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File: Carpobrotus_edulis_03.jpg (3.21 MB, 3216x4288)
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Welcome to /plant/, the happy green place on this blue board, where growers, gardeners and horticulturists share their love for things that grow.
Newbies and amateurs are very welcome, and we’ll always try to answer your questions.

>Flora of the World
http://www.worldfloraonline.org/

>Hardiness zones
https://www.plantmaps.com/

>Plant ID Sites
https://identify.plantnet.org/
https://wildflowersearch.org/

>Pests and Diseases
https://www.rhs.org.uk/science/plant-health-in-gardens
https://www.growveg.com/plant-diseases/us-and-canada/
https://homyden.com/garden-pests-diseases-directory/

>Thousands of Botanical Illustrations
http://www.plantillustrations.org/

>Succulents
https://worldofsucculents.com/
https://www.succulentguide.com/

>Carnivorous plants
https://botany.org/Carnivorous_Plants/
https://carnivorousplants.org/grow/guides

>Alpine plants
https://www.alpinegardensociety.net/plants/

>Ponds
https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/actions/how-build-pond
https://aquaplant.tamu.edu/plant-identification/alphabetical-index/

>Previous Thread
>>3763613
>>
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Bee lucky.
>>
>>3777316
Look at that buzzy boy
>>
Holy crackers, the phototropic effect on my opuntia is absolutely insane. Even though it's just a single potted pad, the whole damn thing leans greatly towards the window where the sun's hitting all in the span of a few hours. And when I turn it around to let the other side get hit, by the time the sun goes down, it's back to vertical again.

Absolutely insane, I'm in awe at the speed of it.
>>
>>3777481
You should look up Codariocalyx motorius if you want to see the botanical definition of fast. Unfortunately, although I've found them easy to germinate, they're hard to keep alive indoors for longer than a couple of months.
>>
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>>3777314
Got a crested japanese cedar a few days ago
>>
Thoughts on germinating lemon and lime seeds from store bought fruit and trying to grow trees from them?
>t. retard who just recently started to own any plants
>>
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>he isn't growing phyteumas yet.

what is your excuse, anon?
>>
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very dense edelweiss
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nice
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nice too
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daphne
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in the rock
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alpine dwarf willow
>>
>>3777571
I only grow southern hemisphere plants.
Purple is the second best flower colour, after blue.
>>
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>>3777601
just be so purple that it looks blue.
>>
>>3777491
Looked it up and ended up watching time lapse videos. Love this shit. I love plants so much. They have no concept of time at all, they just chill and grow for as long as they can, with nothing but time ahead of them. Slow and deliberate, just like the ents.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ai_armsOe1U
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhE_WAVZhvI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNr_cttSf4U
>>
>>3777549
It's going to take a VERY long time to grow a tree from them (if they even germinate at all), and even if you do, it's almost guaranteed the resulting child will be completely different from the parent tree it came from and yield subpar fruits. It's an exercise in futility unless you got time, energy and resources.
>>
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I bought an "easter cactus" at a store and the internet said it needed to be sprayed with water "Frequently" but i'm not sure how frequent frequent is. I did it every day for a couple of days but the flower wilted and theres little weird brown tips at the end of the cactus leaves now, and unsurprisingly lots of little calcium stains on it. Please educate me on making this plant thrive? thanks in advance
>>
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>>3777717
The water is hard and that's why you have those white spots on your cactus. The flower only lasts for a little while and then it falls off, and there could be a number of reasons why the edges of your cactus are turning brown.
Don't mist the cactus unless you want to raise the humidity, Easter cactus aren't tillandsias, water the pot where the cactus is sitting in. Trim the flowers if they get too brown, and filter your water if you have really hard water.
>>
>>3777717
Forget about spraying any plant, it's one of those gardening tips from when animals still spoke, but it's completely pointless and only ends up causing ugly stains. Did you actually water the plant, though? The soil looks pretty dry. It's normal for the flower to die off, cactus flowers don't really last that long in general (some only a couple of hours). Give it lots of light and it'll start growing new segments soon.
>>
>>3777717
>the internet said it needed to be sprayed with water "Frequently"
Awful advice for any succulent.
>>
>>3777771
>>3777773
oh i see. no spraying them, understood. I havent watered it yet, no, but the water IS pretty dry so i'll give it some water now
>>
>>3777775
Honestly, you wouldn't believe how many customers tell me they only mist their cacti and other succulents every so often and have never watered them at all. If it works for them, it works, I suppose, but holy hell do people love overcomplicating things. There also seems to be this weird superstition that you should water plants from the bottom (i.e. put their pots in water) otherwise they'll die. About 1 in 2 customers will ask if they should water from the top or from the bottom. How do they think rain works?
>>
>>3777775
>>3777815
not that anon but i just water it every day with a watering can, is that bad?
>>
>>3777821
Well how does your plant look?
>>
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>>3777823
>>
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the leaves on the sunflowers(top) and corn(bottom) are turning yellow a bit, is it time i separate them into more space?
>>
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anyone know what kind of grass this is? the whole plant was in this shade of purple.
>>
>>3777821
Watering on a schedule is bad, yes.
Water when the soil has dried out.
>>
Most of my seedlings just finished germinating now. Am I too late? Am I gonna make it?
>>
>>3778024
It's too late, Anon. All the world is ending tomorrow. Your seedlings have no chance anymore. It's better to spare them and just eat them now.
>>
>>>/out/hgm
>>
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>>3778199
>>
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Post yfw you realize your favorite plant will never grow as easily and effortlessly as that weed growing in between a crack in the sidewalk.
>>
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>>3778398
it will once you get the conditions right for it in your garden.
>>
>>3778206
Kek.
>>
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>>3778398
>mowed the lawn 2 days ago
>the dandelions are back
>>
Can a branch off a tree grow roots if kept in water like regular plants do?
>>
>>3778741
Depends what tree it is.
>>
>>3778764
Realized I could google.
In my case I have a maple, seems it will work. Should invest some dedication into it.
>>
>>3778788
For old wood maple try air layering, it's a common technique used in bonsai.
>>
>>3778398
I unironically have no idea how tf non weeds grow in nature. I have so many seeding plants I'd like to spread wild and none do, my whole neighborhood should be riddled with native everlasting daisy and native grasses with the amount of seed that's taken from the wind.
>>
>>3778834
Wow, what a technique, fast results.
The thing with bonsai that I can't quite understand is how the tree produces new branches when an old one has been cut off.
Or the entire main stem for example, the tree can survive purely on the water/nutrients from the roots and skip whatever it gets from the leaves?
>>
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nae nae
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seedz
>>
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haberlea
>>
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stalks
>>
>>3778847
It's about ecosystems. The most beautiful and delicate plants require the most specific environments, environments that are stabilized by all the other plants growing around it. If those plants aren't right, then the environment isn't right.
>>
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/plant/ buddies I request a favour. my dad got one of our neighbours who's a builder to render the house for cheap and didn't request coloured render so now it looks dull and grey - but the render itself is good quality.
I'm convinced instead of painting it white, it is both cheaper and aesthetically pleasing to grow a climber along the wall (area outlined in red). I am considering confederate jasmine and/or clematis nelly moser as it faces northeast and gets 5 hours morning to afternoon sun in peak summer.
is it a good idea or will it look out of place in a row of terrace houses?
also for the 'porch' area (B, C and D) how can I cover up and improve it? right now we've got hanging baskets but imo those are useless and something on a teepee trellis thing for C is better, such as scented clematis. and something to grow on the left wall B but that gets no direct sun at all. perhaps a form of artwork would be better?
although I'm unsure what plant could grow along the top of the door (D) since again that gets barely any sun.
UK climate so pretty much mild all year round
btw those little pots had busy lizzies and begonias growing in them last summer
>inb4 "the absolute STATE"
this house was built in the 1930s
>>
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here's the biggest mushrooms that's grown in here, most of them are half it's size

can someone ID this?

i took it out and the stem felt hollow
>>
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What is this plant? I live in Dallas and we're getting rain lately
>>
>>3779189
Looks like an Asteraceae
>>
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Who likes my Red Finger Lime? I named it Bunji.
>>
>>3779059
I don't think those vibes you mentioned would grow long enough to cover. How about dutchman's pipe? If you're willing to wait a few years, a climbing hydrangea would also work, especially for the shadier area you mentioned
>>
>>3778847
Hard for seeds to spread when all the surrounding land is smothered by lawn grass that gets sprayed and mown every other day.
I've been ignoring some parts of my land for three years and now they're home for saplings of trees I didn't even know existed around here.
>>
God I really fucking hate normies especially women who are into this hobby
Frustrates me to see the way women view plant collecting but also how much they're willing to pay, it's completely ridiculous and you'd think an increased market would make the prices go down as the scale increases...
>>
>>3779476
...what?
>>
>>3779189
Wait for it to bloom but I think it's a shasta daisy
>>
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How do you feel about the art of flower arrangement?
>>
Boy, what I would give to grow my own coconut palm if I lived in zones 9+. Fucking love coconuts.
>>
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My succulent started flowering recently, I wanted to share
>>
>>3779059
This >>3779417 or some kind of Wisteria would also look great.
>>
Hey guys, anyone know if this gray substance on the surface of my seed starter mix is some sort of mineral deposit or mold? I was assuming the former but I’m starting to become suspicious. Not sure if I’m retarded or not
>>
>>3779573
Imagine bonsai coconuts.
>>
Guys, I have this tree in a pot, about 250cm tall, trunk is about 150cm.
Since it's spring I'm very tempted to split it in half, doing air layering. But I also want to prune and graft branches.
Would it be a better idea to air layer it before I attempt to do any grafting? Maybe prune the top part and graft onto the lower half of the trunk?
>>
Bat guano is a good fertiliser, that's bat shit right? Isn't that crazy
>>
>>3779417
jasmine has a 9m height by 5m spread so if I kept tying the vertical growth horizontally then it would be enough to get to the left of the big bay window perhaps? (about 3.6m). and for the smaller window I could either grow another copy or clematis such as nelly moser up the left of the house which has a good height but narrower spread, maybe?
>climbing hydrangea
that wouldn't want to take over my house and leave permanent damage right? good suggestion if it's well behaved
>>3779651
wisteria is my third option if it can do fine with the aspect
>>
>>
>>3779929
Holy shit
>>
>>3779975
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iktRKHr94T0
>>
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>>3779573
Build a coal-fired hothouse as an extravagant display of wealth, Victorian style
>>
>>3780154
Yeah bro, lemme just plant a bunch of money trees real quick.
>>
>>3779476
>an increased market would make the prices go down as the scale increases
with gardening, an increase of scale corresponds to more retards getting into the hobby (as is true of basically any hobby), but with plants there is the risk of killing it and wanting to buy a new one to try again, hence why it might tend to drive prices up, as there tends to only be a small hard core of hobbyists who care about propagation on the scale required to significantly maintain supply - the normies getting into the hobby only take, they don't give
>>
>>3780159
the anon in the last thread bought 4 seeds for over $200 so feasible
>>
Okay so I started collecting plants and just got this beautiful monstera, came with the pot for 16 bucks, was pleased with the purchase for sure, but I have a couple questions:
>I know it wants to climb, does anyone have any trellis construction guides/recommendations for a small pot like this
>Should I remove the moss crap?
>What type of soil does it sit in, for future re-pot purposes?

Ty
>>
>>3779565
I don't really care for it, to me plants and flowers are beautiful in their form and function, flower compositions are just form
>>
Any advice on how to best collect seeds from wild and urban plants?
>>
>>3779666
Probably calcium
>>
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>>3779975
Who knows how many amazing species like this were destroyed by agricultural and urban expansion without even being discovered
>>
>>3780296
>I know it wants to climb, does anyone have any trellis construction guides/recommendations for a small pot like this
For a small pot, if you want to make it climb, you're better off tying it to a stick or one of those ugly moss poles. M. adansonii is a bit different from many of its siblings, though, as its leaves won't really get that big even when it's able to climb, because it doesn't really send out aerial roots. If it touches something it can stick its roots onto, that's when the leaves start growing and growing. Unfortunately, this means those ugly moss poles are at least somewhat useful for M. adansonii.
>Should I remove the moss crap?
It seems to be some type of sheet moss, which is stupid and can even be somewhat harmful, but grannies (young and old) think it looks totally amazing (notwithstanding the fact that the moss will die within a month or two because it requires radically different growing conditions).
>What type of soil does it sit in, for future re-pot purposes?
Just use the cheapest possible potting mix you can find. In fact, just do that for pretty much any plant and your plants will grow well. I find most people who create their own soil mixes for tropical weeds usually have unhealthy plants.
>>
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Have a look at my cattleya, first time posting on chans
>>
brehs, I have a bathtub next to my toilet in the bathroom which is never used (there's also a shower).
Do you think I could fill it with soil and then plant some plants?

It's relatively modern, so I don't know about the material (degrading, etc.)

Should I better ask the guys over at /diy/?
thx anyways, anons
>>
>>3780499
Completely inadequate drainage (read: nonexistent) is an open invitation to all manners of mold and fungus and harmful bacteria from the still water and clogging. Plus, where would your light source come from?

Very bad idea.
>>
>>3780503
>inadequate drainage
I mean, a bathtub has at least one hole. But you're probably right about the "inadequate" part.

Fungus and especially insects are sure a thing I haven't thought about, damn. Especially since there's mostly wild nature all around the house.

Light would be ok, since the bathtub lies directly under a big window, though.

>Very bad idea.
kek, you're right. but it'd sure look/feel great
>>
>>3780499
If you're willing to drill a bunch of holes in it
>>
>>3780513
>>3780499
Wouldn't it be a (slightly) better idea to place some sort of elevated tray/egg tray light diffuser type thing in the bathtub, then densely pack it with flower pots? If you let the plants grow large enough the visual difference would be neglible, but:
>no problem with draining
>don't risk clogging the drain (just put some cloth or sth over the bathtub so that soil from pots doesn't fall in)
>easy maintenance, a flower pot is easier to remove than the entire bathtub's contents
I don't really see any downsides compared to a tub of soil
>>
>>3780564
yeah, that sounds like a better idea. Thanks for the great input, anon !!!

maybe I'll find an additional plant that will grow in a way that "hides" the tray+pots from sight.
I'll post photos in a few weeks, if I follow through
>>
>>3780580
I'm looking forward to them, really curious how it turns out
>>
>>3780332
Sounds good, gonna grab a moss pole
>>
>>3780499
You can fill it with water, add gravel on the bottom and turn it into a weird pond
>>
>>3777314
Plant bros, plz redpill me on prehistoric looking leaves like Ginkgo. I'm here for the old shit
>>
Will roots also grow more roots if you prune them, as long as you give them water?
I was thinking of raising this plant and expose the roots frequently.
Roots doesn't like sunlight though, does it? Would it develop bark to protect itself?
>>
I needed to cut apart my lophophora diffusa today, as of root rot. Tried to save as much grafts as possible, desinfected them and put em on new, clean, dry cactussoil. Hope it works.
>>
>>3780885
there are a bazillion different plants, anon lmao
just think about how you'd phrase such a question about animals (from fish over spiders to elephants)
>>
>>3777895
I ran it through the PlantNet app. Looks like it could be False Barley (Hordeum murinum L.)
>>
>>3780564
>over the bathtub
over the drain*
>>
>>3780922
Any plant, really. Well not flowers. Green leafed plants, bushes, trees.
>>
>>3778847
The plants we call weeds are just the lucky ones that do very well in the urban environment we usually create.

The usual lawn is actively overfertilized, overgrazed and suffocated by too dense grass vegetation so for your seeds to have a chance - there needs to be a little opening and a little less 'care' by the owners. Every perfect lawn turns into a short flowering meadow of a lot of different species if you do nothing but mow it like 3-5 times a year but most people fear stepping on bees or looking lazy so they keep the work intensive boring lawn.
>>
>>3781069
>fear looking lazy so they keep the work intensive boring lawn
that just gave me the feels
hold me, plantbrehs
>>
>>3780925
Plantnet isn't equipped to properly identify grasses
>>
>>3778847
There are no weeds in nature
>>
>>3780925
thanks. I thought the same, looks like ssp. leporinum or glaucum but I can't tell the difference between the two. when I found it it was just one purple plant in a field of yellow/green grass which is what piqued my interest. from other photos it looks like the stalk turns purple as it goes to seed, so I'm guessing the one I found just matured early.
>>
When I buy a plant I always “see” then as a female, but when women buy plants do they see them as male? Am I misgendering my plants?
>>
>>3781251
What kinds of plants are you buying? I don't see them as either unless they are literally male or female.
>>
>>3777314
I've tilled and prepared a nice plot of land appx 35 square meters, got rid of all the weeds and sowed a mix of wildflowers and fragrant flowers, basically all the seeds I had left, very excited to see the results, I'm very curious what will come up and what won't. Will post results after a month or so. Any anons that've planted any meadows recently? What were your results?
>>
>>3781251
some plants are either male or female though like Nepenthes
most have both male and female parts
>>
>>3781336
>Nepenthes
oh shit I didn't know that and I had Nepenthes for 7 years now, I guess you can tell by the flowers and I cut that shit off in a heartbeat
>>
Watching Jsacadura and Herons Bonsai on youtube has awakened something in me.
>>
>>3781101
Disruptive invasive species are weeds in nature
>>
>>3781342
yeah the flowers aren't very pretty and smell of semen so I don't blame you
they either have pollen or a stigma, pretty easy to tell if you let them bloom
>>
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>>3781433
>yeah the flowers aren't very pretty and smell of semen
t-tell me more...
>>
>>3781433
tbqh I did it bc flowering is pretty taxing on a carnivorous plant and all (I think) bug-eating plants' flowers are ugly/inconspicuous so why bother, the trap leaves are the real stars
>>
I'm really tempted to plant Ailanthus altissima in a pot, I mean what could go wrong if it's in a pot
>>
>>3781489
Plant a sumac instead. Most people couldn't tell them apart
>>
>>3781499
wow it really does look very similar, but idk, does it also "self prune" and grow in a nice tree shape by itself?
>>
>>3781251
If you ascribe something like gender or a name or some other unnecessary quality to your plant you're probably a woman and misgendering yourself
>>
>>3779565
I don't oppose it but I personally don't like the idea of having to cut them, I'd rather appreciate flowers for what they are. Arranging living flowers, however, is a yes from me.
>>
What type of cactus is this
>>
>>3781738
Looks like an Oreocereus trollii/Espostoa lanata/Cephalocereus senilis.
Has it flowered yet?
It's darn near impossible to tell some cactus apart without a flower.
>>
>>3781477
>flowering is pretty taxing on a carnivorous plant
It is on all plants, but you shouldn't believe the ridiculous myth that it'll pretty much kill your favourite carnivorous plants if you don't cut all of the inflorescences off. That's just some nonsense spread by people with sickly plants that tried to flower one last time to try to spread their genes before they died. Healthy plants flower to assert dominance.
>>
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>>3781857
...riiiiight
never said I think flowering will kill it, but it will surely weaken it and if I have a choice between a shitty flower and one or two more pitchers the choice is very simple
>>
how can I achieve this screen of verbena bonariensis, yellow yarrow and what I assume to be bronze fennel? as in, how close do I plant the seedlings or what planting density.
>>
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here's another image with just verbena bonariensis and yarrow ‘Gold Plate’
>>
>>3781938
Cutting off inflorescences on a healthy plant will only cause it to try producing another inflorescence, it's pointless.
>>
>>3779476
stfu incel
>>
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>when you go to repot a plant but as you take it out of it's pot all the roots have died and they crumble away
>>
>>3781477
it's generally accepted that cutting venus flytrap flowers off is helpful (their flower stalks are huge compared to the plant itself so makes sense)
Nepenthes flowers do fuck-all to the plant's health, might slow down the next couple of leaves but that's about it
A lot of carnivorous plants have very nice flowers, particularly Sarracenia, which can flower in abundance without detrimental effects
>>
>>3781454
same way as Linden trees smell of cum
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4p0uw42cdo
>>
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Post cool cactus pictures. I recently got this Tephrocactus Articulatus and think it's absolutely gorgeous. One of these days I'll get a Tephrocactus Geometricus.
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>>3782582
i have geometricus but has never ever grown anything, i may graft it this year
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>>3782582
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>>3782595
Partially why I don't own many cacti... They tend to grow painfully slowly with the amount of light I can get them.
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>>3782582
Another one.
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>>3782602
Do you live in an apartment?
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>>3782605
Yup. In New England nonetheless. I dream of owning a house in zones 9-11 someday
>>
>>3782603
Catching mealybugs on something that looks like that must be impossible
>>
Bought a small tillandsia 2 weeks ago and it's flowering already, is it just going to die now?
Seems like a huge waste of money to me
>>
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You're not really supposed to have any foliage on these branches when attempting to propagate some roots, right?
They stayed stiff the first 4-5 days in the shade. Swapped to fresh water every 2nd day, put them in the sun the 6th when they started to get flaccid. Now day 9. I see tiny buds forming so at least that's working.
Maple.
>>
>>3782919
Never take cuttings from flowering growth. The flowers will die and send rot all the way down the stems.
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>>3782987
So, cut that off, a clean branch?
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>>3782851
There should be an off shoot at the base.
>>
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Spotted these lads while at work.
I've got a soft spot for weeds that just don't give a fuck about where they are and grow regardless.
I think these ones look pretty neat so I'm gonna pot them if I can.
Any ideas what they are and if it's possible to just take a cutting and root it that way?
>>
>>3783142
>LITERALLY what I referred to here >>3778398
Fucking...
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>>3783144
>not appreciating the chadly aesthetic of the common dandelion
>>
>>3782851
>>3783058
Bromeliads in general pretty much always put energy into pups right before or after they flower. Also, perhaps important to know is that they'll still live for a long time even after they've finished flowering in order to put every last bit of energy into their pups. You can often even force them to create more pups than they usually would by taking off the current series of pups once they've grown to a sufficient size (the rule of thumb is about 2/3 the size of the mother plant), and in many cases they'll send out another series of pups. On rare occasions, you can repeat that once more.
>>
>get a bunch of new plants
>soil and pots too
>fertilizer is completely out of stock

Which one of you is making a bomb?
>>
>>3783142
Solidago
>>
>>3783216
Ty anon.
>>
>>3783142
>>3783216
No, it's Epilobium angustifolium, aka rosebay willowherb, aka fireweed.

Propagates easily from roots. Very easily.

Solidago has alternate leaves, while Epilobium grows spirally, so very easy to tell apart. Plus Solidago never gets the red pigmentation as far as I am aware.
>>
>>3783233
Oh cool that looks even prettier.
Thanks.
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>>3781332
bumping my question
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>>3783291
I can only share this wild poppy field
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>>3783300
it looks nice :^)
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update on my S. purpurea
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I live in zone 9b and I'm looking for a spiky barrier plant to keep some assholes from hanging out behind a utility box on the corner of my property. I need something less than six feet tall and not too much wider than four feet that'll grow in fairly quickly and not need a ton of water or trimming once it's in the ground and established. Do you have any suggestions?
>>
>>3783492
hawthorn maybe
>>
>>3783492
Holly is what you need.
Hawthorn, Pyracantha, and Berberis are good also but require more frequent pruning.
>>
>>3783496
>>3783500
Hawthorn sound like they get huge huge and I don't really want a tree so much as a bush. Holly is interesting and sounds tough as nails, but I guess I'd just have to trim them for height. I was actually looking at Berberis but wasn't sure if I was being retarded or not.
>>
>>3783507
They all get as big as you let them, but they can also be kept within the size you specified with pruning.
Holly can be pruned once a year, but the others I mentioned require twice or more.
Holly is also the most shade and drought tolerant, so imo it's ideal for what you want to achieve.
>>
>>3783509
Interesting. Well, that leaves me with some decisions to make since the Berberis look better and trimming two or three times a year isn't SO bad, but I'd also love not to water much and trimming less is better. Solid food for thought, thanks.
>>
What can I plant in superfine soil that stays moist for weeks even in constant 70 F weather?
>>
>>3783492
Mahonia
>>
Out of curiosity, anyone here live in zones 5 or below? Every grow Purple Saxifrage? Seeing as it's seemingly the most hardy plant in the world, it's certainly a novelty.
>>
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I have two questions:

1. what size pots do I need to grow traditional 6 foot tall sunflowers? they will remain in there all summer
2. I have two recycling tubs about 50 litres in size and a lattice panel. is this enough to grow some small melons like minnesota midget or would they need to sprawl along the ground? what else could I grow? zone 8b
>pic related is an example of the tubs
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>>3783765
Probably too common and lame for alpine anon.
>>
>>3784211
That's enough soil space for a melon but you need to give them rambling room. You could build a trellis over the tub to grow on.
As for sunflowers, if you wanted a 6 foot flower you would need at least as big a tub as your melon tub. They're not pot-friendly. Kind of like corn
>>
i want a tall shade tree for both shade and privacy from neighbors, anybody has a suggestion?
btw i live in a hot mediterranean country with mild winters
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>>3784356
could I put the tub right against the trellis? for instance, one watermelon/canteloupe plant per tub and the vines would be trained up the 6 foot tall & wide trellis panel. if necessary I can drill more holes in the tub so the roots can go through and spread through the shitty soil below it - as long as the tub has nice soil then the surrounding earth's quality doesn't matter isn't it?
>sunflowers
hmm how about a smaller one such as 'lemon queen' in a 3 gallon pot?
>>
>>3784356
Kek, who would grow corn in a pot?
I use the three sisters method.
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>check out master farmer's advice on kudzu
>doesn't know if it's illegal or where to get it
>call our department of agriculture
>says to check the website
>find a law stating it's illegal to distribute,buy or sell INTO the state
>mfw there's already kudzu within the state so i could be good to grow it in my house
kudzu might still be on the menu in roblox, girls
>>
>>3784211
>>3784380
>>3784356

ive grown velvet queen variety sunflowers up to 6.5ft tallest and 5.4ft shortest in containers. compared to in-ground which avg above 5.10ft, my tallest container i grew on my previous apt. balcony which attracted squirrels was roughly 6.7ft until beheaded by squirrels.

that size container must have been 18". the smallest ive used and successfully flowered was 16" container with a short growth of 5.5ft velvet queen. last year i purchased two 24" containers and grew queens to reach 6.5ft+ and two plants of seven flowered twice and lived until november.
>>
>>3784211
>>3784380
i second anon about the sunflowers, they have pretty big root balls
as for the melons, a trellis wouldn't really help, curcubits sprawl across the ground and root along the nodes, having it trained into the air doesn't allow for that.
>>
>>3784356
>>3784380
>>3784423
>>3784423
all my velvet queen sunflowers have always been multiheaded and multibranching plants. 2020 i had seven sunflowers and my smallest velvet queen in a 18" container that reached 5.4ft super short i named Linus.
now 2 months ago i took the fattest seed from Linus which turned out to be 3 seeds in one shell and he resides in one of my 24" pots. all three germinated however only two survive. as of april i had to cut the runt of the three. i recommend letting one plant per container, however i am allowing this exception as an experiment for now.
>>
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>>3784380
>>3784426
I just think if he's growing in such a small space, using an A shaped trellis over the tub like this would maximize the surface area for light. The vine won't fit in the tub, so without a trellis he would have to manage the overgrowth somehow
>>
>>3784423
>>3784431
thank you anon for the extremely detailed info about your container grown sunflowers. I will look for 16-18 inch pots instead and hopefully grow lemon queen multi-headed sunflowers
>>3784426
>>3784435
this woman grew blacktail watermelons on a 7 foot trellis. surely this proves I can do it with a 6 foot square trellis especially with a smaller variety? the trellis itself is a spare that I want to repurpose instead of buying or making a frame specifically for melons
>>
>>3784392
The only people who care about this meme weed are the ones who wouldn't be able to stratify a seed if they tried for their whole lives
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>>3784512
don't you just have to give it a lot of room and make sure the soil's moist for a week?
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Probably a noob question, but I do a lot of cooking and am tired of buying fresh herbs. I got two basils, thyme, cilantro and catnip (for the cat, not me), is it alright to plant them all in the same large planter? I don't have access to outdoor gardening, only indoors.
>>
https://altnps.org/seed-packs
If you're a burger the Alt National Park Service is giving out free seeds to attract pollinators
>>
>>3779929
agriculture really was the original sin
>>
This tree/shrub popped up next to my well. It’s on year two and it’s about 5 feet tall, I originally thought it was a mulberry so I let it live but now I’m realizing it’s not. I’m in zone 6b, soil is mostly clay and acidic / the Cohan set water system.
Any ideas on what it could be?
>>
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>>3784544
I would recommend using three planters. One for basil and cilantro, one for thyme, and one for catnip. Catnip is a member of the mint family and will take over the other three herbs if put into the same large planter. I know because I grow catnip in a large planter and it makes use of the whole thing. Also, I think your cat would enjoy it more if you had one planter dedicated to it where you grow an endless supply that gets them high.

Basil and cilantro do well together as they both love moisture and have similar full-sun needs. Thyme, while it needs full-sun, isn't a moisture lover.
>>
>>3784544
Get a small all in one hydroponics system. Way easier to take care of and less messy than dirt. Just change the water every three weeks and add nutrients once a week.
>>
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I like fat trunks I cannot lie
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Sarracenia hybrid of my own crossing. Loving the yellow and red contrast on this guy. Extremely vigorous too.
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>>3784691
It is a mulberry. Seems to be the chinese one (white)
>>
Asshole birds uprooted my dionaea recently and that's why it looks so rough
>>
What are the best plants that require no sunlight that I can raise in my bedroom?
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>>3785066
>that require no sunlight
All plants require sunlight, barring merely a handful of notable exceptions. If you meant to say "little amount of sunlight", most common succulent plants that you'll find at the grocery store can survive easily with little light. Bright indirect light is preferred, but if you have absolutely no windows, or a sufficient grow light setup, I'm afraid it's basically impossible to actually *grow* any kind of plants from mere bedroom fluorescence. Some might "survive", but they won't really grow.
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>>3784958
All you other shrubbers can't deny.
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>>3785067
>most common succulent plants that you'll find at the grocery store can survive easily with little light.
pretty much all succulents need to be in full sun all day long. these kinds of plants tend to have evolved from arid sunlight intense environments, it makes no sense why they would tolerate low light.
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>>3784512
just put it into soil before winter and wait :)
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Am I taking good enough care of my vanilla? I'm not quite sure how best to accommodate it. Also I know the leaf is dirty I'm gonna clean it
>>
>llifle is still down
Life is suffering.
>>
>>3785140
Feel free to change the potting medium into regular potting mix. I grew some in pure live sphagnum moss for about two years, and they certainly grew fine, but they can get more nutrients out of normal potting mix and will grow bigger, tougher leaves. They're pretty easy to take care of overall as long as you give them a bright/sunny place to grow.
>>
>>3785208
Wouldn't using regular soil on orchids cause root rot? Also how long does it take for them to produce beans?
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>>3785208
Thanks! Any specific brand or formulation? I tend to buy fox farm potting mix but idk if the worm castings and bat guano are good or bad for orchids. I've had her in my bathroom for a while, figured the humidity + remembering to water when I wash my hands and she wouldn't dry out (which was happening before); I had thought her axial meristem had dried out when she got shipped to me but then she suddenly grew quite a lot (almost all the fresh growth) in the past few weeks, probably as it got a bit warmer.. but it almost seems as if she's slowed down a bit again. I just put in the moss behind to climb

>>3785214
I heard 2-5 years for flowers?
>>
>>3785214
>Wouldn't using regular soil on orchids cause root rot?
That completely depends on the type of orchid. Many popular ones (like Phalaenopsis) are pure epiphytes, but Vanilla (at least planifolia, but presumably all species) starts out on the ground, and crawls along looking for a tree to climb up, the same way popular aroids like Monstera grow. And again just like Monstera, they send out long aerial roots that look for stuff to either latch onto, or soil to tap into. They grow magnificently well if they can climb up something whilst at the same time using their aerial roots to get more nutrients out of the soil.
>>
>>3785217
Just get the cheapest possible potting mix that says it's for houseplants or for everything, there's no need to get a specific brand because they're all fundamentally the same thing.
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>>3785221
When I first got it I let it dry out and it's only aerial root dried out. When/where/how do the aerial roots grow?

>>3785230
okay. any other general tips?
(and any plant reccomendations?)
>>
>>3785231
>When/where/how do the aerial roots grow?
Whenever they want to, out of the nodes. Sometimes they dry out quickly, sometimes they keep on growing and growing.
>any other general tips?
Not really. Once established, they can tolerate quite a bit of desiccation, so you don't need to worry if you ever forget to water it for a couple of weeks. The leaves will just get pale and soft and the aerial roots that are just dangling there will probably dry out, but as soon as you water it, the leaves'll be dark green and rigid again before you know it.
>any plant reccomendations?
Like what? Easy plants, special plants, funky plants?
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>>3785260
alright thanks!
just anything you find interesting or would reccomend. I wouldn't say I'm a newfag to gardening or anything in general (pic related is the hundreds of seeds I have), more just household plants. So I am always interested to try new ones
>>
>>3785268
Well, some genuses I like that are really easy to take care of, although they probably aren't everyone's cup of tea:
Adenium
Pachypodium
Platycerium
Dracaena
Euphorbia (there's a lot more than just the cactus lookalikes)
Epiphyllum/Disocactus/Pseudorhipsalis/jungle cacti in general
Selaginella
>>
>>3785067
>most common succulent plants that you'll find at the grocery store can survive easily with little light
WRONG
>>
>>3785272
Thanks, I'll take a look!
>>
Is it possible to replicate the outside environment, indoors.
Strong enough rgb led light to get the correct kelvin temp, one strong uv light, fresh air, mineral rich soil/fertilizer?
I want to grow a tree indoors.
>>
>>3785369
Look up tropical relatives of whatever tree you want to grow, and just grow one of those indoors. You'll save yourself a lot of trouble.
>>
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I just watered it
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>>3785452
>pot only half filled
why do people do this?
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>>3785454
It's a tree, it's not going to stay in there for long. Filling the pot entirely will only make it harder to transport later on
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>>3785462
>Filling the pot entirely will only make it harder to transport later on
no it won't. it will only cramp the roots and stunt the tree forever.
>>
>>3785452
Oak? so cute!
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>>3785386
I don't want some tropical pussytrees, and I don't mind the challenge/failure.
It's a hobby.
>>
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>>3779477
there are a bunch of plants that are kind of hard to get your hands on because they're in high demand by trend-chasers. monstera deliciousa is one of them. it's not HARD to get your hands on one because its basically a philodendron and they grow everywhere indoors but it's more like every nursery has been sold out for the last four years straight

>>3779476
take the obscure pill and collect plants nobody cares about.
>>
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Going to sow these this week. The bees will have a party
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i thought sunflowers needed a lot of space?
i don't understand, this youtuber guy put a shitload of sunflowers together for their sprouts
>>
>>3785752
Maybe he's going to eat the sprouts?
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>>3785752
>for their sprouts
Well there you go.
>>
>>3785752
Microgreens are so lame
>>
>>3785794
I like radish sprouts, but everything else tastes the same to me and they're pretty messy to eat. Never tried sunflower sprouts though.
>>
can cats and birds get poisoned by drinking everyday from a small pond containing mentha aquatica?
>>
>>3785837
No.
>>
>>3785852
thank goodness
>>
>>3785724
They will I can attest to that. Make sure you have the tools to be able to cut them back as they will likely invade (unless you're in southwest then you're probably good)
>>
>>3785907
I've got normal garden shears. going to cut them all back in midsummer after flowering for a second bloom and try to prevent seeds from setting...unless there is a better idea
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>>3785926
hmm might need more than that. I had to use a machete when I was clearing them out. then I covered the roots with hay. then it was at a point where I could use shears to trim as they grew back
>>
>>3785907
>>3785937
You make it sound like knotweed or kudzu.
It's nowhere near as invasive.
Maybe you're confusing it with the related Pentaglottis, which is a horrible problem weed. Seeds everywhere and has a massive taproot.
>>
>>3785937
>>3785944
didn't think borage was such a tough plant. I'm only growing a row of about 30 with 6 inch spacing between centres so if worse comes to worse I could pull them out due to growing in a new bed. btw do you approve of the spacing? the range given online is usually 12 inches between seeds but some writers said 6 inches is better as the plants can support each other due to the hollow stems
>>
>>3785944
>>3785946
no no it was borage. It really depends on their environment. obviously you can use shears but once they're established shears are a super slow/inefficient way to cut them back.
6 is a bit close. if I recall the patch I'm referring to were probably 8-10 inches apart. I don't think it'll be a negative for the plants though
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>>3785980
I'll do 10 inches then
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I got a Orchid back in November. I thought I killed it, but no it has adapted to it's new cold home. I'll replant it into a larger container at some point soon.
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>>3779532
I waited, those same plants were in another flower bed. Looks like you're right
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>>3777314
I'm happy that there is finally a plant thread on this board. Although being a self-described "Animalfag" I can't help but feel that our silent green friends are being over shadowed by their oxygen breathing neighbours. Plants need love too.
>>
>>3786392
/plant/ has been going for years.
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>>3786124
I want to get an orchid but all I ever see for sale is boring Phalaenopsis or the occasional Dendrobium.
>>
>>3786452
Buy online.
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>>3786452
This >>3786796, or just to go to your local plant shop or garden center and ask if/when they can get some special orchids in. Many orchids that aren't Phal/Den are easy for them to come by, but they only order them occasionally because people wouldn't buy them if they were in stock all the time (mostly because they'd then notice that not all orchids bloom for months on end).
>>
Anyone know where to get Dendrosicyos seeds?
>>
>>3785466
They're really not that developed yet
>>
>>3786392
/plant/ isn't something new
>>
>>3787165
>/vn/fag in /an/
woah
>>
>>3785724
>censored something on the seed package
?
>>
>>3787470
maybe a name from a seed swap?
>>
what are some funny plants i can grow?
also where can i buy seeds and shit besides the home improvement stores/walmart-like stores?
Not sure what to look for on google maps
>>
>>3787492
>funny plants
elaborate
>where can i buy seeds and shit besides the home improvement stores/walmart-like stores?
plant nurseries and online
>>
>>3787514
a funny plant...maybe something that looks weird or would be fucked up to have
>>
>>3787518
carnivorous plants but they are extremely easy to kill if you've never grown a plant before, even the $5 venus fly traps you find at common retail stores need to be grown in pure peat moss or peat moss and perlite for better drainage and watered with purified water only
the cacti and succulent families vary wildly in appearance. something like Euphorbia aeruginosa, Lithops, or Senecio rowleyanus might be to your tastes. most succulents are easy to take care of as long as they get lots of sun and dry out completely between waterings
variegated Monstera look cool and can grow huge but are a pain in the ass to get nowadays because instagram bitches hiked up the prices for fucking cuttings to hundreds of dollars.
Begonia maculata has polka dots. water moderately with most but not soggy soil and keep in indirect light. not a really weird looking plant but it is pretty cute
>>
>>3787518
oh and also check out caudiciforms and Albuca spiralis
>>
>>3786435
>>3787165
I'm happy that I am wrong.
>>
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Quince is flowering and I haven't repotted it yet.
>>
>>3787518
>would be fucked up to have
What does this even mean? Zoomers speak another language it seems.
>>
>>3787470
>>3787488
it's the name of the company. I thought maybe you guys would think I'm doing stealth marketing or something
>>
>>3787518
Dracunculus vulgaris, looks like a dog dick and smells like rotten flesh
>>
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>>3787738
speaking of which I found some nice pictures of this species.

(and I sincerely doubt some retard looking for 'funny' plants is able to grow it well)
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>>3787738
Aroids? More like assroids.
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>>3787723
ah well makes sense; no worries
>>
>>3787492
Castor beans
>>
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>>3787524
Venus flytraps are such queens.
Just go for sarrecenia or nepenthes. At least they're easy to look after and can take a little bit more abuse.
>>3787492
Any South African succulent.
It should be noted that the novelty of having a funny looking plant wears off fast.
>>
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My Patchouli has started curling downwards with the new leaves. I'm giving her 12 hours of light a day which probably is too much but I'd like a second opinion. She used to do fine with 16 hours before but I guess they're happy with less sun when bigger.
>>
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How can I save my mint?
>>
>>3788022
>mint
Not entirely sure it needs saving.
>>
>>3788022
I've had this plant for 1-2 years now. She got pummeled by rain yesterday so she's pretty soaked, but she was really flourishing in the beginning of spring when I was only watering every few days, and sitting her in indirect light (underneath a chair with mesh fabric and blocked by another plant). Ever since the rain started she's been looking rusty. Any ideas?
>>
>>3788022
>>3788027
cut it back and put it somewhere sunny if you can, those longer branches don't look sickly so much as they're just old. mint usually goes dormant during the winter and will grow a lot healthier if you prune it in the spring.
>>
I'm going to the garden centre this weekend and I'm unsure which day is better for getting plants. saturday is forecast for heavy rain and therefore there won't be that many people visiting compared to sunday which has better weather but there's more chance of things being sold out on sunday. however the heavy rain means it'll be annoying hauling everything around in the outside section and everything getting wet and dirty. which day would you guys pick?
>>
>>3788111
If you can't weather the weather for first pickings, you don't deserve first pickings.
>>
>>3788111
go on saturday
>>
>>3788111
I'd pick Monday, because it'll be completely packed this weekend due to Mother's Day. Seriously, out of the entire year, this weekend is the worst possible couple of days to go to a place that sells flowers.
>>
>>3788121
>>3788146
okay I'll go on saturday
>>
>>3788189
luckily mother's day already happened in march in my country
>>
>>3788193
Oh, cool, in that case I'd also say Saturday.
>>
>>3781738
cocktus
>>
How long should I let the roots on pothos cuttings grow in water before transplanting them to soil?
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>>3788234
As soon as they start growing. You don't want them to stay in water for so long otherwise the water roots will have a harder time adapting to soil and will rot. You could have just planted the unrooted cuttings directly in the soil too.
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>>3788315
This. Boomers have done a lot of damage with their 'start cuttings in water first' myth
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plantlet here, wtf are rakes/hoes for?
i get trowels for moving dirts/transplants
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>>3788529
you really don't need them unless you're dealing with a huge plot of soil or a shitton of leaves
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Hi, I'm a newbie getting into botany. Here's a photo of Caltha palustris I took the other day.
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>>3788529
Rakes come in several kinds and are for moving materials around such as leaves, soil, and gravel, depending on the type of rake.
Hoes are for quickly removing shallow rooted weeds from the surface of the soil. It saves getting on your hands and knees and picking them out by hand. Also depending on the shape of the hoe can be used to create seed furrows.
A trowel is a small hand-held tool, fine for small jobs, but in a garden context is far too small for any efficient work.
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I want a franklin tree. They're so beautiful.
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>>3784691
Please remove that! It's white mulberry and it's quite the pest around the world. If you would like a similar tree you should try black mulberry. Tastier berries, slower grower, stronger overall, and not invasive. Or if you're in North America give red mulberry a chance. Although, mulberry trees drop lots of berries I heard.
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>>3785066
hello! have you tried cast iron plant? it gets its name for being hard to kill. Parlor palm, too. Also peace lily, which has another name: closet plant. Ferns like maidenhair fern also like the dark, but they also like water.
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>>3788818
>maidenhair fern also like the dark
idiot
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>>3788817
In my experience, they don't drop that much fruit, but birds, wasps and other animals with a sweet tooth will often get to the ripe, tasty berries before you even notice they're there.
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>>3787743
Shady looking plant
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Can anyone identify this plant? It reminds me of a foxglove flower.
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>>3788995
Here is the inside of the flower
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>>3788995
>>3788999
thorn apple
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Found some new victims today to experiment with.
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>>3789000
Thank you fren.
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>>3788817
I have white mulberries and the leavea look the same as black mulberries (simple, not lobed)
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>>3788811
I have one seedling just come up. It's not the healthiest but this was my 'throwaway' pot. I have others just developing roots in their pots elsewhere
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>>3789017
They all have many different types of leaves they can grow, impossible to tell be leaf shape. The telltale signs are the mature fruit color (most of the time), glossy leaves above (red mulberries are dull) and hair beneath the leaves (whites are hairless or at most only hairy veins)
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>>3789154
One thing I forgot to mention is it's a branch grafted onto the black mulberries tree many years ago, by my grandpa
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>>3789002
nice choice in textures
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Is this a good place to ask if anyone can ID this plant/flower? It is from Bangaladesh.
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>>3784958
eburneum? I've been wanting to get one but apparently they're quite picky and easy to rot
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>>3789292
I was merely going to get a smaller tree. Couldn't resist all these plants.
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>>3789322
Some Persicaria maybe?
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>>3789631
I do believe you're right - thank you!
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Repotted 3 plants.
Time to watch them slowly die.
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Hear me out...

What if...

>1cm thick plastic/wooden sheet
>drill hole in it
>cut sheet in half across the hole
>take your single stem plant of choice
>put the sheet over the surface of the plant-soil so the hole fits around the stem
>secure the sheet-halves together
>fill hole with something that will keep hole shut but let stem grow
>flip it all upsidedown
>remove pot
>tease the roots up and add some soil
>diy a holder for this platform
>put it somewhere it will grow
>witness nature finding a way to solve this new upside down world or die
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>>3789896
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>>3789906
Oh shit!
I guess I'm not crazy.
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my succulent (aloe aristata) has a lot of leaves that have bloated hollow spots
just underwatered?
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Fresh Thread

>>3789964

>>3789964

>>3789964





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