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File: Nicotiana alata.jpg (819 KB, 1164x1280)
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Welcome to /plant/, the happy green place on this blue board, where growers, gardeners and horticulturists share their love for things that grow.
Newbies and amateurs are very welcome, and we’ll always try to answer your questions.

>Flora of the World
http://www.worldfloraonline.org/

>Hardiness zones
https://www.plantmaps.com/

>Plant ID Sites
https://identify.plantnet.org/
https://wildflowersearch.org/

>Pests and Diseases
https://www.rhs.org.uk/science/plant-health-in-gardens
https://www.growveg.com/plant-diseases/us-and-canada/
https://homyden.com/garden-pests-diseases-directory/

>Thousands of Botanical Illustrations
http://www.plantillustrations.org/

>Succulents
https://worldofsucculents.com/
https://www.succulentguide.com/

>Carnivorous plants
https://botany.org/home/resources/carnivorous-plants-insectivorous-plants.html
https://carnivorousplants.org/grow/guides

>Alpine plants
https://www.alpinegardensociety.net/plants/

>Ponds
https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/actions/how-build-pond
https://aquaplant.tamu.edu/plant-identification/alphabetical-index/

>Previous Thread
>>3911706
>>
>>3916912
Ragweed
Biscuit Root
Pamita (tansy mustard)
Miner's lettuce
Rocky mountain bee plant
Devil's claw and its relatives
Graythorn berries
Snowberries
Serviceberries
Gooseberries
Barberries
Mormon Tea
Aloe
Yucca fruit
Yuca
Tepary beans


PROTIP: There's foraging books available for free on Library Genesis.
>>
>>>/out/homegrow
>>
Chapparal (possibly carcinogenic but some people turn it into tea)
Black nightshade (debatably toxic)
Epazote
Chia
Henbit
Hackberries
Partridgeberries
Rhus berries (sometimes known as lemonade berries)
Wintergreen berries
>>
Chiltepin peppers
Purslane
Beautyberries
Waxmallows
Jojoba nuts
Ironwood nuts
Horseweed
Several cucurbitae frens like the Desert Starvine and the Buffalo Gourd
Broomrape
>>
>>3917672
Based
This
>>
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The fact that nobody is making a fuss about rape is a testament to the obscurity of this hobby.
>>
>>3917721
People grow rapeseed as a hobby?
>>
>>3917728
Probably. Rape is very useful.
>>
>>3917673
>Black nightshade (debatably toxic)

People only say that because the average beginner forager is too retarded to know the difference between ripe Solanum nigrum/ptychanthum/americanum and Atropa belladonna or S. dulcamara
>>
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>NOTE: YELLOW RATTLE IS ONLY NATIVE TO WA, OR, ID, MT, AK, AND NORTHWESTERN CANADA
>WE WILL NOT SHIP THIS SPECIES OUTSIDE OF THOSE REGIONS
>>
>>3917761
Send them a message telling them to brassica their mothers
>>
>>3917761
>>3917761
So you like mass demographic replacement then?
>>
>>3917771
That won't be a problem unless he plants a Tradescantia.
>>
>>3917761
what’s cool about it, I’m trying to get more red pilled about native perennials
>>
>>3917798
Try leaving your house.
>>
>>3917800
never mind, I looked it up. It’s a leddit plant dubbed “the meadow maker”. See, I did that using the internet. Saved myself a cringe moment
>>
>>3917801
So what's cool about it? Redpill me.
>>
>>3917805
it supposedly parasitizes grasses thus making it easier to establish a sustained meadow
>>
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How do I identify plants this is hard
I'm supposed to for my botany class
This is one in my dad's backyard, he doesn't know what type.
I don't see any visible sori. Is that cause it's late summer or are they just hidden?
I was thinking it might be a cinnamon fern because the fronds are all in a circle and I found at least one cinnamon-colored frond detached and on the ground, but that could've just been part of a frond that died.
What else should I look for? It has both pinnae and pinnules.
>>
>>3916912
Breadroot
Arrowroot
Bay of Fundy dulce
Taboose
Apios/Potato bean
Nahavita/Blue Dicks
Jerusalem Artichokes
Lambsquarters
Thimbleberries
Strawberry Blite
Juniper
Crowberries
Cloudberries
Springbeauty
Sweet Vetch (Masu)
Mousefood (Anlleq)

The Wikipedia page on Native American botany is really sad. A lot of the plants posted here aren't on it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_food_plants_native_to_the_Americas

>>3917673 # #
Henbit isn't actually native, that's an import that got invasive.
>>
>>3917663
Inaturalist.org should be added to the plant ID sites in the OP, posting flower pictures there is fun.
>>
Somebody please answer my previous question:
>>3917305
>>3917307
>>3917317

>
>
>>
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>>3917728
I do but there isn't much to talk about. Super easy and resistant plant, you just throw seeds somewhere.
>>
"A reason for your monstera leaves curling might be because of underwatering. Another reason might be because of overwatering."

Hmm.
>>
>>3917307
>>3917317
>>3918000
Looks like a sunburned Crassula ovata. It looks like it doesn't receive a lot of light, so when there's sunlight shining on it it can get burnt.
>>
>>3917669
>>3917673
>>3917700
>>3917954
Still forgetting Chokecherries.
>>
>>3918323
Thanks for identifying the plant and what might be wrong. Should I just put it further from the window, or Or keep it where it is until it has grown accustomed to the sun? It has grown a bit, and the new leaves seem ok, since they have no dead spots, so idk. Im pretty new to owning plants, and I really wanna keep it alive, so sorry for these stupid questions.
>>
>>3918460
Give it as much light as you can, just keep in mind that whenever you move it to a new spot where there's more light than before, it'll need to grow accustomed to those higher light conditions. It's the same for humans: if you go on holiday to a tropical island and you immediately lay down on the beach from morning to evening without acclimatising first, you're going to get (severely) sunburnt.
Crassulas in general are pretty easy to keep alive as long as you don't water them too often (or grow them in a 100% inorganic medium). They can take lower light conditions, but they'll grow much better the more light they get. C. ovata is a pretty slow grower, though.
>>
>>3917721
Former slogan for a village in my province was "The Land of Rape and Honey". They grow lots of canola and it looks awesome when you drive by, and 10% of Canadian honey is sourced or produced there. I can't remember which. Tisdale, Saskatchewan.
>>
>>3918323
>>3918460
>Looks like a sunburned Crassula ovata
It's actually a Portulacaria afra.
Lots of people mistake it for C. ovata.
>>
>>3918536
How do you tell the difference between an etiolated C. ovata and a P. afra? In my experience, P. afra has more colourful reddish stems. On closer inspection, the leaves do look a bit flat, but if you hadn't said it was Portulacaria, I'd have attributed it to underwatering.
>>
>>3918541
>>3918541
They are quite different under closer inspection.
P. afra has smaller, rounder leaves, dark brown or red/pink stems, and a less upright growth habit than C. ovata.
>>
>>3918131
It's great for wildlife too, some insects are rape specialists
>>
I have no idea what I’m doing.
It’s a ficus of some sort.
Stole the clipping from someone else’s tree and I’m propagating it now.
>>
>>3917721
I swear I saw someone trying to change rapeseed. They even had a way less cool name lined up.
>>
>>3917816
>supposedly
It's a proved scientific fact
Parasitism is the speciality of all orobanchaceae
>>
>>3918596
>It’s a ficus of some sort.
Not even close.
>>
>>3918609
I’m thinking of stealing apple and peach trimmings to make my own trees.
Got any plants I should steal next?
>>
>>3918610
Stealing is wrong.
>>
Mystery cactus anon here. You may remember me from a couple of threads ago. Just wanted to report that my cactus is doing very well in near-daily, full-blast outdoor sunlight with semiregular watering. By “semiregular,” I mean to say that I just kind of wing it. I’ll give it half a bottle of water if the soil is bone-dry, or less if it just needs a bit to get through an absurd heat wave. Fortunately, I’ve had no problems with burning to my knowledge.

What I’m curious about are the off-white patches between the “boobs” of this mammilaria cactus. They’ve been there since I bought the cactus... is it fungus? Is it new growth thorns for new tits? My girlfriend seems to think it’s fungus and that I should use rubbing alcohol to kill it, or it’ll kill the cactus. I’ll post a picture of what I mean in a second, but here’s a picture of an increasingly happy cactus, in recovery from its lousy time at my LFS.
>>
>>3918610
Go /out/doors and take clippings of cool plants your come across. I suggest edible plants.
>>
>>3918617

Zoom. Enhance.

See those fuzzy patches? Can somebody help me figure out what those are? Will post more cactus pics after I eat something.
>>
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>>3918610
Do like this guy and hunt down rare heirloom plants:

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/heritage-appalachian-apples

Heirloom Dichelostemma Capitatums taken from old Indian harvesting spots could be cool. Bonus points if you can track down old Indians who could tell you stories about them.
>>
>>3918621
I was going to say sunburn, but the fact that the patches are only in the cracks is pretty weird.
>>
>>3918621
Those are the new areoles where spines will form.
You can see some spines sprouting in the areole on the bottom right.
Don't listen to your girlfriend.
>>
>>3918626
>is pretty weird.
It's completely normal.
>>
So what kind of plant did I steal?
It was just one leaf when I got it three weeks ago.
>>
>>3918634
Maybe Calathea orbifolia or something related. Not sure.
>>
>>3918642
Just looking at it I can tell that's wrong. Is there some identification site where I can compare. It's all one solid green color with rounded edges.
>>
>>3918657
>>3918657
>Just looking at it I can tell that's wrong.
Like I said, I'm not sure. It's in that ballpark though. Something gingerish.
>Is there some identification site where I can compare.
Yeah it's called Google Images.
>>
>>3918657
>Just looking at it I can tell that's wrong.
Anon, you thought it was a Ficus.
>>
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>>3918669
>Calathea orbifolia
and anon thought my leaves were striped and had some sort of cleft at the end of the leaf.
It's a solid green color all the way through with a rounded edge and ovalish in shape.
>>
are we also allowed to discuss fungi here?
>>
>>3918674
Better to make your own general.
>>
>>3918673
I said 'or something related', which I still think is the area you should be looking. Some family of the Zingiber (Ginger) order.
Maybe it's a wild plant to your region, that could help narrow down your ID search.
>>
>>3918634
Another picture of the leaf head on. It’s not striped that’s just the light.
>>
>>3918693
Sure it's not striped, but it has the veins which angle upwards at 45 degrees to the midrib, compare with other plants in genera within Zingiberales such as Calathea, Goeppertia, and even Canna and Musa (Banana). I was just trying to give you an area to look within, rather than fixate on that specific species I named.
>>
>>3918674
>>3918675

>>3903590
>>
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Is it possible to keep a walnut tree in a container?

Also, how do I overwinter it? Leave it outside? Or is it okay if I put it in a cold, sheltered area, but without frost?
>>
>>3918746
>Is it possible to keep a walnut tree in a container?
You can bonsai them, so yes.
>>
>>3918746
Piggy backing off of this question, how long can a tree (any tree, really, just in general) survive in a container, sustained solely by regular feedings of fertilizer once the soil nutrients have been depleted and/or drained? With such frequent watering, it seems the nutrient content in the soil would be flushed out fast, in addition to the tree sucking up what remains during the growing season.

How long can a fertilizer schedule last before it becomes detrimental to the tree, if at all?
>>
>>3918764
Are there hydroponically grown trees?
>>
>>3918769
I do believe so, but only small/dwarf type varieties, as well as young saplings.
>>
>>3918764
depends on the tree
>>
>>3918773
Well let's say it's a cherry tree then.
>>
>>3918783
sure why not
>>
>>3918791
Well that's not a very helpful answer. I could have told myself the same thing.
>>
>>3918792
you didn't tho
>>
Can we revive my fiancé’s succulent? It wasn’t watered for one full semester and a summer, so roughly 8~ months.
>>
>>3918818
Looks dead already and if it doesn't get better after this most recent watering she's dead.
>>
>>3918818
F
>>
Is it ok for fern from shady place to get 24/7 light?
>>
>>3919119
It's not OK for any plant to get 24/7 light.
>>
>>3919133
How about hydroponic farm?
>>
>>3918818

Dude, your fiance can't even take care of a succulent? Find a new woman.
>>
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Found these 2 ficus benjamina along with a bunch of more fucked ones thrown away from one of those bar terrace separators, so I'm assuming not enough sunlight nor water nor good soil. Do you reckon those 2 24cm pots will be enough for them while they bounce back? The one on the right looks a bit more sketchy but the last days of summer in mediterranean weather with some nutrients should maybe help a bit? I bought some general purpose compo sana potting soil from a chinese joint and then found these on my way back because I'm in the middle of repotting a dracaena massangeana (I also got a bunch of pumice to mix in for that repotting, I'm assuming the ficus won't need that and a couple fingers at the bottom just for draining should be enough?)
>>
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>>3919343
messed up the sizing on the picture.
>>
>>3919343
>>3919350
Looks fine.
>>
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Evening, was gifted some half-dead lythrum and found these on a particularly woody stem- I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing and I'm scared of massacring something inoffesive or loosing pests on my neighbours, anyone recognise these? I've tried searching myself but I'm not better at describing eggs than I am taking pictures
>>
>>3919343
>a couple fingers at the bottom
I'm not sure I understand.
>>
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>>
What's the best thing to grow in the desert to add an evergreen taste to things? Juniper?

I really want wintergreen berries but they would hate the climate. :(
>>
How feasible is it to breed new cultivars as a hobbyist? Is it the kind of thing where you need a giant operation to have enough traits to select from?
>>
>>3919664
It depends a new cultivar of what. Some plants don't take up much space.
>>
>>3919638
How much desert are we talking? Cause I live in zone 7b, technically desert area, and all pine, juniper, and cyprus grow very well here.
>>
>>3919171
No, all plants need a night/day cycle
>>
>>3919638
Cypress maybe? I live in the middle of the desert and the like 8 cypresses I have in my yard are absolutely thriving and have been for like a decade.
>>
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>>3919687
>>3919700
9a
>>
>>3919688
What about the ones that are native to places where night and day can last months?
>>
>>3919688
Plants that grow in caves probably don't need much light..
>>
>>3919712
You mean like some tiny inch-high alpines that spend half the year just as some roots?
>>
>>3919718
Plants only grow in caves where there is some light.
>>
>>3919710
>>3919700
I live in zone 9a too. Cypresses do fine here. Look around the city in nicer suburban neighborhoods, they're everywhere.
>>
>>3919732
Can you eat them?
>>
>>3919767
Not really.
>>
Cactus taxonomy is one of the most retarded things I've ever seen.
>>
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>>3919911
>Escobaria is also called mammilaria
>Mammiloyida is also a mammilaria
>Three different cactus species are mammilarias but not
>>
Do you know of any good books about plants? Any plants, so long as the book is interesting. Here's some I'm looking at:

Mesquite: An Arboreal Love Affair by Gary Paul nabhan

Pawpaw: In Search of America’s Forgotten Fruit by Andrew Moore

The Sakura Obsession: The Incredible Story of the Plant Hunter Who Saved Japan's Cherry Blossoms by Naoko Abe

The orchid thief: a true story of beauty and obsession by Susan Orlean
>>
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>>3919911
cactus taxonomy is the pursuit of the impossible by the incompetent

>Ancistrocactus / Echinomastus / Glandulicactus / Toumeya are part of Sclerocactus except they're not
>whatever the fuck is going on with Rebutia
>>
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>>3919925
https://www.rtsd.org/cms/lib/PA01000218/Centricity/Domain/418/the_man_who_planted_trees.pdf
>>
>>3919936
All the seeds on cactusstore.com and other seed places have some archaic name from the 80's and then has 4 other names on a different website.
>>
>>3919911
Taxonomy has been one of the most retarded things ANYONE has seen for a while. According to some classification systems, a coconut can technically be considered a mammal. And let's not even get into Diogenes.
>>
>>3919972
>coconut can technically be considered a mammal
Elaborate please?
>>
>>3919974
>has hair
>produces milk
Good enough for some classification systems people used to use.
>>
What kind of cactuses can breed with each other? They seem to hybridize a lot. I wonder if it would be possible to breed new spineless cultivars using the ones that currently exist.

>>3919664
Luther Burbank did it by growing thousands of plants at the same time. You could buy a rural property somewhere, or you could grow plants that are naturally tiny.
>>
>>3919982
Whales don't have hair but they're still mammals, what the fuck.
>>
>>3919986
And then we have the goddamn platypus, which is nigh a mythical animal with its features. Try figuring that one out, medieval scholars.
>>
>>3919911
>>3919922
>>3919936
It's also interesting that every cactus you find in a regular, non-specialised plant shop is either simply labeled "Cactus" or has a wrong or outdated species name. (Not to mention many Euphorbia spp. also often being labeled "Cactus") Epiphyllum oxypetalum has been the only exception to that rule in my experience.
>>
>>3919972
Taxonomy has been undergoing some pretty big changes in recent years, since they decided to reclassify along phylogenetic lines. It's an ongoing process.
It's hilarious how they're still unable to split Euphorbia into smaller genera though.
>>
Do any of you grow your own berry bushes?
> https://balconygardenweb.com/best-berries-to-grow-in-containers/
Post aesthetic pics. I’m going to grow blackberries, raspberries, and blueberries.
>>
>>3919972
>>3919982
How do you come up with shitposts like these? Is it the byproduct of some kind of brain damage?
>>
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Lavender harvest. Planted back in June. Was I correct in cutting back to around an inch above the brown, woody bits?
>>
>>3920286
>I can't think laterally so clearly it's the other party that's retarded
How is that a shitpost? That way of classifying things was perfectly valid for a long time. The people that came up with the heliocentric theory and the idea of the four humours can hardly be considered brain damaged, but those are both ideas that existed and were accepted at some point, regardless of how wrong they are looking back at them.
>>
>>3920523
>mfw I wrote the same thing in the previous thread
>>
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>>3920555
You absolute motherfucker. No way. I missed the last thread so I had to go back and check. That's one hell of a coincidence.
>>
>>3920427
Is there foliage and buds left?
>>
>>3920194
ask on hgm
>>
I've got ants infesting one of my potted plants. Do I completely have to replace the soil, or can I put the plant and pot in a bucket, submerge the pot completely in water with the soil still in it for a few hours and drown the cunts?
>>
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This is my neon Pothos I just got. I didn't know it would glow so pretty under the light.

>>3920915
>submerge the pot completely in water with the soil still in it for a few hours

You may drown your plant if you do that. There's a million cheap remedies for ants. Baking soda, neem oil, etc.
>>
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I've had these schefflera leaves in sphagnum moss for months now.
Impressive to see the amount of roots they produce, even the single leaf in the background has just as much roots.

No form of new leaves though. It was a cool experiment.
>>
>>3920611
foliage yes, but no flower buds left
>>
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Which hydrangea is this and could I grow it in a large planter to achieve the same effect? How long would it take?
>>
>>3920194
Bonsai mulberry, it has been years and still no fruit.
>>
>>3920194
I planted a bunch of a native blueberry but they are just bird food
>>
>>3918603
sorry meant parasitize in way that appreciably hinders grass growth
>>
>>3921150
Just a regular Hydrangea macrophylla.
They grow moderately well in containers, but do best planted in the ground in good organic-rich soil.
>>
god damn plants are getting too popular all this yuppie faggot sustaining member richers are first dibbing everything nice
>>
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I want to fill an empty part of my yard with a bunch of tall grass, is there a place online where I can buy a bunch of it for cheap? Kinda like those websites that sell bareroot saplings for a few dollars each
>>
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>let my friend plantsit again
>one of my cacti turned brown and just broke in half

How do I fix this? Can I cut off the brown part and re-plant the healthy green part? Should I dig up and throw away the roots of the broken cactus since they're probably dead?
>>
Supposedly it turned brown overnight after being watered. Overwatering, maybe?
>>
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>>3920194
I'm going to try growing beautyberries and turk's cap berries. No pictures yet, my plants are babbies.
>>
>>3921646
How long are you gone for that you need a plant sitter? I was unexpectedly away for 4 months and left a dozen of my succulents on a west-facing windowsill that got sun most of the day and they all survived (and some even grew) by the time I came back.
>>
>>3921150
It's the regular kind like >>3921541 said. I "caught" a wild one and potted it and it's been happy for 4+ years. Only thing is it disobeys my flower-color commandments. I tell it to go blue, it goes pink or red. I tell it to go blue; it goes white and green or green and pink. Needs to get trimmed back a lot to keep it in proportion with the pot.
>>
>>3921646
>plantsit
That's the dumbest thing I've ever heard
>>
>>3921698
>Only thing is it disobeys my flower-color commandments.
The different flower colours are a reaction to soil pH.
In neutral or alkaline soil, pink.
In acidic soil, blue.
>>
>>3917663
>Nicotiana Edition
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2sg1sqrScc
>>
>>3921700
>>3921690
A week. My cats needed sitting too.
>>
>>3921700
Come on anon, surely you know there are plants that need stupid amounts of almost daily care or they'll just lose the will to live or something

>>3921741
Honestly most any cactus will do fine not being watered for a week unless you like, blast it with heat and dry it out on the daily. Next time water them yourself the regular amount before you leave, and just ask the sitter to not water them at all, or leave a little note that says not to or something.
>>
>>3921750
What do I do about the cactus that died, though? Can I salvage it or should I throw the whole thing out?
>>
>>3921753
I specifically didn't give any advice about that because I truly don't know and don't want to risk giving you a bad suggestion, anon, sorry.

Best guess: If it's mushy, it's gone. If it's crispy dry, it's gone. If it's still green and looks like it was literally just broken, it's *probably* salvageable, and I'd google "cactus propagation" to figure out how to save it.
>>
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>>3921756
Thank you fren. I think I'll throw the bottom away and try to salvage the top using this person's advice.
>>
>>3921646
>that nasty dry soil
>even succs hate it
wew
>>
>>3921765
It's the soil it came in. Maybe I should replace it.
>>
>>3921766
yea
>>
>>
>>3921768
With what, though?
>>3921774
That looks like delicious lettuce.
>>
>>3921774
imagine camping here at night when that cool breeze rolls in
>>
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>>3917663
is this scam of selling moth orchids with dyed blue flowers in supermarkets, etc. happening in any other countries or is it just a UK thing?
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>>3921891
i have seen plants they paint pink at Walmarts here in the states.
>>
>>3921895
oh yeah, we get that too

poor succulents usually spray painted with some sort of shiny colour and optionally covered in glitter
>>
>>3921901
(painted succulents tend to be something you see a lot more commonly around xmas time and not so much during the rest of the year at least though)
>>
>>3921891
Speaking as someone who works in a plant shop (mainland Europe), those abominations are always the quickest to sell. The worst I've seen so far is Phals with spray painted speckles in all colours. Sold out the day they came in.
>>
>>3921891
Why is it a scam?
>>
>>3921950
Because the flowers are dyed blue to fool people into thinking they'll bloom blue
>>
>>3921950
because it's actually just a white flowering orchid sold at twice the price because it has some fake blue flowers which will all be gone the week after you buy it
>>
>>3921541
>>3921698
thanks. how many years did it take to bush out?
>>
>>3917869
>Get binomial key
>Follow binomial key
What's difficult? It's literally yes/no
>>
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Alright /plant/ I desperately need your help.

I have a neat plant called 'jatropha berlandieri'. For two years now I've gotten seeds from it and yet I have not been able to get a single one of these damn seeds to germinate. Probably a good 20+ seeds have all been failures. This year the plant is producing even more seeds than the all the previous years combined.

Does anyone here have any advice to germinate these seeds? I've tried a bunch of different guides online and nothing has worked.
>>
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what's going on here?
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>>3922076
Your weed is doing cocaine.
>>
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While I intend to light it from the bottom too, the leaves are too tight, arent they? Shading each other.
And I reckon I have to put some padding where the strings hold the shafts, yeah? They aren't tied tight, just figure it's a sharp edge.
>>
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>>3922113
Also, will it survive?
>>
>Why yes, I do steal clippings and fruits from my neighbors so I can grow their plants for free. How could you tell?
>>
>>3922128
Is that just a leaf or does it have a piece of the stem attached? As long as there's some stem, it'll probably survive. The leaf is as good as dead, though.
>>
>>3922113
You're better off putting a couple of strong sticks in the pot and tying the stems to those sticks instead of tying them all together. If they can't find something to climb up against, they'll always bend back towards the ground.
>>
>>
>>3922164
Just the leaf. I'll let it sit there till it dies, good experience.

>>3922168
Ah yes, that's true, the climbing. I have a "moss"pole I'll redo it with.
>>
hmm today, I will commit minor ecological disaster
>>
>>3922203
Legit thought about bringing Spanish slugs back home from Europe this year but then thought is it really worth it?
>>
>>3922228
I love them cute little destructive fellas
is there any reason I’m particular you wanted to smuggle them?? or is it just for the Devilish factor, bc in that case, honestly based
>>
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Why is selling dyed plants legal?
>>
>>3922241
>or is it just for the Devilish factor
Yeah, I thought it would be funny because I read about how it's such a terrible pest that will eat everything if it came to America (basically just more fear mongering like what happened to snakehead and now the lanternflies)
>>
>>3922271
>fear mongering
What studies did you read to come up with that conclusion, if any?
>>
>>3922277
For the slugs or other things I mentioned?
>>
>>3922280
Snakeheads and lanternflies
>>
>>3922133
Do you even know what it is yet?
>>
>>3922261
Why shouldn't it be?
>>
>>3917673
>>3917700
dud...

https://archive.4plebs.org/_/search/text/thimbleberry/
>>
>>3922282
For snakeheads look up John Odenkirk, he's been tracking them for almost two decades and he basically says that they had a population boom but have since stabilized and become part of the ecosystem. There are also some anglers who are asking for limitations to be put on snakeheads because they aren't as common as they used to be.

Spotted lanternflies' main host plant is tree of heaven, which is another invasive weed from China. The only reason they are spreading so much is because there is so much of the tree of heaven to feed on. The problem comes from that large densities of them will need to resort to feeding on other trees, but there still hasn't been any reports of actual damage done by them.
>>
where 2 buy seeds online?
>>
>>3922588
alibaba
>>
>>3922588
What kind of seeds? If you're looking for more common seeds, just head to your local nursery. There's no point buying those online.

Check out Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds for some less common vegetables. Koehres is my go-to for difficult-to-find succulent seeds. Mesa Garden also has a decent selection of succulent seeds, and shipping is much faster than Koehres if you're based in the US.
>>
What are some chud meta plants?
>>
>>3922435
Because it kills the plants and/or the color wears off. It's a scam.
>>
>>3922794
What do you mean? If by Chud you mean /pol/ there's Niggerheads, rape, fagaceae and wandering Jews.
>>
>>3922822
It's also legal to sell "miracle cures" on TV and definitely fake "import goods"; I think the problem is stupid people keep buying them
>>
>>3922261
the problem for me is the labeling

your pic is a great example: there is no reference to the fact that these plants have been dyed, only a passing mention in tiny writing that new growth won't be that colour (and it is still worded in such a way as to deceive the buyer into thinking it will be a sparkly colour... just a different sparkly colour)

i have seen cacti like those pictured on that label with the dyed spines in the UK and there was absolutely no mention that they had been dyed or even that future growth would not have those colours, which is extremely deceitful at best, and i think it could be argued criminally fraudulent

if people are dumb enough to want to buy these sorts of things even after knowing what they are, then fine, whatever
but customers should be clearly informed of what exactly they are purchasing before they take one to the counter and hand their money over
it should be acknowledged on the sign in large text and in clear terms that the plants are artificially coloured and that new growth will not be that colour
>>
>>3922978
The thing I don't get is that they always paint living succulents in disgusting colours, but then they also sell plastic, life-like succulents with the 'real' colours. Why not just sell the real succulents without paint, and sell the fake succulents in rainbow colours?
>>
>>3923001
Look, that would involve people actually making good decisions, and we can't have that now, can we?
>>
>>3922822
I don't think you understand what a scam is.
>>
>>3922978
>i think it could be argued criminally fraudulent
Go to Trading Standards about it then.
Tell us the results.
>>
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Am I correct that this is the spores?
There's 15-20 branches full of it, left some on that had more room to coom.

My other leatherleaf fern has done none of it.
>>
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>>3923122
>coom
Actually, in ferns, the sexual reproduction takes place within a tiny plantlet (a gametophyte) that the spore produces after being shed.
>>
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what should I plant in the square? or at least how should I arrange it?
I believe a central shrub/small tree surrounded by smaller plants is usually how it's done?
>>
>>3923123
Oh, that's very interesting, thanks anon, I'm now smarter.
>>
>>3923131
You could have a single specimen tree, or a topiary arrangement, or just make a nice seating area.
It's up to you.
>>
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These are beautiful.
Shame the price has been driven up on them.
>>
>>3923138
What is that ground-cover plant?
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>>3923137
>specimen tree
any you'd recommend? japanese acers spring to mind due to part shade but not sure it would work well surrounded by smaller plants.
it's a small front garden so don't want to sit in it, but rather make my property prettier
>>
>>3923157
>any you'd recommend?
Plant something you like.
I don't even know what country you live in so can't really recommend anything at all.
>>
>>3923138
Personally I don't really see the appeal. Pink is a nice and special colour in plants, but the 'Pink Princess' is just a typical aroid with some pink in some of the leaves. There's so many other plants with pink colours, and those others are usually genetically stable and not volatile mutations.
>>
>>3923142
Not my pic, not too sure.

>>3923172
That's why, because it can revert so easily I guess.
>>
>>3923169
fair enough
>>
>>3923157
Legume trees are great as specimen trees, here in Europe we have some great ones like Cercis siliquastrum and Laburnum anagyroides, I'm sure north America has lots too
>>
Yo man, why hasn't my ficus clipping rooted even after 4 weeks?
Dafuq.
What do I do to make it root?
>>
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>ate a Skunkbush berry for the first time
>it tastes like Warheads candy with a slight wintergreen flavor

what the FUCK, why does nobody talk about this berry?

And is it just me, or do Rhus plants have different smells? I have a trilobata that smells fantastic. The one I ate from looked like the same species but the smell was much softer and more "green".
>>
>>3923666
Never even heard of it, sounds like the juice would be good in tea or cider though
>>
>>3923672
Native Americans and pioneers used it to make lemonade. It's the American version of Rhus Coriaria berries which are a popular middle eastern spice.
>>
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Anyone know what kind of bamboo this is? I think it might be bambusa multiplex but I'm not sure.
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>>3917663
Beautiful flowers that help the ecosystem.
>>
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>>3923744
Another pic
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>>3923484
I will check them out
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>>3923157
Check out acer sieboldiamum if you go with a maple. It’s similar to a Japanese maple. I’ve been super happy with one I planted.
Best advice is to take note of what other people have planted wheee you live, or research what does well at the local arboretum.
I’ve used the blog a ton when I was researching trees to plant.
http://rslandscapedesign.blogspot.com/?m=1
Funny enough after all the research, I ended up planting fairly standard species for the most part. Guess they are popular for a reason
>>
>>3924453
>Best advice is to take note of what other people have planted wheee you live, or research what does well at the local arboretum
Even better advice is to look at what grows in your local woodlands
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>>3924588
sorry bro, no room for a couple 150 foot tall Douglas fir and the understory trees look like shit grown in sun. What do now?
>>
>>3924598
Look at the plants that grow at the margins of the forest
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>>3924697
sorry bro only large sucking shrubs, thicket, colonizer trees like alder and shit tier cottonwood. Neighborhoods are just too weird of an environment to plop down native trees.
Perhaps if people cooperated and planted large trees that crossed property lines, without that you need to zoom in on the fractal. Or leave native trees when property is developed
>>
I know it's probably impossible to guess based off so little information but do you think avocados from the Dominican Republic (tropical avocados) come from a grafted tree like the basic avocados from Mexico or California or do you think they're not grafted?
>>
>>3924453
thanks for the blog, I'm currently reading it. might as well say I'm from the UK to clear any confusion
>people have planted where you live
looking around, most houses on my street have a shrub like buddleia or roses as a centrepiece.
I don't like the look of buddleia and already have a row of roses, so that's why I'm trying to get inspiration online
>>
>>3924878
most if not all store bought avocados are from grafts, avocados don't grow true to seed so there is a very minimal chance that a seed grown avocado tree will produce edible, commercially viable avocados.
so to answer your question, they're very likely from a grafted tree. They might be a different cultivar but they're grafted nonetheless
>>
Why did the pedophile start a baby cactus collection? He liked little pricks.
>>
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>>3925429
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oh no it's autumn already
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>>3917663
Plants Cleaning Air?

So I've been looking up which plants clean air the best and I start coming across some articles that says that plants don't actually clean air, that HVAC and Air Purifier does it better -- but I wonder, if these articles are funded by HVAC and Air Purifier manufacturers?

I do use an Air Purifiers, but I used plants for oxygen. It's so polluted where I am in the middle of the city I usually feel better with the windows CLOSED. When I go outside, I have ot travel some distance down to the ravine where the mass of plants are to feel better.

They say opening a window is better than plants, but that's because outside is usually where the plants are, unless you are in the middle of the city.
>>
>>3925467
plants cleaning air is a marketing ploy by the botanical industrial complex
while they technically do, you will most likely never fit enough plants in your room to have a measurable effect.
>>
>>3922074
Just try everything I guess, and document what you try, like putting it in fridge than taking it out, or soaking it in spit first.

Like, when I'm collecting cherry tomato and strawberry seeds, I don't bother using a mesh, I eat the fruit and spit the seed out onto soil, plants produce fruit because they want something to eat it, so maybe saliva helps - human salivia is might be a rooting hormone:
https://forum.grasscity.com/threads/human-saliva-as-a-rooting-hormone.1325032/

Don't actually put it in your mouth, just spit.
>>
>>3922074
have you looked at specific guides for the plant in question? otherwise, try looking for guides for similar plants within the genus
since you're working with a succulent / caudiciform it can be really difficult to grow if not under the right circumstances, and some can take more than a year to germinate.
>>
>>3925467
there was a bit about this on a QI episode recently. you would need 100-1000 plants per square metre to have any sort of purifying effect
>>
>>3925429
>>3925432
nice gentiana ;)
>>
Hello there! Sorry to ask such a dumb question, but what are the best stores for succulents / cacti?
>>
>>3925860
Depends on where you live. I can roll down to literally any nursery, home improvement, or even grocery store here and they'll always have a variety of them. I don't think that would be the case if I lived in North Bumfuck, Canada.

Ask around your local nurseries. They'll almost certainly know more about good stores in your area than random anons.
>>
>>3925860
If you're looking online, I'd say miles2go has decently prices, slightly uncommon succulents and cactuses.
>>
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Redpill me on sagebrush. Some sources say it grows edible fruit but the only pictures I can find are of galls caused by insects.

On a scale of 1 to 10, how cool is sagebrush? Can you eat it?
>>
>>3925428
Based
>>
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Had no idea aralias came in weedform.
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>>3926303
You've never seen a Fatsia? They are very common in the UK.
Super frost hardy despite their tropical appearance.
>>
>>3926309
Not too common in my area. I love this, much nicer leaves than the standard one.
>>
>>3926338
It's also grafted with Ivy (Hedera) to make the hybrid ×Fatshedera
>>
>>3926341
Very interesting. I hope it will stay alive long enough to propagate.
>>
>>3919638
>>
>>3926735
Nature's mistake
>>
I don't know if this gets asked all the time or not, but are there some recommended books that are particularly established or helpful to learn about gardening?
>>
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>>3926309
>FAT
>>
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>>3926973
RHS Encyclopedia of Gardening, and the Dr Hessayon 'Expert' series are both excellent resources.
Look for second-hand copies if you don't want to pay full price for the latest editions.
>>
>>3927195
Thank you friend
>>
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i was wondering if anyone has any suggestions for stuff to put under my led lamp.
i just grow junk under it for fun, so far mostly things i'm propagating from cuttings and some chillis from seed. nothing super interesting.

i got the succulent leaves in the front from one i bought at the garden center. it was literally sitting in a puddle and i figured it'd just rot if i didn't buy it. and it did shortly afterwards, but ejected these healthy leaves. they're taking root now.

anyway has anyone got any ideas for what could do well in this environment?
>>
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Why are gardens so relaxing bros?
I love them (:
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>>3927490
That's one of the best shrubs out there
>>
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>>3927499
You mean this white hydrangea specifically?! Or (white) hydrangeas in general?
>>
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Any ideas on how soon this morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor) will open up? First time growing it, would also appreciate tips on hand pollinating
>>
>>3927799
>hand pollinating
No, just don't.
>>
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I have questions about seeds. I have dried poppies in my house like picrel and they are at least 20 years old and have seeds in them. So if I try to grow them will they grow? Basically asking if they expire or not, google is giving me mixed answers.
>>
>>3927942
I'm sure they would, its worth a go anyway. As long as they've been kept dry, some out of the thousands will still be viable I'm sure. People have grown seeds that are thousands of years old, 20 is not too long
>>
>>3927944
>>3927942
NTA but how even does that shit work? Fruit goes bad within a month yet seeds last millennia, and it doesn't decompose or fall apart or whatever? Other organic material from ages ago (mummies, old clothing, etc.) is pretty much dust these days. It's ridiculous. Baffles me.
>>
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>>3927952
Fruit is generally designed for transport via physical or biological means. The seed itself will have to be able to withstand the elements for potentially months, or the inside of a stomach, or both! (the tropics, possibly due to their lack of winter, have a higher proportion of plants that produce recalcitrant seeds, meaning they cannot be preserved via cold storage/seed banking and so require living collections for ex situ conservation)

Seeds are generally made in a way where they are in a way "locked" until something comes along to "activiate" the germination process, water most importantly. So their metabolism is almost frozen in waiting until that point.
>>
>>3927957
So you mean if humanity manages to nuke itself into an eternal winter, millennia down the line, some alien assholes could come by and warm up some plants and they'd live again? That shit's bananas.
>>
Hey someone help our a shitty ass garden newbie.
I'm zone 5A, I want to turn my garden game around as for the past few years I've been focusing on a few tomatoes, cucumbers that sprawl out of control, the occasional pepper plant and beans.

I'm looking to try something a little more reserved next spring, I was thinking a focus on herbs and other useful plants.
I've heard somewhere that herbs are pretty finicky to grow, any advice to make this a thing and any suggestions?

Soil is dense but we got a lot of worms hanging around here. Haven't done a soil test in some time but I know the nitrogen is good as I make a point to till a lot of leaves under every autumn.
>>
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>>3927983
idk what would happen when you get radiation involved, but it's possible. You have to be conscious of the fact that radiation is more on a geological (read: very long) timeframe than a biological (read: somewhat shorter) one, so it may just be that only a couple of seeds from a couple of species end up out-living the radiation.
>>
Can a normal plant develop both normal soil roots and waterroots at the same time?
Like if you were to keep a section at the bottom of the pot walled off but a few holes for roota to get through.
Would this work? Giving the plant a constant source of water while also the benefit of soil.
>>
>>3928090
Technically, yes, but you'd have to completely separate the water and the soil. If you leave a few holes for the roots to get through, the water will also get through and the soil will rot.
>>
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>>3928090
There's no harm in trying, but I would worry about where the active, nutrient absorbing parts of the roots are. They're normally closer to the tips of the roots, right? So maybe if you encourage the roots to grow into a pool of water, there might not be as much/any more growth in the soil.
Given that that's my only worry, if I were you I'd just try it and see if it works. Plants are pretty resilient overall.

Also what >>3928092 said; it might be best to slip your potted plant's pot (with drainage holes) into a slightly smaller pot with some water in it, and let the roots grow out of the pot and into the pool underneath.
>>
>>3928092
>>3928093
Oh the whole multiple pots sounds like a better idea. I was going to try something like a small plastic sphere in the pot with a tube poking up for refill.
This will be fun.
>>
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>>3928101
godspeed, anon
>>
>>3927846
I'm growing these inside, so I have to if I want seeds. :(

They opened today so I tried using a q-tip and a paint brush, couldn't see pollen attaching to either so not sure what I'm doing will work.
>>
>>3927452
Get an actual grow light that doesn't cast hard shadows like in your pic, line the walls with foil, and the sky's the limit. Your only real limiting factor is plant size, humidity, and night/day temps. I would suggest trying out hydroponics and maybe growing some small crops like berries or tomatoes.
>>
>>3928443
*soft shadows
>>
is there a tell tale sign that something is being underwatered vs overwatered?

I realize it probably varies by plant but all of mine are "water when the first inch is dry". I do the finger test, I use a hygrometer, but it seems like some of my philodendrons aren't doing great. new leaves start blackening/browning before they unravel. tips of some are curled downward.
>>
>>3928572
>>
>>3917663
Can I get red pilled on spite landscaping?
>>
>>3928648
I don't even know what that is.
>>
>>3928648
grow morning glories next to your neighbors yard so they spread into it
>>
>>3923001
yeah, this has always been a baffling element about it for me too
>>
>>3921741
what plants do you have that need watering more than once per week? unless you are growing bog plants (e.g. most carnivorous plants) they should be fine after a week with no water unless it is constantly extremely hot where you live

probably your cactus died because of you watering it too much and the timing of the plantsitting was just coincidental
>>
>>3927996
>I've heard somewhere that herbs are pretty finicky to grow, any advice to make this a thing and any suggestions?
they're not, they've been bred to be fast and easy growers. Only one suggestion is don't put mint in the ground, you'll regret it. Otherwise just look at pictures of herb gardens, start small and experiment
>>
>>3928572
easiest way to test for water is feel the weight of the pot. And most plants tend to start dying at the tips of the leaves when it's overwatering, and their limpness has more of a sick kind of limp rather than a dry limp, if you can understand my meaning. It's hard to tell
>>
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ID on this? I only know it's a (primitive) cactus fruit, but I've got no pictures of the trunk (very spiny).
Inside seems to be some brown sludge, although I got these off the ground so they might just have been bad.
>>
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Anyone know what's wrong with my eureka lemon tree? Bought it and another citrus tree a few months ago and I've been keeping them watered but the leaves on the lemon are turning yellow and falling off if you even touch them slightly, pic related. The other citrus tree is fine.
>>
Do anyone have experience with black spots on trichocereus, does it go away or stay? I thought it was due to physical damage while it was coming with mail but it seems to be spreading :( idk what to do

>>3929518
wow this looks cool, I only knew fruits of Opuntia and Hylocereus. hope someone knows
>>
>>3928572
Not sure about other philodendrons but my heartleaf is extremely forgiving and literally tells me when it's thirsty. I dump water on it till it comes out the drainage holes, then around 2-3 weeks later the leaves start looking gaunt and lose their shine. Once it gets water again they "plump up" and get a nice green sheen again.
>>
>>3929518
some sort of pereskia ?
>>
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>>3929569 #
Every cactus makes fruits. Picture related, a fruiting Niggerhead.
>>
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>>3929518
I have no idea. Where did you find the cactus?
>>
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>>3929569
Pics of the trichocereus? It could be overwatering.
>>
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>>3929870
damn
>>3929881
its just on the top parts, I am watering it weekly and stop when water dripping through the drainage holes, 9b according to plant hardiness zone map, in a balcony taking sun for 10 hours or so.
>>
>>3929872
what is this anemone?
>>
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>>3919911
like seriously what the fuck is this
>>
>>3925467
air purifiers are shit too because they produce ozone and can end up doing just as much harm as good

your best bet for better air quality is just to move
>>
>>3919986
>>Whales don't have hair
they actually do
just not all over their bodies
>>
>>3930094
>are these even in cultivation
Yeah, but they're fairly expensive. Seeds are $10 bucks a pop, and the few year old seedlings are 10x that price
>>
to what extent is it possible to make your own little cactus abominations via cross pollination between different types?

is there any guide to which cacti can be crossed with which?
>>
>>3930100
It's probably very doable, but takes a literal lifetime to make your own cultivars
>>
>>3930170
>but takes a literal lifetime to make your own cultivars
can you expand on this
>>
>>3930094
>>3930099
I got some seeds years ago (5 for €8 or so) back when I had no idea what I was doing. They were all attacked by mould before they could germinate. I haven't been able to find any new seeds in recent years, but according to Bihrmann they're actually really easy to grow if you can get hold of them:
http://bihrmann.dk/Caudiciforms/subs/wel-mir-sub.asp
>>
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Is my mystery "miniature christmas tree" cupressaceae dying? :( Inside needles are turning brown.

Also what sort of cupressaceae is it? I got it from Lidl last Christmas.
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>>3929528
my guess is the soil pH is too high, causing various nutrient deficiencies
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>>3930353
not dying, just looks like shit. I think it's a really mistreated araucaria
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>>3930229
Most cacti grow very slowly, although there are exceptions. Myrtillocactus geometrizans takes about two years before it flowers which is pretty short.
>>
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>>3929892
Reddit says it's probably fine.
>>
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>>3930365
How do I un-mistreat it? ;-;
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>>3930365
Also it does looks like araucaria. Why would Lidl lie on their label like this ;-; It said cupressaceae on the label under mini Christmas tree.
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>>3930229
>>3930370
You could always speed up cactus growth by grafting onto certain rootstocks like Pereskiopsis, then degrafting and rerooting once you're happy with the size. This can get you a mature-sized, flowering, offset-producing cactus in a couple months vs. several years if you grow on your own roots.
>>
>>3930388
>trusting the accuracy of a lidl plant label
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>>3930388
Actually not sure if it's araucaria, the layers are not regular at all. I don't know if that come with the mistreatment...

Should I bring it inside if it's not cypress? It's been out only a few months.
>>
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>>3930410
What should I do? Internet says araucaria stays inside but cypress can stay out.

I don't really wanna bring it in because of all the gnats (reason why I took it out in the first place)
>>
>>3930353
>>3930414
>>3930418
It's just some dwarf spruce. They don't grow well long term in containers no matter what you do.
>>
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>>3930423
Should I set it free on the land? If it's dwarf it should damage foundations right?
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>>3930429
no, it won't damage your foundations and it would look quite nice up against the brick. Plant early spring flowers in front of it like a fothergilla for a fantastic spring effect
>>
>avatar or signature use
>>
New

>>3930437

>>3930437

>>3930437
>>
>>3930410
>trusting the accuracy of any plant label



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