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For discussion of dinosaurs and paleontology in general

Suchomimus edition

Previous: >>3757488
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>>3782230
My favorite spinosaurid was always Baryonyx
>>
>>3782230
The thing I’ve always wondered on - that’s a big tail.
Balance, maybe, but no modern evolution has driven such a big tail/body ratio... Except crocodilians.

Hypothetical I’m left wondering on, is was vegetation so dense that a tail could infallibly drive off it like a crocodile in water?
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>>3782240
Patrician taste anon.
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>>3782240
Mine is irritator
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>>3782271
>not loving Icthyovenator
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I want to eat dinosaur eggs
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>>3782275
concavenator's missing puzzle piece
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>>3782291
and I want to cuddle with a pack of raptors
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>>3782390
raptor pussy
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paleo discord users?
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>>3782481
No, fuck off. This is a 4chan thread for discussion of things on 4chan, not a marketing space for direction to discord larping, grooming, and sexual propositions from unfuckable freaks.
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>>3782489
>not a marketing space for direction to discord larping, grooming, and sexual propositions from unfuckable freaks.
So 4chan
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>>3782481
Which one anon?
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>>3782553
I've seen various paintings where Sauropods were given neck flaps, what is the proposed function of this?
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>>3782553
I love how "1900s" that one feels.
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How feathered do you like your dinosaurs to be?
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>>3782632
depends on the animal
if its something like an oviraptor I want it to be as birdy as possible
if we're talking shit like triceratops fuck off
also I don't want to see non-feathered versions of animals we know to be feathered or feathered versions of animals known to be scaly
>>
>>3782249
Theropod tails also played a big role in movement. Muscle attachments from the tail to the back of the leg that pulled the leg back seem to have been incredibly important and the rhythm of tail swings may have also effected the most comfortable walking speed for a given animal.
>>
>>3782548
Link to any
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>>3782745
seconding this
>>
dinosaurs are for _____
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>>3782810
dieing
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Crylophosaurus
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>>3782632
Little ones fluffy, huge adult ones naked.
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which dinosaur was the smartest
>>
Are dinosaurs even real?
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>>3783469
As real as COVID.
>>
>>3782230
If Dinosaurs we're hit with the meteor, would they be more advanced than we are today? Would we even be able to evolve from primates into homo-sapians? Would Dinos be potentially an intergalactic society?
>>
>>3783488
weren't hit with***
>>
>>
>>3782813
Dude
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>>3782810
Mating displays.
>>
>>3783747
What are the chances sauroniops is a valid taxon
>>
>>3783813
The same as Nanotyrannus
>>
This is me >>3783488 no one wants to answer this question? I've thought about this one a few times and wondered if the dinos wouldn't have been rekt by the meteor 65 billion years ago or however long then they would have maybe evolved to have abstract thought and invented technology and eventually go to the stars and wouldn't have let mammals evolve to where they are so there would most likely not be any humans around. What does everyone here think about this scenario?
>>
>>3783924
Dinosaurs didn't gain intelligence and technology for over a hundred million years.
Mammals got it after 66 million.
It's far easier to get bigger or stronger rather than get something as abstract as intelligence. Human civilization and agriculture are technically less efficient than hunting and gathering but just sorta happened to work out for us. Mammals were just in a very unique evolutionary situation having been essentially underground for over a hundred million years and then one day suddenly half free reign of the world, and the adaptations that had leftover from hiding from dinosaurs happened to incline then towards intelligence. Dinosaurs only really seemed to get fairly smart long after most of them went extinct
So no I don't think human level dinosaurs would ever have existed, and even if they did without an extinction event that never would create technology and civilization, since even us doing so was because the megafauna went extinct and we wouldn't survive otherwise.
>>
>>3784118
Cool, thank you for the answer. I've sometimes wondered about this question before.
What about dolphins then? If left to their devices for a few million years you think they would create another civilization as well?
>>
>>3784152
Dolphins have no hands to make tools or civilization with, and no need to since there's plenty of food for them right now.
Civilization is not very efficient and we mostly think it is because it lets a tiny minority of us sit on our ass all day and do nothing. It's not something any animal is going to create unless they have to.
>>
>>3783924
I dinosaurs didn't go extinct 66 million years ago they would still be around today and still look/behave mostly the same, because why wouldn't they?
>>
>>3783924
Well considering dinosaurs were and still are a very successful group of animals, and that the modern day representatives of the dinosaurs - the birds - derive from the most advanced and intelligent set of dinosaurs, we can safely say that there is definitely a lot of potential, insofar as crows and parrots are your level of sophistication. It took over 200 million years to go from a lizard slightly more intelligent than a virtually brain-dead proto-crocodilian to a raven that can figure out concepts like water displacement and threaded jar caps - with human intervation.

>>3784152
Dolphins and whales, despite their vast intelligence, do not live in a medium conducive to the development of civilization. Theirs is a world where things like the wheel and fire and writing are not only impossible to create (even if they had sufficiently tactile limbs) but have no practical use.
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>>3784156
>>3784199
>>3784237
Really great answers, thank you anons.
So why did humans evolve the way we have? What about neanderthals? Monkes? Why don't sub-saharan africans have any neanderthal DNA? Does this affect their way of thinking/behavior?
>>
>>3784265
>So why did humans evolve the way we have?
God gave the original ancestral hominid Adam and Eve souls :^)
>What about neanderthals? Monkes?
no souls
>Why don't sub-saharan africans have any neanderthal DNA?
subsarahan africa was 2warm for ice age neanderthals
>Does this affect their way of thinking/behavior?
Just look at the world around you now and take it to /pol/ lmao
>>
>>3784279
Terrible answers. I was hoping to not get meme'd on this board but here we are. I know about blacks but want to know what someone who is educated in this field says about that topic. I know this is not dinosaurs anymore, but I got on a tangent and am curious about what answers this board has to offer.
>>
>>3784265
We didn't evolve to be technologically advanced we've been around for a loooong time and only resorted to agriculture and settlements recently since our natural food sources went extinct and maintaining big brain requires a lot of food. Neanderthals were just another species of human that were bigger and better than us but that meant they also needed to eat more to survive and when being big and strong didn't matter as much natural selection favored the the most cost efficient homo sapiens.
DNA differences would be the result of neanderthal and human habitats only overlapping in certain areas so interbreeding didn't occur where they didn't meet.
>>
>>3784282
>terrible answers
to terrible questions
>>
>>3784295
Interesting, thank you for the long answer.

>>3784390
I disagree. There some anons here are much more educated about these things than me plus it's interesting.
>>
>>3782810
https://e621.net/posts/2637008
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>>3782275
>>3782415
>>3782537
>>3782542
>>3782543
>>3782552
>>3782561
Didn't most of these have Feathers?
>>
Titanosaur
>>
So i'm reading Crichtons Jurassic Park. How much of it is bullshit?
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Nigersaurus
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>>3785034
Maybe early rexxes and the polar rex Nanuqsaurus
>>
Tyrannosaurus probably didn't have any and most other big dinosaurs too, except for yutyrannus, which is an exception
>>
>>3784118
I wouldn't necessarily say the most intelligent dinosaurs/birds survived the k-t extinction... birds themselves suffered enormously and those that survived were only lucky, probably not as intelligent as raptors, troodontids and other archaic birds... I think given long enough limited abstract intelligence could arise, similer to the form of african hornbill https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/dinosauroids-revisited-revisited/
>>
>>3785034
The Chinese ones definitely did, but all the skin impressions we've found from North American tyrannosaurs have shown scales and no signs of feathers. We assumed they'd be feathered because the ancestral condition is feathered (North American tyrannosaurs are Chinese immigrants). It's possible they were feathered in all the areas we just so happen to not have skin impressions in but I think the current thinking is to restore north american tyrannosaurs with scaley skin, and that is possible the colder climate in China or something was the reason for the difference.
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>>3785415
>tfw you wanna make some sweet sweet paleoart but all you have left is yellow paint
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>>3782632
Whatever reflects reality, so far as we know. I don’t care for paleoartist fashion.
>>
Largest Acrocanthosaurus (Fran) vs Composite Saurophaganx
There were probably larger Saurophaganx or Allosaurid specimens than than what was used in this comparison but they're even more fragmentary.
>>
Largest Acrocanthosaurus (Fran) vs Subadult? Suchomimus (immature holotype)
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Subadult? Suchomimus (immature holotype) vs Composite Saurophaganx
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>>3785516
Curious as to what caused the extinction of Carnosaurs in North America since that seemed to be doing fine in the Jurassic and early Cretaceous but then got completely replaced by the small Chinese immigrant tyrannosaurs.
>>
>>3785596
Something to do with the Cenomanian Turonian event, but there's apparently a Santonian carcharodontosaurid from Nunavut
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>>3785060
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>>3785407
Voring baby sauropods seems like an abelisaur thing
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>>3785046
It's from the early 90s, so even the good science is outdated. Just enjoy the whole thing as fiction.
>>
>>3785756
>voring
>>
>>3785509
Some people think saurophaganax was a carcharodontosaurid
>>
>>3782632
bald/scaley during the warmer seasons
decently feathered during the colder seasons
>>
Why are dinos always depicted as being green
>>
>>3786237
Green is not a creative color
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>>3786086
some people are fucking idiots

>>3786237
because green is a very common color to reptiles and makes sense in a lush jungle environment
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>>3786239
Lol
>>
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I've come to the conclusion that out of all of the crazy prehistoric animals we have discovered, Quetzalcoatlus was the craziest. A 40 foot wingspan and as tall as a giraffe, this is peak wacko evolution. Nothing will ever top this animal
>>
I mean come on
>>
>>3786268
the most unbelievable thing about this is that the whole thing is supposed to weigh like only 100 pounds, I call bullshit
>>
>>3786297
it weighed between 450-550 pounds
>>
>>3782537
He's just asking to get snatched up by like deinosuchus or something
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>>3782813
>eats a Heart
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>>3785412
What's this guy's Game Plan?
>>
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>>3785509
>>
New saurophaganax skeletal by randomdinos
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>>3784199
The earth today is much colder and dryer then it was back then. I doubt dinos could still be of comparable size
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>>3787164
Fitting he made it after his torvosaurus skeletal
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>>
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>>3786268
I feel like this Guy got really famous with Dinosaur Nerds only recently in the past Decade, and I never could tell if if was the same Pterosaur as Pic related in Walking With Dinosaurs, who is this big huge guy, and cant get laid, and eventually dies, being eaten by Raptors.
>>
>>3784265
>stealth IQ/ethnicity post
Based.
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>>3787200
me on the left
>>
my ancestor :)
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>>3787423
post IQ
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>>3787401
1 meter?
>>
Why did T-Rexes have tiny arms?
>>
>>3787380
No, that's Ornithocheirus, who was billed as an airplane sized pterosaur because WWD was fucking sensationalist insanity (muh blue whale sized liopleurodon), when in reality it was a pretty average pterodactyloid about the size of an albatross.
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>>3787653
Basically the musculature needed for the head and bite force need more space and to give them more space you need to make your arms smaller. Though Tyrannosaurus arms were still muscular and useful to it in some way.
Abelisaurs like Carnotaurus have tiny arms because they weren't using them and they would be a waste of energy to grow and maintain. So they essentially were reduced to weird hand stumps and probably would have disappeared completely with enough time.
>>
>>3787823
I swear every dinosaur book in the 80's and 90's had that exact same styracosaurus
>>
>>3784279
>Just look at the world around you now and take it to /pol/ lmao
>leftard is an anti-science biblethumping christcuck
Socked!

>Just look at the world around
Well I did, and did not even meed /pol/ about it, just google and eyes.
>>
>>3785524
>subadult
ALL spinosaurids are described as "subadults", maybe it's time to simply accept paedomorphism in the family that might be corralted to their aquatic habitats and huge sizes.

>>3785509
Teeth fossils indicate that Veterupristisaurus, a possible sister taxon to Acrocanthosaurus, reached nearly Acrocanthosaurus size. If that's the case, that most likely is, that would make it the largest Jurassic theropod by a considerable margin of volume.
>>
>>
>>3785596
>>3785676
Am I the only thinking that where we currently dividing Late from Early Cretaceous is retarded?
Don't know much about statigraphic invertebrates but dinosaurs and general herpetofauna were largely morphologically and ecologically identical plus we have the Cenomanian-Turonian extinction event as a potentially more distinct boundary between epochs.
>>
>>3788158
>but dinosaurs and general herpetofauna were largely morphologically and ecologically identical
Between Aptian and Cenomanian I meant.
>>
>>3788158
The cretaceous is longer than the entire cenozoic despite being a lower rank of temporal classification, it's entire arbitrary.
>>
>>3787802
>when in reality it was a pretty average pterodactyloid about the size of an albatross
Actually, no. Though its original size was grossly overestimated at a wingspan of over 10 meters, it was a rather large pterosaur with a wingspan of certainly above 4,5, possibly up to around 6.5 meters. The closely related Tropidognathus was the largest pterosaur with teeth and it was comparable to larger specimens of Pteranodon.
>>
>>3788161
>it's entire arbitrary.
It certainly is as it is now. There's nothing "arbitrary" about a fuckhuge meteor impact and suped calderas wiping 99% of life off the planet as was the case with the Permian. End of epochs should be signified by significant geological or ecological events and the Cenomanian-Turonian extinction is by far the closest to something like that we have, as a matter of fact it's even more apparent than the Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary.
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>tfw I have been searching for dinosaur books I owned as a teeny toddler in the early 1990s for years and still haven't found any hint of their existence no matter what keywords I use
>I have browsed the entire LITC archives and still nothing
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>>3788190
I remember reading dougal dixon's books good times
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>>3788139
yikes.
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>>3788153
>>
>>
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>>3785750
hehe
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>>3788245
>>
>>3788302
How do we know which middle tail vertebra is which?
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>>3788309
flowering plants weren't even around during t rex
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>>3788420
;)
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>>3788427
based retard
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>>3788302
I always wondered how did they infer so much based on so little remains, they mostly identify their closest relative and work from there huh?
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Im gonna unspino your saurus fucker
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>>3788626
isn't that synonymous with spinosaurus
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>>3786767
I can't believe the raptor fulfilled the nerevarine prophecy.
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>>3783813
What are the chances taurovenator is just mapusaurus
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>>3789264
it literally is
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>>3788139
all an IQ test tells you is how good a person is at completing IQ tests
>>
>>3789360
Unless its biased by making a lot of iq test, it actually meassures pattern recognition, spatial and abstract awareness which are correlated with intelligence. Yeah its not necessarily a 1:1 correlation or even a certainty that someone can be successful in life. Its just an index, people should just stop masturbating around that index and also denying its usefulness, binary mentality for stuff that is analogous as fuck is a bad criteria.
>>
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sanic dinosaurs
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>>3789448
>>3789444
You forgot the part with the triceratops
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>>3782390
Imagine the smell
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>>3784118
>Dinosaurs didn't gain intelligence and technology for over a hundred million years.
>Mammals got it after 66 million.
This is very wrong.
Mammals have been around as long as dinosaurs.
>>
>>
>>
From top to bottom, dorsal view of Ceratosaurus nasicornis. Carnotaurus sastrei. Yangchuanosaurus shangyouensis. Allosaurus fragilis. and Albertosaurus libratus. by GSP
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>>3789624
it's beautiful
>>
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>>3789449
>>
>>3790496
https://youtu.be/FrjAdwATkFE
>>
midge sauropod
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>>3791161
They were all killed by invasive allosaurs with their native megalosaur predators rip
https://eartharchives.org/articles/dwarf-dinosaurs-died-out-amid-blitzkrieg-of-carnivores/index.html
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>>3785380
>North American tyrannosaurs are Chinese immigrants
Just like the earliest North American hominids!
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>>3791161
>bodybuilder has thicker legs than sauropod
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>>3782577
Heat regulation convergent with modern african elephants
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>>3782547
Wait a minute, that card...
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>>3790496
For me? It's Diddy Kong Racing.
Can't get this music out of my head
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YB0tc2ldYiw
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>>3791425
Soul
>>
>>3782230
i bet i can kill that with my bare hands
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>>3790496
https://youtu.be/jFyYNqWdoJY?t=626
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>>3782481
You know what, an /an/ dinosaur server doesn’t sound like the worst of ideas
>>
>>3791678
u fuckin wot
>>
>>3789787
True, but what I meant was during the time of bring the dominant terrestrial organisms. Mammals didn't change that much on the surface level during the dinosaur reign but it's not crazy to think that their brains developed to help them avoid dinosaurs and survive during this long period. The end result being that when they did get the chance to diversify, the average intelligence was significantly higher than it was for the dinosaurs, and since it was essentially a brand new world there was room for stuff like tool use to develop whereas back in the Mesozoic making the sacrifices necessary for tool use would get you eaten somewhere along the way.
>>
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>>3782230
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>>3792105
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>>3792105
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>>3783813
high, the guy who named it has a blog and he goes over the differences from carcharodontosaurus.
>>
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>>3785676
>but there's apparently a Santonian carcharodontosaurid from Nunavut

What now?
>>
>>3785676
Looked into it, the only reference to it is a supposed magazine article by Phil Currie in 2013 and google summarising of a list of his papers that erroneously mixed the Lajasvenator description paper and a hadrosaur leg bone from nunavut
>>
>>3792231
>>3792246
Now that I look back on it, that's rather dubious since the only mention of it came from Currie in a magazine years back. I caught wind of it from other sites.
>>
>>3792252
So im not the only one who thinks Labocania is a carcharodontosaurid?

[spoiler]Are you the deviantart guy who had the balls to go onto the DML and actually as Holt about it?[/spoiler]
>>
>>3792262
>So im not the only one who thinks Labocania is a carcharodontosaurid?
I don't hold any concrete stance on that matter but carcharodontosaurid seems more likely than other options.
>So im not the only one who thinks Labocania is a carcharodontosaurid?
No.
>>
>>3782481
post a god damn link, faggot.
>>
>>3791730
God, what a shitty Turok game.
>>
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>>3792105
I want a big, soft, warm dino to cuddle my anxieties away with. who else?
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>>3782632
Birds have feathers. Some theropods had feathers. Yutyrannus et al had fur analogues.

Stop using words dumbly.





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