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File: 27amnh_tyrannosaurus3.jpg (1.11 MB, 1500x1000)
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A unified thread for the discussion of everyone's favorite Mesozoic megafauna and associated paleontological news

Previous: >>3732098
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>>3745363
New torvosaurus skeletal
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>>3745363
>>
post paleoart
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ahem

FUCK feathers
FUCK protofeathers
FUCK the binocular meme
FUCK the body fat meme
FUCK the warm blood meme
FUCK family units
FUCK stubby legs
FUCK paleontological fake news

DINOsaurs not FAGGOsaurs okay?
>>
>>3745363
For me its nigerosaurus.
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>>3745363
If you want to make love to a dino, you are a normal person.
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>>3745512
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>>3745387
>that contrast
Wonder how it ended up being that different from Hartman's and everyone else's.
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>>3745363
What makes trex feet so attractive?
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>>3745423
>>3745455
Based
>>
Did you guys ever play Turok?
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Why did quadruped carnivorous dinosaurs never develop? And conversely, why were bipedal herbivorous dinosaurs generally so rare?
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>>3745583
>quadruped carnivorous dinosaurs never develop
Bipedals were faster?
>bipedal herbivorous dinosaurs
All Ornithischia were herbivores, most bipedal.
>>
>>3745583
>why were bipedal herbivorous dinosaurs generally so rare, eh?
herbivores have MUCH larger guts. And dinosaurs also swallowed enormous amounts of rock to help grind up plant matter. So they were much heavier all around than carnivores. You can be an extremely heavy biped, but it's usually better to spread that weight oot over 4 limbs instead of 2.
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>>3745363
>>3745387
>>3745390
>>3745403
>>3745423
>>3745455
>>3745522
>>3745546
>>3745549
>>3745567
>>3745569
>>3745583
>>3745598
>>3745607
Why is it so hard for you scum just to make a spontaneous thread why must literally everything have its own general which of course as always will devolve into pointless barely on topic and tired spam that will continue to rot on the board for ever and ever. You want a general go to fucming reddit >>3745607
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>>3745512
just fuck a bird you coward
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>>3745613
cringe
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>>3745546
Because most megalosaurs are pretty lean and people reconstructing Torvosaurus automatically assumed it was exactly like its relatives without examining it. If they would have looked they would've realized that it was an absolute monster with one of if not the thickest femur head ever attributed to a theropod and cube shaped metatarsals.
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>>3745583
The dinosaur ancestors were bipedal. Many herbivores went back to being quadrupedal, and the predators stayed bipedal. That's just how it happened.
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>>3745569
Based game. I used to replay the t.rex boss fight over and over
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>>3745546
At least it doesn't have the comically long head for its body anymore. If you want a serious answer, all megatheropods end up looking the same after attaining large body size because of convergent adaptations for being an elephant sized or heavier predator. That's why most of the freaky looking dinosaurs tend to be smaller.
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>>3745569
I've been let down by The Isle and Beasts of Bermuda. Path of Titans seems promising but it's probably doing to be stuck in gamedev hell.
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>>3745512
>>
Remember when this was hyped
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>>3746265
its cute but I aint gonna try pronouncing it just call it Amphicoelias again
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>>3746162
As someone who caught some of the hype for Isle but never ended up playing it, why was it a disappointment?
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>>3746381
Dev drama, shitty prioritization of game features and failure to deliver on promises
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>>3745512
bro I don't even care for people anymore
I just wanna dino gf. If I have to break into Ft. Knox to finance it, I fucking will
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>American Torvosaurus was larger than European Torvosaurs after all
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>>3746505
If the more robust "Edmarka" is only synonymous with T. tanneri (aka American Torvosaurus) and not European T. gurneyi, does that mean European Torvosaurus was still a lanklet with an oversized skull like every other run of the mill Megalosaurid?
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>>3746507
T. rex varies a lot in its build and robusticity and that's only in one species, it's certainly possible
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>>3746505
Considering europe was an island archipelago with a lower carrying capacity and scarcity of resources during the mesozoic island dwarfism isn't that surprising
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>>3746507
The virgin european torvosaurus vs the chad american torvosaurus
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saltopus.
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>>3746588
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>>3745613
seethe
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>>3745403
I like sauropelta
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>>3746772
Cool
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>>3746772
Cool armadillo.
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I got a dinosaur skateboard today
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>>3747224
sick
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Kaprosuchus
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>>3747403
more like Coprosuchus lmao
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>Walrus spinosaurus
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>>3747422
spinosaurus couldn't even swim well
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Anyone visit this?
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>>3747444 #
Spinosaurus could swim, the 3D model they used was before 2020, and the model doesn't even resemble the OG specimen which got bombed in WW2.
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Who else watched this?
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>>3747495
Wasn't that a canadian show?
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>>3747495
Nah I watched Barney
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>>3746510
>T. rex became more gracile over time
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>>3747635
>cute twink-rex Stan
>thicc baragirl musclemommy Sue
There will be fanart of this pairing
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>>3747739
Sue is from an older layer and we're not even sure about their sex
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>>3747739
How can you even tell gender of extinct animal.
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>>3747764
hip width, baculum, partially intact egg shell inside the fossil
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>>3747764
Medullary tissue in the bone marrow of one of the Tyrannosaurus fossils found indicates that that particular specimen was a female who was pregnant. Medullary tissue is only formed in female birds when they're ready to lay eggs.
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What was the sauropod size limit?
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>>3747635
self domestication at work
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>>3747773
>Baculum in dinosaurs
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>>3745423
What about quill knobs?
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>>3747839
>the topic was fossils
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>>3747818
is there a case for two species of tyrannosaurus? (gracile and robust)
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>>3746515
now i wonder what kind of dinosaurs lived there (in the red square)
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>>3748369
>VHG... HYBERBOREA
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>>3745423
You forgot the T-Rex with lips meme.
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>>3748057

No, since Tyrannosaurus in general were more gracile when they were juveniles and eventually got more robust as adults. Tyrannosaurids in general had the same growth bauplan of gracile juvenile to a robust adult.
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>>3748397
T. rex had lips in almost every depiction except JP. And even in JP the raptors have lips but nobody gives a shit about that.
Lips are canon.
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>>3748397
Lipped rex is based, croc-face rex is cringe
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>>3748466
>That video
The music in that one is absolutely kino
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>>3748466
looks like a negro sucking his teef
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are there any active dino/paleontology discords?
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>>3747818
https://www.artstation.com/artwork/JGD9A
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>>3748725
There are but they're full of trannies and retards
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Hello fellow theropods
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>>3749032
he sus
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>>3746556
edmarka rex you mean
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>>3749155
>Torvosaurus got size cucked
feels bad
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>>3745583
Ostriches are one of the fastest land animals on planet, i assume something along these lines happened where bipedal dinosaurs outcompete quadruped predators.
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>>3745583
Early basal dinosaurs were already bipedal. They eventually became quad to support their weight and their guts.

There were also bipedal ornithisicans like psitaccosaurus and pachycephalosaurus still

and there were also theropods which also developed large arms.
>>
Thoughts on omnivorous prosauropods?
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>>3750226
Imagine if some prosauropods continued to survive, kept to omnivory and grew to larger sizes because of their broader diet. They'd be the mesozoic equivalents of grizzly bears, scaring away smaller dedicated theropod carnivores from their kills.
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>>3750226
They'd be like giant iguanas
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>>
>>3750543
its cute
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>>3750546
pretty giant monitor lizard
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>>3750543
That carch looks frontloaded
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What was the purpose/function of the antorbital fenestra and mandibular fenestra?
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>>3750708
saves weight
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>>3750738
Are you sure that's why these developed, even in small archosaurs?
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>>3750742
Archosaurs are still lighter boned than mammals of the same body dimensions iirc
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Explain this
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>>3751043
Have you heard of abelisauruses?
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>>3751071
Still waiting on that giant kenyan abelisaur
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>>3747782
imagine petting her belly
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>>3751043
There are plenty of mid sized tyrannosaurs. Alioramus, Alectrosaurus Qianzhousaurus, Teratophoneus, Lythronax
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>>3751559
Smol trex.
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>>
>>
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>>3751583
>>3751585
>>3751589
>>3751595
Nice
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>>3751595
>have to finish illustrating this fucking dino book by tonight
>what the fuck does an allosaurus even look like?
>fuck it, I'm tracing godzilla
>>
>>
>>3751130
I'd imagine it'd be like stroking a watermelon
just larger, rougher and it breathes
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>>3751831
>the earliest native americans might have countered terror birds
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Did Spino ever meet any mosasaurs?
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>>3751831
me on the left
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>>3752058
Come to think of it, why didn't spinosaurus fully commit to the sea like whales and other marine reptiles?
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>>
>>
>>
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>>
>>
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>>3750778
Why did theropods have antorbital fenestra while ceratopsians and hadrosaurs etc lost them
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>>3752058
Probably not any, there is one known freshwater mosasaur but he appeared later and not in the same area as the spino.
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>>3752289
>>3752290
>>3752293
Saved, love them.
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>>3750546
dumptruck booty
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just how soft would a well-fed trex have been?
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>>3752370
at most as soft as a well-fed elephant
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>>3752370
This shit has it's own thread on /co/
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>>3752480
so glad we're moving away from the 2014 ibrahim knuckledragger
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>>3751071
Abelasaurids, larger dromaeosaurids, smaller tyrannosaurids, megaraptorids, neovenatorids. There were quite a few mid sized predators
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>>3752517
I haven't seen a sandnigger cause so much butthurt since Osama Bin Laden
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>>3752480
Walrus soon
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>>3752370
>eyelashes
>>
>>
>>
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>>3752925
based
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>>3752315
Theropods are bipedal and need more weight saving features?
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>>3753097
Isn't bipedalism itself a weight saving feature?
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>>3750226
>>3750244
>>3750244
>>3750348
They would be sweet
>>3750546
That is beautiful.
>>
Look at this dude
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>>3753231
This dude
cute as fuck. Would pet 100%
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>>3753231
I honestly really like the recent trend to make theropods look rounder and smoother cause it really just makes them look muscular as fuck.
>>
Anyone have eofauna figures?
>>
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>>3753231
Did theropods have padded feet like cats?
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>>3747495
holy shit anon, you just brought back memories I never thought I had!
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>>3753342
I do what I can
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>>3752952
imagine dinosaurs that lived in dusty and sandy areas could've been photo models for various makeup brands. having gorgeous eyeleashes would've been an evolutionary necessity in many dry areas
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>>3752106
No idea, but they likely did cross some form of marine areas since spinosaurids were found across Eurasia, Africa, and South America.
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>>3753469
>they likely did cross some form of marine areas since spinosaurids were found across Eurasia, Africa, and South America.

>continents never moved
>Triceratops and T. rex just swam across the pacific ocean. Allosaurus and Torvosaurus swam the Atlantic
I detect a problem in your education, anon
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>>3752370
she looks like she smells like play-doh
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>>3753438
imagine a trex stands before you and it starts demonstratively blinking at you with leashes as long as its teeth
>>
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>>3753654
>>3753438
Bird eyelashes are modified feathers. T. rex did not have feathers so it didn't have eyelashes either.
>having gorgeous eyeleashes would've been an evolutionary necessity in many dry areas
A lot of animals living in dry areas today manage to do just fine without them.
>>
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>>3753698
Oh man I remember seeing this picture as a kid. The inflamed neck flabs grossed me out.
>>
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>>3753175
what happens if you were to boop a trex's snoot?
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>>3751595
>>3751616
hahaha lol
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>>3753724
>Can't I take a wizz in peace?
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>>3746588
erectopus
>>
>>
>>3754557
Abelisaurs are underrated
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>>3753704
Is there anything more comfy than old school paleoart?
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>>3753275
I prefer PNSO
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>>3754580
old old school paleoart
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>>3754585
Cool
>>
>>3754785
Why is there a chinaman?
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>>3754787
A lot of their products are made in China
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>>3753594
There is a proposal that Oxolaia in South America is a Spinosaurus sp. During that time, South America and Africa were already split.
>>
This nigga is pretty cool
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>>3755600
Was he the first being with autism
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>>3755611
Have you seen early Amphibians?
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>>3755727
Giant neovenatorids?
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>>3755616
Amphibians are nothing compared to burgess shale fauna
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>>3753438
I remember when planet dinosaur gave gigantoraptor feathers but no eyelashes
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>>3755788
Some nonavian theropods are pretty much indistinguishable from giant flightless birds to a casual viewer
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>>3755751
>Bahariasaurus and Deltadromeus are probably ceratosaurs of some kind
>Chilantaisaurus is likely a more basal avetheropod, something like a neovenatorid
RIP giant megaraptorans (for now)
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>>3755371
If that's the case I don't see why Spinosaurus wouldn't be at home in the shallow seas of the western interior seaway
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>>3755810
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/346643017_Megaraptorid_Theropoda_Tetanurae_Partial_Skeletons_from_the_Upper_Cretaceous_Bajo_Barreal_Formation_of_Central_Patagonia_Argentina_Implications_for_the_Evolution_of_Large_Body_Size_in_Gondwanan_Megara
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>>3755856
The authors themselves disagree with the results of their phylogenetic analysis but yes, Chilantaisaurus won't end up being closely related to Coelurosaur Megaraptorans in any up to date and well sampled matrix. Though it would have been better if they sampled Siats too. On a less related note, it's interesting to see Rauhut and Pol's version of (Megalosauroidea + Allosauroidea) Carnosauria being acknowledged in other papers though.
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>>3745363
>everyone'es favorite Mesozoic megafauna
I prefer the sea monsters desu
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>>3752955
why'd they have lil nubs
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>>3755880
Weren't giant ichthyosaurs suction feeders like sperm whales?
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>>3755894
Better question, who would win in a fight between shonisaurus and a sperm whale?
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>>3755901
why do they have so many ribs?
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>>3755611
I dunno, but this fucker is definitely on the spectrum.
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>>3755923
>be a useless retard
>should pretty much be extinct
>however all competition has died out due to the worst mass extinction even in history
>find yourself basically alone in the world
>waddle around and fuck like rabbits
>make up literally 90% of all vertebrate land fauna as a result
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>>3755929
>>3755923
what hunted them?
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>>3755935
I like to think they died off after consuming all the scarce resources left.
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>>3755949
looks like a creature that would be in the background of a star wars movie
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>>3755966
The late permian and early triassic was covered by vast swarths of deserts like tatooine
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>>3755929
That shit's crazy to me. Imagine landing on a planet and it's basically barren with no life except for only one species: retarded pig-lizard looking things that roam around aimlessly.
Sounds like a No Man's Sky experience.
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>>3745423
>binocular meme
?
>>
>>3745613
>fucming
>>
I’m a noob at Dino stuff and I’m really interested in our true history. I really really wanna know what they looked like. I also really don’t wanna believe that the t rex and other dinosaurs like that had feathers. Also I’m dumb for this but maybe there were trex species with just scales and maybe there were offshoots of them with feathers later on due to evolution of some sort?
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>>3756106
Forgive my autism writing.
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>>3756106
>They all had feathers.
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>>3756141
no.....no....THATS IMPOSSIBLE I refuse to believe it!
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>>3745546
>>3745387
I'm new. What's the difference? And what separated Torvosaurus from other theropod of its time like Allosaurus and Saurophaganax? I always love Torvosaurus since it got a cool name.
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>>3756150
It was a more primitive/basal form of theropod
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>>3756106
T-rex is just a solitary fucked case about feather since it evolved from those faggoty feathered small dinos from China. Other big therorpods luckily had a different lineage that ensure its scaleness.
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>>3755751
Neovenatorids are the closest we'll ever get to Cretaceous Allosaurids, their head to body proportions are the most similar to Allosaurus out of all the Carcharodontosaurians. A giant neovenatorid can be thought of as a Cretaceous version of Saurophaganax or Epanterias.
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>>3745546
Hartman's Megalosaurus looks more like Randomdino's Torvosaurus than his own Torvosaurus does.
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>>3756106
The scale/feather dichotomy is more like a gradient. You have reptilian scales and osteoderms to protofeathers and quills all the way to true fluffy feathers.
>>
How come there are no sabertooth dinos
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>>3756351
Heterodonty is much more common in therapsids and their descendent than in archosaurs. Most archosaurs only have one shape and size of tooth. Mammals have the inbuilt mechanism for tooth differentiation between molars, premolars, canines, ect.
>>
>>
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>>3756420
Did albertasaurus live to see the K-pg extinction?
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>>3756435
If wiki is anything to go by they went extinct shortly before- around 68 mill years ago
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>>3756440
Coincidentally around the same time T. rex started appearing in North America. It's interesting to think about the interactions between the last Albertosaurus and first Tyrannosaurus or immediate ancestral form of Tyrannosaurus. Was the former outcompeted and replaced the same way modern humans replaced Neanderthals? Who knows.
>>
If the Deccan traps hadn't been erupting and causing the dinos to die off would some of them had survived the asteroid?
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>>3756460
well we have chickens so...
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>>3756467
Okay non-avian, non-crocodilian dinosaurs then
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what would happen if you kiss a dino
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>>3756481
bite
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>>3756457
I wonder if the Asian Tyrannosaurids became as large as T. rex around the time of the K-Pg impact like North American Tyrannosaurids did. The fossil record of large Tyrannosaurids stops a few million years before the end Cretaceous extinction iirc and the latest Asian Tyrannosaurid (Tarbosaurus) is still much smaller than T. rex. Did they stay small or did they increase in body mass and body size shortly before the asteroid like in North America?
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>>3756482
how much would it hurt
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>>3756505
if you've ever been bitten by a goose, I would imagine it would hurt that much
if it had teeth than probably on the same level as a house cat or dog
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>>3756460
It's been a while since i read up on circumstances around the late cretaceous but I was under the impression that dinosaur decline, as well as ptersaurs, pre asteroid was overrated... a great deal of mammals and birds were wiped out as well so I think no matter what happened with the traps we would end up same survivors as OTL
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>>3756510
Coincedentll I was reading this today on bird linenage k-t extinction and survival... apparently only ground dwelling burrowing birds survived http://nrm.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1275964/FULLTEXT01.pdf
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>tfw I didn't discover the best general on this site until today
The untold hours of top tier Mesozoic discussion I've missed out on...
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>>3756510
>as OTL
What does that stand for?
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>>3756023
I had the same thought, like minded anon. I wonder if they roamed in huge herds thousand strong like the American bison used to, or was it just a ton of smaller herds?
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>>3745512
>give kids dino toys and shower them in dino media
>they end up wanting to bone raptors and t-rexes
just like the hollow earth reptiloid society intended
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>>3756501
Didn't someone post earlier in the thread about NA trex becoming more gracile over time? Super large rexxes could have been a temporary phenomenon
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>>3756521
our timeline
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>>3756533
Last time I checked asian tyrannosaurs weren't shrinking. If anything since they're likely to be ancestors of T. rex they actually increased in size
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>>3756546
Make sense it would be odd if the asian rexxes didn't get any bigger but the N.American ones did... I'm not really families on the topic....
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>>3756106
The general ancestor for dinosaurs seem to be feathered, with scales being the derived part. Tyrannosauroids ancestrally had feathers, but Rex likely lost them or were with sparse feathers with what skin impressions we have.
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>>3755894
No, adult Shonisaurus had large,pointed teeth with recent studies. Sperm whales also don't suction feed and have teeth to grab prey.
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>>3755371
>During that time, South America and Africa were already split.
ghost lineage. Many such cases.
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>>3756525
Considering herds are mostly an anti-predation measure and Lystrosaurus had no significant competitors or predators, I wouldn't be surprised if they just kind of milled about at random.
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>>3752480
Wait, are they admitting to making things up?
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Why did Macronarian sauropods outlast Diplodocoidean sauropods?
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>>3756857
>>3755929
That's so weird, such a strange chapter in our earth's history
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>>3757056
Any time period post mass die-off is gonna be wierd
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>>3757049
Apparently Alamosaurus crossed over to North America from South America, there was a land bridge between the two continents before the Cenozoic
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>>3757068
Does this mean tyrannosaurs could've met abelisaurs?
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>>3756580
It could've been a situation where there a bunch of similarly sized (4-5 ton) Tyrannosaurid taxon in Maastrichtian Asia while there was only one really large (>6-7 ton) Tyrannosaurid taxon in Maastrichtian North America because T. rex had little competition from other similar sized Tyrannosaurids unlike Tarbosaurus or Zhuchengtyrannus I assume. So T. rex could grow to larger sizes.
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>>3757087
Zhuchengtyrannus lived a few million years before Tarbosaurus last time I checked
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>>3756546
No necessarily, T. rex could've been descended from Southern Tyrannosaurs native to North America similar to Lythronax. "Alamotyrannus" is a good candidate for an immediate ancestor to T. rex imo
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>>3756603
Source?
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>>3756517
It's never too late to start fren
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>>3752058
There was a mosasaur in the kem kem
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>>3757115
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3859474/
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>>3757082
me on the bottom
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Hi
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>>3757131
Thanks
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>>3757143
Fesh.
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>>3756150
Torvosaurus is less sausage shaped in the first picture
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>>3756150
The new reconstruction is much more heavily built. If you're asking what about it makes it a magalosaur instead of an allosaur, then it comes down to morphology. Normally the phylogenetically informative characters are pretty minute and esoteric, but in the case of Torvosaurus, I think even a layman can tell who its more related to just by eyeballing it.
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>>3757195
>I think even a layman can tell who its more related to just by eyeballing it.

>don't find complete articulated skeleton
>assume the parts we find are related to other known animal with complete and articulated skeleton
>reconstruct with the missing or disarticulated parts based on the more complete supposed relative
>entire taxa look alike because they're all based on one known member
>Layman: "See how closely related they are, they all look alike"
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>>3757209
I was trying to give him a simple comprehensive picture, not get bogged down in the minutiae of reconstructions.
>>
we're dinosaurs really reptiles, or were they their own thing like mammals and birds (I know that they are dinos too) are?
also, how sure are we of any of them having fur?
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>>3757143
hey, you look kinda disabled
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>>3757214
>not get bogged down in the minutiae of reconstructions.
I don't blame you for avoiding the topic, you clearly don't understand it.
>>
This is a better irritator outline to the anon from last thread
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>>3757218
>Were they reptiles
Reptiles (and mammals, birds, fish etc) as a group are a fairly arbitrary construction that is supposedly defined by its traits. This works for modern animals, as all modern reptiles share these traits, but when you look into the evolutionary history of all these groups, you find that many of these traits appear and disappear throughout time. Closely related groups may have completely different traits (mosasaurs give live birth while monitor lizards lay eggs) and some distantly related groups have convergent traits (mammals and many dinosaurs are both warm blooded and have filamentous integument). This means that these neat little categories of traits we group animals in are pretty useless, and modern systematics revolves around the idea of evolutionary descent. A group of animals with a single common ancestor is called a clade. Reptiles do not form a good clade because it excludes some descendants (birds) from the group making it paraphyletic and somewhat arbitrary.

Tldr the word reptile doesnt really mean anything anymore and is falling out of use with evolutionary biologists/paleontologists.
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>>3757229
>You clearly don't understand it
Oh? And what makes you say so? The most inclusive phylogeny ever published on Tetanurae retrieves torvo as sister taxon to megalosaurus. While the paper has had criticism, I haven't seen a single gripe with Megalosaurinae. With the addition of Elvis we have enough bones to aggregate pretty close to the whole and the skull is only missing the top of the nasals, the squamosal some of the quadrate and the mid part of the dentary.
I know that the multiple specimens of torvo are different sizes and that leads to some difficulty in its exact proportions, but the thing was clearly a megalosaur. Step off.
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>>3757255
you didn't post Torvosuaurus, you posted Megalosaurus.

and you know zilch about how skull joints worked.

You don't understand how the appearance of the skull is changed based on what we think it was related to. If we thought Torvosaurus was an allosaurid we'd change the shape of the skull to look like an allosauruid. I explained this to you and you're still too dim to grasp it.
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>>3757218
Dinosaurs are closer to both crocodiles and birds than to most of modern reptiles, like lizards and snakes.
Crocodiles are a sister group, that retains a lot of ancient traits, and birds are actually one of the dinosaurs groups, similar how humans are a group of mammals.
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>>3755856
Has anyone restored Chilantaisaurus as a Neoventorid?
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>>3757264
>and birds are actually one of the dinosaurs groups, similar how humans are a group of mammals.
A bit more complicated than that ngl
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>>3746588
Sneedopus
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>Formulas? I just scale using faulty scalebars.
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>>3757261
I posted megalosaurus for the anon to compare torvo to both allo and meg. If I wanted to get autistic, I would post eustreptospondylus or some other more complete megalosaur.

>If we thought Torvosaurus was an allosaurid we'd change the shape of the skull to look like an allosauruid

Yeah no shit. And if my grandmother had two weeks she'd be a bicycle. But we don't think its an allosaurid because every thing we have points towards it being a megalosaur. Just because some of the proportions of the different specimens leads to some ambiguity surrounding the scale of the skull joints doesn't mean the general shape of almost all the skull bones isn't known. You're trying to imply that there's more ambiguity in Torvo's skull than there is.

I get that you're having a bad day, but you either have an informed opinion about Torvo remains that you're holding back and criticizing everyone else for not immediately understanding, or you're just assuming that I just repeat whatever information I see in pictures because I didn't g in depth with a layman and you want an excuse to put me down to feel superior. Either way, you're being a massive asshole for no real reason.
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Thoughts on furry synapsids?
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>>3757299
>Brilliant.
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Anyone tried one of those roblox dino sims?
>>
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>>3757299
They need more love in general
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>>3757333
No meat all bones
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>>3756481
depends on how well you know each other
if you know each other well, expect either a small smooch, or a big slobbery kiss back
if not, don't expect anything interesting. they'll just wonder wtf you did
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>>3757270
The siats holotype is very similar in size
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>>3754585
Look at this dude
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>>3757359
I thought that was a spinosaur but reverse image search gave me qianzhousaurus
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>>3747415
Hey, that's clever.
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>>3757348
dilophosaurus is bigger than that
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>>3757264
Archosaurs aren't reptiles
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>>3752299
>I think we should get off the road...
>
>Get off the road! Quick!
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>>3757379
Cheeky.
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>>3757379
They are members of class reptilia.
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>>3757379
are you really going to argue that crocodiles and alligators aren't reptiles
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gobble gobble
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>>3757423
>JUST
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Image an allosaurus sized coelophysis...
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>>3757425
Big if true. I thought Rauisuchians had a monopoly on the large apex predator niches of that time. Might it be related to Kayentapus?
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>>3757424
Well there was a small feathered polar trex.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanuqsaurus
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>>3757425
Source on that?
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>>3757427
Just looking now, apparently there were a few large Triassic therapods even in the Norian but remained relatively rare until the Triassic.... https://www.researchgate.net/publication/287004648_A_Giant_Coelophysoid_Ceratosauria_Theropod_from_the_Upper_Triassic_of_New_Mexico_USA https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/jpaleontol/article/93/5/1010/573029/large-neotheropods-from-the-upper-triassic-of
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>>3757430
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3045712/
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>>3757429
Animals living in colder climates tend to be stockier and more robust than their counterparts closer to the equator. Would a T. rex sized Nanuqsaurus outweigh an actual Tyrannosaurus rex? Or does Bergmann's rule only apply to Mammals and Birds?
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>>3757434
Thanks
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>>3757432
Interesting. Guess the Triassic-Jurassic extinction must have wiped out those giant Coelophysoids too.
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>>3757488
New
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>>3757438
considering birds are dinosaurs...
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>>3752318
>One known
There's an undescribed one from hell creek. I think I've heard of more but can't remember its locale
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comfy
>>
ded
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>>3757556
not all dinosaurs are birds
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>>3757780
sauce?
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>>3757379
based
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>>3757277
go back to deviantart
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>>3757234
Still too short legged imo
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>>3757317
What exactly are they?



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