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How to stop being scrooler?
My goals: being big and rich
I go to gym, but I am too lazy (maybe too dumb) to become rich, I've started studying computer science this year but can't find internship
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>>24060614
>to become rich, I've started studying computer science this year
Oh boy...
Take it from someone in the industry: Do NOT go into CS for the money!

If you desperately want to go into tech, choose an actual engineering degree (higher regulations, higher acknowledged certifications, less saturated, etc.). But to make money, going into finance, accounting or business administration is a far easier/faster route.
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>>24060639
>24060639â–¶
>>>24060614 (OP)
Why is computer science bad for money? Question from a young man who maybe also going to go CS
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>>24060672
A degree in CS itself is not of much use in the Software/IT industry. You need internships, work experience and a project portfolio first to be valuable for potential employers. A specialized degree like Software Eng. or similar could also help, if you want into that field.

That being said, the field is quite over saturated and for the few good jobs at FAANG there are many competitors. Every high school graduate and his dog got told to go into CS in the last 20 years, not to mention everyone from third world countries who think of CS as a way to enter the western work force.

You also have a strong age discrimination. If you didn't managed to land a project management job in your mid-/end-thirties, your employer will replace you with a younger graduate who is in touch with the flavor-of-the-week technology/framework everyone is talking about. This will happen far sooner, if you don't keep (re)learning your field and know what the recent trends are.

You and your department will almost always be seen as expense factor for your company and the minute some upper manager decides, that outsourcing is cheaper, your whole team is gone.

Other fields offer a slower pace of change with more job security and steadily growing salaries.
Are there any more questions?
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>>24060820
Not OP,but what about data science?
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>>24060891
Well Data Science highly dependent on the actual company you work for. It is often called a meme-field/-degree for a reason, because it got hyped so hugely that many people jumped CS for it. The niche itself isn't bad, it's just overhyped and glorified statistics paired with domain knowledge. Without that domain knowledge a data scientist is practically useless and the demand for specialized data scientists only is far lower than the companies make people to believe...

Problem is, most employers don't have a fucking clue what DS actually is, they just heard they need specialists for it. They will hire a self-acclaimed data scientist, put him into the sales / business / controlling department and expect him to do some number-voodoo to magically increase their profit.

My advise would be to get a degree in one of these business majors of one of those departments and the specialize in the quantitative methods for it (maybe even get a statistics minor).
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>>24060941
So u mean something like an MBA or business analytics
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>>24060941
Also:
The working conditions in DS are similar to CS. The pacing of technological change is very fast and you get outdated pretty quick. If your DS work doesn't meet the magical expectations of your employers (because the few collected, garbage data they provide you don't give much to work with), your department will get reduced / kicked.

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of DS, a lot of them neither know how to be a software engineer (scripting with python doesn't count) nor a statistician (executing the anova() function in R studio wont make you one).

One big advantage is though, if you can present your data and talk to people / management in a way they understand it, it could open doors to higher positions.
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>>24060964
Yes. Someone with a degree / experience in business analytics, business information systems or an MBA with some stat courses is capable of completely replacing a data scientist AND has the advantage of knowing how a business is run, which allows your employers to apply him in all sorts of different departments.
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File: data_science.png (485 KB, 1432x1732)
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>>24060941
pic kinda related
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>>24061004
Thank u anon.
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>>24060614
look at how most people "get rich". It's normally through real estate, owning multiple businesses, or investments. Idk why people goof around with that goal and think "GOING TO COLLEGE WILL MAKE ME RICH!"
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>>24060639
agreed
if you want to be actually rich, don't work for a wage
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>>24060614
Dont worry about hitting it rich. Get a decent job and make enough to get by plus a little extra for yourself. The love of money is the root of all evil
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>>24062515
if I rape a woman do I want money or sex
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>>24061004
Is business difficult to entry without a "business management/management information systems degree"? I'm in between more bio/CS, about to graduate, and was fixed more on data science for a career (maybe in the biology field, or environmental). I'm curious if business is something I would need to start below-entry (below a fresh business grad) or if I could feasibly compete with them. Throughout high school I was in competitive business groups such as DECA, ended up playing first in my state and went to nationals— so I don't feel I'm completely out of the loop for that field. Could be wrong, though!



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