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Welcome to /plant/, the happy green place on this blue board, where growers, gardeners and horticulturists share their love for things that grow.
Newbies and amateurs are very welcome, and we’ll always try to answer your questions.

>Flora of the World
http://www.worldfloraonline.org/

>Hardiness zones
https://www.plantmaps.com/

>Plant ID Sites
https://identify.plantnet.org/
https://wildflowersearch.org/

>Pests and Diseases
https://www.rhs.org.uk/science/plant-health-in-gardens
https://www.growveg.com/plant-diseases/us-and-canada/
https://homyden.com/garden-pests-diseases-directory/

>Thousands of Botanical Illustrations
http://www.plantillustrations.org/

>Succulents
https://worldofsucculents.com/
https://www.succulentguide.com/

>Carnivorous plants
https://botany.org/home/resources/carnivorous-plants-insectivorous-plants.html
https://carnivorousplants.org/grow/guides

>Alpine plants
https://www.alpinegardensociety.net/plants/

>Ponds
https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/actions/how-build-pond
https://aquaplant.tamu.edu/plant-identification/alphabetical-index/

>Previous Thread
>>3951298
>>
Hello friends. I am new to bonsai and bought a tree. I have kept the soil wet and only water when the soil is dry. The leaves are now like paper and new growth is wrinkly and the leaves are looking sick. Without cutting into it, is it safe to say it is dead?
>>
>>3979639
>I have kept the soil wet and only water when the soil is dry.
Huh?
>>
>>>/out/homegrow
>>
>>3979641
Didn’t edit before posting so it came out retarded. Meant to say I only water when the soil is dry which is what I do with all of my indoor plants
>>
>>3979643
Really hard to say without knowing the species of tree, and the conditions you are keeping it in.
Pics are good too.
>>
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>>3979645
Chinese Elm
It faces the morning sun so it gets a decent amount of direct light.
>>
>>3979659
Nightmare on a Chinese Elm Street (for cats/dogs)
>>
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>>3979663
>>
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Did a 3~ day timelapse for the roots.
Cool to see the capillary force of the pumice too. As well as how the shaft of the strelitzia throbbing, no homo.
>>
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>>3979874
And was meant to do the same kind of repot with my large mangled monstera. But found out that it was multiple plants shoved together, it explains why it was so unstable.
So relaxing to unravel roots.
>>
I hate cabbage.
>>
>>3979659
Look pretty sad. Overwatering maybe.
How do the stems look? Are there healthy buds?
It could still be saved.
I'm not a bonsai expert, but I think this species should be kept outdoors also.
>>
>>3979981
Buds look pretty bad. I will let the soil dry out and see if that improves things then. I generally water until it drains through the bottom but maybe that’s the issue
>>
>>3978716
I've collected seeds from native plants but I haven't had a lot of success so far. I've thought about plating wild sunflowers around grass plots like you said but I'll have to find free time for that.
>>
>>3979888
Why?
>>
>>3979992
>I generally water until it drains through the bottom
That's not necessary to do every time you water tbqh, it can result in nutrient deficiencies.
>>
What would anons recommend I use for a medium to grow plants hydroponically in conjunction with some aquariums? I was thinking sand might not be too bad but I'm pretty unknowledgeable on the subject.
>>
Hi /plant/, I'm thinking of growing some sort of berry in an outdoor pot in the spring. But I'm in the U.S. and I know we have a lot of invasive berries. I don't want some bird eating a berry and spreading the seeds in the ecosystem.
Is this a real concern? Are there any types of berries that this isn't an issue with?
>>
>>3980585
Blueberries are native
>>
>>3979874
This is pretty cool, how did you record it?
>>
>>3979659
Seems like your rotting your roots in that soil
>>
>>3980452
Leca (clay balls) or lava rock
>>
Hey, bros. How do you know when to give up on plant that "seems" dead?

I have a boston fern and fiddle leaf and they're basically just sticks in the dirt. But today, I pulled them gently and they look like they have healthy roots still.

Should I just keep waiting? Do those types of plants even do that?
>>
>>3980653
Found my old actioncamera, timelapse feature. Will use a poweroutlet charger next time.
>>
>>3980432
Tastes boggin
>>
>>3980807
Wait until late Spring maybe before composting them. Such plants tend to be dormant or becoming dormant this time of year anyway.
>>
I'm gonna give all my succs one last drenching of neem before the Winter sets in.
>>
Hey friends, I've always wanted to get into botany. Thing is, I don't know where to start.
Do you recommend any places, podcasts, youtube channels for learning history of plant's and such or should I just learn by doing and research about plants as I come across them?
>>
>>3982059
I like books best.
Get a second hand RHS Encyclopedia and read it with a nice cup of tea.
Books on the history of famous gardens are super comfy too.
>>
>>3982059
see if theres a botanical garden nearby and watch a botany course on youtube
>>
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wat is dis
>>
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>>3982404
>>3982406
Orchid.
>>
Sup, /plant/! I want to make a sub-irrigated planter with herbs in it. Herbs like Chives, sage, parsley, etc. Does anyone have any pointers? This will be the first time I enter the world of hydroponics so any beginner mistakes I can avoid would be much appreciated!!!!!
>>
>>3979659
It's been a few days but I would agree with the other Anon in keeping the elm outside. Generally tropical bonsai (like most house-plants) are the only ones that can be kept inside for long durations and even then it's often detrimental.
>>
>>3978716
I just bought a mix of over 60 native species of local populations to upgrade my lawn. One little patch at a time though because I don't want to anger the housing association.
>>
>>3982059
In Defense of Plants is a decent podcast.
>>
How do I clean off the grey drops off leaves from storebought plants? If I rub it off with a moist papertowel, they reappear. Like it is a mineral residue.
>>
>>3983182
use a weak acid like a bit of citric acid in water or vinegar in water (use rain or RO/distilled water for best effect)
>>
>>3979874
erotic
>>
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>>3983254
Speaking of erotic, anon. I'm having a baby pixie.
>>
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What would be a good plant to pair with a Monstera deliciosa? Aesthetically speaking.
>>
>>3983334
A huge tree for it to climb on.
>>
>>3983340
My dog would tear it to shreds.
>>
>>3983334
Tetrasperma.
>>
>>3983367
But doesn't it look like the Monstera? Or do you think the slightly different leaves would fit well?
>>
Hello /plant/ I was wondering if you guys had any recommendations for grow lights for casual houseplant growing? If I just get an led grow light bulb will that be enough to help my plants through winter? They’ve all made it before so maybe it’s not even worth doing. What do you do for indoor lighting during the winter?
>>
>>3983378
As long as the LED is strong enough, it should be fine. What you should seek is reflective materials to make sure light hits all parts of the plant instead of just one fixed area.
>>
Anyone else ever think about the absolute fucking craziness that is in different plants being able to create themselves differently in different chemical compounds which make them sweet, or bitter, or even poisonous and deadly?

Like how do they take the same base elements of NPK and the other micro-nutrients, and manufacture these different compounds? It's fucking fascinating to me. Like, how does Hemlock create such a deadly poison within itself that it kills anything that eats it, and how does Stevia create leaves which are so sweet they can be crushed into natural beverage sweetener?

Absolutely incredible.
>>
>>3983367
>Four seed in Greek
Use the full botanical name including the genus, otherwise what you're saying doesn't mean shit. It's like going to a book store and asking for "the second edition" without specifying which book you're talking about.
>>
Hi /pant/ I'd had an issue in the past where I used to have an pink/purple RGB led strip on most of the time because muh gamer aesthetics, but the thing is that I think it burned my plants since they died after a few days of having those lights on. Is that the case or just my imagination?
>>
>>3983375
I think they fit well, at least if the monstera leaves are large. I can take a photo of them together if you'd like.

>>3983674
But if you google tetrasperma, all you get is the one plant.
>>
>>3983709
http://plantsoftheworldonline.org/results?q=tetrasperma
>>
>>3983643
To me the most fascinating thing is that plants communicate even between different species and at least one can see or feel shapes to a certain degree to imitate them.
>>
who here has fully taken the fernpill?
They are the only plants which I never managed to kill so far, both tropical and temperate ferns.
>>
Wish I owned property, I want to grow currants and rhubarb so bad.

imagine the pie potential.
>>
>>3984272
I own property but don’t really like rhubarb
>>
I'm thinking on getting a humidity dome and maybe a heating mat as well, any specific advice or recommendation?
>>
>>3984286
I own rhubarb but don't really like property.
>>
>>3983884
I've killed 2 Boston ferns but my Kimberly is immortal
>>
What are some other and particularly interesting existing megaflora's in the world besides the California Redwood? Really sucks there aren't nearly as many gigantic plants as their once might have been a long time ago.
>>
>>3985234
Do you interpret megaflora as extremely large plants or just plants that are much larger than other similar plants? For me, Rafflesia spp. definitely count as megaflora, in fact even literally.
>>
>>3984899
I started out with boston ferns as well. Two tiny ones planted in tall vases on my balcony despite the nursery saying they are for indoors. In 2 years I had to cut them in half because the roots grew so thick that I couldn't water them anymore. Now I have 4, 2 of which in large concrete boxes that are as tall as me almost.
Also bought a ton of others: osmunda regalis, male fern, ostrich fern, polystichum setiferum, cyathea cooperi, oceaniopteris gibba. They grow like weeds and this is coming from a guy that managed to kill ficuses
>>
>>3985540
>Do you interpret megaflora as extremely large plants
Mostly this. Just absolutely fuckhueg plants. Like the whales of the plant world.
>>
>>3983884
Does it count as taking it if you're just let one fern basically take over a small space? I'm not sure what it is, but it likes growing and spreading a bit too much.
Also have a huge Davallia spp. I like it.
>>
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/an/ons i have a plant that i cant identify growing quite fast in some of my vases, pic related, it's "flowers" are very fragile and where they are they get direct sunlight from morning to noon, they grow either inside the vase (dirt with rocks) or in the floor below it (i suspect it's because its moist in there) i'm in south america, will post 2 more
>>
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>>3986338
in red is what i mean by "flowers"
>>
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>>3986338
>>3986341
>>3986343
Briophyllum spp., probably B. daigremontiana (the correct name is Kalanchoe daigremontiana but let's leave it like this).
And no, those aren't flowers. Those are full-on plantlets. They'll eventually fall off the leaves and infect every single free space where they could fall on.
Invasive so don't let the problem get too out of hand.
>>
>>3986338
>>3986341
>>3986343
That's Kalanchoe delagoensis (Mother of Millions).

Those flowers aren't flowers at all, and are actually a bunch of tiny little plantlets. It's its primary method of propagating itself.

https://worldofsucculents.com/kalanchoe-delagoensis-chandelier-plant-mother-of-thousands-mother-of-millions/
>>
>>3986374
Actually, I think this is the correct one. My bad.

https://worldofsucculents.com/kalanchoe-x-houghtonii-mother-of-millions-hybrid/
>>
>>3986374
>mother of millions
This is some eldritch being we're talking about.
>>
>>3986377
Personally, I'm a bit more fond towards Mother of Thousands. More colorful.

https://worldofsucculents.com/kalanchoe-laetivirens-mother-thousands/

They're both native to Madagascar, btw.
>>
>>3986380
Very pretty, but I'd hate to see it spread everywhere. I don't get the love for succulents at all...
>>
>>3986381
Succulents are extremely diverse in all respects. It's a wide world of plants out there. Some are slow, some are fast. Some are sensitive, some are aggressive. Some are large, some are tiny.

Just all sorts out there. One for everybody.
>>
>>3986372
>>3986374
thank you a lot!
>They'll eventually fall off the leaves and infect every single free space where they could fall on.
yeah it's taking up a lot of space in the vase and floor already, i have many other succulents and plants in those vases but none are resilient as this one, succulents usually break apart really easy but not this one, i'll pay more attention to it now
>>
>>3986406
Yeah Kalanchoes are generally extremely abuse-proof. Don't even worry about them.
>>
>>3986381
>I don't get the love for succulents at all...
Cringe take.
>>
>>3984667
if you dont like priv property then you own nothing then you dont own rhubarb
>>
>>3986414
Show me what's so good about them. I wasn't being smug, I really don't get it.
>>
What type of adenium grows the fattest caudex? I'm want to graft.
>>
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bit of a long shot but does anyone here have a career in conservation horticulture or botanic garden work? Would you recommend it as a career? How did you find your way there?
>>
>>3986381
It’s the houseplant craze I don’t get. Can’t imagine spending a fortune on some boring plant that could easily die or lose value.
>>
>>3987221
>on some boring plan
That's really the gist of the gripe for me. So many of the exact same plain and boring rosette patterned plants. Like, get more interesting shit.

The people who buy those plants rife at the store are the ones who don't really care and just want *a* plant at all to serve as a vapid decoration piece. That's dumb.
>>
>>3987221
My thoughts exactly. I took a further look after posting, and some arrangements look really cool, but they obviously require way more work to make and take care of than 99% of the succulents I see out there.
>>
>>3986797
The A. obesum that grow on Socotra are by far the fattest, but it's hard to say whether that's a genetic trait or just a result of their growing conditions.
>>
>>3986381
>>3986478
There's a lot more succulents than just the ones with the fat-leaved rosettes. I used to think I didn't like succulents either because just like you, I associated 'succulent' with the typical Echeveria/Crassula/Kalanchoe/Aloe/etc. Then I realised that most of my plants are actually succulents, but rather than fat rosettes they're usually caudiciform plants (swollen stem/root/tuber, most often with regular leaves or vines) like Adenium obesum and Brighamia insignis, or jungle cacti (epiphytes growing in the jungle as opposed to the desert) like Disocactus anguliger and Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa. Also some really odd succulents like Euphorbia platyclada (just looks like a bunch of dead sticks) and Seyrigia multiflora (just looks like a bunch of mouldy sticks). Or small plants that can attract everyone's attention like Euphorbia decaryi (pictures don't do it justice).
>>
>>3987344
Wait, Adenium is a succulent? I'd never have guessed, I thought they didn't have any flowers.
>>
>>3987324
I'll look into them, thanks
>>
>>3987344
What, this thing is creepy.
>>
>have congestion so bad it's painful
>eat chilli pepper
>its gone
any other home cures I can grow indoors
>>
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>>3987364
You must be thinking of a different plant
>>
>>3987514
You could probably grow Chelidonium majus indoors. Rub the orange sap on warts every couple of days and they'll be gone in a week or two.
>>
>>3987784
who tf just gets warts
>>
>>3987532
No, that's the one, we call it "flower from the desert" or "rose from the desert". I thought succulents didn't have flowers.
>>
friend gifted me pothos for my birthday. Are the yellow spots an illness or is it some sort of variegation? Ignore the hard water stains
>>
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>>3987841
Forgot pic sorry for double post
>>
For me it's WildFern.
>>
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Speaking of hardwater stains, how the fuck do you get rid of them? I rubbed these with a sponge, water and a drop of soap.
All of the storebought plants have them.
>>3987841
Looks like variegation to me.
>>
>>3987922

>>3983214
>>
>>3987922
Thank you I hope you are right
>>
>>3987931
Acid huh, thanks anon, I'll try it out!

>>3987944
All of mine has it too
>>
>>3987922
Try rubbing with a fresh banana peel or something slightly acidic.
>>
>>3987840
The vast majority of ornamental plants have flowers, and many succulents actually have really impressive flowers. Cacti usually have large, intricate flowers, and many species in the Crassulaceae (Kalanchoe, Sempervivum, etc) family have large inflorescences with tons of flowers. Succulent Asparagaceae (Yucca, Dracaena, Beaucarnea, etc) also often have huge inflorescences, often with a sweet fragrance. Many succulent Apocynaceae (Adenium, Pachypodium, Stapelia, etc) have large and often either very fragrant or very stinky flowers. 'Very stinky' is even understating it a bit, they literally smell like shit, rotting flesh, etc. A few succulent Euphorbiaceae also have impressive flower spikes, and then there's the many, many Aizoaceae with their many-petaled fowers. The list goes on...

>>3987828
HPV spreads pretty easily. I'm not talking about the giant witch nose warts, of course, although you could also get rid of those.
>>
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>>3987840
>I thought succulents didn't have flowers.
That's bizarre. Why would you think that?
>>
>>3987984
I've only ever seen the word "succulent" being used for those small plants with triangular leaves, this thread opened my eyes to the amazing variety of them.

>>3987971
Ok, but I thought plants with flowers couldn't be succulents. Now I want to make a nice pot for my workplace...
>>
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Succulents that flower die shortly after though, don't they? At least the ones with large flowers. All of my pic related did.
>>
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>>3988073
Not all succulents by any stretch.
Remember, succulents are only an informal grouping of plants, those with fleshy leaves or stems that store a lot of water.
There are several thousands of different succulent plants, from many different families, genera, and species.
The only unifying feature they share is the fact that they are succulents.
>>
>>3988073
Some are monocarpic (bloom only once in their life), but that's a minority. Even within the same genus you can have monocarpic and polycarpic species.
>>
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Anyone have tips for obtaining seeds for rare or exotic plants? I'd really love to get my hands on Ipomoea parasitica
>>
>>3982059
Youtube: Crime Pays But Botany Doesn't
>>
>>3988259
What's so special about I. parasitica? The name alone is interesting but I can't find much info about it.
>>
>>3988492
Like I. tricolor, this plant contains psychoactive ergot alkaloids; however, I. parasitica supposedly has these alkaloids in significantly larger quantities.
>>
man there were a lot of leaves in my pond, ended up disturbing some dragonfly larvae because I had to scoop through the silt. I'm fairly sure there's way more at the bottom that I can't see
>>
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>>3988007
>Now I want to make a nice pot for my workplace

do it, you might find yourself hooked in no time. it's what happened to me for sure, i swear succulents are crazy addictive.
If you want any suggestions on cool looking succs I'm sure many of us will be happy to help
>>
>>3989011
I need a few options that can survive with not a lot of sunlight. The curtains at my workplace are frequently half-closed, so it's kinda dim most of the time. Oh, and I live in a tropical climate.
>>
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>>3989093
Lack of sunlight narrows it down by a lot, but these should work out okay.
>succulent vines like Xerosicyos danguyi
>vining caudiciforms like Dioscorea elephantipes and Adenia glauca (note that these are deciduous for a short while each year)
>most of the smaller (< 1m) succulent Euphorbia spp. like E. obesa var. symmetrica, E. decaryi and E. guentheri, although even the giant trees like E. ingens can withstand shade
>all jungle cacti, like Rhipsalis spp., Epiphyllum spp., and so on
>most semi-succulent Peperomia spp.
>literally any Dracaena spp. (though not all are succulent)
>so-called 'ant plants' like Hydnophytum moseleyanum (note that most of these are not actually succulent, they're just fat)
>creeping/hanging Crassulaceae spp. like Sedum morganianum and S. burrito (the latter is the one in >>3989011's pic)

Of course, seeing as you live in a tropical climate, you probably get significantly more light indoors than us temperate climate sufferers even with the curtains drawn, so perhaps there are more plants you'd be able to grow in your workplace conditions.
>>
>>3989166
>narrows it down by a lot
>gives me like 10 different options
This should be more than enough, thanks for the tips.
>>
Anyone know if the two on the right are modeled after real flowers? If so, what are they?
>>
>>3989181
Left is probably modeled after cinquefoil, but could be literally any flower in the rose family.

Middle looks a lot like the Japanese Chrysanthemum emblem, but could also be literally anything.
>>
how do you do, fellow succulents?
>>
>>3990192
Cute and funny succulent...
>>
It's about to snow and I'm just now sowing wild flower seeds, will this work? I'm hoping the more humid and cold consitions will help some species to sprout and also keep the slugs and birds away.
>>
>>3991081
I’m under the impression that those do better when sown in spring or fall since I think they need a little warmth for their initial germination. Not sure how well they survive winter without being able to grow a little bit
>>
>>3991081
Hardy plants are good to sow in the Autumn, but it's pretty late now, and if it's already cold enough to snow where you live, I think casting seeds is just going to be a waste.
>>
>>3988893
Please post pond, I want dragonly babies.
>>
>>3983378
For a house plants you will want a cheap, efficient and long life LED, I'd recommend one with the new LM301B diodes at about 150w + 50w per plant. Kingbrite does decent cheap lights, if you want a go really cheap, Mars or Spiderfarmer.
Pick up some mylar reflectors while you are at it, or you will be wasting a lot of light. tinfoil works too but it's not nearly as good.
>>
>>3991356
>>3991368
Yeah, autumn or spring would be ideal but both were shitty in case of watering the last years. I've got more than enough seeds so I'll just try again in spring with additional watering or maybe light mulching if this won't work out.
Has anyone experience with mulching wild flower seeds? The majority of them need light so I'm not sure that'll work that well, either.
>>
>>3991389
will try to do so tomorrow when I do more leaf removal. they're pesky buggers that move away when I get my camera out
>
can I grow sunflowers indoor over the winter? I have a large south facing patio window but can buy grow lights if needed. I want to grow one with big leaves so I can run some experiments on them and don't want to wait until next august
>>
guys is there a name for thin tree trunk?
thank yu pls
>>
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Lads, what is this plant
>>
>>3993060
probably Dracunculus vulgaris
>>
>>3993069
lovely drawing
>>
So I had no perlite around and planted my first succulent, crassula into my normal mix with added vermiculite. Always thought that it's more or less the same thing, just with some added trace minerals benefit.
But apparently it retains water and it's something that succulents don't like? Is it just clickbait bullshit? Root rot requires swampy soil to settle in, not a bit of excessive retention, right?
>>
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>>3993253
Any succulent you can buy in your local garden centre can be grown in normal potting mix. The most important thing is giving them sufficient light, the growing medium is not that important, especially for many Crassula (I'm assuming it's C. ovata). Root rot is often caused by fungi, which can thrive if there's stagnant water, but it's very unlikely to happen if you let the soil dry out more than you would for your other plants. Don't drown your plants and don't plant them in too big of a pot and they'll do fine.
>>
>>3993069
Interdasting, I will try to confirm that because pictures on internet don't help
>>
27% humidity in apartment. I need to get a humidifier.
Any recommendations?
>>
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Any ideas what this could be? Looks like a kale/cabbage thingy but I found it on the street side
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>>3993685
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>>3991389
sorry I forgot to take a photo since it was too cold to bother doing anything, but here's a photo from summer. the brooklime (veronica beccabunga) has grown a lot since then and I need to cut its wayward tendrils back before it roots in other areas of the pond.
aponogeton distachyos is sending up leaves again due to the cold weather, while the lily is dying back
>>
>>3991389
>>3993754
oh yeah forgot to mention, you can't see it in the photo but I placed two thick tree branches on the shallow soil to encourage dragonflies to lay their eggs underneath them (rotting wood). no idea if that worked or not but I just followed the advice of guides that said they prefer rotting submerged wood to lay eggs on. it is also possible that they laid eggs in the water or attached them to the plant baskets
>>
>>3993685
>>3993686
Probably rapeseed from a bird feeder
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>>3985595
Yes of course. Post pics of the spreading fern
>>
>>3993754
>>3993760
Thank you! That helps a lot. Also nice to see it isn't that big, I only have limited space.
>>
>>3993869
yeah it's only 3m x 2m so 6sqm; I believe a 4sqm surface area is enough to attract dragonflies
>>
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>vermiculite
>>
>>
>>
>>3994007
Pumice is the god tier.
>>
>>3994007
>peat
>>
>>3994007
>sand
>>
The Milkweeds I grow keep catching some root rot type of thing. I'm gonna transplant them once the initial leaves come out the seeds so they can get accustomed early
>>
>>3995124
Keep us updated. I haven’t noted any milkweed in the wild with rot that sounds like that
>>
>>3993581
Post it on inaturalist
>>
>>3993754
Beautiful pond, I'm sure it's full of dragonfly eggs by now.
You probably won't see many larvae since they have so many hiding spots, but you will definitely see lots of exuviae on the plants next year once they metamorphosize.
I recommend to cover the liner edges with jute, it will conceal it, allow plants to grow on it and most importantly protect it from direct sunlight. Exposed liners break fast.
>>
>>3995263
Im positive its a drainage related rot.
I planted two seedlings into the ground 2 weeks ago and when I went to visit them they looked underwatered, though the ground is constantly moist there. Then they just slide right off the ground to show the bottoms turned black and dry/calloused, when I had planted them with healthy roots. The same thing happened suddenly to one I haven't transplanted yet despite doing just fine since germination. Its strange because its a native species, so technically I could drop a seed in the ground, water it, and it'll be just fine.
Ill try to get photos in tomorrow
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>>3979612
ID on the plant from this clip art?
>>
>>3995479
dog rose
>>
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What is this stuff on the underside of my fan palm rescue? Got it for a fiver at Walmart in late October because it was wilting and yellow, since then I've nursed it back to a healthy green and it's doubled in size. But now the leaves are being covered in these little white eyeblights and she's been leaning pretty bad since I transplanted her right before Thanksgiving (that's when I first saw them).
>>
Hi, Im quite new to this board and it’s been a while since I wanted to learn about gardening and grow some plants in my room first, but I just actually took action now. I know pretty much nothing about the subject. Can anyone give me some tips or recommend some YouTube channels for beginners? :)
>>
>>3995328
yeah there were a lot of larvae and exuviae at the end of summer which was really cool. I never expected them to populate a new pond and develop so quickly. there's still some really big larvae hiding in the deeper parts now, probably ready to fly next summer.
>jute liner edges
it's a good idea but wouldn't it just rot and allow weeds to grow on top? I was hope the marginal plants (marsh marigold and myosotis scorpioides) would expand and cover the liner. but so far only the brooklime has managed to do that
>>
>>3995502
Looks like mealybugs or wooly aphids
Just wipe them off with a cloth soaked in isopropyl alcohol, or any other strong (70% or higher) alcohol, then keep an eye out for any that come back.
Make sure not to put the plant into bright light until the alcohol has all evaporated and the leaves are dry again.
>>
>>3995585
Step One:
Get an Aloe plant and make it happy.
>>
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>>3995604
That's great, and once the first generation is born they will keep coming back every year. I used to see lots of larvae in mine but now it's very overgrown and they're all well hidden. Still, I know they're there because during spring and summer my plants are covered in exuviae. You can watch them metamorphosize if you visit the pond in the early morning, as soon as the sun begins to rise.
>wouldn't it just rot and allow weeds to grow on top?
It would, but you can prevent weed growth by planting Myosotis and Veronica on it beforehand, and once the jute starts to break down the root mat will remain in its place.
>>
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Can someone help me figure out what these things are? They're cool but I have no idea what they are so I don't know whether to kill 'em or leave 'em. This one is about a cm across
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>>3996006
And this one is maybe 3/4 of that size, but it's hard to tell because it was very flighty. Barely managed to get a picture of it before it scampered away.
>>
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Hey i just got this dionaea b52
It's virtually my first plant
I put it in this box with some cat sandbox' "sand" until I buy proper "dirt" for her
>>
>>3983643
How about the fact that the biomass of the plant is entirely derived from the air? Its like in our minds we imagine the roots pulling up all these nutrients or even water and that being the source of the plant itself, but nope, ultimately the CO2 in the air is the source of all the biomass you see and associate with a plant. Literally plants making themselves appear out of “thin air”.
>>
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Look
>>3996396
It's outside now, to get sunlight, and in a pet bottle to protec from the wind

>>3983643
>>3996684
Indeed

>>3983793
Sauce?
>>
>>3995631
>as soon as the sun begins to rise
curse my lazy self!
I'll give your jute idea a try, thanks anon
>>
>>3996684
>>3983643
All of this thanks to energy coming from the sun
They truly are the superior form of life
>>
>>3995629
This. My aloe live like a pauper on 15 cm pot with garden soil, it made a lot of tiny offshoot and i dunno where to plant them lol
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>>3996684
>Literally plants making themselves appear out of “thin air”.
Not literally but OK.
>>
This general is just as slow as a plants growth
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>>3996835
You call it slow.
I call it comfy.
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>>3996835
It's a very specific topic in a very specific board with not a lot of activity to begin with.
>>
>>3990192
Is that plant spiky at all? It kinda looks like it is... does it hurt to touch it? Looks neat though
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Don't know where to ask this but I figured you guys would know, but how can I raise a frost line?
I'm building a reptile enclosure in my yard but the problem is I have clay soil so I'm worried about the reptiles digging too deep to escape the cold only to end up drowning when it rains. If i put logs around the enclosure and cover them in soil will it protect the enclosure from frost? Or are there any other methods, like wrapping it in a tarp (i know people do that with figs and citruses)
Pic related probably explains it better than i could
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>>3996955
No, the hairs look huge and prickly on the picture, but touching a Pinguicula's leaves feels just like touching butter, or snot. Slightly slimy, just enough to trap very small insects.
>>
>>3991081
When it comes to pasture seed blend, just before the first snow that you expect to stick around is the ideal time to sow, because the low temp means the seeds just chill out until spring and then you get a good amount of time with decent moisture from the snowmelt.

I would presume native wildflower mixes would do similarly well with 'frost seeding'.
>>
>Get Alocasia
>Everything's going great
>Notice one stem/leaf hidden behind the rest is a transparent and yellow
>Water it and put it on the window sill so it can get some sun
>No sunlight the next day/today because of heavy fog and cloudy skies
>Come home 10 minutes ago to find the leaf shriveling and curling upwards
I know the last part is a symptom of overwatering, but is there anything I can do right now to help it? I'm going to be gone all day tomorrow and Sunday.
>>
>>3997443
The stem and leaf in question. Be honest, how fucked is it? Also realized the things I’ve been killing the past couple days are Fungus Gnats, but I’m pretty sure they’re just transplants from the nursery I got it from.
>>
>>3997443
>>3997469
need to see the rest of the plant to really tell. it doesn't look too bad just based off the one leaf, they will absorb their leaves from time to time, especially when stressed - is it growing a new leaf?
>>
>>3996835
post more then
>>
What are some plants with offensive names?

-FAGacea
-FATsia
>>
>>3997525
Won’t be home for at least 15 hours, but the rest of it is green and healthy.
>>
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What's this thing that's on my nicolai strelitzia leaves?
The one that has it is not feeling good at all. Came with rootrot from the store.
>>
>>3997708
some kind of pest's nest. probably spider mites, or I've seen mealy bugs leave evidence like this before. Wipe them off with isopropyl alcohol on a qtip - if they come back then you might have to try more involved treatment.
if it has root rot, then you have to prune the affected parts or it will just keep spreading to the rest of the plant.
>>
>>3997708
>>3997876
Definitely mealybugs, very common on Strelitzias. Check the plant thoroughly because they often hide in young, not yet unfurled leaves, and in the petioles. Once you find them you can just squish them, though.
>>
>>3997876
>>3997880
Ah, yes mealybugs. I saw more of them on this plant. I repotted them all into pumice once I got them. So the rootrot has been recovered but perhaps too late.
I had to remove a leave and as I cut it at the root I saw that there was still soil in the crevice of the leaf.
None were alive though.

Taught me to not buy plants all willy nilly. Thanks.
>>
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>>3996700
>Dionaea
>sphagnum
>perlite
>tree fern
>little piece of tomato to attract mosquitoes
Wish me luck bros

>>3997526
There u go
>>
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>>3991976
Sapling?
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>>3979612
a few days ago a mystery plant turned up in my window box (I just throw all kinds of seeds in there). today I had the idea to take a taste of the leaves to see if I could make a guess at what I had grown, but first I put my nostril right up to the leaf and took a deep breath and I smelled unmistakably lemon! I had completely forgotten I threw some lemon seeds in there like 4 months ago. Incredible that the seeds are now starting to come up!
>>
>>3998135
Cute. I like plants with wheely and round shaped leaves as opposed to the common angular ones.
>>
>>3997046
Offer the animal an alternative to digging, like a heated pen
>>
what plants make air in room humid?
>>
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Guys...... I think I am killing my plant ......
>>
Any idea what kind of soil indoor Olive Tree prefers? Google says extremely well draining and sandy, but the original Italian soil it comes in is basically a heavy slab of clay and the tree is perfectly happy in it.
>>
>>3998689
>indoor Olive Tree
I just don't see it working.
Olives grow best in free-draining, low-nutrient soil.
And outdoors.
>>
>>3998693
Well there are plenty of old olive bonsai our there, and I have some decent lighting. Should be fine for at least a few years until I get a heated greenhouse or something.
>>
>>3998699
>Well there are plenty of old olive bonsai our there
Grown outdoors most likely.
>>
>>3979612
Hello, I have some questions.
I bought a liquid fertilizer bottle and the label says that I should put a cork of fertilizer in 4 liters of water.
I have few plants, can I place instead a bit less of half a cork in a normal 1.5 L bottle?
Since I'm not going to use it all right away, can I store the fertilized water? Does it stop being effective if I leave it mixed with water for too long?
Right now I have only a Calathea Crocata, few Cyclamen and another couple of flower plants.
>>
>>3998693

A lot of people in the Greek/Italian community with potted olive trees here in 6B, They're usually 5-6'
>>
>>3998889

You can store diluted fertilizer water with no issues. Its more important that you dilute it to the recommended amount so you don't burn/cause nutrient-lock your plants
>>
>>3998889
Some fertilizers actually requires you to use the entire recommended amount since they have an assortment of different granules.
But you're probably gonna be fine just using half or whatever.
I personally prefer slow release stuff.
>>
>>3999029
>>3999033
Thanks
>>
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What's up with this I. tricolor flower?
If it successfully pollinates, would the offspring have whacky four-petaled flowers as well?
>>
>>3986343
Fren
>>
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Hey PLANTS! You guys like POOP? What kind of POOP do you eat?
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I repotted my aralias into pumice, clearing all of the soil from the roots. I'm going to guess this stressed the plant a lot.
It hasn't grown any new leaves at all until now ,after the repotting.

So, do aralias splooge out their energy into new growth in an attempt to survive?
I recall hearing some blooming plants can do that, to then die.
>>
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>>3999817
Also brand new monstera leaf, timelapsing another for the next weeks.
>>
>>3998559
Some suggestions for you then:
>Xerosicyos danguyi
>Peperomia obtusifolia
>Peperomia prostrata
>actually lots of Peperomia spp.
>Pilea peperomioides
>Stephania cepharantha
>Euphorbia pulcherrima 'Christmas Mouse'
>Polyscias scutellaria (often called P. 'Fabian')
>Portulacaria afra
>Kalanchoe luciae (often mistakenly called K. thyrsiflora)
>Ficus pumila (young form)
>Hoya obovata
>>
>looking for neem oil
>out of stock at all plant stores
>google it
>plenty of it in store for make-up/health stores

Bitches put this shit on their faces??
>>
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>>3998559
can you believe its that big?
>>
>>3999891
It's got antifungal properties as well. There's two different kinds of neem oil, though, only one is useful for plants.
>>
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>>3998684
Today was a rainy cloudy day with not a single moment of direct sunlight so now I put her indoors under a florescent lamp, or else she may finish dying
>>
>>3999934
Keep in mind that Dionaea muscipula goes dormant this time of year if you keep it outside in a temperate climate, losing most of its leaves. Put it back outside, cloudy days don't kill plants and regardless, it'll still get more light from the sun on a cloudy day outside than indoors from a fluorescent light.
>>
>>3999938
I'm in the south hemisphere so dormant times are 6 months from now, and I think I'll have to put it on the refrigerator by then
As I've been showing, the plant has been getting worse on the last few days (I just bought it) so I consider that another day without sun and water could be critical. I left it outside the whole day and now that the sun is setting Ive put it under the fluorescent.
After taking it out and in a few times, I've settled in the following configuration:
>sphagnum (trimmed) and perlite, plus a bit of tree fern to make it a bit more acid
>all compressed a bit with the hand
>about 10~15cm tall
>in a pet bottle cut a few cm taller than that to protec the plant from wind
>with five little holes on the bottom
>inside a slightly wider bowl filled with water to keep it well hydrated
>>
>>3999891
i get mine from pinksun.co.uk
really good pure neem, stinks like shit, as it should
>>
>>3999826
Claytonia perfoliata is quite cool as well
>>
>>3999826
Hmm. Most of those are pretty meh, however the Stephania cepharantha is my favorite among them. One specific one belonging to the same genus that I really want is Stephania erecta. Not usually interested in most caudiciforms, however that one in particular is VERY cute.
>>
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>>3999819
First time I've seen a monstera sweat too. It's standing right above the humidifier and it was just watered.
>>
I bought a couple small succulents to make a Christmas gift for my mom. I hope it works, they're so cute...
>>
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>>4000804
Here it is, it's my first time dealing with succulents.
>>
>>4000896
Nice composition, but is the stapeliad on the left one of the non-stinky ones? Have you sniffed the flower yet?

Either way, make sure you tell your mother to put the bowl in a sunny spot and to only water when they start looking thirsty. I'm assuming you used normal potting mix and topped it off with those black rocks.
>>
>>4000921
It doesn't smell, so I guess I dodged a bullet.
>>
Bump
>>
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>>3979659
Iron deficiency. Do you have hard water?
If not it could be a calcium deficiency, and even if you do it still could be because the alkalinity of the water/soil is too strong and it is not absorbing metals.

Observed the darkened veins, blanched flesh between them and browning tips. Typical alkaline soil metal absorption issue.

Test your soul and water alkalinity and soil nutrients, my dude.
>>
Hey, does anyone here have some experience with bonsai trees?
At the beginning of Covid, almost 2 years ago, I planted almost 2 dozen tree seeds into pots, half of them didnt even started to grow and the other half died off over the 2 years, all I have left is 1 tree (Delonix regia), which looks pretty decent, starts to lose his leafs since its winter now but other than that grew pretty decent.

Now, my grandmother saw the tree and asked me to buy her some bonsai seeds for christmas, and I hoped that someone here might know some easy to grow Bonsaitrees, maybe even fast growing.
I tried to look into a few but they dont really show a difficultylevel on the websites i bought them, the ones I bought 2 years ago had a difficulty level attached to them but the "easy" ones didnt even start to grow.
So maybe you have experience with indoor bonsai and can recommend an easy one. I already have bought a few yesterday online, once Im home I will check the order and post the ones I already bought.
Thanks in advance.
>>
>>4001667
Maybe I should add that I live in Germany, in case that matters climate wise
>>
>friend gifts me dwarf picea glauca
>live in zone 10
how do I not kill it?
>>
>>4001667
Get her a schefflera and let her go from there. Bonsai isn't really something you "have" so much as it is something you "do". Making a schefflera into a nice bonsai won't be fast. But It will be a whole lot faster than starting a tree from seed.
>>
Redpill me on spineless cactuses. Are they any good? Is the spineless gene copyrighted or can I crossbreed them to make thornless hybrids? What is your favorite kind of spineless cactus?
>>
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Do you know of any cool books about plants? The orchid thief is what got me into botany.





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