a similar one?
>>
>>10526039
I can't tell you what book your teacher had, but thankfully that type of book is extremely common. Look for any title with "guide to sewing" in it. I have the Reader's Digest: Complete Guide to Sewing for example.
>>
>>10526003
How does one adjust the bobbin tension?
>>
>>10523803
>silk painter
ooh neat. what does silk painting entail? i'm vaguely aware it's a thing but haven't ever looked into it.

>>10525573
sounds like the needle was bent. doesn't even always look like it when that happens but it really doesn't take much for it to cause trouble. how long had you had that one in there before this?
one other thing to mention is to remove the throat plate and ensure that no small bits of thread have managed to wedge themselves in somewhere along the feed dogs or bobbin assembly. since you've just had some jamming and thread breaking issues, i'd highly recommend doing this now actually just as a precaution. might save yourself a headache later. grab a pipe cleaner or something too and swipe away any built up lint while you're in there. drop of oil too if you've got it.

>>10526101
>
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>>10526039
>>
>>10526402
>bent needle
Unlikely, that needle was brand new.
Going to check for straightness anyway though.
>bits jammed around the bobbin
Took off the plate and cleaned everthing, made sure it wasn't jammed when it started.
Only found some slight dust.
Oiled it with some synthetic motor oil (didn't have anything else on hand).
>that screw
I had it tight, any tighter and I might strip the threads.
Allthough I should check if the tension is correct according to your guide and may bend that spring-piece a little if it's still insufficient.

As I said, I'm a noob with sewing machines.
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>>10527398
Different anon, but have you tested it on other fabrics? Is it only a problem with this specific fabric you've been using?
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>>10527398
>I had it tight, any tighter and I might strip the threads.
back off on it a bit. tighter isn't always better here, don't think of it as a typical screw assembly, it's really acting as more of a clamping mechanism than a fastener. as little as 1/16 of a turn on that screw can mean the difference between correct tension and unbalanced stitches. don't bend the spring piece, just adjust it using the screw. only time i can ever see the spring piece needing to be bent is if the bobbin case was trash to begin with or got damaged somehow.
>breaking thread
>jamming
>needle coming back up without having engaged to form a new stitch
bobbin tension being adjusted overly tight can def cause all of the above. though it is rather curious that things went smoothly after you changed other stuff. then again...
>Later when I switched the needle and yarn
>and yarn
if the thread you'd first been using was thicker than the thread you switched to, then bobbin tension was probably your culprit here. and if that's not it either, i'm out of ideas as to what it could've been.

>Oiled it with some synthetic motor oil (didn't have anything else on hand).
that'll work. if you want 'the good stuff' pick up some tri-flow. doesn't get gummed up and need wiped off.
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>>10527433
I didn't change the fabric, but after I changed the needle and thread it worked perfectly on the same fabric somehow.
>>10527513
>if the thread you'd first been using was thicker than the thread you switched to, then bobbin tension was probably your culprit here
Thread thickness was the same as far as I can see it.
Also can't realy get anything except online since my country is still in lockdown, so my machine will only get motor or gearbox oil.

I will check everything now.
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>>10527671
Checked the needle, it's dead straight.
Checked the bobbin tension, it was indeed too high.
I adjusted it according to the guide.
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I'm wanting to hand stitch this patch on to a hoodie, and the patch came with an iron adhesive which I was going to use simply to fix it in the right position smoothly to make sewing around the edges easier. Just wanted to check with the thread that I'm not going to get any weird puckering or problems that I should look out for if I do that. The fabric is a stretchy material, but I also bought stretch thread to compensate.
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>>10527984
It should be fine once you iron the patch on. The patch should be secure enough for you to satin stitch around the edges. If the base fabric doesn't want to stay flat, you can pin a stablizer like Stitch n' Tear or a wash-away type to the back of the entire thing.
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>>10527987
Thanks for the tip. You don't think just a doubled thread back stitch around the inner edge will work? the satin stitch seems like kind of a pain especially if I'm supposed to be going over the edge of the patch it will kind of mess with the aesthetic of the ridge I think.
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>>10527992
It should be fine, too, especially if you do it in the edge ditch that hides them. I doubt most people would get close enough to your costume to see stitch details like that.
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>>10528125
Haha yeah "costume". I totally don't plan on wearing a constantly or anything haha.
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Can metal eyelets like pic related compromise the durability of a garment? I want to make something that can be worn regularly and tossed in the washing machine without any fuss but I worry that the eyelets will eventually rust or cause the fabric around them to wear down over time. Ideally I want the things I sew to last as long as possible.
>>
I finally caved and got myself a Kumya. I knit, crochet, and do a bit of hand sewing. Are there any patterns for clothes for it or will I have to freehand it?
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What kind of cotton fabric did brands use back in the 2005ish days? I want to make an apron but I don't wanna shell out for the fabric to just be shit.
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>>10529463
Sorry, cotton for the blouses specifically.
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>>10529360
If Google serves me correctly and youre talking about a lil bear backpack, there should absolutely be patterns out there. American Doll, Build A Bear, or infant clothing should fit. If you buy a cheap pair, you could copy the pattern onto a paper or seam rip it and create a pattern that way.
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Is there a way to make a classic(ish) hoodie? I finally got myself a serger and already found a hoodie pattern. Just asking, I have some sweet skirts to coord if not.
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>>10529535
IIRC IW has made a few hoodies and so have brands like JM and Leur Getter. You could use those as inspiration.

What does your pattern look like? Personally I’d go for a more fitted or streamlined look, probably without a kangaroo pocket or anything else that adds bulk around the waist. You can make it cropped so it sits on top of lolita skirts or make it longer but use a two-way zipper so you can wear the bottom open. I think AP hoodies generally use two-way zippers.
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>>10529538
The pattern is somewhat fitted without pockets or a zipper. I have in mind to modify it a bit after testing it out. Thanks for the tips, I didn't even think about a two way zipper!
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>>10528949
I've found these tend to wear down fabric pretty badly in the dryer, both the garment they're on and other clothes. They get really hot. I've had other things get burn marks from being in the same load.
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>>10529464
It's sold as "cotton poplin" where I live
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I'm doing some small doll jfash clothes. Any good places to get fabrics with small cute prints? cotton is good, but something with a bit of stretch would be best
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>>10529788
Spoonflower, Etsy, Aliexpress, or your local store.
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>>10529887
>local store
god i wish. The closest thing we have to a fabric store is the hyper expensive bougie priced quilting store with the shitty trash cotton, or walmart.

I'll give ali a look though
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>>10526067
>>10526039
I'm pretty sure this anon meant that the book literally has fabric swatches as well.
I found this while searching
https://grainlinestudio.com/blogs/blog/fabric-for-fashion-the-complete-guide-the-swatch-book
Expensive, but I think i'll purchase it myself.
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>>10529920
Oh I see! In that case, there's the Textilepedia too
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Is it mechanically safe to run my machine manually by turning the handwheel to sew as slow as I want?
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>>10531588
Probably but most newer machines have speed adjustments you can do by adjusting foot pedal sensitivity or using the speed selector instead of the pedal.
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>>10531588
Yes, it's completely fine. Just make sure you don't accidentally have it on spool winding mode. A lot of stitches start with the step "manually lower your needle to where you want to start and hand-turn a stitch to make sure it will go through".
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Is wet felting actually a doable thing or am I being tricked by fake viral videos again?
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>>10531779
Yes, it is. I have done it few times and don't really like it (maybe a school time trauma? you know). There's also yarns for washing machine felting if you like to knit or crochet. You just need to make them a lot of bigger as they shrink a lot when washed.
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>>10531779
Yes but it has to be real wool to work
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>>10531828
>>10532439
Thanks for the help! Especially useful to know about the real wool.
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>>10532462
...are people actually making wet felting tutorials/videos without mentioning it has to be wool? No shade to you anon, we all have to learn somewhere, but that's a really important detail to leave out
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>>10532604
There was no distinction made whether it was synthetic or real wool.
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>>10532604
Wouldn’t it be common knowledge? I don’t think I’ve ever met an adult who didn’t know wool shrinks and synthetics don’t.
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Anybody got any good patterns for space age (as envisioned in the 60s - 80s) jumpsuits?
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I just started sewing and i was going to sew a pair of gloves to get used to using patterns,what fabric should i use?
http://dr-cos.info/freepattern/gloves-en-lm.pdf
this is the patter I'm going to use.
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>>10533684
4 way stretch fabric. This is not a beginner friendly fabric. You should pick a different project to begin with.
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>>10533684
Try making a pillowcase or apron first if you're a beginner, using a mediumweight cotton fabric.
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>>10533728
i choose gloves because i thought it would be less of a waste of fabric if i messed up.
Do you think some shorts would be ok as a starting point?
>>10533746
i've made a pair of pillowcases while helping my mom before.
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>>10533762
*chose.I apologize for my bad grammar
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>>10533762
The funny thing about sewing is that "simple" projects are always deceptively difficult. I'm sure you're thinking, "Ah, but gloves are such an easy shape how can you mess that up?". However, its not the shape that makes it difficult but the fabric. Stretch fabric needs a specific stitch, foot, and tools to make sure that it doesn't pop the stitches or pucker when sewn. It's also very prone to shifting/moving under the needle. That's what makes it an intermediate level project. Not just gloves, but projects that use stretch fabrics in general are not beginner friendly for those reasons.

Shorts made of a non-stretch fabric (cotton is the best) with either a regular (not invisible) zipper or an elasticated waistband are a good project to start with. Same with skirts, bows, simple shirts, and simple dresses.
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>>10533775
yeah that was pretty much my thought process.Thank you anon for the advice
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Posting here because not sure where to ask.
What are some good resources for learning basic sewing?
I'd like to sew on some velcro backing and a few Ace Combat/Danganronpa patches onto my M-65 jacket, and I'd like to learn how to attach them on my own. I already have a set of needles and some olive drab thread, looks like I might need some pins too.
Where should I start? Should I try some stitches on a plain tee shirt to get the hang of it first?
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>>10533812
No worries, anon. Good luck!

>>10533985
Youtube is the best resource out there for driving your own sewing journey, but you could also go the traditional route and buy a beginner's sewing book. It sounds like you're doing some hand sewing, so you should learn: how to insert thread into the eye of a needle (or how to use a needle threader), the basting stitch, backstitch, and how to end/tie off a stitch. A piece of cotton is the best to practice on. A t-shirt is fine, just make sure it's not too stretchy or loosely woven. Alternatively a bed sheet is also a good choice.
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>>10534003
Thank you fren.
I'll do some more research and start learning the basics.





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