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Only people who know what they are talking aboutcan post in this thread.
Here is an example that although the amount of increased oxygen is small, mouth breathing wins.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4047298/
Post about anything from breathing patterns to techniques.
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>>10645701
did this control for reverse causality, i.e. the pfc being recruited more to execute a different breathing strategy
>>
>>10645701
Why assume that the slight increase in oxygen gives benefits that outweights
> Individuals who habitually breathe through the mouth are more likely than nasal breathers to have sleep disorders and attention deficit hyperactive disorder.
?
>>
>>10646953
Cont.

Not to mention that mouth breathing is associated with higher risk of many types of dental problems
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>>10645701
but surely if you get less oxygen your body acclimates and you become more efficient at utilizing oxygen, meaning if you nasal inhale you'll get a boost switching to mouth breathing temporarily while if you always mouth breath you'll just work at a lower efficiency
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>>10645701
>Post about anything from breathing patterns to techniques.
yoga bitches
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>>10646988
This. /thread

You're probably one of the few smart people on this board
>>
Here's an easy one, when you inhale your stomach should be inflating, not your chest
>>
There was a thread about Wim Hof Method a few days ago where someone posted a link to the stuff he has behind a paywall.
https://boards.fireden.net/sci/thread/10639672
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>>10646988
>>10647016
samefag
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>>10647075
He's actually not, as I am the only one that have posted more than one post in this thread. I am

>>10646953
>>10646964
>>10647046
>> this post
>>
>>10647093
>>10647093
>>10647093

SHUT UP AND JUST SNORE ALREADY, SHIT
>>
>>10647075
no, I've just studied exercise physiology at the graduate level and it's a logical assumption, same reason athletes will sleep in hyperbaric chambers, or those from higher altitudes will have an advantage against those from lower altitudes. if you're used to getting less oxygen there are physiological adaptations, making the utilization of oxygen more efficient, and considering the more efficient person can still mouth breath, what advantage would always mouth breathing hold? you'll just make your respiratory system less efficient, and have less room to buffer for increased oxygen demands

although I do appreciate that anon's kind words
>>
>>10647075
Nice try fuckhead but no
>>
>Only people who know what they are talking aboutcan post in this thread.

You really shouldn't be posting on this thread then.
>>
>>10647131
Somebody's got a temper, lol. Mouth breathing sucks dude. It's makes your mouth dry and your breath stink. It also makes you look silly. In Asia they call this pathology "fish mouth". I think I've read that snoring is associated with decrease of oxygen too. But according to acclimation-guy that might be alright.

>>10647133
I think an important remark is that one should not try to make a DIY acclimation chamber by having the windows closed when you sleep as this will cause CO2 buildup if the room is small to medium sized. CO2 quickly becomes toxic and sleeping in rooms with high CO2 concentrations is associated with lowered cognitive performance the day after. It is CO2 that makes for the feeling of dull air, not low O2. Also, CO2 sinks to the bottom of the room so having your bed up in the ceiling is optimal if you have trouble with ventilation.
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>>10647195
Cont.

The ventilation varies a lot from building to building. Older building usually have larger airflow and removes CO2 faster. The most common ventilation technology is simply a little hole in the wall. The effectiveness of passive ventilation in general is dependent on the pressure gradient outside-inside the room. Some buildings have inherent problems that makes it hard to sustain a good pressure gradient. Active ventilation completely eradicates the problem of CO2 buildup if properly set up.
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>>10647195
I haven't studied sleep medicine but I wouldn't be surpised if even though snoring is less effecient, snorers stay as oxygenated by altering respiratory rate, especially since they're more likely to wake themselves up and get less restful sleep. the bigger concern is that snoring is usually associated with sleep apnea, and that's potentially life threatening. thanks for sharing the information regarding implementation of DIY hyperbaric chambers, I think if anyone is seriously considering building one they should do a lot of research but you're certainly right to point out the dangers
>>
>>10647280
Increase in respiratory rate sounds reasonable, but there seems to be additional concerns with snoring like sleep deprivation, daytime drowsiness, irritability, lack of focus and decreased libido.[wikipedia]. Sleep apnea is somewhat associated with snoring, at least the obstructive form of sleep apnea.

Yes, CO2 buildup applies to DIY hyperbaric chambers as well. I was originally thinking of people wanting to spend time in poorly ventilated rooms for the purpose of acclimating to breathing less O2. It's a naive idea as high CO2 becomes a problem much faster than low O2 becomes a problem. I do not believe there are pertaining positive effects of high CO2 exposure.
>>
Then why aren't runners mouth breathers?
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>>10648858
>for brain
You're as smart as runner it seems.
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>>10648858
Lol. I think mouth breathing while running is quite common regardless of breathing technique while idle.
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>>10645701
I think mouth breathing is good, but only temporarily. You often see athletes mouth breathe in important or stressful moments. But to do it on a day to day basis is probably bad.
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>>10645701
stop breathing PLEASE.
>>
>>10645701

Deep breathing.



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