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File: morski ślimak toksyczny.jpg (2.93 MB, 3648x2736)
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let's talk about some toxic and venomous animals itt
>>
inb4 political derail
>>
>>3734018
pls no
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>>3734015
Wait this cutie is toxic?
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>>3734175
yes, venomous, to be more precise
>>
garter snakes are apparently venomous
>>
I love bugs. Fuckin adore them. If it's an arthropod I dig it. These assholes are the exception. No animal freaks me the fuck out more.
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>>3734223
i dont like spiders but i love centipedes, i even kept some as pets in past
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>>3734249
nononononono absolutely not do not like that one. I dig spiders okay but I still wouldn't let the big ones crawl on me. Pancrustacea master race
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>>3734271
this thread is about venomous and/or poisonous animals...
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>>3734350
right right right bessies are off topic sorry. Keeping with the idea of Pancrustacea venomous though
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>>3734359
Love me some velvet ants. Cute guys, highly unlikely to sting and they squeak too! They have the badass factor of the sting hurting like a motherfucker too. They're commonly known as Cow-Killers where i'm from What's not to like?
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>>3734201
There are plenty of snakes that we classify as venomous in technicality but don't do anything serious to humans outside of maybe, at extreme worst, causing an allergic reaction.
>>
venomous snib
venomous snab
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>>3734392
smol
>>
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>>3734431
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>>3734454
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>>3734392
You know you've reached peak status when spiders mimic you
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>>3734488
why does the spider mimic them?
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>>3734015
OP
>>
>>
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>>3734678
why are they venomous?
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>>3734015
no animal can be that toxic after meeting my ex was, am i right fellas?
thank you, have a good night!
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>>3734703
to kill stupid people
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Toxic bird
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>>3734769
allegedly it is not pleasant to touch one
>>
Aren't Cuckoo bird hatchlings toxic or something?
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hellooo there
>>
>>3734392
>licks claws
nothin personnel kid
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>>3734392
Reminds me of the clamps robot from Futurama for some reason
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>>3735478
here he is
>>
I find it really interesting how being toxic creates an evolutionary bias towards bright and flashy colours. You'd think there would still be some pressure for camouflage but I guess when predators learn not to eat you then suddenly all your neon blue mutant offspring don't have to worry about shit. Must be nice being toxic.
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>>3734223
Why do they look like gushers fruit snacks bros?
>>
>>3735579
i would rather be cryptic to be more anonymous, i dont like attention
>>
>>3735586
>guy uses the word "bias" in a context unrelated to anything in your post
>this still causes you to have a meltdown
who's fucking your wife, anon?
>>
>>3735701
im an incel ;_;
>>
>>3734650
Probably because pseudoscorpions (and scorpions) are formidable enough that many predators will stay clear.

How about pretending to be an ant
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>>3736005
ok
interesting
thanks
>>
>>
>>3736011
Or a ladybug
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>>3736018
Or a beetle
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>>3736024
Or a scorpion
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>>3735579

It's nice to have colors that say "I'm toxic, don't eat me" instead of looking like everything else edible.
>>
>>3736011
>>3736018
>>3736024
>>3736030
wow
>>
>>3736030
>>3736024
>>3736018
>>3736011
>>3736005
>>3734488
How does this even happen?
>>
>>3736706
evolution, bro
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>>3736706
If you get eaten you don't pass on your genes but if you fool everything that wants to eat you ya get to mate.
Now multiply my simplification by about a few million.
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>>3736835
true
>>
>>3734703
>be redditor
>see wild animal
"I must go bother and touch this creature. Karma awaits."
>>
>>3736835
>>3736831
That evolution wasn't spontaneous though, so how could it survive to evolve to look that way?
>>
>>3735579
You don't even have to actually be toxic. Just having bright and flashy colors is often enough to convince predators that you are
>>
>>3734223
These look so fucking cool
>>
>>3738098
I don’t know much about arachnids but maybe it’s a consequence of them already sort of looking like insects alongside their relatively quick life cycles. All it would take is one spider to somewhat resemble some other bug and survive because of it and then that starts an evolutionary chain reaction
>>
>>3738098
>evolution wasn't spontaneous
what do you mean?
>>
>>3734015
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inland_taipan
>Based on the median lethal dose value in mice, the venom of the inland taipan is by far the most toxic of any snake – much more so than even that of sea snakes – and it has the most toxic venom of any reptile when tested on human heart cell culture. The inland taipan is a specialist hunter of mammals, so its venom is specially adapted to kill warm-blooded species. It is estimated that one bite possesses enough lethality to kill at least 100 fully grown humans,

And yet, it still jobbed from time to time
>The mulga snake (Pseudechis australis) is immune to most Australian snake venom, and is known to also eat young inland taipans. The perentie (Varanus giganteus) is a large monitor lizard that also shares the same habitat. As it grows large enough, it will readily tackle large venomous snakes for prey
>>
>>3738359
isnt dart frog's toxin more potent than venom of inland taipan though?
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>>3738351
It's many ancestors didn't resemble an ant before it became to be what it is now. And we know that spider brains are only programmed enough to do 10 things, so how could it's lineage recognize that it needed to mimic a specific ant subspecies and morph it's body/scent to almost identical proportion?
>>
>>3738488
evolution is not a consciously steered process
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>>3738492
true
>>
>>3738383
Don't know. I was under the impression venom used for offense would be stronger than the one used for defense. Could be wrong though.
>>
>>3738614
"""venom""" used for defense is usually poison since it's passively used through skin and whatnot. If it's used for offense it's usually venom because it is actively injected via fangs and whatnot.
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>>3738799
but toads can spray poison
does it make them venomous?
>>
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>>3734015
Is it tru these things somehow came to south america? I live in southern huehueland and i've seen a few of those, none of them were bigger than 1cm tho, were getting eaten alive by the tatuiras too
>>3737244
Reminds me of that pet mice sub where people would just fucking grab wild mice every once in a while, no gloves
>>
>>3738829
>reddit
you have to go back
>>
>>3738941
It's the easiest way to find pet rodent QnAs, everywhere else is second guessing by people who have only ever owned cats and dogs
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>>3738951
i will forgive you if you post itt in situ photo of a salamander that you have taken
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>>3738614
Generally venom is an offensive ability used for hunting. It can also be used in defense. I believe even jellyfish use their venom for prey.
>>
>>3738801
Venom is pretty specific. It's a toxin which is injected with fangs or stingers. If the animal can't injection the toxin that makes it poison. If the animal can inject the toxin then it is venom.
>>
>>3738965
when a monitor lizard bites then is it injection?
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>>3739040
It appears that is still not confirmed but it does appear some monitor lizards have glands that produce something that may be venom, though.its apparently not clear if said secretions are a venom or has another purpose not yet understood.
>>
>>3734703
>>3737244
Went to see if that dumbass kicked the bucket, but apparently spic was lucky enough to pick up a death one so he is still alive.
>Colombian
Why is it every time I see screenshots of stupid redditors doing stupid shit is some cocaine snorting spic from my country.
>>
>>3738965
TIL
upvoted
>>
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>>3739418
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>>3734769
What bird?
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>>3739978
i think it is Pitohui dichrous
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>>3735586
One of the worst posts made
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>>3739137
>Why is it every time I see screenshots of stupid redditors doing stupid shit is some cocaine snorting spic from my country.
confirmation bias
>>
>>3738488
At one point there was a spider that had a color or shape mutation that made it and it's offspring slightly more successful with hunting. It was so much more successful than it's non mutated counterpart that it took over the species. Every time there happened to be a mutation that made this spider look a little more like an ant then it became the new normal. Consider that there were millions of individuals with mutations that did not help and they all died out.
>>
>>3738488
Also with scent it is often a matter of then getting the scent of their prey on them. Not that they have evolved to have that scent
>>
>>3739418
I wish. It'd be cool as fuck if I could bite a fucker and watch him keel over. Though I guess it would make foreplay tricky.
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>>3740407
>Never heard of a dry bite
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>>3734198
>>3734175
It's always the bright ones huh
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>>3738956
Different anon but I took this one yesterday
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>>3740747
are you a burger?
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>>3736011
>>3736018
>>3736024
>>3736030
>>3734488
>>3736005
lazy bastards can't even come up with their own designs
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>>3740990
rude
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>>3740525
Hyla arborea is bright and it is not poisonous i think
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>>3734015
I don't feel like talking about my ex-wife thanks.
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>>3734223
>>3734249
Coolest invert pet I have ever had by far, and I still have my tarantula and worms and so forth. I've kept wasps, vinegaroons, scorpions, true spiders, etc and the centipede is the coolest by far in my eyes. One of the coolest critters ever.
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>>3734769
>>
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>>3734015
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>>3744540
what worms do you have?
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>>3744587
did he died
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>>3744987
learn english
>>
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>>3744994
>Being this new
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>>3744998
im an oldfag desu
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>>3745016
>>
>>3745020
bad monke
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>>3744540
only just occurred to me that sauropods must have gotten struck by lightning fairly frequently, especially if the theories aboot them clearing forests by pushing over trees like elephants are true. perhaps during storms herds would have flattered themselves to the ground as hard as possible and stayed immobile for the duration of the bad weather.
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>>3745101
wow, interesting
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>>3745131
kind of want to do some paleoart of it. maybe smaller predator species that would normally never tackle a large theropod would take the chance to choose a member of a prone herd to harass, nipping at it until it had to stand up to defend themselves. all the other herd members would have to stay flat, and if it worked and they got hit by lighting the smaller predators would have an unprecedented bounty. google tells me that giraffes and elephants do in fact get struck by lightning, so it would definitely have been an issue for any large sauropod (or any tall dinosaur i guess) stuck in an open space during a storm.
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>>3745135
why would dinosaurs live in herds if modern reptiles (excluding birds) dont live in herds?
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>>3745170
are you serious? first up why exclude birds when birds are the closest relatives of any extinct dinosaur species you choose and vast numbers of them are social species. second tonnes of reptiles live in groups, all sorts of lizards live in colonies, like marine iguanas, and so do most crocodiles, the closest relatives of dinosaurs outside of birds.
>>
>>3736835
Lady bugs and ants do not hunt spiders.
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>>3745180
>Their bodies often touch each other, but there are no social interactions like grooming, as commonly seen in social mammals and birds.[26]
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>>3745224
so? did anyone say 'sauropods are always grooming each other'? what are you even quoting and why would you think it applies to dinosaurs more than the birds mentioned in the same line?
>>
>>3745170
saurpods lived in herds dude. there's fossil trackways of many feet all moving together, and bonebeds where large numbers of individuals died together in things like mudslides. the same is true for many large dinosaurs, others even have well preserved communal nesting sites.
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>>3745170
Modern birds don't live in "herds" because we call them flocks
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>>3745229
im more interested in modern reptiles
give me proofs that they live in colonies
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>>3745739
they don't because they're all dead haha
>>
>>3745745
baka
>>
>>3745739
Maybe that's why they're still reptiles and not birds
>>
>>3745832
excuse me?
>>
>>3745739
garter snakes have orgies during mating season if that counts
>>
>>3745993
well, i know that
>>
>>3745739
you got given examples of reptiles living communally and went 'no not like that'
>>
what is your favourite zootoxin?
>>
>>3747034
Agatoxins are kind of interesting and some look to have important medical uses
>>
have you ever been bitten by a venomous snake?
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>>3734223
These things aren't fun to get bitten by, more painful than a wasp sting and the burning feeling lasts for an hour
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>>3747247
you shouldnt have caught them
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>>3747034
bee venom, it's just enough inflammation to trigger blood flow.
it can be used to improve blood flow in damaged joints
>>
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why do they do it?
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>>3748232
Wouldn't be surprised if it's all down to an adrenaline rush
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>>3748515
but what is the purpose?
>>
>fed a freshly moulted mealworm to a parson spider earlier today.
>just went to check on the spider >it's fat and happy
>Look at mealworm
>Mealworm is still alive
>even though it's rear half has been completely sucked dry

So now I'm trying to figure something out if...
The venom failed
The spider didn't envenomate by choice
The spider couldn't envenomate
Or....?

All I know is sucks for that mealworm
>>
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>>3734015
>>
>>3738488
>>3738098
Punctuated Equilibrium helps to explain a lot of it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punctuated_equilibrium
Basically the mutations that cause this sort of speciation do happen quite quickly on the geologic scale, within like 50,000-100,000 years. Rapid mutation causes very stark natural selection of the mutated individuals. Those that survive can mate with each other and further the mutation.
>>
>>3734015
Is there any biological reason why mammals seem to not really evolve venoms or poisons very often?
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>>3749373
Im pretty sure (can't quickly find a source so salty grains) that most mammals are herbivores by a considerably large margin.

What I can find though is that over 60% of ANIMALS are carnivores
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120416154417.htm

So if most animals are carnivores but most mammals are herbivores that suggests a pretty logical reason why venom is uncommon in mammals.
>>
>>3749385
>>3749373
I would pressume its related to metabolism and niche
>>
Hey I'm contemplating on purchasing a poison dart frog
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>>3749395
Dart frogs are only poisonous in the wild or soon after capture. Dart frog poison is dependent on a diet of poisonous ants
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>>3738488
bruh...
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>>3749401
so those kept in terrariums arent poisonous at all?!
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>>3734454
thats one big ass Collembola
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>>3749714
Nah
Not ones who have been eating a captive diet long enough

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2016/02/poison-dart-frogs-raised-captivity-lose-toxicity/
>>
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>>3749735
I'm not sure you realize how small pseudoscorpions are
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>>3749752
are pseudoscorpions venomous?
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>>3749759
Some are. The venom is in their pincers.
Yes I can tell which are venomous because they have fatter pincers while those that aren't venomous have slimmer pincers. I'm just not sure if that's universal. Pseudoscorps are fairly understudied, actually
>>
>>3749768
*You can tell
>Duck this phone

Pseudoscorpions also make silk but it's not used like spiders do
>>
>>3749773
Almost forgot the new bit of pseudoscorp information I recently learned.

Some hunt in packs, are terrifyingly good at it, and then share the spoils as well or better than most vertebrates do

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2168506-ferocious-pack-hunting-pseudoscorpions-believe-in-sharing-fairly/
>>
>>3749768
venom in pincers? im suprised
>>
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>>3749805
They are pretty amazing little things. I only recently started looking Into them.

Oh, another thing they like to do is go up to larger flying insects where they clamp on for a ride
>>
u mean the communists and the hungarians and the british kek
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>>3736024
Fren
>>
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>>3749805
>>
>>3749862
thanks
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>>3734015
I rather not talk about my mom
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>>3749812
where do they live? in litter?
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>>3749912
They are widespread around the world so I imagine their habits vary from ecosystem to ecosystem.
They like moisture and eat pretty much anything that's small enough, so that ought to give you some ideas where to find them.
I guess they're also a thing in many libraries where the eat booklice and other pests.
>>
>>3749930
have you ever seen any irl?
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>>3750001
Not him but I see them from time to time here in Sweden. Can confirm that they are very small and cute.
>>
>>3749930
What a nice little hunter.
>>
>>3750007
how do you find them?
>>
>>3750001
I actually have not but I also was never paying attention for them.

>>3750013
Look them up on youtube or whatever.
They are formidable for their size.

Their movements are also distinctly arachnid which is kind of interesting to watch
>>
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>>3745993
>one life
>not born a garter snake
Bros.....
>>
>>3743622
Topkek, boomer
>>
>>3738488
It’s okay anon, it seems fishy to me too. Are we saying that we could breed humans to look like other animals if we watch their mutations closely and breed them for long enough?
>>
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>>3750480
>>
>>3750659
it is not /b/
>>
>>3751392
Ur mom is /b/
>>
>>3745993
no it doesnt count
>>
>>3750050
Just a few a year, here and there, I don't go looking for them or anything.
>>
>>3735579
How do predators develop a tendency to not to eat brightly colored animals? I might be retarded but that seems like a pretty abstract behavior to pass on to offspring relative to genes for a bigger body part or some physical shit like that.
>>
>>3740397
That’s mind blowing. I would assume you’d need billions of trials to get an appearance so extremely similar to another organism. Boggles my mind
>>
>>3751911
show pics pls
>>
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>>3752462
Not that anon, but I also find them in my house from time to time.
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>>3752485
which state?
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>>3752508
central europe
>>
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>>3752509
I think the next time I see one I'll try to keep it. I could feed it springtails, flightless Drosophila or firebrats.
>>
>>3752515
is it even legal in the EU?
>>
>>3734456
>talk crap
>get the snippedy snap
>>
>>3736706
God, bro
>>
>>3752547
What
>>
>>3752684
is it a question?
>>
OP im scared
>>
>>3752718
why?
>>
>>3752547
Pseudoscorpions exist pretty much everywhere. They can just be hard to find because they don't have the same density as spiders and are MUCH smaller
>>
>>3752515
i would like to keep them as well
>>
>>3753026
>>
>>3743622
Oh, are they venomous or poisonous?
>>
>>3752485
where? in books?
>>
>>3749752
HE SMOL UwU
>>
>>3754122
>>
>>3754449
does he have earbrows?
>>
>>3755284
Earbrows?
Talking about the second set of eyes?
Pseudoscorpions have 1 or 2 sets of eyes
>>
>>3755507
heh okay, thanks for the info
>>
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>>3757092
Aw he smilin :)
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>>3738488
>so how could it's lineage recognize that it needed to mimic a specific ant
this is bait
>>
>>3757098
he is just playing
he loves children :)
>>
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>>3735509
pls go away
>>
>>3748232
>>3748515
>>3748801
>The practice originated in the Appalachian region of the United States and is based on a literal interpretation of the following biblical passage:

"And these signs shall follow them that believe; In my name shall they cast out devils; they shall speak with new tongues; They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them; they shall lay hands on the sick, and they shall recover,"
>>
>>3757217
Worship services usually include singing, praying, speaking in tongues, and preaching. The front of the church, behind the pulpit, is the designated area for handling snakes. Rattlesnakes, cottonmouths, and copperheads (venomous snakes native to North America) are the most common, but even cobras have been used. During the service, believers may approach the front and pick up the snakes, usually raising them into the air and sometimes allowing the snakes to crawl on their bodies. The snakes are considered incarnations of demons, and handling the snakes demonstrates one's power over them. Members are not required to handle the snakes. Some believers will also engage in drinking poison (most commonly strychnine) at this time.
>>
>>3750658
we did it with dogs in like, 200 years?
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>>3757217
ok thanks
>>
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>>3753026
>>3752915
There was a Hungarian experiment that attempted to breed them in captivity, to use them as pest control in beehives.
The breeding was unsuccessful because the selected species is an asocial cannibal, but the introduction revealed that one of the causes of the colony collapse syndrome is the usage of plastic instead of wooden or wicker housings, that are more humid and provide no hiding places for pseudoscorpions, making them ideal for varroa mites.
https://www.biokontroll.hu/alskorpiokkal-a-varroa-atka-ellen/
>>
>>3757860
The experiment was not Hungarian, but nevertheless quite interesting.
https://www.beeculture.com/chelifers-or-pseudoscorpions-as-varroa-control-agents/

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327550710_Chelifers_or_Pseudoscorpions_as_Varroa_Control_Agents
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259552738_Culturing_chelifers_Pseudoscorpions_that_consume_Varroa_mites
>>
>>3757860
is it similar with them like with scorpions with more venomous species having smaller pincers?
>>
>>3749773
>>
>>3749862
This makes me wonder why other arachnids have evolved with their venom and silk glands on the wrong end of their bodies.
>>
>>3757968
it is like this in webmrel because they detest the chemicals in that ink
>>
>>3757860
is it possible that i have pseudoscorpions in my isopod culture or millipede culture? i put in there wood and litter and leafs from the wild without disinfecting them
>>
>>3752509
germany?
>>
>>3759162
It's possible.
There's a youtube channel where someone ended up with pseudoscorpions in their isopods. Considering they weren't discovered until a rehouse I would assume pseudoscorpions aren't an issue
>>
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is it a pufferfish?
>>
>>3749752
MODS MODS MODS
>>
>>3761023
what?
>>
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>>3734249
FUCK that shit.
I don't really mind spiders or even tarantulas, but for some reason even tiny centipedes are nightmare fuel to me.
Having that thing on me would probably genuinely traumatize me.
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>>3761055
im the opposite
i like centipedes but i dislike spiders
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>>3761055
>>
>>3761674
why didnt the snake attac?
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>>3762854
Looks like the snake didn't see the person as a threat, whether that's because they have been acclimated to being handled by a person or the way the person handled it was non-threatening. Venomous snakes can be pretty chill if they don't feel threatened. Of course, I have to wonder if that snake was defanged or something, because not even professionals handle rattlesnakes that freely.
>>
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is he poisonous?
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>>3757219
strychnine poisoning sounds very unpleasant from what I'm reading
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>>3757219
what is the naturalistic explanation for them not being envenomated/poisoned?
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>>3764399
bump
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>>3736005
>>3734488
>>3736011
>>3736018
>>3736024
>>3736030
>>3749284
Gay little larpers and petting zoo inmates.

This mad cunt literally mails herself across the ocean to butcher the bane of the planet. How can one arthropod be this based?
>>
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>>3765705
Kek
if I ever found one I'd probably end up holding it like I do every other spider
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>>3765705
Dangerously based.
Saving the Earth with LEGENDARY venom, one dead ape-thing a time.
>>
>>3745739
prehensile tailed skinks live in family groups
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>>3762854
looks a little on edge at first but it's not even rattling, must be pretty comfortable with that person
handling a rattlesnake enough to get it to that level is not worth the risk
>>
>>3766268
oh, thanks, it is true indeed, very interesting
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circulus_(zoology)
>>
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they are poisonous too
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>>3767023
venomous*
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>>3767023
fake.... shock factor for responses... fraud...sad!!
>>
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these cuties are venomous
or rather- will be venomous when they grow up, and if they are males
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>>3752041
Well, it's less an evolutionary/instinctual drive and more "I ate one of these a long time ago and it made me feel like dogshit". It's a learning process that kills one member of the prey species, but saves every other member of that species the predator runs into for the rest of its natural life.
>>
>>3734223
>>3734249
I hate this fuckers so fucking much, it gives me chills just to imaginate them
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>>3767844
do you even have them in the usa?
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>>3768073
Different anon here
4 species of pedes here including
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scolopendra_heros
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>>3768671
in europe we have Scolopendra spp. too but only in mediterranean region
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>>3769019
Apparently the whole genus is located within the tropics and other warm regions so that makes sense
>>
>>3749373
Just saw an article about this the other day
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.livescience.com/amp/could-humans-be-venomous.html
>>
>>3769509
it is interesting that species from the opposite sides of the globe belong to the same genus, isnt it?
>>
>>3764399
they commonly are ... many deaths. good riddance lol.
>>
>>3749373
first mammals were venomous, then they developed claws and canines to kill the prey so venomousness wasnt needed any more. at least this is how the story goes
t. anon who lectures that staff at university
>>
>>3749385
>I'm pretty sure (can't quickly find a source so salty grains) that most mammals are herbivores by a considerably large margin.
The sheer number of small omnivorous and insectivorous species of rodents and bats would push me to assume otherwise.
In any case, that would only then go towards explaining a lack of venom. Poison is generally a defensive measure, and as such would be quite handy among herbivorous prey animals.
>>
>>3770464
Poison is defensive
Venom is offensive

My theory is that mammals didn't develop venom because they were mostly herbivorous and the few that were carnivores were going after prey that was much smaller such as invertebrates and smaller mammals.
The vast majority of venomous animals I can think of hunt prey that is commonly of equal size or otherwise pose a significant threat and so needs to be neutralized ASAP

Another thought concerned with carnivorous mammals is the fact that massive blood loss in the prey has nearly the same effect as venom. Once a lion or tiger opens an artery the gazelle will be out as quickly as a venomous strike.
>>
>>3770505
>Venom is offensive
>Heloderma- venom is used only in defense.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heloderma

>>3770420
*stuff
>>
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>>3743622
Came for this post, was not disappointed.
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>>3734015
what is that thing?
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>>3770866
a marine snail
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>>3734015
Why are venomous mammals so rare
>>
>>3734015
Wow, a whole thread about my ex!
>>
>>3771070
is it a question?
>>
>>3763154
A unicorn :D
>>
>>3771118
*an
>>
>>3770817
I could have used a honeybee as my own example
It's called generalization tho
>>
>>3743622
are we back in the '00s?
>>
>>
>>3771070
>>3770420
>>
>>3763154
*venomous
>>
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cute but venomous
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>>3734223
Don't they have one of the most painful bites in the world
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>>3775030
is it a question?
>>
>>3772716
baby bathtub
>>
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yuck
>>
>>3776317
Not venomous
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>>3776524
arent all spiders venomous?
>>
>>3776550
Practically speaking, yes (though there is a family of over 300 species that are non-venomous [Uloboridae])

Those aren't spiders though. They are harvestmen (Opiliones) which are also arachnids but very different from spiders
>>
>>3776565
okay, thanks, sorry for my mistake
>>
>>3745016
lies
>>
>>3776685
nope
>>
wholesome thread all the way through, good job /an/

>>3749812
fuck they're based
>>
>>3776624
No worries.
It's an extremely common mistake for people to confuse harvestmen for spiders because of the 8 long legs
>>
Ur mom is a harvestmen
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>>3776946
Opiliones are based, just like all arachnids
>>
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>>3772716
>>
>>3777027
HE ATTAC
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>>3772716
The living testament that satan is real
>>
>>3777415
rude :(
>>
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is he venomous?
>>
>>3738488
>thinking = lineage
If your ancestors had control over your lineage they wouldn't have chosen you to become a four eyed hunchback with gamer neck, an attraction to body pillows and a congenital heart problem.
Animals don't choose who to mate with, their body chemicals just tell them this looks and smells like a thing to rape or court to mate. Better adapted spiders survive to adulthood to mate more than spiders not adapted for their circumstance.

>>3750658
Yes, see livestock, pets and work animals (hunting/police/war).
There's even a special word for it in humans but it's highly unethical, politically impossible and people use it as a cover word for "Getting rid of the people I hate".
>>
>>3777415
>a mother caring for her young is a living testament that satan is real
not liking how something looks doesn't make it a demon, anon
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>>3778780
This
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>>3778148
>Animals don't choose who to mate with
so free will is not a thing?
>>
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>>3778148
>There's even a special word for it in humans but it's highly unethical, politically impossible and people use it as a cover word for "Getting rid of the people I hate".
eugenics did nothing wrong
>>
>>3738351
evolution isnt spontaneous = it is driven by selective pressure and other forces
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>>3778114
bump
>>
>>3738488
burger education everyone
>>
>>
>>3748232
Because some retard born in the 1900s tried to interpret the Bible for himself.
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>>3777415
Ticks are the living testament that Satan is real anon, Centipedes are neat.
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:^)
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>>3782452
>>3782449
>>3782448
>white women
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>>3738383
Some of them yes, the inland taipan is the most venomous species of snake. Last I remember the most toxic animal on earth is the golden poison dart frog,

Which secretes poison strong enough that holding the frog and absorbing the poison through your skin will be fatal
>>
>>3770505
There are a couple mammals with venom, solenodon and some shrew have venomous bites, and the prosimian slow loris secretes poison
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>>3783207
is loris both poisonous and venomous?
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>>3783202
isnt venomousness supposed to be more advanced in Viperidae rather than Elapidae?
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are they venomous?
>>
a fish cant have a casual stroll around the coral these days tf
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>>3782449
what kind of windyman isthis?
>>
>>3784505
dont you recognize a cobra?
>>
>>3784059
I don't know, but any discourse about "most venomous" usually revolves around sea kraits and taipan, I've never heard a claim like that about any vipers
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>>3784446
The cuttlefish or the striped catfish? Either way the answer is yes.

Cuttlefish have venomous bites like most cephalopods, they use it for paralyzing prey shellfish.

Striped catfish have venomous stinging barbs on their fins to defend themselves
>>
>>3738098
gradual
>>
>>3784755
sometimes it is gradual sometimes it is not
>>
>>3762857
I think they've had that rattler for a while, gave it love and respect, and it's more or less tame to them, but I think it's still got its OEM parts, they do have to be careful. Even your best friend can accidentally kill you if you spook him while he's wielding a sword
>>
>>3785227
what is OEM?
>>
>>3768671
Don't these things bite?
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>>3734015
When i was camping many years ago there was millions of these dudes on the beach dead.
Aussie brain made sure i didnt touch em.
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>>3734249
Imagine it wrapping around your dick 'n' balls and just walking all over 'em with its tiny legs haha
imagine it biting your urethra haha
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>>3785273
Sure they can and it probably hurts like hell even though it's not lethal.
They aren't aggressive as far as I know, and shouldn't really sting if they don't feel threatened.
Eventually you I'll get stung if you handle them regularly enough, but that applies to most lesser animals
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>>3785355
when i was in mediterranean region i was picking big stones and taking photos of Scolopendra spp. that were under them and they were not aggressive, i have never been attacked by them so far
>>
>>3785343
sick man



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