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Hello fellow docs and pharmacists. This thread is aimed at med students, pharma students, dental students, nurses, as long as you're a medical professional, you're welcome here. Let's talk about specialities, residency, research, literally anything related to medicine.

I'm an EU student from eastern Europe and will likely choose family medicine (I like palliative care), ask away if you have any questions.
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>>10459453
Why can't I build muscle?!
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>>10459459
It really depends. What do you eat? How much do you exercie/week? I can't help you out until you give me more info, friend.
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>>10459453
im a pre med student, and i want to do oncology

i know how saying what you want to do at this point is meme tier, but is there anything bad about this specialty and/or internal medicine
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What are the best specialties for someone fed up with patients? I was thinking radiology or pathology but are there any others?
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>>10459796
>fed up with patients
As a radiologist you do have to see patients in order to make the right diagnosis. Also if you want pathology, don't think it will be only based on interpreting biopsies, you will mostly work with corpses and do a shit ton of research. Both of the specialities are good, but if you really really hate patients, go for path.
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>>10459787
Nothing bad but oncology is genius level, imo. Unless you're extremely good and participate in a shit ton of conferences to be up to date with all the cancer research papers, don't do it. If you choose oncology, you will have to be 100% dedicated to the job.

Regarding IM, go for it if you like primary care (like I do) and if you want a decent lifestyle with not so much stress.
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>>10459453
why family medicine? Unrelated, how much do you hate your life right now?
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>>10459840
I like having a long relationship with my patients, I like chronic illnesses and their management, I like to be the guy that is sending other patients to specialists with an accurate diagnosis and I also like doing full check ups. The patient-doctor relationship is what makes me want to become a doctor.

I don't hate myself, I really like the way my life looks right now. The only thing that I wish for is that I would like to have a love for cardiology. I hate it, my profs were okay-ish but their teaching style was just horrendous.
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Waiting on one more medical school to get back to me after an interview. Waitlisted elsewhere. Hopefully everything works out for me this cycle, I'd rather not waste time during a gap year. Send me your energy anons
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>>10459453
>I like palliative care
How can anyone like this shit?
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>>10459879
I had a very very good prof that explained paliative care very well. It's not only about terminally ill patients but after a laborious surgery you can improve the patients quality of life so much more instead of letting him "rest". It was one of my favourite classes, if not my personal favourite.
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>>10459878
I send you all the medanon energy I possess and I wish you the best, anon.
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Bump
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I'm MS1 and want to do neurology and almost everyone around me wants to do neurology (maybe unconscious selection bias?), but why does it seem so popular? What can I do to stand out, outside of research?
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>>10459453
How do I motivate myself to get A's and not just rest for bare minimum until I find something that I actually like studying
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>>10459453
MS1
Fuck anatomy
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>>10460659
In a field you can stand out with two things. One of them is research, the second is experience. Neuro is a good choice but it's not what it used to be. Nowadays you can't diagnose anything until you see a CAT scan or MRI.
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>>10460781
I'm exactly like this. You don't. I just get the bare minimum at stuff that I hate. You don't have to get big scores in order to be a good doctor, just do what you like. (And hopefully, you'll find it)
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>>10459796
>radiology
don't do radiology, the job will be completely outsourced in 5-10 years.


>>10459878
>Waiting on one more medical school to get back to me after an interview. Waitlisted elsewhere. Hopefully everything works out for me this cycle, I'd rather not waste time during a gap year. Send me your energy anons

good luck bro. i go to nyu med, was waitlisted at harvard, straight rejected at JHU.

>>10459879
because medicine is not about curing diseases, it's about alleviating pain.

>>10460781
if you wanna be a doctor, you need A's. there's no way around it.

i hated pre-med because it discouraged me from pursuing a double major in physics and biochem.

i still made it though with a 100th percentile MCAT score and a 3.5

>>10460659
>>10461945
i wanna do cog-neuro, but only 3 programs exist and they take 2 people each.
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>>10461618
Yeah, I stopped wanting to become a doctor after my first anatomy class. Anatomy is pure autism. There is no reason why things can't be named in a more logical, comprehensible, and understandable way.
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>>10461958
>if you wanna be a doctor, you need straight A's
I don't get this, why?

>>10461978
Honestly, I liked anatomy more than biochem. Maybe that's just me being an autist, but anatomy was a bit more "elegant" imo.
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>>10459787
>but is there anything bad about this specialty and/or internal medicine
a few notes...

1. You will have very little time for your spouse and family. This might seem like the kind of thing to which you can respond with, "Once I'm established/successful/whatever, I'll make time." But that won't happen. You have to know that going in, and your spouse has to know, too. You will not know your children nearly as well as your spouse
2. If you go into medical oncology, for example, you will treat patients over long periods of time. You will get to know them, establish bonds as you work together through the ups and downs, get to know their families, and so on. Then, oftentimes, they will die. It will never be OK, it will always be emotionally draining. It will take a toll on you, no matter how distance or tough you think you are.
3. The emotional engagement mentioned above will affect the amount of energy you have for your spouse and your family. It will reduce how emotionally available you are. This might seem to be of little importance to a student but once you have a souse and children you will come to understand that each of you requires a certain level of emotional engagement with the other, and if you are unable to fulfil your side of that equation, the others will lose out on something important, because of you.
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>>10462011
>>if you wanna be a doctor, you need straight A's
>I don't get this, why?
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>>10462011
>>if you wanna be a doctor, you need straight A's
SO you'd like to know that the doctor cutting into you and making sure you survive got C's in college?!?!?
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>>10462036
Already married and divorced because I realized domestic life is fucking hell. I'll take the medicine route. As long as I can return to my own solitude fortress at the end of shifts I'll be good.
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>>10462088

????????

What's the bad thing here? If he does well at anatomy and surgery rotations and does badly at let's say, cell biology and useless shit, he doesn't need huge scores, desu.
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>>10462123
Being OK with a doctor lacking a thorough understanding. Whew, lad.
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>>10462130
For example, I already forgot almost everything about cell bio, histology and biochem (1) and had pretty good scores. If I want to know about them again, I just have to revisit them but I don't need to because they're fucking useless after I started my rotations.
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bump, don't let it die bois
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>>10459787
It's great if you're a sociopath that wants a license to murder people.
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>>10462918
>wants a license to murder people
Bait? I'm smelling bait.
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I'm 25, med school is 6 years here ( mainland europe), so I'll be 31, if everything goes as planned, before I can do my residency. Is it worth it at this point? I mean it's been my only dream since I was young but I always was discouraged by the entrance exam. Now I'm 25, have a masters in biochem with excellent grades but I hate my job perspectives and want to try medicine
Am I too old?
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>>10462937
Go for it. You're still young. I have a guy in my class that started at 30. In my country med school is still 6 years, now we're both in the 4th year, I started at 19 so I'm 22 now and he's 33. Definitely a good idea.
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Bros i was real lazy fuckball in first years so my anatomy knowledge is lacking, now that im really into studying theres so much stuff piled up that i dont have time to reread all the anatomy books. Is there any way i can get quick online free lessons that are fast and not complicated which will make me remember stuff ive forgoten or lazied over?
Second question, what is required for doctor to do research, is it possible after residency and years of experience or you have to get some degrees or how this shit works?
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>>10463362
>what is required for a doctor to do research
Be smart, have a good question that needs to be answered and answer it by doing research. I don't really like doing research, tbqh. It feels boring for me but if you're willing to focus on discoveries instead of patients, go for it.
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>>10462937
If you have excess time and money sure.
I say dont and find a good hobby like programing for example to fill your time.
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>I want to be neurologist
What kind of person do you imagine?
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>>10462937
You should definitely do that. Kikes discouraged me from doing real studies and memed me into physics, telling me I had a good shot at becoming an academic. Then I found out only kikes get those positions so now I'm left with a bunch of useless degrees and I can't find a job related to my studies. I have to become a code monkey and make half the salary of a brainlet CS code monkey with a relevant degree but with half my iq. How convenient for (((them))). I'll kill myself.

The "S" and "M" of STEM are memes, don't do it, there are no relevant jobs (and the jobs you can get with these degrees suck because there are other people with more relevant qualifications than you so you can be the brightest of your uni and still come out last in the competition vs other degrees)
If you try to keep going with your Msc in biochem you'll be kept as a underpaid slave, knowing that you have nowhere to go if they fire you, so you'll do whatever they ask even if it's sucking their dick. They know you can't find a new job easily. Better find a way out one way or another.
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>>10463625
From my experience, neuros can be:

1.Hyper intelligent and get to diagnose a patient without much effort (Or barely relying on the CAT scan/MRI)
2.Nerds that go for research only and invest a lot of time in their work that usually doesn't go as they planned
3.Shit neuros that can't link the CAT scan/MRI with the patient's symptoms and only relies on the scan.
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I'm secretly gunning for Ortho, but pretend I'm just a family med guy. My classmates? Fuck em
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>>10462036
and you won't know your spouse as well as the mailman
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>>10462130
Dumb pre med. Nobody remembers biochem after graduation, completely useless for dealing with real people.
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>>10463974
They don't understand, my friend. These are the future arrogant gunners.

>>10463927
>ortho
OP here. I loved ortho when I had rotations, it was very fun to learn and see how the surgeons approached each case, the trauma part was the real shit but I kinda liked bone tumors and cancers too. Too bad I had palliative care classes that semester, it kinda shadowed ortho for me and when we had a case with advanced bone cancers, I always cared for the palliative part of patient management. Family med is cool as long as you do it from your heart, imo. They don't earn much money and if you go for a private practice, the stressful part will be there too.

Regarding classmates, everybody in my class wants either cards or surgery (usually plastics and gen surg). There's me with family med and another girl that wants IM -> primary care. I know that most of them won't become cardiologists, but they think they're hotshots and it's funny to watch them struggle over-studying and memorize every detail, kek.
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I am premed how hard is it to get a trauma residency?
>>10462076
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>>10464261
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>>10464261
Ortho is a very competitive field, you have to study hard and get a very high score to get into it.
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>>10459459
a symptom of too much shitposting on /sci/
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>>10464349
I haven't been able to build muscle even before I started to post on /sci/. Your reply is typical of doctors who can't diagnose or explain shit yet act like they know it all.
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>>10459787
The field is changing every month, you need to be reading a lot just to keep up. You'll have long relationship with your patients and they keep dying. Fair amounts of people who don't want to die and are in no shape or form ready to do so. That's always heavy.
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>>10459796
Clinical laboratory sciences, pathology and radiology.

t. clinical chem master race
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>>10464364
Do you lift, sleep, and eat eggs, milk, steak and peanut butter?
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>>10464108
Tbh only reason I'm doing it is for the money. Tired of being a poor fag.

I enjoy medicine and I'm good at it, but my primary motivator is money
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>>10464420
We all have reasons, but one of the main reasons = helping people.

If only money is on your mind, you'll either end up as a shitty doctor ( grades don't really show how good of a doctor you will be, experience will) or you will hate your job. As long as it makes you happy, I root for you. Money is important because happiness can't pay you bills and stuff, but already being in the field of medicine as a doc will bring you enough to live decently and better than most jobs out there.
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>>10464403
I lift, sleep and eat meat and pasta, this should work for everybody but it doesn't for me
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>>10464364
There's nothing to diagnose. You just asked a vague question without additional info, just like a shitty patient that every doc hates would and yet you expect us to give you an accurate answer. Kindly fuck off back to /fit/.
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>>10464364
What the fuck do you want? There could be a million things causing it, none of which I can diagnose through the internet. Go see a doctor.
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>>10464440
I think there was some research on doctors' motivations and how their colleagues evaluated their skills. The people who repoted money as their main motivation were generally regarded as more skilled by their colleagues and respected more.
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Medistud here. Our teachers often underline the difference between the anglosaxon method of always telling the patient the complete truth about his situation (eg "you have a bad cancer, you will be dead in 2 months") compared to us. Honestly, i worked in oncology department for a few months and i think most of them didn't know for shit they were soon gonna die. But it seems they at least enjoyed carefree time they had left.
Anglosaxons style docs, what are the usual reactions you get from reporting bad news? How do they react on short and long term? Is it a waste on someone with short term poor prognosis?
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>>10464440
Cringe and Bluepilled

>>10464483
Would make sense, the guy who goes after money will hone his skills to get that good speciality and those fellowships. The guy who just wants to help people will settle for family medicine.

90% of the surgeons I rotated with were arrogant, and that was a good thing
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>>10464538
>90% of the surgeons I rotated with were arrogant
All of them are, man. Surgeons do think of themselves of being hotshots and fair enough, they have the right to be since being a surgeon brings much more stress than family med.

Also, why am I cringe and bluepilled? There's nothing wrong with my main target being helping people. I just want my own private practice in a rural/suburban area and practice medicine the way I want to for what I want to. I'm not saying he's wrong, it's normal for any surgical speciality to earn more than a clinical one since they're all procedure heavy, but money on the first place seems to be a bit foolish in the sense that you as a student, studied to help out people in need and how to treat their conditions and so on, but instead your main focus is money. Idk, I'm shit at explaining this kind of stuff, better forget it.
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>>10464571
Just a joke lad, I respect that view
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>>10465047
Well then, I must say I'm sorry. It looks like I took it a bit too far.
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Anyone know of specialties (besides the obvious dermatology) which allow for some work life balance? Should I just get a cs PhD and work as a radiological AI consultant?
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>>10464538
What are the good specialties?
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>>10464108
Why do your peers "over study"? How do you know what not to study?
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>>10465115
psych, family med, something that doesn't require you to be "on call".

>>10465127
not him but that's a dumb question

>>10465129
>over study
Simple, instead of learning the general idea behind the subject and then to develop it into something just a bit more complex, they just "eat" the books and still struggle.

>how do you know what not to study?
Don't go into details???
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>>10465115
oculistic
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>>10465220
how can they overstudy and still struggle? I"m hoping to avoid that but want to gun for a specialty
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1st year MD seeker here
For those of you that already did your Step 1
>Did you study step-specific materials (i.e. First Aid or Zanki) during your pre-clinical years?
>How did you match it with school curriculum?

My school makes us take all of our core rotations before the Step, which makes it 2 years down the road for me. I don't know if I should dedicate time to it now or I'll just forget it by then and should focus on my school's learning curriculum for the time (which, I must say, largely matches step content but is in a different format with a lot of the usual professor idiosyncrasies)
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>>10465553
use anki, adderall, and any nootropics shown to cause neural growth.
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>>10465514
>how can they overstudy and still struggle?
I think what their getting at is their peers are too concerned with memorizing every detail rather than understanding the concepts, so when they're presented with a question utilizing the concept in different form, they're left clueless.
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>>10459878
Best of luck anon.
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>>10462937
You're young and have plenty space for exploration. Give it a shot.
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>>10465569
Uh, thanks, but that wasn't really what I asked about
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>>10465349
You mean optometrist?
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>>10465586
I see, I should be good then. Thanks anon
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>>10465674
No problem. Cheers!
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>>10459453
Any fellow Canadacucks here? How hard is it to get into med school in Canada like UBC med or U of T med? I heard you need an absurdly high MCAT score.

Is there even any point trying to be a physician when you're not that passionate about it and only really care about getting a high paying career?

I do care about health but only really if it's related to my own's body's well being and not performing procedures on others
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>>10459453

I can't choose between majoring in Chemistry or Biomedical Engineering for Pre-med. I can succeed in both, but I am worried about being a legitimate canidate for med school (being unique).

I'm in BME at the moment, first semester was at 3.19. Now I'm probably going to have around a 3.5 for my second semester.
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Any current medfags here?
I'm starting med school this fall in Boston and I don't really know what to expect for M1. I've heard from pretty much everyone that M1 is the most rigorous, content-wise. Should I start studying some of the material now or is it possible to keep up with the material during the school year?
If I should start studying now, what are some coursework/materials I should buy and utilize?
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>>10465775
probably won't make it. Nowadays you really got to stand out with a 4.0, extracurricular activities and volunteering (but mostly that 4.0 GPA)
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>>10465775
>>10465990
Why is it so hard for Americans to get into medschool?

Being from EU, there's lots of ppl that try for medschool and do get it. It's true that the admission is pretty easy but the hard part is maintaining yourself at a level that you can pass the exams with decent grades. Some of the students here that went for medschool because they didn't know what career path to choose in life just dropped out after the 1st year because they weren't ready regarding the study quantity and limited time.
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>>10465990
why
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>>10464510
the fuck? what country are you in??
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>>10466029
>Why is it so hard for Americans to get into medschool?
Why is it so hard to get into MIT or Cambridge? What are you asking? Do you think it is good to have a system that allows in tons of people who have zero chance of making it through?
It's hard to get into med school in the US (and Canada, which might be a little harder, tBh) because you have to have the potential to succeed, once admitted.
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>>10466212
Shit answer but fine, I'll take it.
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>>10466238
Be more specific with your qeustion, then.
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>>10466241
I can't be more specific ,desu. Med school is free if your entry grade is in top 80 here. The tax is not high at all (2k $/year), for a country like USA. I want to know why are mediocre students barely accepted into medschool. I was a mediocre student myself but once i got into medschool and found something that I enjoyed studying, my grades went up. In US,unless you are not a top student, they won't even look at your admission papers. Idk how MCAT works btw.
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>>10466207
Italy. In general the patient doesn't want to know his details. Most elder men don't even know what they have (not necessarily oncology patients, any sort of cronic disease), they will literally tell you to ask their wife.
This attitude is changing with younger people, but most of times it's hard to include them in the decisional process. Either they want to decide everything and shit up some procedure they found on google or give you complete freedom of action.
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>>10466338
Not the guy that asked you.

I feel like the patient should know what's going on in their body. They may not live that long but the quality of life can be greatly improved with hospice/palliative care. When I had my EM rotations, I shadowed a resident that was always delivering the bad news, maybe he was a masochist or he was the scape goat of the department I don't really know, the family usually ended up devastated but the patients did thank him for finding out what's wrong with them. It's their right to know, but if it's like in your case and the patient doesn't want to know, sure , you can choose not to tell them.

I didn't understand this
>Either they want to decide everything and shit up some procedure they found on google or give you complete freedom of action.

You're talking about younger patients or docs?
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>>10466356
Meant to say those kind of patients that think they know it better because they googled it up, therefore want experimental drug A, B and C or some surgery procedure like removing pancreas, liver and lungs since that's where the metastasis are.
On the complete opposite side there are patients that lack any basic knowledge and trust you a priori, therefore will tell you "do what you think is better"

>the family usually ended up devastated
Something i forgot to mention, it's also common that the relatives get more info told to them compared to the actual patient. So the family as a whole knows, but not the patient himself.
This obviously leads to a complex situation. Some do have a complete psicological collapse at the last weeks/days and the burden on the family and medical staff is heavy.
I'm still a student so I've never been given the task to give communicate such bombs to patients but i wonder if i would even be able to. I accepted death as something that will happen, but it's hard to transmit this sort of acceptance because it's quite obvious that i'm not the one dying.

>the quality of life can be greatly improved with hospice/palliative care
Also something still quite underdeveloped here. It's quite solid for oncology patient but all other cronic pts that suffer from basically equivalent life quality mutilations are left on their own. (relatively, they obviously have their family)
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>>10466369
I get it now, thanks for the reply.

I encountered some patients that wanted to get a laborious procedure that they discovered surfing the internet and every time that happened our prof just explained to the pt why the procedure will do no good. The patient is desperate to live so obviously he "takes the matter in his own hands" and does "research" on google.

The quality of life here is mostly for terminal onco patients, but that's not the limit. At the palliative care unit I had classes, I saw many pts with advanced kidney failure, congestive heart failure, even Alzheimer's. (But that was in the psych hospital department)

>I accepted death as something that will happen, but it's hard to transmit this sort of acceptance because it's quite obvious that i'm not the one dying.

We're human after all, of course we don't want to be the ones that deliver the bad news but someone has to do it. That's just how life is. I was mentally exhausted after I shadowed that resident for a while, but I learned to live with the idea.
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>>10466381
>our prof
That's a good point, i always noticed better compliance when the professor status is involved. Almost as if normal doctors are considered unreliable or something.
You are right about taking the matter in his hands tho, maybe i'm just a cunt. After all they didn't study this stuff.
>I saw many pts with advanced kidney failure, congestive heart failure, even Alzheimer's
Nice. Alzheimer goes on its own since it's part of the geriatric care usually, and those have great care about quality of life for those patients and their family and palliative cares are well structured. We have dedicated structures for those terminal patients that are completly dependant from nurses and professional help for everything and it seems like a good system. It's more like a retirement complex than a hospital, with more freedom of movement for them and a more "aestetic" appeal which seems dumb but has a deep impact on a lot of things, especially in advanced demential patients.
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>>10466400
Well, we had to learn how to communicate with the patients at palliative care, he told us to not tell the patient to stop searching Google because he's desperate, I was thinking like you, but you have to put yourself in the patient's shoes and see the suffering from his point of view and also keep in mind he doesn't have the medical knowledge you possess. You're not thinking like a cunt, it's just normal to think like this and refute any info Google offers. Man, I'm in love with palliative care, kek.
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>>10466422
It seems like a good specialty actually, maybe a bit heavy on the emotional side and probably considered a meme by most collegues.
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>>10466453
It is considered a meme but I don't get it why. There are only 328 docs that practice palliative care in my country out of those 328 only 130 are family docs with a supra speciality. (Supra speciality is what we call some extra studying on top of the chosen speciality , ending with an exam ofc)
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>>10466542
Anything involving lots of psicology and relational skills is probably meme'd. You sound more like an entertainer than a doctor, despite there being lots of drugs that you are forced to handle in terminal patients which are incredibly complex to fit all together.
Also the fact that you aren't healing anyone, just giving support while waiting for his death probably contributes.
Here in general all family doctors are shat on by hospital doctors (they keep saying they work less - false - and earn more - sometimes true) but in my area even oncologists are shat on as being simply pseudo palliativists that take care of the failures that surgeons and radiotherapists failed to fix.
This at the level of doctors, obviously all of them are very respected by everyone outside.
How's the legal risk of being sued? I think there's also a correlation on how much hate you get depending on that, the safer you are the more hated you get.
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>>10466553
Family docs are indeed hated by the hospital docs. I still see it on a daily basis, especially when I had surgical rotations. They think that FM docs are only referring patients to specialists with no suspicion of a diagnosis and without running a blood panel or doing a check up before sending them. When they asked me what I want to do after I finish, they told me it's a waste of time. I feel like they're a bit frustrated by the fact that they don't have as much free time as FM docs, although they usually earn more than them. So whenever someone asks me what I want to do, I just tell them that I don't know yet.

As doctors, we're viewed very well by most of the patients but by other doctors, it sometimes is disgusting.
>>
I was left off of a paper that i was promised a second position cofirst on. it was my discovery. i have it in writing that i would be a cofirst. should i sue? the postdoc-now-pi that i had the agreement with insulted me many times and tried to take credit for my discovery, we made a deal with the oversight of the pi, and he didnt live up to it now.
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>>10466572
a lot of shit egos and entitlement. let them work themselves to death (literally). they have shorter lifespans and have massive chips on their shoulders
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>>10466572
>They think that FM docs are only referring patients to specialists with no suspicion of a diagnosis and without running a blood panel or doing a check up before sending them
Some do that, sadly. I think especially in bigger cities. I live in a 10k people town and if you were a drug dispencer you would lose all trust faster than light. Obviously sometime clinical exam is not enough.
A great upside for FM is that they are outside of all the hospital hierarchy which i thinks contributes to a big part of the stress they get. Only recently here are starting FM groups (made of the 3-4 that cover the town) so that they can cover each other if they have some sort of trouble and eventually discuss more complex cases and get updates together. An alone doctor is also sad, since he will obviously stagnate.
I'm into oncology but im not sure if i could do it all my life. Second option would be IM. FM is still out because we only do pratical experience with them after we've ended the studies, so i will decide then about it.
In an hospital dept there was a daily literal public humiliation for FMs, being taken in front of the staff and laughed at with pointing fingers. Mostly banter yes, and they laughed it off, but many believe it.
The fact that hospitals and territorial medicine are completly separated is probably another contributing factor.
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>>10466573
I don't know how it legally works, but can you prove that you had the idea? Is the paper that says you should be cofirst a legal contract or something like "i promise to be a good boy, signed: Anon"?
I think you are fucked, you learned a valuable lesson the hard way. If you fuck a big shot legally he will probably take some underground revenge so that you never work again. If he's big enough. Hope it wasn't a revolutionary idea.
A hug.
>>
>>10466585
i dont know how you do it. my friend had many patients die while over the holidays.
>>
>>10466585
>Some do that, sadly
Theres got to be FM docs like that too, right? Just like some surgeons that are shit too.

I want to practice it in the suburbs of the city I live in. The city has 350k and the suburbs only 8k and has only 2 FM docs now (both old and I might buy one's practice, who knows). I feel like one FM/practice is fine as long as you have a nurse to help you out, the cases shouldn't be too difficult and the patient management should be pretty easy compared to onco.

>I'm into oncology but im not sure if i could do it all my life
That's what I was thinking about EM even though I loved it. Never had IM on my list since I don't really like working in a hospital but it's okay if I'd practice that in private.

The good thing is that FM's in my country can't practice in hospitals. They have to get a private practice (either start from scratch of buy a retiring doc's place), a nurse, an echo, an ECG and the basics like steth, othoscope and ophtalmoscope, a shitty laptop because your patient's database is online and you're good to go. (Plus a room for check ups, one for meeting the patient and a waiting room are the most basic)

I also have never seen docs humilliated in front of me nor in front of the patients. It is unprofessional and in shit taste. They finished med school but had other choices regarding their speciality but sadly, it's true that most FM docs did not want to go into FM, so I have an advantage = doing what I like, in a non-competitive field where I have all the chances to get into (Seriously, if I won't be able to get FM, I will commit sudoku)
>>
>>10466596
i have a paper on its mechanism but this was the human application thats seeing clinical trial in a few years.
>>
>>10466601
>Just like some surgeons that are shit too.
Yeah it's unavoidable, some docs will be shit. Heck even some professors barely know what the fuck they are doing sometimes.
>as long as you have a nurse
>I also have never seen docs humilliated in front of me nor in front of the patients
With us med students it was a daily occurence. The case i described is surely rare, the professor is completly nut. He got sued once for literally kicking a nurse in the ass for who knows what reason.
>most FM docs did not want to go into FM
Yeah even here it's usually plan B. I think a relevant contribution is due to the fact that while we experience many months in hospital we have zero days outside of it.
>>
>>10466610
Kek, that prof was surely frustrated. I haven't had any nutjob profs so far. Most of them were chill, just the occasional arrogant surgeon that asks very hard questions from the start and is very pretentious even though he barely taught us. The worst one I had so far was in cards, he just left us with the patient and all its papers, went away for 2 hours, came back and let us go home. Wtf?!
>>
>>10466650
>he just left us with the patient and all its papers, went away for 2 hours, came back and let us go home
Literally 99% of my pratical experience. Even managing to visit the patient was a great achievement (obviously without explaining so you dont understand shit as a freshman). IM tours were grotesque, we had like 30 students for a couple of docs, imagine all of them gathered around a patient everyone struggling to put the phonendo on the chest to hear literally anything and then nod in approval to each other pretending you understood the situation.
Surgeons usually ignored us completly and let us there standing for hours. Only once i interacted with one, i thought he was asking me if i was enjoying and lied saying yes but i misunderstood, he wanted the chair i was sitting on (and was angry i didn't catch it at the first mumbling).
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>>10466680
IM rotations were okay-ish from my experience. Surgery was shit, as you said, we had zero to no interaction with most of the surgeons and in the OR they wouldn't explain anything. Just stood there and did his job, we couldn't see shit, we only knew it was a hernia operation or gall bladder removal. I have some gunners that want surgery and tried to get closer to the profs but got BTFO'd really fast. It feels like they're paid to do nothing with us and when the exam comes they're extremely pretentious.
>>
>>10466728
>It feels like they're paid to do nothing with us and when the exam comes they're extremely pretentious
This is the most annoying part. Many profs skipped like more than 50% of the lessons because muh unpredictable work schedule and asked the world at the exam even when you didn't give a shit about becoming a surgeon. I understand the basics but come on.
Gotta mention a few honorable exeptions tho, the best teacher i ever had was a surgeon, a sistematical machine, he would check all the main points without wasting time in what his biased beliefs were and gave us what we needed to pass the exam and have a realistically useful basic to effectively interact with specialists in surgery. Also a friend of mine who is studying ORL is one of the most intelligent and most humble people on the planet. An exeption, sure, most of them are presumptous as fuck, but he is great.
>tfw remembered the big shot IM prof that took a month talking about hypertension without mentioning drug therapy once
>>
>>10466754
Kekd at that IM prof. I actually liked it, renal and pneumo and digestive are my favourite, cards is the least favourite. He was very strict with us and taught us maneuvers like how to palpate, percussion, auscultation and so on. The exam was 1 ecg + one patient just for yourself and had to order the right blood panel, the reason for it and he supervised while you did maneuvers on the patient. It was pretty fun even though he was an old man (which is normal for them to be strict bu the was also funny in a way).

The only friend I have that's closer to being a medic is an 6th year guy that wants to become an anesthesiologist but he focuses more on research, you can check out Indirect Calorimetry, it's a paper that he and his team wrote and got pretty popular in Hong Kong conference.
>>
ITT: greedy faggots who cant do math and dont care about biology
>>
>am an anxious wreck (have been actively working on that for some time) who has trouble communicating with people
>want to go into psychiatry specifically to improve on this
How utterly fucking retarded would that be?
>>
>>10467037
Seems quite retarded. Also psychiatry is a meme.
>>
>>10467055
>psychiatry is a meme.
How so?
>>
>>10466989
You'd have to be dumb af to become an MD or something similar if you were greedy... Unless your education is free. Enjoy all that interest combined with delayed earnings.
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>>10467061
Random classifications with diagnostic criteria completly made up by "experts". Most of them simply drug their patient just the right amount for them to be harmless and semi zombie.
>>
>>10467061
Don't mind him. Psych is a good field but you need a good attention span to survive there.
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>>10467064
>have "free" university in my country
>med studies + residency are between 9 and 12 years
>am still young so I'd be an MD at 31-33 years old which is pretty good
But the selectiveness during first year is absolutely insane and now you can't even retry anymore. I hope I'll make it.
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>>10467069
Literally /x/ tier post.
>>
>>10467076
>you need a good attention span
I have that, and I'm a good listener. Are you currently in psych (or know people who are), and if so, what's it like?
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>>10466286
Simply put, they want the best.
And not to offend you, but if the person isn't motivated until they are "interested" that might not be a good fit - do you want to be looked after by a doctor who only gives it 100% when he's interested?
A family doc has to deal with a huge variety of things and they're not all going to be interesting.
And specialists and super-specialists are dealing with extremely important shit, but it might not be "interesting" to them per se.
>>
>>10466989
makes no sense.
pic related...to you
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>>10467093
What's a "super specialist"
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>>10467093
That already depends on what speciality they choose, my friend. FM is broad and has many interesting cases.

>but if the person isn't motivated until they are "interested" that might not be a good fit

You got it wrong. I was interested in medicine when I started studying in medschool. I enjoyed most of my classes maybe besides biochem, cell bio, histology and genetics. I was a mediocre student because I didn't give a shit about chemisty and physics, just studied to only get the bare minimum and was cool with it. Now that biochem and the other stuff that I consider useless is gone, I really like it.

>>10467097
specialist = radiology
super specialist = interventional radiology
>>
>>10467088
Haven't had psych rotations but my fiancée did. It's much better to practice it in private than hospitals because in hospitals you have emergencies, more severe cases, some patients get aggressive, etc. A psychiatric "interview" is very long. You have to bear with the patient and not interrupt him rudely, you must be professional and listen to all the shit their minds is creating. Let me give you an example:

She had this old lady that arrived at the hospital, the police found her in the middle of a busy street and when they asked her what's going on she said "I'm waiting for the train". She regained what was left of her sanity when she got into the police car and asked them if she did something bad and why she was arrested. These episodes when she "was waiting for the train" and back to reality went on at irregular times, it didn't have a trigger and it was senile dementia in the end. But for fucks sake, the medical history took a fuck ton of time, you had to wait for her to get back to normal to ask if she is allergic to some meds and when you wanted to ask the next question she "was waiting for the train" and had to wait for her to finish again.

So, that's her experience with psych in hospital, she practiced in private too but compared to hospitals it was much better. Patients come in with mostly generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder and depression. (where the medical history takes like 15-20 mins instead of 45-60 mins)

If you think you've got what it takes and from a mental point of view, you are strong and can handle exhaustion, go for it.
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>>10467142
Doesn't sound bad honestly. I think I'd enjoy it.
Thanks for the info.
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>>10467069
Please grow up.
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>>10467080
I guess you're greedy af then.
>>
I'm torn between neurosurgery and neurology. I've always wanted to do surgery during med school and volunteered at virtually all local NS clinics, so I'm familiar with the strain, but I don't know if my health would allow this type of work long-term. Is neurology a good substitute? It seems awfully unfulfilling as far as jobs go, coming from somebody who's dreamed of being a surgeon their whole life.
>>
>>10467097
I think he means a sub specialty
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>>10467548
Just do plastic surgery
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>>10467548
Too little is much more than even slightly too much. But then again if it's your dream, you should try it out. Just don't be afraid to change if it seems too heavy for you.
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>>10467142
I have the opposite view, at least with hospitals you get some interesting cases, in a private practice it's just upper middle class people with ennui and endless 20 min med checks. Forensic is the absolute top tier, pediatric and youth are fun too.
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>>10467585
I don't really know since I haven't had psych rotations yet, so I can't say anything. My fiancée enjoyed the addiction part of psych too but at a private practice, it's more comfier and less stressful.
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>>10464448
You've got ALS and I hope you die the slow painful death that should befall all anons who rely on 4chan for medical advice
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>>10464510
Man, I couldnt imagine not telling my patients they are going to die. By not telling them, you are robbing them of the chance to make the most of the time they have left.
>>
Dental student here getting about 400k in free tuition bux from the military, ask me anything
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>>10467585
how much do forensic psychs have to work and how much do they make?
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>>10468021
how?
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How do i recover from liver disease
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>>10468103
I have to give them 4 years of service afterwards but it's more than worth 400k tuition at a private dental school plus the killer grad plus loan interest
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>>10468110
Drink excessively
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>>10468115
what exactly do you do doing those 4 years? What is the name of the program?
>>
>>10468021
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>>10468123
HPSP my nigga they have it for doctors too. You gotta be prepared to do the time though.
>>10468126
cope.
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>>10468128
But do you spend your 4 years training, being an emergency dentist in a field clinic, or what? I don't wanna die for Israel.
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>>10468123
>what exactly do you do doing those 4 years?
Forgot to answer this question. You are a doctor, but in the military. Most branches actually have their own residency programs. The Navy runs it's own OMFS, GPR, AEGD, Perio, etc. programs from a variety of Naval hospitals.
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>>10468128
jusst joshing, m8 - but if you're going to be a professional you might want to stop posting shit like
>my nigga

My buddy is responsible for overseeing a gorillion hires a year. First thing they do is comb through the applicants' social media and other online postings (inb4 "4chan is anonymous" lol).
If they find partying pics, racist/sexist shit/, nude pics, "poor lifestyle choices" (drugs, drink, threatening behavior, etc) the candidate doesn't get the job...but they never know why.
And that same candidate won't get the next job and the job after and so on, if the same company s doing the vetting.
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>>10468145
so no dying for israel. cool.
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>>10468156
>having any social media besides a nearly curated linkedin profile that you never log into except to change jobs

Seriously though, do you not get that this is an anonymous shitposting website? I also post racist stuff on twitter, doesn't mean I'm going to call my next jewish patient a whiny kike when he won't stop wimpering during an IAN block
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>>10468187
>this is an anonymous shitposting website?
Can a fully grown man be this naïve?
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>>10468215
How could they know it's you that made any post on this website?
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>>10468400
This website is a CIA honeypot.
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>>10462918
Aw, did you get lost? This board is for adults. /x/ is that way, kiddo -------------->>>
>>
>>10468215
>recruiters/employers casually dl your browsing history from government spy agencies/ISPs
>being this fully grown and naive
Social media, sure. Anonymous image boards? Na, m8... honestly now
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>>10459787
Most stressful specialization & highest burnout rate, plus you've got to be elite - so no lfie just work and that work will grind you down to a pile of ashes.
Is that what you want?

Oncology Most Stressful of Specialties: High Risk for Burnout
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/887230
>>
>>10468459
>lfie
life
>>
>>10468459
Not him but I agree. Oncology is the hardest clinical speciality, you have to keep up to date with every article regarding your field, patients die every day, emotional drain, stress and so on.
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>>10468156
This. As a doctor you have to be professional. I remember my histology prof, she was in her late 30's and the girls from my class were searching for her facebook (idk why). Her profile was so fucked up, smoking cigarettes, she even had a pic with her half naked and wearing one of those masks that people wear at swinger parties. I don't really know how the fuck she got hired, she wasn't even that good at what she was doing, tbqh.

And now, looking at my facebook profile, I'll be sure to delete it when I finish medschool.
>>
Do I have esophageal cancer?

t. can't swallow anything
>>
>>10468795
try dick then report
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>>10468795
Get an endoscopy.
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>>10468747
I deleted my Facebook entirely even though there wasnt anything incriminating and remade it completely with a professional image of me in my white coat. Only follow other dental students and pages for dental students on there.
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>>10468438
Yeah anyone who posts here should probably give up their dreams of ever having intelligence security clearance but ZOG would be making it a little too obvious if they started leaking that shit out into the civilian world on the regular.
>>
Why do some non-surgical specialities wear scrubs? I'm not talking about cards or GE, they do procedures, I'm talking about family physicians and IM docs.

>>10468828
It's fine. You can have vacation pics and stuff like that, but when at a party, make sure that you don't upload pics of you licking salt off a hoe's body and chugging alcohol, kek.
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>>10468844
>Why do some non-surgical specialities wear scrubs?
Standard clothing that needs no specific care. It's convenient and saves you the trouble of picking clothes and it's comfy.
>>
>>10468857
What about private practices in non procedure heavy specialities?
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>>10468099
Depends a lot on what you do. If you do just evaluations, ie. assist in court cases, you get paid by the hour, so how much you earn is determined by how much you want to work. Hospitals and prisons pay nicely and you generally don't have to be on call very frequently if at all. Depends a lot on the institution.
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>>10468872
It being comfy is usually reason #1. Black scrubs + white coat is actually a pretty sharp look imo. Scrubs are one of the only pants that actually feel like they have enough room for my balls when I'm sitting.
>>
>>10468795
doctor now
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>>10468844
No hassle, much less laundry and I can keep my coat open unlike with my own clothes. Fucking hygiene regulations.
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>>10468923
Black scrubs are ugly imo. I usually go for navy or surgical green. But that's when I have rotations that require scrubs. If not, I just go for white coat and shirt/pullover with jeans. I know that wearing scrubs is comfy but it's not /fa/. (It's just a joke, don't mangle me)
>>
I've had a sore throat for the past 2 weeks and now I feel like there's a lump I can't swallow. My physician prescribed a bunch of stuff and some antibiotics but the discomfort hasn't gone away. Is it cancer?
>>
>>10469230
>is it cancer?
I hate patients like you that jump to conclusions without more investigations. Just because you feel a lump and can't swallow properly, doesn't mean it's cancer. It can be an esophageal diverticulum, it could be achalasia and many other things (even minor ones)

My advice: Go back to your physician so he can check your throat again (if he did it) and then get a referal to a GE for an endoscopy to see your esophagus. I honestly doubt there's anything serious, but if it makes you more calm, definitely go for it and don't search google because it jumps to cancer every fucking time.
>>
>>10469241
>don't search google because it jumps to cancer every fucking time.
I know. I was just taking a jab at how it always does that. I hope I won't lose my voice or something in the following days because that's the worst thing that could happen to me.
>>
>>10469254
All the best, anon. Take care of yourself.
>>
>>10465723
I only applied to my one in province school and got in, but generally yes it is extremely difficult to get into a Canadian medical school.

If you only really care about money, go another route.
>>
What are the respective pros and cons of cardiology and radiology?
>>
>>10469641
Cards pros:
Good money
Procedures (if you like them)
Time for family (not on call)
Cons:
Procedures (if you don't like them)
You need to be elite tier student
Competitive (hard to get into)
Being cardiology (always hated it)

Rads pros:
Ton of money
Time for family
Works mostly alone if diagnostic rads (good for introverts)
Can go into interventional radiology
Cons:
Radiology will be shit in the future if you focus only on diagnostic radiology
It's not clinical/surgical
It's competitive
>>
>LGBT medicine seminar
>its just a bunch of shit about AIDS
What did they mean by this?
>>
>>10469720
Gay people have a high rate of HIV infection? What else can they talk about? Besides their partner selection, they're normal people like us. (Maybe a psychiatric aspect but that would offend the average lgbtq member)
>>
>>10469664
I'm a great student and my peers are urging me to go into either of those (or surgery but fuck that), but since people kind of tire me out, I'm thinking card is a no-go.
I've always thought radiology money was kind of overblown due to imaging equipment costs in private practice.
>shit in the future if you focus only on diagnostic
Could you elaborate?
>>
>>10469756
If you want to be big brain without seeing patients go into anatomic pathology and maybe do a molecular genetics fellowship
>>
>>10469756
Rads is fine if you work in a hospital but if you have the money, get them juicy equips.

>Could you elaborate?
Yes. The future of diagnostic rads will be like this:

Some programs have been developed to diagnose X-Rays. In the future, there will be programs that will diagnose CAT scans/MRIs, that's for sure. (10-15 years) Rads is pretty good but it's not that "great student" level. Fuck your peers, dude. Go with whatever you want to do and don't listen to them. As the other anon said, pathology is another genius level specialty, oncology is another one and ofc, cards.
>>
Pros and cons of being anatomopatologist?
>>
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>>10469780
Pros - need to know a lot of theoretical science and be able to apply it to describe disease processes. Can work alongside surgeons to clear the margins during tumor removal surgeries. Requires a high degree of subjective judgement skill unlike clinical pathology which is very numbers-based and more objective. Opportunity to participate in a mountain of research if desired.

Cons: you will probably spend a lot of time in dark rooms looking at microscope slides all day
>>
>>10469780
Cons:
Works with corpses
If not paying attention may infect itself
Cancer risk because working with cancerous substances
Genius level student required for a good pathologist

Pros:
Good hours
Money money money, not so funny
Works with corpses and uses a knife instead of scalpel
Microscope work
You get to diagnose a shitload of stuff
Wors with surgeons but other docs too.
>>
>>10469797
the autopsies I saw with the path residents were insane, they were not being gentle in the slightest
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>>10469773
Card, oncology and pathology are the top specialties in terms of the level required to be good?
I thought that was neuro and nephro
>>
>>10469756
Clinical laboratory sciences, fuck your peers.
>>
>>10469804
Because you're not supposed to be gentle. That's why you use a knife instead of a scalpel, because you don't need that much accuracy. Plus it takes a while, until you take each organ out, examine it, take a piece for the slide and then close the corpse up.

>>10469845
Imo nephrology is discount urology if you ask me but with more knowledge regarding the kidneys, they should just combine the two.

Neuro is boring since you can't do shit unless you see a CAT scan or MRI.

Cards, onc and path are all difficult specialities and require exceptional students.
>>
>>10469871
>are all difficult specialities and require exceptional students.
What about the surgical specialties?
>>
Orthopaedics vs Plastic?
>>
>>10469891
If you want a lot of money and don't mind being forever haunted by the thought that you're not actually a real surgeon, plastic
>>
>>10469877
Some of them require exceptional students too. Neurosurgery, ortho (because it's competitive and brings a lot of money, most of them are top tier), cardiothoracic , even urology in some of the cases (transplant team). I haven't talked about them because I don't want surgery. I'm OP, so you can see my choice.
>>
>>10469891
Both bring a lot of money but plastics is considered a meme and not surgery because most of them say that you only put breast implants and so on, and when you ask them about patients that suffered severe burn injuries, they shut up kek.
>>
What do mediocre students do then?
>>
>>10470119
What they like?

Family, IM, nephro, rheumatology, immunology, gen surg, peds, psych, EM, pulmonology/crit care, and the list goes on.
>>
>>10470119
Orthopedic surgeon
>>
>>10470130
Still me.

I'm not saying that mediocre students shouldn't go for the more competitive specialities, but consistent and excellent students will do more than your average oncologist. They can go into research and so on.
>>
>>10459453
I'm going to end up in pharmacy if everything goes well. Anyone a pharmacist here?
>>
>>10470130
Nephro is pretty high tier, it's not regarded as a mediocre specialty where I live. It's almost as competitive as ophtalmology and maybe even rad
>>
>>10470130
>peds
>EM
>critical care
Only the top students in my area can make it in those fields tho.
>>10470131
Why are those poor guys so meme'd.

Unrelated: how meme is regenerative medicine at the current stage of knowledge? I've always been interested in restoring whatever phisical loss of the body (ideally mutilated limbs) but never had even the slightest mention to related stuff in my student years. Probably more a field for engineer than docs if about mechanical protesis, but what about biological ones?
>>
>>10470145
>nephro
>high tier
It has 0 competition from where I'm from
>>10470147
>peds
>EM
>crit care
All of them are non-competitive in my country. We had 12 peds places that got unoccupied at last years residency exam. EM is even worse because it's mentally and physically exhausting, most of the candidates opt for a good lifestyle. Here, the most competitive are cards, derm, optho, GE, neurosurg, ENT, plastics, ortho and psych.
>>
>>10470189
>psych
>competitive
where the fuck are you from?
>>
>>10470189
>GE
>ortho
>psych
>competitive
Guess each country has their own.
>>
>>10470203
Eastern Europe, non-slav, close to hungary.

TIP: We kind of hate them, guess where I'm from!

>>10470205
All of them bring a lot of money compared to nephro, peds and EM. When I re-read your post, now I imagine myself (mediocre student) having to pick one between those...still FM for me.
>>
>>10470214
Hehe i think people from my country come to take the test to your country and then move back to cheat the number selection.
>>
>>10470231
We have lots of French, Italians, arabs at uni. They come here because the tax is cheap (5k euros/year) for this reason. They take non-competitive stuff in our country that is competitive in theirs, considering the speciality is recognized world wide.
>>
>>10470251
Romania?
I thought med school was expensive there and that going back to one's home country afterwards (be it france, italy or whatever) put you at a disadvantage.
>>
>>10462937
Take these words for your life:
You are only too old if you are dead.
>>
>>10470262
Got the country right but no, medschool isn't expensive for those students. We do 6 years, so 5k x 6 = 30k euros for medschool. Most of them go back to their countries and practice medicine there (usually a parent is a doc, so they have a head start) but some of them decide to practice it here and stay in my country. Too bad Romanian docs leave the country to look for a better life but shit happens, if they don't want to work in here, the foreign docs will.
>>
>>10470284
unless youre a woman attempting to conceive
>>
>>10470340
Bait or no?
>>
>>10470346
Both, I guess. It's both bait and a literally true statement. Most of the women I go to school with won't even start trying until 35 to have a kid and that doesn't bode well for their chances at a successful pregnancy.
>>
>>10470251
>tfw tax is 550€/year here and not even poor
>>
>>10470358
This is why you should marry a nurse who is 5 years your junior desu
>>
>>10470358
My mom is a doc. She was pregnant in the last year of med school and she was 29 when she had me. That didn't stop her to become a doctor or to try for a baby.

I get that most women try for one when they have their careers in a comfortable position, but it feels like that shouldn't stop them. That anon's advice is good.

>>10470361
550 euros? Man, and I really thought our tax was cheap.
>>
>>10470423
Highest you can get is maybe 2200€. If you are poor its free, and if you do good they also give you money. And people ask for more gibs to stay jobless. Fuck my shit up.
>>
>>10470431
>if you are poor, it's free
I know about that if you're good, they give you money but that one takes the cake. The only way to do med school for free here is if you score in top 80 candidates at the admission exam. (And if you don't, just like me, you have to pay 1500 Euros/year)
>>
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>>10459453
Master Curriculum reporting in. Where are my RN>NP/MD/DO frens at? Any researchers for Cancer, HIV-1, or altering senescence? I came here to medpost.
>>
How hard is it to get matched into emergency residency?
>>
>>10468459
>>10464378
>>10462918
>>10462036
>>10459839
thanks for the advice, is neurology any better? it's the other thing that has my interest. i don't really see myself doing any kind of surgery.
>>
>>10469230
>>10469254
Almost certainly postnasal drip or similar, funny how the guy berated you for thinking it's cancer then made similarly esoteric (and unlikely, assuming you are in your 20s) diagnoses.
>>
Am i fucked if i dont volunteer as a nurse before residency?
>>
>>10471135
Anon, I seriously hope you're joking.
>>
Are all RTs like this?
>have COPD patient
>sudden SOB, accessory muscle use, resp rate of 35
>sat is at 80%
>baseline usually at 93%
>call resident
>no change in sat even when put on 100% o2 via non-rebreather
>give puffers/nebs to no avail
>ECG normal
>page RT
>tell them the situation
>"why do we need to see this patient?"
>>
>>10471144
What do you mean?
>>
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I have an interview on Friday. Made it to the next stage.
Wish me luck, anons!
>>
>>10465990
3.7+ is considered strong (unless we're talking Harvard/Stanford where it's slightly below average). 3.4+ is really the bare minimum for MD though.

If you go to a decent undergrad known for premed then you will get access to all the extracurriculars/volunteering stuff that has to be done. Very few premeds come out of top premed schools with super weak activities.

Truth be told, activities/volunteering are the easiest parts of the application imo. At most schools, it's really easy to get involved in research and volunteering/shadowing over the summers can be grinded out in summers.

I am in med school rn, and went to a school that was very well known for premed and this generally held true for the majority of kids there. I will note that for kids who decided to do premed as upperclassmen there activities/volunteering were obviously lacking.

One piece of advice I would give to any premeds is to get involved in research after your first semester. Getting a publication/poster is like activity gold.
>>
>>10465775
It really depends on your school. If you're at a primarily engineering school (god forbid MIT/GT/Caltech) then yea definitely swap out of BME. Those courses only get harder, and since premed BME is uncommon at many schools most professors don't give a fuck about giving you a B or C. If you're at a school with a decent premed BME population then you might stick it out.

Just know that Chemistry is probably easier considering you'd have a lot of the requirements done simply from the premed requirements.

What premed requirements do you find easiest? Are your bio courses easy, if so, then I'd prob just get out with a bio degree.

If you're at a strong school (like T30 in the US) then you can probably salvage your GPA with a strong MCAT (especially if you're still a freshman). If your school isn't particularly well known then you're gonna be fighting hard.
>>
>>10470878
Is this something people actually do? RN to MD? If so, why would anyone go the route of taking some generic bio or biochem degree instead of a BSN
>>
>>10470333
How can so many foreigners manage to study medicine in Romania where I'm assuming you're supposed to know the language?
>>
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It's been a long journey getting here, and I just wanted to share it with Anon.
>lost my mom early on, grandparents raised me until I was 8
>grandma basically filled in for my mom
>grow up in a broken/abusive home after that, basically self-sufficient in HS, actually run away at one point and live on my own while attending school
>19, go to the first college that accepts me, English major because I'm "good at it" and don't really want to try/decide on something to do, get into drugs
>second semester, get depressed, stop going to classes, stay up all night jacking off and smoking weed and playing vidya and watching anime in my dorm
>get a 1.9 GPA for the year and drop out
>go to live with my grandparents again
>uncle (their son) is dying waiting for a liver transplant
>spend a few months as a caretaker, driving to and from the hospital, being on-call late at night, cleaning up Hepatitis-positive blood, helping play nurse at bedside
>he dies with me holding his hand
>grandpa gets cancer immediately thereafter, while grieving his son, and has to spend the next few months getting radiation
>he lives
>meanwhile, apply for a 4-year program at a different college, try my best to write a killer essay
>get in as a 21-year-old freshman, decide dropping out again at 22 isn't an option, dedicate myself 100% to being a good student even though I'm a degenerate stoner weeaboo piece of shit
>get straight A's for the first time in a decade while doing 18 credit hours
>spend the next 4 years with A's and B's
>spend the next 4 years basically frying my brain on psychs and undergo a massive personality shift
(CONT)
>>
>>10471368
Not sure about Romania, but here in Czechia/Slovakia foreign med studens study in English.
>>
Don't know if anyone will know or bother answering but I have a mid shaft humerus spiral fracture and I was wondering the necessary torque/force required for causing such an injury. I read that it was 42nm but I can't find anything else on it. Can anyone answer?
>>
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>>10471375
(CONT)
>drugs mean hospital trips, become a renowned trip-sitter and a go-to guy for those kinds of things
>continue to spend every break with my grandparents, grandma's Alzheimer's is worse every time I go back, eventually start helping out when I'm there it gets so bad
>dad gets cancer
>upperclassman, decide I want to go into medicine and talk to the premed advisor
>start looking into post-bac programs to fill out the chem credits
>buy the Kaplan books and begin studying for the MCAT
>get a part-time job while doing 18 credit hours to pay for the postbac applications, take out a loan, beg, starve, spend my birthday money on it
>manage to graduate with a 3.42 GPA and get into 2 post-bac programs, path to medical school is now open
>grandma is dying and grandpa asks me to help him take care of her
>hate the idea and get angry at the prospect of losing ANOTHER year
>decide to stay and help anyway even though it fucking kills me inside
>spend a year working as a full-time Alzheimer's caretaker helping to take care of my grandma
>feeding her, bathing her, taking her to go to the bathroom, dressing her, changing her diapers, wiping her, carrying her, being struck, changing pads and bedsheets, crushing pills, being bitten, measuring out and giving meds, staying up all night and all day, just sitting and holding her hand, applying lotion, putting her to bed, lost 20 pounds doing this
>she dies with me lying next to her and holding her
>lost my mom all over again
>fall into depression, can't even be bothered to care about going back to school for like a week
>next week, find out my little cousin has stage 4 ovarian cancer and will need surgery and chemo
>somehow, instead of making me even more depressed, this news lights a goddamned fire in me
>fill out a new batch of applications to 1-year postbac programs
I'm 25 now and honestly kind of a garbage person at heart, but I'm 1000% sure I want to be a doctor now. Interview Friday. Wish me luck, Anons.
>>
>>10471368
We have English and French programs. The ones that want to study in Romanian are given free Romanian lessons before they apply (Usually a year)
>>
>>10471386
Depends on your bone density and like a million other things, hard to say.
>>
>>10471389
All the best, anon!
>>
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30874756

'muricans, stop eating eggs.
>>
>>10471500
Meme study
>>
>>10471630
I know. Couldn't find anything else more interesting in the new section. Cancer research is straight up another language for me with all the genes and mutations and stuff.
>>
Hey guys, just a gentle reminder to fix tinnitus. Thank you for your attention.
>>
>>10471718
Here. It can be fixed by most docs.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tinnitus/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20350162
>>
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>>10471389
You sure have been through a lot Anon. But I believe the experiences you have will make you a more understanding medical doctor in the future.

Ganbatte!
>>
>>10471282
Good luck, anon!
>>
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>>10471264
RIP
>>
>>10471634
Most cancer research papers are just straight up memes with very few actually being important
>>
>>10472251
Most studies are memes. But only by doing a lot of those you can do metas, that are actually sometimes reliable.
>>
>>10472276
So in order to find relevant or good studies (new ones) should I look for somebody that has done research before?
>>
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6196905/

Post based articles.
>>
What's the real difference in skillset and knowledge between a medical specialty and its surgical equivalent?

e.g. neuro vs. neurosurgery, card vs. cardiothoracic, etc
>>
>>10471282
Good luck dude
>>
>>10472622
Neuro and neurosurgery...hmm, the main difference is that neuro diagnoses nervous system illnesses while the neurosurgeon already knows what the patient has so he operates. Both require incredible amount of knowledge although neurosurgery has the edge because it's procedure heavy while neuro isn't. Same goes for cards and cardiothoracic, the cardiologist diagnoses whatever the patient may suffer from, let's say mitral stenosis and the cardiothoracic surgeon solves it.

The difference is of course that one is clinical and the other one is surgical, the surgical one will always require more knowledge and self control. Cards and neuro aren't procedure heavy (cardio has some procedures but they're a walk in the park compared to the surgical sister speciality.)
>>
>>10472692
So the surgeons can do the same job as their clinical equivalents, but the opposite isn't true?
>>
>>10472590
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21726350
>be 45 year old woman with breast cancer
>no treatment for 22 years
>discovered metastases to lungs
>started AI at this point
>live another 14 years with no treatment other than AI
>discovered metastasis to spine, not considered good candidate, treated with SERD
>2 years later discover additional metastasis to liver
>start chemotherapy
>rapidly degrade
>die two years later
What would you have done /med/?
>>
>>10472771
well she was 93, seems like an acceptable result
>>
>>10472778
What if she could have been 100?
>>
Why do people get into mentally draining fields like oncology?
>>
>>10472786
easier to kill the old lady with any sort of treatment for a metastatic cancer than just let it be
should have been removed at the beginning but i dont know what was the state of knowledge that long ago
>>
>>10472802
I am fairly certain they knew what a mastectomy was 40 years ago.
>>
>>10472813
sure but dunno how they approached an ER+ not aggressive tumor at the time, what was the life expectancy at the time, what the patient wanted to do, if there was different outcome compared to just medical treatment on short and long term etc
>>
>>10472720
Not necessarily. Can only speak about NS vs Neurology, but NS doesn't deal with demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases, dementias and other chronic illnesses of the nervous system. On the other hand, neurologists don't operate and don't really deal with invasive procedures beyond lumbar punctures which are somewhat scarce nowadays.
>>
>>10469744
They could mention higher rates of anal cancer or all the other STDs that they get
>>
Out of the 200 4th year students who just matched yesterday at my school only one person matched into neurosurgery. This worries me for when it's my turn.
>>
>>10472771
>She expired 2 years later after fighting BC for four decades.

EXPIRED.

I'd really like to know who was her family physician, to be honest or when was the last time she had a routine scan/x-ray. At 93, honestly, no one gives a shit anymore and wait to die peacefully, but still...

>>10472799
Stupid question, tbqh. If that's the part of medicine you like the most, go for it. Some people won't be affected as much because they do what they like most, and in this case it's oncology. There's a ton of stuff to do in onco, research, management and therapeutic scheme of the patient, think how rewarding it is when a patient is finally cancer free, you make a ton of money, basically you're seen as a light of hope in their darkest days.
>>
>>10472984
Still me, read the article wrong, I thought she was diagnosed 18 years before she was 93, not at fucking 45. Holy shit, imagine living with cancer for so long.
>>
>>10472990
Can't have been that bad.
>>
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4244351/

>Miracle mineral solution
>41 year old gets KFD because of it
>The distributors said that the solution can cure cancer, AIDS and hepatitis

What are these people called these days, again?

>>10472996
It still affects your quality of life nonetheless.
>>
>>10473008
Psychologically, sure. But I would dare to say that she was asymptomatic until the very late stages of her illness. If she was the kind of person that obsesses over it, it was probably torture. But I doubt that kind of stress would have allowed her to pass 90s. Hell, at 20 years from the diagnosis she probably didn't even believe she was ill but some sort of prank.
>>
I'm not gonna make it lads
>>
>>10473172
Explain
>>
>>10473175
I'm to much of a distracted drunkard to keep an A average. How am I supposed to get into med school with all of these fucking Bs
>>
I'm a college student going into an accelerated nursing program. I have 4.0 in most of my classes. I've been eyeing anesthesiologist programs after I get my BSN or trying to go to med school. All I would need for med school is a physics class and the DNAP program would require a couple years of nursing experience.
Money is no issue. Any advice anyone?
>>
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>>10473181
>premeds itt
>>
>>10473190
you were premed to once dick
>>
>>10473212
Yeah, I was. But I wasn't as insecure as you, lad.
>>
>>10473181
Are you American? If so a high Mcat fixes everything but a shitty personality.
>>
>>10473212
Yeah, but I made it, and the vast majority of you are not. Also you people are annoying and we make fun of you specifically, and as a group.
>>
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>>10471341
> Why would anyone go the route of taking some generic bio
Because they don't know better. I was bio until I started thinking of an actual career plan.
>>
>>10459863
Lol so do you like curing your patients?
>>
>>10462088
Id rather know the track record of his curing patients not what arbitrary score he got..
>>
>>10464420
Incoming burnout in 5 years or less make sure youve saved a years vacation so you can recover
>>
>>10471341
There are pros and cons. You may get more semi related clinical exposure but the nursing classes may not fill requirements for certain medical schools so you'll need to take extra. The classes themselves tend to be less rigorous versions of standard bio classes and you have less room for more higher level bio classes like developmental biology or immunology that could help you once in medical school.

But the pros do go without saying including a backup plan. I just generally think if you are willing to spend the extra time doing classes to fulfill the medical school requirements it's better to do a more interesting major like philosophy, psychology, music, or such. Assuming you enjoy it.
>>
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>>10473518
> you'll need to take extra
> "muh orgo/physics/calculus"
lol. Nursing is the perfect pre-med except it's lacking the requirements of Organic Chem, Physics and Calculus. There are many higher-level bio classes required for nursing including Pathophysiology and many more requirements that help in med such as pharmacology or medical terminology to name a couple. Some universities allow you to minor in Psychology or other cool titles like "BSN w/ Minor in Global Health."

Though most Nurses just go NP to begin prescribing medication instead. I for one am going MD because I want to practice medicine abroad where an NP title won't get me far in other countries. This is the same reason I'm going MD although I'm an Osteopath in theory. MD/DO is the same med degree in America, but certain other countries don't let DO's practice because those countries are convinced they're stoner-herbalists and Reiki practitioners or something.
>>
Is it really that hard to have a good and large family while being a surgeon? Why can't someone just be exceptional at time management to devote enough time to one's family while also excelling as a surgeon?
>>
>>10472245
Anon please dont play with me
>>
>>10473493
I'm sorry, what's your point?
>>
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>>10473498
This. Dumb premeds only care about grades.
>>
>>10473555
The only reason why a DO is allowed to practice is becasue they have the same curriculum as an MD. Osteopathy is quackery when it claims to work on anything other then the muscoskeletal sytem
>>
>>10474128
I'm from EU, we don't have a program such as DO. From what I've searched on google, there's not much difference between MD/DO besides that DO has a focus on musculoskeletal techniques and stuff like that. Why are there both MD/DO programs?
>>
>>10474134
Historical reasons, in the 19th century osteopathy claimed to be able to cure any disease, and osteopaths worked alongside regular doctors and alternatives like homeopaths. As time went on evidence-based medicine became a thing, and while homeopaths kept making outrageous claims the osteopaths accepted the evidence and the line between MD and DO started becoming very blurred. So now there are DO programs that have basically the same curriculum as med school
Today you can hardly call a DO an osteopath
>>
>>10474181
>osteopath
aren't those some kind of PT's?

Also, I see so many family physicians in my country that do a fellowship in homeopathy, it's outrageous. It's true that most of them didn't want to become family physicians but still, it feels off. I know that we should cure people no matter what the method, but homeopathy is a meme.

I've seen so many DO's on youtube explaining the difference between MD and DO, all of them coming to the same conclusion: it's the same.
>>
>>10474181
Placebo effect fucked us for good. There's literally nothing convincing you can say in front of it.
>>
Any good resources for mastering Anki? It'd be nice to have a good understanding of how best to use the app, what addons to have etc. before I start med school. Would appreciate any tips.
>>
>>10474238
I still use Anki for cardiology. That shit is horrendously difficult.

https://apps.ankiweb.net/

This is the app I use and no addons. I just write in my language what I consider important and then I expand the concept.
>>
Why you all hating cardio? Its great and one of the few where objective exam actually makes sense
>>
>>10474278
I don't think we're more than one. I'm OP, I just happen to dislike cards. I need a good prof to properly understand the speciality, they are not good.

Example: First day of cards rotation , Prof calls us in the ecocardiography room and starts explaining us stuff we had no idea existed and made no sense whatsoever because we were not expecting it. Prof goes straight at explaining the pathology and we had no idea at what part of the heart we're looking. Then leaves us with patient to find out what's wrong with him. We finish him up in 20 mins, nothing abnormal besides a third sound at heart auscultation. We do an ecg and when the prof comes back

>so, what is the patient suffering from?
>"silence"
>come on, nobody?
>have you heard of WPW syndrome?

What. The. Fuck. Bitch, don't give us cases with stuff we haven't studied, it's the first day. Now I know most of cards but it just wasn't "fun" to study.
>>
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30877146

Ok, short one, not so much info but let's discuss this

>As educators and advocates, pediatricians can play an important role in the prevention of drowning.


How is that possible? They're doctors, not lifeguards. What can I tell a kid besides what their parents are teaching them? (example: Don't go into deep water even if you're a good swimmer. Don't go too far in the sea/ocean, stay close to your parents, parents should supervise their children strictly if they know the kid is a fucking moron)
>>
>>10474488
By a fast read, there are valid points in the article but it's not a "direct" contribute. Most of it is identifying kids that are at major risk because of conditions that can trigger istantly while someone is swimming preventing him from going on and consequently drowning (eg epilepsy, ipoglicemic shock due to uncontrolled diabetes type 1, family history for cardiac sudden death...).
In this scenario they could be the ones to directly contact the family and explain those risks (water is a thing but also any sport where a sudden stop will kill you, eg to be extreme acrobatic motocross) so that the kids can make the safest decisions. Also they can tell to at least one parent or relative to get some cpr basics just in case.
It's all screening work, obviously the ped himself can't be the one at the rescue but i would say it's still part of his job.
Most of those cases could probably be avoided with a bare minimum of common sense anyway. But it seems a trend in current society to have this kind of unthinking attitude, "science will fix my shit later anyway" .
>>
>>10474292
Well, most of my practice was like that anyway. Sometimes it was so badly structured that you started practice before even starting the lessons so you wandered like a retard wasting time. And lessons too are often shit, books are often hard to approach compared to short lessons but they are almost always much clearer and you are left with the feeling of actually having understood something.
>>
>>10474498
>But it seems a trend in current society to have this kind of unthinking attitude, "science will fix my shit later anyway" .

Haha, good point. I wasn't correlating pre-existing conditions with that, now it makes sense.

>>10474508
This happened not only at cards but gen surg and uro rotations too. They did expect us to know everything beforehand, even though we were just starting the semester.

The structure is utter shit, we first have the rotation and then we have the course, except that during the rotation, we have mini-lessons that last about 30 minutes where the prof explains some diseases. (Which were helpful, but not as helpful as the textbook)
>>
>>10474526
>They did expect us to know everything beforehand, even though we were just starting the semester.
We move from "why should i explain this to you? you don't have the basics to understand anyway" to "why should i explain this to you? all the students at your point of studies know all that already anyway". Well, thanks for the hard work sir.
A nurse once made a valid point, that we should actually ask them to tutor us and not docs, pity i didn't realize this sooner.
>>
>>10473555
Where do you want to practice?
>>
>>10474261
Why is cardiology difficult?
>>
>>10474533
It's just how it is. Either the prof is shit at explaining or it doesn't give a damn about it. Mine completes his work with us. I've seen so many heart ecos and still have no idea where to look, kek. They all think we want to become cardiologists or something, I think that when they were residents, the amount of studying the had to do was a walk in the park compared to what the hell they're trying to teach us. Instead of letting us study the basics and then study everything step by step, they makes us jump in the most hardcore cardio stuff.

>>10474551
Personally, I find in difficult because I never liked the cardiovascular system. It wasn't my cup of tea, with all the pacemakers and the way the electric fascicle crosses the heart in order to produce a normal beat, the ECG was fine though, that's something I enjoyed studying because the prof did not make the explanation very hard to understand, he just said stuff like

"If P wave has a sharp head then it's a mitral P"

or

"If you see that the difference between V1 and V6 in S waves and R waves is 5 big squares then it's left ventricular hypertrophy" and the list goes on.

He wasn't explaining the pathophysiology because he thought it was useless and that's how I memorized most ECG pathologies.
>>
>>10474593
>just remembered that gastroenterologyst that explained me ercp at like 2 inches from my face with his literal embodiment of death morning breath
>tfw he was there to do support to a younger doc because the patient was a big shot and the prof actually sucked at doing stuff
>tfw he kept annoying him with do this do that that's not how you are supposed to do it
>tfw the doc literally has an autistic tantrum and covers the prof with insults and "SHUT UP"s
>tfw prof just quietly observes the procedure until the end and shame walks away
>tfw there's justice in the world
In all honesty practice here is more about seeing those memes.
>>
>>10474619
Never seen stuff like this in any hospital I've been in. Maybe just in the ER at in was between two nurses who started to argue about who should go to the lab to give them the blood samples.

Oh, and between two pharmacists who argued because of a prescription, kek. It was a prescription for 28 days and they were arguing wheter it's correct, 28 days or 30 days. One of them was adamant that 30 days is the correct number and the other one was like "whatever, if the doc prescribe that, just give the patient his meds and get over it".
>>
>>10474678
Really? The cardiosurgeon also BTFO a freshman anestesiologist because she didnt reply immediatly with the info he wanted (wasn't critical dying patient, they were barely even started).
Obviously for each time something like this happened there were 100 med students getting btfo.
My proud moment was noticing that a patient had Cheyne-Stokes breathing pattern no one noticed, docs included. Other than that, btfo.
>>
>>10474741
Was never BTFO'd, honestly. I'm not the silent type either, if I say something that's wrong ,there's no problem, most of the professors tell me where I was mistaken and explain it to me.

We do have some very demanding profs that only want to make our life harder, like asking shit questions during surgery (Uro prof asked us what kind of device is the one he's using to cauterize the prostate. It was SideFire in the end but no one had any idea about it and we still don't care)

I don't think I have a proud moment. The closest one to that kind of feeling is when I had my IM rotation and a patient went into cardio respiratory stop. The prof let me and a colleague do CPR on him, called ICU, the anesthesist came down and intubated him while we did compressions. He was asystolic but in the end, we got him back and saw him the next week back in the IM unit.
>>
New thread

>>10474772
>>10474772
>>10474772
>>10474772
>>10474772
>>10474772
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>>10459453
>>10470333
So I amn't the only one from romania on this board, are you from Iasi or Bucharest? is it UMFCD?



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