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File: frodo.jpg (45 KB, 600x599)
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> One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
> One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them
If this was written in Elvish, why does it rhyme in English?
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>>63398373
Coincidence. Or possibly, it was written to rhyme in all relevant languages.
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>>63398373
They had good translator
or maybe it didn't even rhyme in english
Poetry is quite hard to translate between the rythm, intent/meaning and number of syllable but it's possible to translate rhyme from one language to another
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>>63398373
Because it's not a literal, word for word, sound for sound translation. Tolkien "cleans up" the "translation" to English to preserve what he thinks are important themes or to make something understandable, rather than be a slavish dedication to how the characters themselves would have spoken.

That's why, for instance, it's "Frodo" and "Bilbo" instead of the 'actual' "Frida" and "Bilba"; because we in the 20th century tend to put -o at the end of masculine names and words and -a at the end of feminine ones.
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>>63398373
A good translator makes the original feeling of message work in the language they were translating in to.
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>>63398373
First, it rhymes in The Black Speech, you cockfuck.
Second, we receive stories from the Middle Earth Mythos as a translation from the various languages of Middle Earth, you assdrip.
Third, the conversation spoken between Gandalf and Frodo where we hear the rhyme for the first time would be spoken in Westron, you spunkstain.
Fourth, you wouldn't be asking this question if you had the barest inkling about the artwork or artist you're referring to, you fucking fleshwaste.
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>>63398373
While translating poetry you write it to be a poetry in your language. It is not word to word translation you Angband orc
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>>63398465
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>>63398431
At that point I think you need to step back and reconsider how much work you're putting into your conlang...
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>>63398373
Because both lines end in the same word, "them", dummy.
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>>63398791
I think he meant "find" and "bind"
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>>63398791
doesn't mean that the original would've also put 'them' at the end
languages differ in sentence structure, you fuckwit
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>>63398791
It did though
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>>63398882
>>63398951
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>>63398373

Gandalf translated it to rhyme as is standard with poetry. See, the Aeneid or the Odyssey for RL examples
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>>63398373
Elvish is actually just English, so it makes perfect sense.
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>>63398605

He was a linguist, what else would he spend time on?
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>>63398373
>poem translated
>lol why does it rhyme
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>>63398373
>LotR is the far future of Earth.
>Magic is nanites. Balrogs are mutants, orcs are still niggers though.
>Elves are English speaking precursors.
>Elves only appear advanced because everyone else degraded over time.
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>>63398373
>If this was written in Elvish, why does it rhyme in English?
It was written in the Black Speech using Elvish runes. It was translated by Gandalf into Westron and then by Tolkein into English.
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>Ash nazg durbatul√Ľk, ash nazg gimbatul,
>Ash nazg thrakatul√Ľk agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.

It rhymes in black speech as well.
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>>63398373
Like all of LOTR this is allegory for the great wars. In this case the poem is a direct reference to French propaganda/folk tune Le tombeau de Couperin
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Did Tolkien and Poots create the greatest fictional worlds of the last century?
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>>63402126
So what would be the closest translation of that if we ignore rhyming and poetry?
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>>63405015
As best as I can do, given that we never get a very complete lexicon with all associated connotations with the black speech:

>One ring constraning all of them, one ring discovering them, one ring dragging all of them, and darkness inside tie them
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>>63405272
That's a bit creepier
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>>63405332
It's the Black Speech, of course it is.
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>"blah blah blah" said frodo
why do people like this again?
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>>63398605
We call that quitter talk around here, you're on /tg you're supposed to be an autist damn it!
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>>63400275
The odyssey didn't rhyme in Greek
Only Pope and Chapman et al translated it to rhyme
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>>63398373
>Elvish
What the shit, did you even read LotR?
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Elvish poets are so skilled and the language so elegant as for meaning or substance to not be lost between translations.



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