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>my views to likes ratio on ArtStation is 10 to 1 on average.

Is this bad? It seems average but some people get double of that. I don't get it, I get good feedback from 3d communities when I post wips, I manage to get to trending when I post on artstation, but ultimately I fall down really fast and the ratio is starting to get worse and worse. God forbid if I choose a day when someone team will do an art drop, I immediately disappear from first 5 rows while others hold their ground for much longer.

I know I'm getting better at this and am being noticed by more and more people in the industry, I do this professionally, but social media posts don't reflect it and it is making me doubt myself more than it should, but I can't help it. I'm even happy with where I am at this stage, but those stupid little internet points are killing me and immediately make me doubt my skills. Every time I post now is making my day ruined because the views and likes are getting lower despite getting more followers.
>>
Number of followers/Internet points has little to do with skill. That's marketing. Learn about it and you'll see it's a whole different beast.

Anything by Seth Godin is a good place to start, but only if you're dead serious about your art. If not, then get on a internet marketing/social media course or something.
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>>912368
Yeah I've downloaded some of his books, read a bit but honestly it seemed like lots of words with not much to show for it. You're probably right, I do notice an increase in engagement when I force myself to add people on linkedin etc. and spam everywhere, but it all seems very random. How do some newbies and students who post for the first time get featured everywhere? This was actually my case as well, I still haven't beat the engagement of my first (shitty in comparison to my current work) scene and it also annoys me. I was literally nowhere and doing it as a hobby with 0 connections, I just shared my wips on one discord community a bit and posted it on artstation. I don't understand these damn algorithms.

If it didn't affect my job offers I would probably care even less, but it does, so I think attention is still important. Maybe I don't need them now, but I would still like to build up my following faster with each new project release.

I guess it would also be easier to deal with it if I posted smaller works more often, but I'm slow and post a few times a year at best. I spend months on my shit and when it reaches only 200-400 likes it feels bad. Sometimes it doesn't pass 100.

What I fear is that my tastes might have been ruined, who knows, maybe I also got a brain rot and am focusing too much on technicalities so my props are better, but general theme of the scene isn't. Or maybe it has nothing to do with it. Maybe it's something completely else. Maybe it's luck. I have no clue.
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>>912369
Consistency. Try different things. Increase your production value. Add trendy shit to the things you model. Maybe 3-minute challenges or something that speaks "this is hard to do, so I'm doing it for you to enjoy it and so you don't have to"

What works for you won't work for anybody else, but you have to figure it out on your own. Do some AB testing. Keep experimenting.

The good part is that all that effort will pay off regardless because you'll be practicing workflow skills besides your craft.

And that's your inner critic screwing you up, so put it to work. Instead of beating yourself up for not having enough engagement, have it pressure you into figuring out the next steps.

Seth talks about the engagement thing and separates it into two big categories of marketing. Direct marketing is more "organic" and better for growing, and brand marketing is more numbers-oriented, which is better for raking in cash when you're already established. If you focus on brand marketing (counting numbers) when your brand is still not established you'll get misleading data.

Some summarized notes I've taken from his books:

- Do work that matters for people who care
- What do we make? Change. If not, why bother?
- Average is the enemy.
- Tension is created every time change shows up
- Care about status roles and how they play in marketing. Casio tells the same time as a Rolex, they are marketed toward different people.
- "Just because it's new" doesn't last
- People can't remember all of your things
- It's a journey. Let people know you want them to join you (the human experience is a story) and see you grow. Show your growth and compromise with your craft, and you'll earn real support.
- It's not you, it's those you serve to
- If you build it to be paraded, it probably will be
- More < Better
- Go make a ruckus!
- Scarcity is a motivator
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>>912367
>I do this professionally
I am literally not reading the rest of that garbage, you already have your foot in the door and do this for a living. the hard part is over, stop fucking whining
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>>912367
I can't really judge the situation if I don't know what your work looks like. A plenty of artists can create technically proficient pieces, but can't make anything that catches the eye. It could also be a networking problem.
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>>912367
>zoomers be like: I work professionally and get praise but I don't get millions of likes and comments on social media? AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH IM GOINNNNG INSAAAAAAAAAAAANEEEEEE
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>>912370
Thanks for the tips, I appreciate it. I guess I'll check out more of Seth's work again.

>>912372
It's understandable, I guess that's true as well. I've seen a lot of people stop posting almost completely once they got a job in the industry. I want to do it for myself and share my art with people, I also enjoy it if other's find it inspiring. It was never about getting a job in the first place. I'm just posting more rare because of lack of time and, honestly, me being indecisive and perfectionist often so a lot of wips that are almost finished I never release.

BUT - my first project which was featured everywhere is what ultimately got me into the industry. If it got the attention of my recent works I probably wouldn't be doing this for a living.

>>912374
Makes sense. I don't want to share my work here for obvious reasons but what you're saying may also be right. But judging by comments I usually get I really think the theme itself may not be an issue and it's eye catching enough. Like, on communities people notice it easily, but on artstation, twitter, linkedin it's less, or at least less than what I would expect after getting all the attention during my wip sharing stage.

>>912375
Kek well yeah, it's pretty stupid, I admit that. Obviously I'm playing it up a bit for 4chan, my world isn't crushing before my eyes because of this, but I can't say it doesn't feel bad sometimes and I'm sure others felt like this at some point in their careers.
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>>912376
Artstation is pretty rigged when it comes to exposure. Non "pro" accounts very rarely reach the top of trending, and the top is also almost permanently filled exclusively with coomer bait, fanart of a fotm IP and already established big names.
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>how2get popular
Porn sells. Simple as.
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>>912377
>Non "pro" accounts very rarely reach the top of trending
Is this true? I never bothered getting a pro (or plus) account lol. I've seen some of the features of it like analytics from an account of my studio which I have access to as well, and it is pathetic. I know having that "pro" tag could be useful for standing out and you get listed on top of search results, but does it actually matter to the algorithm when it comes to exposure it gives to your work?

I mean, I reached the trending page every time, even if it was in lower rows sometimes, and I see plenty of other people did the same so I really don't know.
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>>912367
Larping until proven otherwise. This is not your vent space retard. Go to discord.
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>>912381
Do a quick sweep and see for yourself. One in 10 will be a non-pro account. I don't know how the algorythm works, you could explain it by "pro" accounts being more competent, but this should get balanced out that there are more non-pro accounts.
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>>912367
That's a pretty good baseline ratio actually, idk why you're despairing. Anyways if you feel like you're stagnating or backsliding then the solution is basically always the same, do a project but commit to spending significantly more time on it than you usually do and take it to a quality level that you haven't targeted before
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>>912381
No, it isn't true. Trending is about the velocity of likes. Get a lot of likes in a short time, you go up; the likes start to slow down, you fall off. The reason big accounts are often up there is because they have a lot of people following them who get the notification of new work and come like it. They aren't there because the pro account boosts them, that's just cope
>>
Almost certainly this faggotry about likes and ratios has bled into what you produce. You've become a faggot and the market is responding. Stop being a faggot and you'll stop getting treated like a faggot, you faggot.
>>
Speaking of followers, what's up with random 3D art students on linkedin with literal thousands and thousands of followers (it says followers, not connections)? And then you go to their artstation and it's a literal /wip/ tier hobbyist who doesn't even work in the industry. How do you get even close to that amount of following, at that age and without noticeable works behind you? Of course it's easy to get a shitton of likes when the website will serve your post to thousands of people in their feed without even counting the shares and auto reposts when somebody likes your work so it's visible to their connections as well.
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>>912367
show your work then
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>>912377
>the top is also almost permanently filled exclusively with coomer bait, fanart of a fotm IP and already established big names.
Everywhere is like this unless those things are explicitly banned. People will like the things they already like more than whatever idea you have.
>>
>>912989
Yeah, lack of views is probably due to a chosen theme. All the time I see stuff that looks "grandiose" like some large architectural structure, landscape etc., often just straight up copied from a (existing real life) reference or a famous concept art, and it gets a lot of attention even though the quality is pretty lackluster and sometimes assets are even unusable when you look at them from a closeup. I think the main reason those projects grab attention is because the original works they're copying had a good design and were eye catching.
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>>913167
This is peak souless pandering to the western jews. Just stick to anime and avoid artstation like the plague.
>>
How tf do you get any engagement on twitter when your posts are getting literally 0 likes and you have barely any followers and impressions? Do I need to shill twitter on other social media? Using tags and posting good stuff isn't enough?
>>
>>913459
Your art sucks. Simple as.
>>
>>913468
AAA projects behind me say otherwise.



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