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In 1996, the Rapture happened.

It is now the fall of 1999.

Nicolae Carpatescu - the Antichrist, according to some religious fanatics - has solidifies his grip on the world, and has tapped you to launch a global cashless system to drag the world economy into the 21st century kicking and screaming.

You are the faceless man who runs the internet, or at least, the physical web of wires and antennas that underlies it.

You have been warned by said religious fanatics that the world may have more or less five years to live - their predictions, so far, have mostly checked out.

Your mission: Keep the Internet alive. Even in the face of Armageddon.

Old thread: >>3696022
>>
>>3710768
>>3711044

You haven't been to Effincold since the place was established, having left its operation to Ryan Andrews. The place is, you have to admit, bustling; a small town has been built around the processing plant, to take advantage of its waste heat, and despite the low price of silver and cobalt the operation is financially solvent. One thing that worries you a little is that the people here are clearly loyal to Andrews rather than you, even though they are technically on your payroll.

Dr. Robertson has set up his experiment a little further north; you're both at the observation platform, waiting for the wind to shift, just in case.

"This is a uranium hydride bomb. Unlike every other design, this relies on slow rather than fast neutrons..." Dr. Robertson briefly explains the physics to you, in sufficient details that you muse that if you weren't a high ranking government yourself, you'd probably get a visit from the FBI if you were to write them down.

Eventually, the wind shifts. There's no big red button to push; this is a test, so a timer is activated automatically once the telemetry systems all report that they are recording.

You put on a lead-lined jacket and thick goggles, just in case.

https://twitter.com/BreakingNLive/status/1159551101370322945
>>
>>3737334

The explosion is... whelming. You know that if this had been a fully functional nuke, the observation platform you're standing on would have been reduced to ashes, as you would have. As it is, it looked like a large conventional bomb went off, save for the characteristic shockwave. Your personal electronics go numb for a few dozen seconds, then manage to reconnect.

This, then, is the result of years of squirreling away nuclear fuel and providing Dr. Robertson with approximately three times more funding than his above-the-table research has received. You aren't impressed.

Dr. Robertson, on the other hand, is triumphant. "We have initiation! We'll calculate the yield in a few minutes, but.... That was what nuclear targeteers call a fizzle, an incomplete reaction. I estimate point fifteen, maybe point two kilotons, comparable with the old Upshot-Knothole tests."

"How is this a good thing?"

"It's a great thing. It means that whatever caused fast-neutron collisions to no longer go supercritical - and I am expecting to have some answers soon in that respect - isn't affecting slow neutrons. This gives us an upper boundary to, well, physics going topsy-turvy on us. Everything below that should remain relatively unaffected, and this test gives us an idea of what can be done with things above that."

"For example?"

"Particle accelerators that can fit in a backpack or a jeep. Restarting the nuclear power industry. And... well, actual nukes, if you still want to go in that direction."

He explains that a multistage device with a hydride bomb at its core would be able to realize the sort of yield that "traditional" thermonuclear weapons were capable of - possibly even more, if anything, due to the supercriticality event happening over milliseconds rather than microseconds - at the price of much heavier construction. Sticking nukes on top of missiles, or slung under bombers, is probably a thing of the past at this point, however nuclear mines and possibly tank-mounted bombs are possible.

"... There's also the safety factor to consider. Uranium, unlike plutonium, is remarkably non-toxic aside from its radioactivity... I wouldn't say put it in your morning coffee, of course, but occasional exposure should be relatively safe if proper precautions are taken. But we're talking lead-lined jackets, not NBC suits."

You look at Dr. Robertson's eyes, seeing a fire in them that wasn't there before. This is the man who had claimed to be happy to leave the genie back in the bottle where it had crawled into.

# Encourage him to dream big, even if it's risky - now is the time.

# Remind him of his professsional and ethical obligations as a scientist. We need sane science, not mad science, now more than ever.

Your people had sent out a warning that a large explosion - chemical, of course - would be set in an uninhabited area, to perform mineralogical survey and, while at it, to test the new cheap accelerometers for early earthquake warning.
>>
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>>3699859
>>3699876

You direct Aki to give a gentle poke to the Burroughs MCP system that Carpatescu has. While she dives right into it, her support team contacts Burroughs and asks for details on the original implementation from the sixties and seventies. You're surprised to learn that a number of financial institutions are still using old big iron like that; if anything, there's been a surge of hiring for COBOL and FORTRAN programmers lately, as the old guard retires. Due to the extensive testing that the decades-old software has undergone, it's considered more reliable to build clusters to emulate the old mainframes and run said software than to reimplement everything from scratch; banks like predictability, and having three known bugs with known workarounds is considered less harmful than having one new one.

As far as Aki can tell, Carpatescu's MCP used to belong to Jonathan Stonagal's financial conglomerate, and has been in continuous operation - on the original hardware - for close to forty years now, having come online Sept 11, 1961. As far as she can tell, it has received a number of ad-hoc modifications, including a fast analog recursive differentiator built by the short-lived company ENCOM in the early eighties.

Unfortunately, her attempt to log in directly is detected and deflected, although it cannot be traced back to you. Carpatescu has largely dismantled Stonagal's organization after his former mentor committed suicide, so it's trivial to discover that this "Mr. Dillinger" is long gone, as are most of the MCP's sysadmins aside from maintenance staff.

>>3699859
>>3699876
>>3699922

Moira deploys your security teams all over Egypt; some will ensure that families and skilled workers can move to Cairo, some will run interference with the Peacekeepers directly under Rebohoth's control.

Gideon Raveshaw is the commander in charge of the forces under Rebohoth's responsibility; you don't know much about the man yet, but he seems to have done a decent job replacing Hassan, for most intents and purposes - at least off the field, since he is known for leading from the rear. He's exploiting the confusion between Rebohoth's personal guard and the Peacekeeper corps in order to openly raid fleeing Egyptians under color of law; your local contacts tell you that the situation in South Africa is heating up again, largely because over there this ruse hasn't been as successful due to many locals having cell phones with cameras and being able to at least document the most egregious abuses.

When facing Raveshaw's forces, Moira is directed to

# bait and bleed: you have a security force, not an army. Making them scared to sleep with both eyes closed will be sufficient, for now.

# Take them on: your soldiers are better trained and better armed. Time to start shifting the balance of power.

# Focus on defending the refugees.

Since the Garibaldi has been configured for strike operations, she only manages to do 1 or 2 trips between Libya and Sicily.
>>
>Defend the refugees. We don't need any more bloodshed than absolutely necessary.
>>
(Argh, something ate my post)

>>3737433
(What quest are you running?)

Your forces are happy to play the good guy. Raveshaw ends up frustrated: you leverage the Garibaldi's sensors to intercept his comms, and can work out evacuation orders. You suffer very light casualties, which are easily replaced thanks to your decision to set up a pension plan for your security forces. Your tracking teams note that Rebohoth is mad: he's decreed that no computers or cell phones are to be used in his palace at Khartoum.

Unfortunately your focus on saving lives means that you fall a little short on asset recovery, so you

# Abort construction in Australia.
# Abort construction in Russia.
# Take the budget hit next month; Carpatescu may notice.


In Britain and India, construction has proceeded apace; Foreman Domai has been silent, although you hear he's trying to unionize Bangalore coders, and Terry April's efforts in tandem with your own mean that the damage in England has been completely repaired.

Your work teams report some friction between Commissioner Lal and Chairman Yang at the eastern Indian border, but the arrival of your work teams to construct additional pylons is welcomed without reserves.
>>
>>3737433

As you get ready to go to New Babylon, Carla brings you the preparedness report. She's got droplets of marinara sauce over her normally impeccable uniform, and explains that she just came from the basement where the server room is, and that it's "some internet thing about spaghetti" and apparently a hydraulic press.

"I've cross-correlated our preparedness report with the seismic tests we've done up north. The great news is that we're in fine shape when it comes to handling things like earthquakes and floods - not just our own pylons and nodes, but a significant chunk of urban infrastructure won't be vulnerable to secondary damage like fires or prolonged blackouts. Of course, if a fissure decides to open up and eat a train, not much can be done, but should that happen at least the power grid is now smart enough to isolate that section of rails so as to not short the rest of it. And so on."

You figure that Carla wouldn't show up disheveled (you're used to being around construction workers, sysadmins, and mercenaries, so what counts as disheveled for her would count as damn near impeccable for most of your crew) if she just had good news for you, so you encourage her to come out with it.

"Well... I was looking at the timeline. I think that a global earthquake is nonsense, it's just not how plate tectonics work, but the other stuff... it looks like a prediction of an asteroid falling to Earth, or more than one. I was thinking, most of our satellites have cameras. Is there any way to aim them up rather than down?"

You say you'll think about it. The microsats' cameras would not do much good, but if you were to launch one of the larger systems in intermediate orbit that your people have been designing, installing something with better resolution and giving it its own CPU for autofocusing shouldn't be too difficult. Like everything else, though, it's extra work; Carpatescu's mandate is pretty tough as it is.
>>
>>3737337
>encourage him to dream big
>abort construction in Russia.

>>3737546
Time to put up a big boy sattalite
>>
>>3737471
(Oops, meant to remove that from my comment. Running Phoenix Cape Quest.)

>Abort construction in Australia. Start looking for ways to make extra cash for the asteroid cam, X-Risk is no laughing matter.
>>
#Focus on Defending Refugees
#Encourage him to dream big
#Abort construction in Russia

(Glad you're back Geist)

I've been doing more brainstorming on our 'theological efforts' and had yet another idea, although this one is more focused on mental defense.

What if we consider the possibility of Zen meditation and mindfulness exercises as a supplement to our nomenclature. We could have our staff try to figure out how to mentally block outside influences (i.e. Carpatescu's hypno-wizardry) or at the very least have some sort of bulwark if things go south.
>>
>>3737817
(Not sure if you were talking to me or the other guy. I'm not Geist though.)
>>
>>3737817
Would be interesting if that works. Qe could put a team on that.

>>3737766
Really just sell more nomenclatures is how we make more dosh.
>>3737471
Have the team not making network dye to funding sell nomencLturea instead so we make the +1 funds
>>
>>3737869
Talking to the GM. Still getting used to the tag thing here... ;P

>>3737893
We should be in the neighborhood, seeing as were visiting Japan.
>>
>>3737337

# Remind him of his professsional and ethical obligations as a scientist. We need sane science, not mad science, now more than ever.
# bait and bleed: you have a security force, not an army. Making them scared to sleep with both eyes closed will be sufficient, for now.
# Take the budget hit next month; Carpatescu may notice.
Explain we are making all recent and newer infrastructure disaster proof from earthquakes and flooding, and so forth.
>>
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>>3737817
Traditionally, people looking for that sort of guidance would go to the Far East; these days you are dismayed to find that even in Japan there are plenty of scammers and McDojos. Nevertheless, you make contact with someone reputable. The main issue, as always, would be to test anything you learn: the only person in your organization who gets to talk to the big boss regularly is, well, you

Carla notes that Aki has a decent chance of being immune to Carpatescu's mind-whammy, just out of how topsy turvy her brain is, but notes in her usual pleasantly professional demeanor that if you expose Aki to the Potentate on purpose, she's going to quit and take as many of your staff along as she can

You now have the option to use one of your monthly actions to train in meditation, although it will be a few months before you find any effects, if there are any to be found.

>>3737817
>>3737762

You take the opportunity - the normally sedate Dr. Robertson is now excited about the possibilities.

"Doctor, I am with you about not wanting to restart the nuclear rat race, but does this new understanding of physics do anything for us, since we now know what it does against us?"

"Well, yes. We can, presumably, rebuild nuclear reactors so that they will generate again, quite safely, although you're looking at a sixty percent loss of capacity. On the other hand, it'd take years.... assuming the public would agree to be rational about it, which, well, is more your bailiwick than mine."

Better drag him away from that line of thinking; you want him to make promises he'll have to at least try to keep.

"Could you nuclearize a ship?"

"Oh, easily. There's enough deuterium in salt water to keep the uranium hydride reaction going for years. You wouldn't need nearly as much shielding as you do on a nuclear submarine, either.... actually..."

"Less shielding means cheaper and smaller reactors, right?"

"Well, that's offset by the fact that you'd need more reactor volume per unit of energy, so... sorta. You could do some interesting things, though."

"Like what, Ghostbusters backpacks?"

Dr. Robertson shakes his head. "I'm a scientist, Foreman, not a propmaker. Let's be serious here." But he's nodding vigorously as he says it.

"Nuclear powered construction vehicles can be built safely. Now there's this rather persistent employee of yours who has been sending spider-tank designs to one of my engineering students, and a system powered by a nuclear reactor might-"

"Anyway." Didn't you toss that guy out of a window?

"Oh, I'm not saying it's particularly practical, but for things the size of cranes or quarry trucks, or even large earthmovers, it's now within the realm of possibility. Unless physics decides to go back to what we used to call normal, of course. In which case, well, I was worried that we would see spontaneous initiations... now, after this test, I no longer am. The new reactors would simply become inert - we'd have wasted a lot of money, but no lives."
>>
>>3738455
>>3737893
>>3737762
>>3737766

Getting a basic design for a "big boy" satellite happens for free; you have enough technically qualified space nuts on staff that a project proposal paper, based on Salyut/Almaz station cores and using Proton rockets, is brought to your desk within days. The actual implementation will have to be paid for, of course.

A large satellite will cost 4 aerospace parts to launch, and carry 4 components. Since it will be established in a modified Molniya orbit, It will be able to cover an entire region. One problem is that you will have to launch from Baikonur, since that's where the heavy hardware already is: the Garibaldi can be reconfigured to launch a microsatellite swarm into orbit, but we're talking about flight articles large enough to have a crew compartment here. Fortunately, Zakharov seems to be in good relations with you. The mini-stations can be fitted with repeater antennas, doing roughly the same job as a microsat swarm, and cameras, which can be pointed at the ground or at the sky. The paper shows a highly modular design, indicating that new component types would be fairly straightforward to design and integrate. You think that having giant composite mirrors to light up the night in an area, or tungsten rods to rain fire upon your enemies, or dedicated EMP jammers is a little impractical. You are also pretty sure that the ion cannon design was ripped straight out of Command & Conquer and was left in the paper as a gag.

>>3738455

Dr. Robertson is clearly proud of what he has accomplished. You listen to him patiently as he extols the possibility of a safe atomic power future that looks a lot like what he must've envisioned as a student in the 1950s and 1960s, and gently tease him about putting fins and chrome on the nuclear earthmovers he's describing.

Inevitably, a few of his students get involved in the conversation, and before long you're hearing about backpack mounted particle accelerators, teleforce beams, and industrial lasers that fit in a briefcase. You've successfully gotten this research team to loosen up a little.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4oMaxo3jlc

Dr. Robertson's written report, coming a few days later, is a model of professionalism of course, although the list of engineering application sounds just as broad as his excited impromptu lecture. Notably, he says that since he and his team are committed to pacifism, he is going to publish about reactor designs but not about nuclear mines. You figure that barring surprise events such as brainwashing or conversion, you've earned his loyalty in addition to having bought his services; it should still be possible to talk him into building a bomb, if it comes down to deflecting an asteroid or dealing with a similar existential threat. As for publishing,

# Okay.
# Veto.
# Publish in full.
>>
>>3738617
# Okay.
But delay it for a month or two.
What we need to do is set up a company that works with nuclear materials and building, so we can start making and patenting the building of these reactors. They can acquire the necessary material without too many eyebrows raised.

We can also further fund research and add to our budget.
Also we need to have a demo reactor built.
>>
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>>3738455
>>3737817
>>3737762

Unfortunately there's no time to pivot your team to make and market more Nomenklators, so you decide to postpone installation in Russia. Since you had made no announcements or promises, the Russian people don't even know that they are missing out on anything; your rollout in Australia and Indonesia happens without difficulties, the wide open spaces with no right-of-way restrictions and ample availability of solar power making the deployment easy, for once.

You do end up with a few unfinished pylons -- they're missing the solar apron --, which are earmarked for use locally in case of an emergency, since they can be run off diesel generators for a few days.

Either way, it's time to go to New Babylon. You check that Moira's people made it back safely aboard the Garibaldi before booking a flight to Iraq; she notes that if you're going to keep using CATS security as a private military company, you should probably pick a name and a flag for the outfit, as much as the "Tiger Mafia" thing worked out well it's not the sort of name that brings to mind reliability when looking for customers.

You're pretty sure that her proposed flag design sends the wrong message, though.

The first thing you find is that the monorail from Baghdad airport to New Babylon has been completed, so you dismiss the official limo, and take it. The second thing you find is that Carpatescu has a sense of humor, since one of the LCD screens in the conveyance is playing that one Simpsons episode on loop. The monorail cars look nothing like those in the cartoon, of course, but they do have solar panels on them.

New Babylon is fast replacing New York and London as the hub of global finance; on the ride to the Burj Carpathia -- apparently the Potentate has moved to his just-to-impress office after all --- you see more suits and ties than kandooras. The giant skyscraper itself is a little more ornate, the austere Modernist stylings inside having allowed in a little bit of gold trim and carpaeting to conform to the local style.

Ahead of you in the meeting schedule is Dr. Neal Damosa, an expert in the area of tele-education. You wait in the lavishly appointed anteroom, and listen in a little - Carpatescu wants to take advantage of the Rapture gap to reform elementary schools by introducing a worldwide standardized civics curriculum, to be beamed to schools via satellite, and wants to test the technology with some existing high schools. Dr. Damosa is excited by the promise of funding; you groan internally, both because this sounds like more work for you and because tele-education when there's an overabundance of teachers is clearly a terrible idea.

>>3738653

That's a good idea! You'll have to pick a site for it, though. You'll also have to decide who will nominally head it. Dr. Robertson is an option, since he is an internationally recognized expert. He doesn't mind a short delay: right now he's at least half a year ahead of everyone else.
>>
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>>3738668

Carpatescu's secretary - not Mrs. Durham, you note - welcomes you in as you watch a very happy Damosa leave.

The big boss seems to be in good spirits; you glance around the office and find that it too is less austere, there are now more awards and medals on the walls and the carpeting has been redone.

"So, Foreman. I've got to admit that i was hoping for faster progress on the electronic payment system. While you build the consumer infrastructure, I've had my own men take steps to ensure that centralized control becomes available as soon as said infrastructure is ready -- in addition to making tax evasion impossible, this will make sure that my administration has enough data on each global citizen to plan for their future needs. Whatever the Remnant crazies say, we are in for the long haul. To which I wish to ask you: is your slow progress for this quarter an indication that you have a long term strategy, or are you just slacking off?"

This sounds like a tongue lashing, but his tone is benign and his body language is relaxed. Mixed signals again.

# My people have worked hard for two years. I must have misunderstood you about how fast you wanted this done. I'm sorry.

# After the attacks, we've wanted to make sure anything new we put in place won't fall to reactionary sabotage. That takes longer.

# You know how exponential growth works - it starts slow, then snowballs. I'm doing the same thing.

# You hired me to do a job, and I'm doing it better than anyone would have. On that note: There are plenty of teachers and not enough children - why clog our bandwidth with telepresence schooling when we can use it for e-commerce instead?
>>
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>>3738668
Robertson will be head scientist and chief researcher.

Best hire a proper CEO or President to run the actual company

As for our PMC....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YoalS27eNhw
>>
>>3738694
I feel like bringing up all these points in the options are valid.
>>
>>3738694
# After the attacks, we've wanted to make sure anything new we put in place won't fall to reactionary sabotage. That takes longer.
Better safe than sorry, and better than having to build it twice.
+
# You know how exponential growth works - it starts slow, then snowballs. I'm doing the same thing.
+
# You hired me to do a job, and I'm doing it better than anyone would have. On that note: There are plenty of teachers and not enough children - why clog our bandwidth with telepresence schooling when we can use it for e-commerce instead?
It would bring in more tax revenue.
>>
Also. Carpatescu took our best programmer.
>>
>>3738762

(Good point, you can work this in, if you feel it's safe to be snarky.)
>>
>>3738765
Do you want a write in? I think I can work it in without really being snarky.
>>
>>3738774

(Sure, go for it)
>>
...Would it be a bad idea to track down and interview Mrs. Durham on the side?

Because it occurs to me that as far as understanding Carpatescu's psyche, we're still very much on the outside looking in.
>>
>>3738694

In light of the recent terror attacks, I've Instructed my staff to build redundancies and safeguards against sabotage and natural disasters. What is better than building someone quick or well than not having to build it twice? This of course takes more time.

But you know how these things work in its infancy, slow growth followed by exponential growth.

Now, Sir, I understand you hired me to do a job, and I'm certainly doing it better than anyone would have in my position, but I can only rush the crews so much before the work becomes sloppy. Then it becomes a compromise between quality and quantity, and recent events have seen some of my top talent leave our teams.
That said, I've come across a few concerns to note. We have an abundance of teachers and not enough children. While this is great for children receiving more individual time from teachers to learn and for them to be taught, this will clog our bandwidth from telepresence schooling when it can be used to generate extra tax revenue form e-commerce.
>>
>>3738825
We can just monitor her phone and email, and eaves drop on her, or we can just do a fake gossip and fashion or woman's magazine and send a agent to fluff her up.
>>
>>3738828
Support
>>
>>3738836
It's probably gonna have to be a face-to-face interview, and explicitly about her boss. Chances are she won't just casually chat about...if I can word this right...things she didn't know she picked up about him.
>>
>>3738765
Also I'd like to stroke our bosses ego, ask if we can get our picture taken with him in his office, by the window overlooking the city. Have it signed by both of us with his signature ontop of ours in the bottom corner.
>>
>>3738836
>>3738852

You're already tracking her: it's known that she is pregnant, and you have every reason to think the baby is Carpatescu's. She's in good health. They have not yet made an official announcement, and apparently aren't planning to.

What you aren't sure about is how Carpatescu found the time, being as he works any time he's not sleeping and sleeps 2 to 4 hours a day....

You can definitely talk to her in person; she stays out of the spotlight, but you're important enough that she's unlikely to say no. Since you can know where she is with some precision (within a few city blocks) as long as she's carrying a phone, arranging an "acccidental" meeting isn't even particularly hard, requiring a minimum of manpower (C1).

A thing to do before flying back from New Babylon maybe....

Carpatescu listens to you, frowning. Then crosses his fingers in front of his face.

"Well, now, Foreman. I must've touched a nerve last time we spoke, when I called you a nerd!"

He laughs, managing to inject some genuine mirth into it. "Despite what some press - which I could censor, but do not - tries to imply about me, I am no dictator, and have little use for sycophants. Those have their place, don't get me wrong - but not in my Peacekeepers or my engineering corps."

After a button press, a glass of water moves up on a piston from the black desk, and he takes a sip. "I understand your concern, and would too prefer that you do the job well once than poorly twice. I'm sure you will do what is necessary to motivate your teams. As for schooling... I'm thinking long term. The Event robbed the Earth of children, but as much as it was a tragedy, it also presents an opportunity. The teachers of the world have, for the first time in history, been able to catch their breath. I intend to make sure they never run short of it again. Your bandwidth concerns are noted; Dr. Damosa has been tasked with generating prerecorded material, which can be transferred offline, if need be - we're talking elementary schools here, it can afford to be a couple of days stale."

"As I ask you to trust me with steering us all into the new millennium, I in turn respect that I should trust you with making decisions within your sphere. Your budget is unchanged for the next trimester: keep up the good work, and I'm sure any doubts I might have will be dispelled soon."

His expression changes, and he leans forward. Back to the creepy monotone; he looks at you unblinkingly.

"I would like to tell you what you are going to never do again. Eavesdrop on me. Not by your ears, not by machine. You exist to serve me. Damosa exists to serve me. I exist to serve-" and his face changes expression quickly, almost like a glitch "-mankind. Now get out of my office before we forget that we need you."

# Thank the Potentate for his time, and leave.

# Leave without a word.

You can be in New Babylon for a day or so without it impacting your schedule; are you going to try to talk to Mrs. Durham?

#y

#n
>>
>>3738890

(Derp, I just committed the next post - this is a good idea, is it OK if I put it as an option for the next meeting?)
>>
>>3738891
# Leave without a word.

Did he derp for a moment?

Was he gonna say satan?

>>3738891
#n
Does he suspect we are spying on him?

Also won't she mention this to our boss that we visited him? Won't this go directly counter to what he just said to us?

>>3738892
Sure.
>>
>>3738902

Carpatescu did, for all practical purposes, derp for a moment. Fortunately, the noise canceling system by now works quite well.

Whether it's some of the hypnotic effect bypassing the filter or just you being understandably creeped out, the fact remains that one way or the other you can't wait to leave the office and, ideally, the building; the hair on the back of your head is standing on end.

>>3738902

Harriet Durham is fairly likely to mention it if you were to accidentally bump into her on purpose, yes, but she's not in Carpatescu's office; you know she's in New Babylon, but won't know exactly where until you ask your people. Even then, unless she's using the map app on her phone or you want to risk turning her phone's GPS on without her touching it, you will only know approximately.
>>
>>3738910
I'm still going to say no, we can talk to Santiago for that or maybe some other people we can befriend that have been affected.

Or we can visit Ben and test out his powers on us or some Guinean pigs and stuff.
>>
>>"I would like to tell you what you are going to never do again. Eavesdrop on me. Not by your ears, not by machine. You exist to serve me. Damosa exists to serve me. I exist to serve-" and his face changes expression quickly, almost like a glitch "-mankind. Now get out of my office before we forget that we need you."

Sonofabitch.

Either Carpatescu got wind that we eavesdropped on his chat with the Pontifex, or he's gotten paranoid about how much (and what) we've been amassing.

Either way working inside the system just got a lot more dangerous.

#Leave without a word.

#n.
>>
>>3738949
Think Damosa dropped a dine on our activities somehow?

That stuff isn't even in place yet.... and they are two separate systems and industries.

Maybe Santiago or Dimmsdale sqeaked or has leaks?

Was it Rebootha? I mean we never really used any of our info on him outside of the battlefield so he can't suspects anything beyond us intercepting battlefield comms which is fairly well know ability of enemy armies.

We should put a tracker on Rebooths new guy.
>>
>>3738960
Any of them. We haven't done a damn thing to compartmentalize CATS or establish counterintelligence. Any informants, anywhere, would at least have access to know everything.
>>
>>3738949
>>3738922

You get out at a brisk walking pace, and only stop feeling a sort of primal fear after you're out of the giant skyscraper. Just to be safe, you get on the first plane back to the States.

One consolation is that it's pretty obvious that Carpatescu doesn't know about your earbuds, or he'd have told you to take them off, or worse....


>>3738960

You don't know much about Gideon Raveshaw other than, unlike Hassan, he prefers to lead from the rear. A cursory search by your tracking team reveals that originally, Raveshaw was a mercenary strategist in Africa, selling his intelligence gathering services to the highest bidder. Eventually he was recruited by Rebohoth to lead his espionage and sabotage branch in Tunisia. Looks like this guy may be a little wiser to your tricks, but that in turn may make him more vulnerable to direct methods.

>>3738731

By now you have a system in place to set up dummy companies, so that's not an issue. Moira doesn't dislike Blackwatch as a name; it sounds a decent mixture of scary and professional.

When you get back, Andrews tells you that he's identified a couple of places where an automated factory can be set up. India and China are out of the question: the people there would actively resist automation, and Domai is sure to get in his way, and yours. Your best bets currently would be Russia and Japan - the population in these territories is relatively scarce, so automation would be welcome. Both cultures are fairly well primed to a cybernetics-based approach to production.

>>3738967

That's true. One advantage of this approach is that it has created a remarkably cohesive corporate culture; people work with you because they like to. Another advantage is that it has allowed cross-pollination between your various research and engineering programs.

Your IT security and SIGINT is top notch - but don't let that make you feel overconfident: as it stands, one well-placed mole working with traditional methods could do a pretty good job ruining your day. Fortunately, so far you've only pissed off someone who was stupid enough to "only" send an assassin.


# End month.

# Wait, gotta go over some things.
>>
>>3738967
Well no one ever wants to let us... as if guided by an all powerful all knowing, omnipresent hand....
>>
>>3738971
# End month.
Can't remember anything else, so don't remember anything we may be forgetting.

>don't let that make you feel overconfident
I feel jilted.

Gonna post this here so its easier for folks to catch up.
http://suptg.thisisnotatrueending.com/qstarchive.html?tags=left%20beyond
>>
>>3738971
>>3738985
Oh shit, we were suppose to visit Rosenwig weren't we? Did we do that? I don't recall.
>>
>>3738971
>That's true. One advantage of this approach is that it has created a remarkably cohesive corporate culture; people work with you because they like to. Another advantage is that it has allowed cross-pollination between your various research and engineering programs.
>Your IT security and SIGINT is top notch - but don't let that make you feel overconfident: as it stands, one well-placed mole working with traditional methods could do a pretty good job ruining your day. Fortunately, so far you've only pissed off someone who was stupid enough to "only" send an assassin.

Hmmm.

Tradeoffs, tradeoffs...but we should definitely see about getting Blackwatch together as a public company and divesting ourselves of our black ops and military units, and soon. That'll help to compartmentalize between military and CATS ops at least.

>>3738974
You can say we're been stupid, mate. I for one wouldn't judge you for that.

And...no, I don't believe we have.
>>
>>3739001
To clarify, what I meant was public as in publicly traded and self contained(meaning, among other things, an entirely separate support team and chain of command, with only the CEO answering to us--discretely!)
>>
>>3738987

You had it on the agenda as a "If I have time" item; the man is currently in Tel Aviv, and you can definitely swing by as you head back to the Americas.

Happily, Carpatescu simply told you to get out of his office.

# Might as well visit.

# No need.

>>3739001

(Yep, it's always tradeoffs).

>>3739004

Spinning off part of your activities gives you plausible deniability for their actions, however, whoever you put in charge is going to occasionally override you on tactical decisions. However, they will never override you on strategic decisions: they know which way their bread is buttered.

On that note, a couple of Dr. Robertson's underlings have teamed up with a few of your researchers to check whether physics has changed enough to allow for a promising venue for nearly free, clean energy. This line of inquiry was closed after the cat got bored and wandered off.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8yW5cyXXRc
>>
>>3739007
I thought we used one of our personal actions to see the man....

If we didn't then put it off for next month, since us turning around and getting off back at our bosses work city may be suspicious and may raise eyebrows. If we can do it discreetly or do so without anyone noticing then sure....

That cat is dead, and Schrodinger was not involved.
>>
>>3739004
>>3739007
We can do a board members and stockholders type of control, with hiring and firing options or something.

>whoever you put in charge is going to occasionally override you on tactical decisions.
That's fine so long as they are on the field and we are not.
>>
>>3739015

(You did schedule it: it's been a few days IRL so I am asking if people want a refund, and do something else with it, or if it's OK to proceed!)

>>3739017

That's sensible. A good thing about being a global cabinet level officer (if a low ranking one) is that you don't have to worry about hiring lawyers for this sort of thing, it's done for you in the background as part of regular business management. If CATS wishes to contract out for their security services, there is no legal requirement for you to take bids, you can simply give the job to a PMC that you happen to trust.
>>
>>3739022
Hmm, So can we spend that action to go see the drone guy?
>>
>>3739007
>>3739015

# Hold off for now.

>>Spinning off part of your activities gives you plausible deniability for their actions, however, whoever you put in charge is going to occasionally override you on tactical decisions. However, they will never override you on strategic decisions: they know which way their bread is buttered.

I can certainly live with that.

>>3739017

I'd be careful about owning board members or stocks...too easy to leave a paper trail back to us.

Better to keep in the CEO's good graces, deal squarely, and leave them to their own devices. So long as jobs get done we shouldn't care too much about how.
>>
>>3739022
Unless we can boot the extra action over to next turn we ought to use it now.
>>
>>3739024

Yes, you can go talk to Patrick Zevo instead.
>>
>>3739026
We could use frontmen as puppets, or put actors in place who won't complain about getting good paychecks for being our yes men and also have clauses for their dismissal if they displease us, by releasing blackmail or sackable offenses such as drug use or video of them doing something like soliciting prostitutes.
>>
>>3739031
Sure lets do that. He can be our robotics guy.
>>
>>3739036
>>3739026

Will you meet with Rosenzweig, Patrick Zevo, or neither? (Sorry I am not sure what y'all want to do here!)

* Chain Rosenzweig is a non-practicing Jew who invented the Eden fertilizer. Lately, he has been reconnecting with his religious roots after talking with Tsion Ben-Judah, although not in the way that the theologian-turned-preacher might have hoped. He mentioned being willing to meet about Eden Fertilizer catalyst shortages.

* Patrick Zevo is the sole extant heir of Zevo Toys, a company that tried to sell the US Army and Air Force on inexpensive drone swarms to complement or even replace air-to-ground capabilties. After the Event, his brother Leslie committed suicide, as did many who initially believed there would be no more children. Since Patrick never wanted to be an entrepreneur, he is interested in liquidating his remaining assets.

* Taking a couple of days off opens up a chance for something interesting happening in your own backyard.
>>
>>3739049
Patrick Zevo. He may drop dead. I made that mistake when I let the prince die in Wolf Among us.

Unless we can visit Chain without anyone noticing...
We can send someone to meet him later via agent, or send him an email to meet us in America on a all expenses paid visit untraceable to us.
>>
>>3739049
>* Taking a couple of days off opens up a chance for something interesting happening in your own backyard.

Is that a third option to just sit around and do nothing?
>>
>>3739060

People will notice in the sense that your comings and goings aren't secret, in the sense that if a journalist were to call the airline and confirm that you went on a Chicago-Baghdad-Tel Aviv-Chicago trip, they'd confirm it (if you want secrecy, you'll have to land somewhere in Italy, then have one of the Garibaldi's aircraft pick you up, and then switch planes on the carrier since the Antonovs should just about be able to cover that part of the Mediterranean), but you consulting with Rosenzweig is not something that would raise any alerts; the man is in the odd position of being a scientist who is famous among the general public, so people visiting him to confer an award or try to get his help to raise awareness for a cause isn't particularly unusual.

>>3739063

Yes. That may result in HQ shenanigans. (I've written up a few in the past when, for one reason or another, the Foreman didn't use an action).
>>
>>3739071
Didn't know/remember about that mechanic even existed.

Would leaving two unused actions have a compunding or greater effect?

What about our other Named heros? Would they get fun or interesting events?

What if we and another hero had unused actions, or use and two other hero's had unused actions? Would there be a double or triangle effect?

Hmm.. You know what, lets YOLO this and leave the last action unused. Its fairly organic since we left Tel Aviv in a hurry.

>>3739049
>>3739060
I'll change to this then

* Taking a couple of days off opens up a chance for something interesting happening in your own backyard.

Take the day off. This is my last change on this option
>>
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Rolled 16 (1d100)

>>3739080

When not called upon, your agents tend to do their own thing. In general, Dr. Robertson will continue his work at the neutrino observatory (this has actually resulted in measurable advancement of your nuclear program once), Andrews will operate the Effincold base and expand his own influence, Moira has been known to get in a few fights but you have yet to bail her out of jail, and Aki effectively lives in your basement, and is to blame for the occasional sighting of a number of cellphone-on-tracks mini bots that infest your air ducts (They aren't reliable enough for spying yet, but at least you can be sure that nobody is deploying them against you).

(I have written a few such interactions in the past, if you note. They rarely have much in the way of a mechanical effect, but they're fun to write. In the older quest, it was stuff like Kat opening a restaurant, which did then become a minor plot point).
>>
>>3739080
>>3739026

I'd rather talk to the Zevo guy. Having drones plus automatic factories equals possibility to go full AdMech.

Alternatively talk to Chaim since it's what we had scheduled. In-universe, don't want to flake on someone after scheduling an appointment, and gaming wise, if Tsion is already at work converting him he's going to become hostile soon, so we might want to jump on it.

>>3739090

That's great but I think it means we'd need high rolls for that stuff to have an effect. And those tend to not happen.
>>
>>3739060

If we got various supernatural disasters coming, it means a lot of rocks fall everyone dies.
>>
>>3739049
>meet with rosenzweig. We need to get to him before the embargo. We dont need a global famine right now.
>>
>>3739386
>>3739360
>>3739026
>>3739027

Tel Aviv these days is a remarkably prosperous city. The New Babylon architectural envy is evident in all the new construction, but unlike the manufactured global capital, this city has a rich and organic history and, at least to you, doesn't have that uncanny valley Disneyland vibe.

Dr. Rosenzweig is a liberal Jew, having grown up after Israel's establishment but before the intifada; everything considered, he's part of a slowly shrinking demographic, much like mainline Protestants back in North America. Your file on him does indicate that he sporadically attends an Ecumenical Council approved synagogue.

You find the man in what looks like a historian's study in his magnificently appointed but relatively small townhouse; his lab facilities are at TAKA, and home is where he follows up on his side projects, from a history of internal Cold War politics in ex-Soviet republics to, by the look of things, an interest in metallurgy, given that he greets you wearing an old fashioned blacksmith's apron and his kitchen has been taken over by small crucibles and similar implements of old-timey steel manufacturing. He welcomes you in and apologizes for the heat.

"Oh, it's just a hobby of mine, really. I've been trying to recreate Damascus steel - it's all the rage on the internets lately, don't you know? I co-wrote a paper showing that modern Bessemer steel is actually superior for making blades, but alas, haven't really gotten much in the way of attention for this particular bit of research.... I put the whole thing on the Datalinks, but some kid from California undid my edit."

He offers you a nice, worn, very comfortable seat as he gets behind his desk. "Say, it wouldn't be possible to just ensure that experts have more of a voice online, would it? Get the uneducated to stop being so loud and pushy?"

You explain that the internet's infrastructure treats censorship as damage and routes around it, and recommend that he make it clear that the Datalinks article edits came from him -- it turns out he'd uploaded anonymously. "Oh, but having a reputation for botany ought to not influence my credentials in metallurgy, surely. I'm a poor amateur at best..."

Dr. Rosenzweig isn't particularly wise in the ways of the world, but he does come across as earnest.

# Ask him about Terry Pratchett's sword, since he's interested in the topic.

# Go straight to the point: the Eden fertilizer supply chain is still too centralized, even though it shouldn't be.

# Go straight to the point: you have reason to suspect that the Eden fertilizer will cause a dustbowl in a few years.
>>
>>3739424
>lets be plesent and start with terry pratchetts sword and ask if they would like to see it as well.
>>
>>3739447

"Oh, I would love to!" Turns out Rosenzweig is familiar with the author, and has the Bromeliad trilogy - as a trio of small, torn paperbacks made in a kibbutz some time in the 1980s - somewhere in his bookshelves, which cover a good half of the walls of his townhouse.

After learning how the sword was made, he launches on an explanation about meteoric iron in history that you find yourself listening along to; the man would make for an excellent lecturer, more so than Dr. Robertson's more brusque approach. That in itself is odd; you've been around researchers quite a bit in the last few years, and they're generally very future-oriented. Rosenzweig by comparison is almost grandfatherly; you have trouble imagining him make such a fundamental breakthrough as the Eden fertilizer, especially working essentially alone, as he did. It sounds more like something out of a Victorian scientific romance than of the realities of modern scientific research - although there are definitely examples to the contrary, Barry Marshall for example.

# Mention this. People respect his achievement, as they should, but he must have been accused of not paying his dues academically, surely?

# When he goes on a tangent about the nuclear physics of iron and carbon, tell him about some of the older nuclear research which, you reckon, will have made it into the academic press by now anyway. Specifically, about the changes in carbon radioactivity.

# Go straight to the point: the Eden fertilizer supply chain is still too centralized, and you're worried about future shortages.

# Go straight to the point: you have reason to suspect that the Eden fertilizer will cause a dustbowl in a few years, and are worried about loss of diversity as other cultures fell by the wayside.
>>
>>3739474
>Take about the older nuclear research. And the changes in carbon radiactivity. Mention we work with Robertson often and are intrigued about these changes. Ask what he thinks caused this sudden change in how radioactivity works.
>>
>>3739479

You share some of Dr. Robertson's research about the changes in nuclear physics brought about by the Event; Chaim notes that, oddly, he's been meaning to read up on it -- he even has the papers downloaded or printed, see -- but never gets around it. "It's not too strange. Nobody likes to spend time thinking about death."

Chaim's expression changes - losing his jovial smile, he looks like he's aged ten years in five seconds.

"You have no idea how much I hate miracles," he says, and didn't say anything else, just stares at the ceiling like he could see the stars through the roof and the midday sky.

"Miracles?"

"Non-repeatable phenomena," he continues. "Some stuff only happens once, ever. How do you build up a model for that? What would you do, Foreman, if you encountered a communication method that was truly unique, different from all the others, different from all the models you had seen?" He sighs, an old, ragged sound.

You say that you'd evaluate it, and deploy it, if necessary. "Ah, yes. I'm talking to a manager, not to a scientist. Actually, you know? You don't come across as the manager type to me. You take risks. You remind me of the bright young men who get the next big idea and move to California, and come back with two kids and a Gentile woman and a lot of broken dreams. I've had the privilege of mentoring a few, for what little it mattered"

"Uhm, you're a world renowned scientist" you interject "one of the smartest people alive, and you've done more for the world than most." Maybe he's just fishing for compliments.

"I am a genius," Chaim says. "Not a very smart person. I'm a... mostly smart person. Slipping a little, in my old age. But I am a genius. I am a miracle-worker, a maker of wonders, or so the world says. And why wouldn't it?"

Chaim starts doing a little bit of math on an old-fashioned blackboard as he looks at Robertson's paper on carbon-14 decay. He's clearly not forgotten that you are there, but he seems to have gone into full old man rant mode - about how his family believed in the Renaissance ideal, and made sure he got a comprehensive education. "These days they'd probably diagnose me with Asperger's and put me in a happy home, or something. As if there was less truth in Maimonides, or Rembrandt, than in steam tables." Looking around, you note that the man clearly admires Leonardo; you suspect that one of his sketches, framed under heavy glass and hanging from a wall alongside a number of honorary degrees, might be an original.
>>
>>3739518

"When you create a wonder, there's always a theory behind it, a system. You've been thinking about systems, I think. When we're young and the possibilities swirl around us like a storm, we try to find a philosophy that explains what we can do, but they're all vacuous nonsense. That's the big horrible joke: there is no accommodating genius, no explaining it. Genius is a non-repeating phenomenon. A miracle, every time. None of those scholars at the College with their slide rules and tables of logs and test tubes were scientists. They were just playing with the trappings of science, like some kid waving around a toy gun and scaring the rest of the playground. We got results, but that's all we had: results. There was no system. Look!"

You can read advanced math, but when it's typed, or on a MathCAD spreadsheet; Chaim's chicken scrawl looks more like some strange angular alchemy than equations, at least at a glance.

"Your director of systems research is right. Combine this alteration of physics with the simple fact that we've been burning so much coal now that the fools in the suburbs kicked out nuclear power from every backyard, it's become near impossible to do radiometric dating anymore! I was going to show this to Tsion next week, and...."

"Tsion Ben-Judah?"

"Yes, yes. He was my student for a little bit, can you believe that? Declared a minor in natural sciences as an undergrad. Good man, full of passion. Heart definitely in the right place. Brain, I'm not so sure anymore - you'd think he fell in love when overseas, the way he got himself Americanized! Lately he's been trying to talk me into reading up on Young Earth Creationism, so for scholarship's sake, I was going to set him straight about the world - he's welcome to change his beliefs, don't get me wrong, I consider Christianity a tradition of Judaism that got a little out of hand anyway, but the Torah tells us how to touch heaven, not how the heavens go, if you don't mind me mangling Galileo - but it turns out, as I were to go out with a Geiger counter, I can't!"

# Mention Dr. Robertson's research on supernovas, which shows that the radioactive anomaly is a local phenomenon.

# Steer the conversation back to the sword - in his long winded exposition, Chaim mentioned playing with meteoric iron himself. Would it do anything interesting, hypothetically?

# Move on to the Eden fertilizer scarcity; this is fascinating, but not very useful.

# Move on to the Eden fertilizer long term effects; this is fascinating, but not very useful.

# Wait, does he mean to say that his big discovery was a fluke?
>>
>>3739524
>lets try and push him to talk more about miricles and how his genius is part of that eill porbably get him to talk about the eden fertalizer.
>mention researxh on supernovas which shows that the radioactive anomaly is a local phenomenon. I think this will push torwards miricles
>>
>>3739676

Dr. Rosenzweig is nothing but thorough; he said he was going to read Dr. Robertson's work, so you figure he's already printed out the SN1987A paper, and it's somewhere in the stack... yes, there it is. You hand it over. He skims it, taking maybe a minute to do it, and occasionally making a note on the blackboard.

"Strange to see a scientist believing in miracles" you interject.

"Oh, I'm a naturalist by training - I'm more inclined to accept that outliers exist than to fit everything into a model." That sort of contradicts what he just said, though. "I only wish it would made sense, is all. When a scientist writes about God, his colleagues assume he is either over the hill or going bonkers. In my case it should be understood from the start that I am a student of the cosmos, not just a scientist. It's why I try to make time for art and history, as much as I understand how fortunate I am to be out of the academic rat race. Let me quote Darwin at you: my theology is a simple muddle. I cannot look at the Universe as the result of blind chance, yet I see no evidence of beneficent design in the details."

"Are you saying that God may be malevolent?"

"I'm saying that if God has a will, it would be as unknowable to us as an artist's interest in the pursuit of completeness in simplicity, would be to a sabertooth tiger who is constantly a couple of meals away from starvation at best."

He finds the page he was looking for, erases the whitebaord, and resumes scrawling at it. You let him.

"At this moment it seems as though science will never be able to raise the curtain on the mystery of creation. For the scientist who has lived by his faith in the power of reason, I think that this story ends like a bad dream. He has scaled the mountains of ignorance; he is about to conquer the highest peak; as he pulls himself over the final rock, he is greeted by a band of theologians who have been sitting there for centuries. Only - like me - they would have no system, only results. By the way, none of this is for publication, right?"

You allow yourself to smile; Chaim hasn't been happy with being a public figure, preferring to do research like a gentleman scientist, or to lose himself in minutiae of history or philosophy. "No, of course not, Doctor. I'm just trying to avoid turning into one of those single-track specialists who know everything about nothing."

The botanist turns towards you and regales you with a paternal smile; you get the idea that it's the point he was trying to make to you, if indeed there was any.
>>
>>3739756

He points at one paragraph on Robertson's paper. "There, see." It prefaces itself with being highly speculative in nature, and notes that the only alternative to the changes in nuclear physics being a local and rare anomaly, possibly brought about by a supersaturation of yet undetectable particles such as Higgs bosons or dark matter, would be to accept geocentrism. "Dr. Robertson is right to want to look for other anomalies - I hope he gets to, but I understand his telescope was taken away? - but he really should allow himself to make that step."

"Come Doctor, don't tell me you are a geocentrist."

"Of course I am!" He smiles. "Not in the scientific sense, obviously, and not in the Biblical-literalist sense that some folks have been trotting out lately. But consider: when it comes to our sense of art, our sense of history, even our sense of right and wrong, we are all geocentrists. If an alien race were to contact us, and we were to consider them gods - the go-to dodge of so many positivists on the internets, if they would only understand what positivism actually is - would we understand their art, their culture, their taste? Of couse not; they would have spanned the cosmos to come to us. They might see invading us as a way to uplift us, the way you'd deny a feral dog his freedom by turning him into a pet, and incidentally tripling his average lifespan as a result. They may even do so for the sake of art, the way the ancients used blood to make some pigments. Do you know why purple is the color of kings? Because it was hard to get! Spiny dye-murex. Cute little sea snail. Thousands of them had to be found, their shells cracked, the snail removed. Mountains of empty shells have been found at the ancient sites of Sidon and Tyre! They were left to soak, then a tiny gland was removed and the juice extracted and put in a basin, which was placed in the sunlight. There a remarkable transformation took place. In the sunlight the juice turned white, then yellow-green, then green, then violet, then a red which turned darker and darker. The process had to be stopped at exactly the right time to obtain the desired color, which could range from a bright crimson to a dark purple, the color of dried blood. Then either wool, linen or silk would be dyed. The hue varied between crimson and violet, but it was always rich, bright and lasting... To a cosmic civilization, we just might be the snails, Foreman. Then, would our duty to the cosmos not be to shine vibrantly?"

"That's... a bit nihilistic of you, Dr. Rosenzweig."

He chuckles in that peculiar grandfatherly way. "Excellent! Now I know what to talk about next time dear Tsion comes calling. You'll forgive me having used you as a guinea pig for my argument, Foreman, I hope - and if I may bribe you to do so, please accept this."

Rosenzweig puts away the astronomy paper and hands you a very unassuming USB drive. "Miracles. As many of them as I could document."

# Thank you.

# Do you have more time?
>>
>>3739784

See if he's got more time. We're getting useful data here.

>>3739524
> # Wait, does he mean to say that his big discovery was a fluke?
>>
>>3739784
>>3739875
Support
>>
"How do you mean?"

"Oh, I just happened to be interested in that, a while ago. I do that. So, I've documented every miracle, of every faith, that I managed to come across. Who knows; maybe what to us, humans, what look like non-repeating phenomena would show patterns to a nonhuman mind. Potentate Carpatescu tells me that the day when we will have artificial intellects is not too far out."

"I don't think it'll happen in our lifetimes, but it will happen, at some point."

"Oh, nonsense. You're young. You'll see things I can only dream of! But now I have to ask you to go; I'm experimenting with slow cooling and would like to keep a close eye. Besides, Tsion really wanted to talk to me later this evening, and he said it'd have to be one on one. I would love to visit, and see Sir Pratchett's sword, incidentally!"

"I think we can arrange that. But, do you have more time?"

"A few minutes, if you don't mind me working while we talk..."

And just like that, you move over to the kitchen, where the botanist starts adjusting old fashioned Bunsen burners heating up crucibles; they're hooked up to the gas stove, but the hookup itself seems to have been done professionally.

"Of course not, Dr. Rosenzweig. I've got to ask, though" you say, almost as an afterthought, while he's distracted "were you saying earlier that your invention of the Eden fertilizer was a fluke?"

You half expect to be thrown out, and for a moment, worry about being assaulted with a crucible full of molten steel. The answer, however surprises you about as much as that would. "Oh, yes, yes. From a certain point of view. I won't deny that it was very much a moment of inspiration - quite a bit of trial and error, with not nearly as much as I would like when it comes to theoretical underpinnings. My work since then has been focused on working out the kinks, you see. That's why the production process is still a little temperamental. This is why I caution people away from working so haphazardly: I don't feel I deserve half the praise I get, and to be frank, I feel like so sophomoric entering the lab at TAU, every time! Everyone's just so deferential, I constantly worry that I am making basic mistakes and nobody's calling me on it. Enough with that, I say! Here I am, trying to make sense of non-repeating phenomena... At least, I supposed, it worked out well for many stomachs across the planet. Speaking of which, my neighbor, wonderful lady from Yemen you see, brought me some Kubaneh bread, could you get it out of the oven for me before you leave?"

Well, you got that recorded, for what it'll be worth: the Eden fertilizer, much like WD-40, was developed thanks in part to a stroke of luck, which makes industrial replication difficult. The flatbread looks like it's been reheated a little too much; it's dry and the corners are burnt. You exchange emails, and leave the man to his experimenting.


# End month.

# Wait.
>>
>>3739360
>>3739361
Well I figure if we want hidden special events, now would be the time for them because we know in the coming months we will probably never take time off again. Which sucks for the qm making all those hidden scenes to never play out.

Plus it was just a trail to see if it would be worth doing again in the future, which seems evidently not.

# End month.
>>
Hello, Foreman! You are planning CATS' operations for the month.

Rules: http://emlia.org/pmwiki/pub/web/LeftBeyond.Quest2Rules.html
Datalinks: http://emlia.org/pmwiki/pub/web/LeftBeyond.Quest2Datalinks.html
Tentative timeline: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1BlMOSEOxSihj1gdagq7yxCjONaRBgcdlRxnc68uWf0A

You can deploy yourself on TWO actions for a small bonus to all rolls Your Nomenklator system can be issued to ONE team per turn, for a small bonus to all rolls

Dr Robertson can be deployed on ONE action for a large bonus to R&D rolls or a small bonus to any non-covert rolls

Ryan Andrews can be deployed on ONE action for a large bonus to construction rolls or a small bonus to any non-covert rolls

Moira McSingh can be deployed on ONE action per turn, for a medium bonus to covert rolls or a small bonus to all rolls; She can give basic combat capability to a work crew

Aki Lattinen can be deployed on TWO actions per turn, for a medium bonus to R&D or construction rolls; She will hack into things if bored

Performing an action outside of your home territory will also require the availability of (complexity) fleet assets, OR renting them at the cost of 1/asset

C0 (Free):

Move the Garibaldi (Mediterranean, Arctic, Atlantic, Indian, Pacific)
Track someone (max 3)

Buy equipment on the open market:
Power generation 1
Small arms 1
Network equipment 2
Fleet assets 2
Aerospace part 3
Supplies (food, fuel etc) 0.5

C0 (Agent):

Survey a territory for opportunity using an agent Not surveyed: Northern Europe, Western Europe, China, India, Greenland, Japan, Indochina, Pacific Islands, Afghanistan, Madagascar, Sahara, Central Africa, Israel, Middle East, Western Russia
Construct a CellSol pylon (Needs 1 network part)
Undergo combat training (Max 1 per month)

Tail someone
Meet with someone

Buy equipment on the black market:
Small arms 1
Squad weapons 2
Stimulants 1

C1:

Reconfigure the Garibaldi (generic, cargo, hospital, strike, orbital)

Tail some1

Survey a territory for opportunity using a team

Hire out a covert operations team for a situational reward

Construct network equipment

Procure network equipment and construct a CellSol pylon

Make and sell consumer-grade Nomenklators (Net gain 1BN)

C2:

Do research (1~3)

Construct an aerospace part

Construct a logistics hub (cap 1 fleet requirement for that territory; can deploy covert teams there with no notice; costs 1 power; stores supplies)

Study the USB drive

C3:

Recruit a work team

Schedule a satellite launch, which will happen at the end of NEXT month Requires an aerospace part

Do research (4~6)

Start DEW research

C4:

Recruit a covert team

Do research (7~9)

Construct a network node (unifies cell and net; costs 1 power, 1 network)

C5:

Rush a satellite launch, which will happen at the end of this month Requires 1 aerospace part

Construct a base and a network node at the same time (2 power, 1 network)

Do research (10)

What are your orders?
>>
Foreman
Survey USA for Zevos and an CIA/FBI guy.

4 Covert teams with Moira doing jobs.

2 work teams construct network equipment

1 work crew with Aki Study USB

1 work crew with Aki does research in Ai

3 work teams Recruit a covert team

3 work teams with Dr. Roberts work on big satellites.

4 work team Construct a (secret military) base and a network node at the same time with Andrews....
In West Virgina!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EqcMbkFR6jk
>>
Wait no. Cancel Dr. Roberts and RD on Sats. We need to go build the aborted project in Russia.
>>
>>3740262
>>3740307

(I need to pass out for a bit, will return when I'm awake again. hope it's still interesting!)
>>
>>3740323
Where can I send you coffee?!
Alright see you in a bit, don't let the Formication bite!
Seriously I think I have something but I can't find any proof!
>>
>>3740186
My vote is

> 8 teams make factories in japan and russia.

>3 teams launch a large sattalite with ryan on it. Make sure to have the telescope to point up as carla suggested

>3 team with aki to research AI

> Have robertson draw up a nuclear generator we could set up and test soon for lots of power we dont need to pay for.

>have moira and 4 teams work on jobs if a nuclear option is available take it

>factory make netowkr parts deploy in north east russia

> tell ryan to start on extracting uranium from our mine.


>have aki look over the list of miricles if anyone is gonna pice it together its her.

>us practice meditation

>us see if we can purchase eden fertalizer directly for stockpiling.


>>3740262
Why only one team research AI? Its a 4 complexity with aki its gonna be like a 30% chance


Also giest shouldnt we be at AI 8 and nuke 7 on the map after last turn?
>>
>>3740403
Ah, got that mixed up when switching around researching the USB

Also there are two research options in the c3 and c4 sections.
>>
>>3740262
>>3740186
Just a few quick fixes.

Foreman
Survey USA for Zevos and an CIA/FBI guy.

4 Covert teams with Moira doing jobs.

2 work teams construct network equipment

1 work crew with Aki Study USB

3 work crew with Aki does research in Ai

3 work teams make network equipment, place two in Russia, east and west. One in China or Japan (same region)

5 work team Construct a (secret military) base and a network node at the same time with Andrews in W.V.
>>
Also we lost a favor with our boss.
>>
>>3740421
Not sure what you mean by two research option in the c3 and c4?

>>3740429
I disagree with making a military base why bother? We really only need the ahip for that. Logistics bases are far more helpful and we already have one in the us. What benefits would a miltity base give us?

Also shouldnt we be making that sattalite to look for a metorite hitting us like carla suggested?

Do you agree that we should fully rollout the network once we are at max logistics AI?
>>
>>3740186
Under Complexity 3 and 4 there are research options
>Do research (4~6)
>Do research (7~9)

I think we have more than to do than we can really do, and we should hire more people to help us do them.

Also, I'd like to build our factories closer to home so we don't have to worry about logistics and shipping.

One of the first things that tend to break down in global conflict are safe and affordable shipping lanes.

Its for us to safely hole up and and stockpile our supplies, and provide very strong and reliable infrastructure than can't be easily taken out.
>>
>>3740538
Ok. Yeah logistics should be at 8 so its the complexity 4 which is what i was syaing erlier. Unless you mean somthing else?


Well we have no other locations to build factories right now the two places i chise are the only places. We can semd ryan to find mpre but hoenstly more factories the better.

True thats why we have bought our own shipping which is our fleet supply.

We really arent really in a position to hole up. But i agree we have more to do then we can but we dont have the budget for more people as well we are near our limit of people. Factories work around both.
>>
>>3740708
We can build them in Canada or Mexico, that commie union foreman is still likely limited to America.

We won't be holing up, we would have a bolt hole to move our North American HQ to.
>>
>>3740802

There is also the Caribbean (Cuba, etc.)

>>3740488

It would also be good to have eyes to the sky, considering that 'asteroids' are a common occurrence in Revelations, with Wormwood being the most obvious threat.
>>
>>3740708
>>3740835
I think we need to finish research on the Large sat.modules
>>
>>3740802
>>3740835

I dont see where you are getting those as options. Giest has said we can't build whereever we want
>>3738971
This post says russia and japan are our options.


Also thats why im launching a large sattalite for the eye in the sky
>>3740864
I agree but after AI Na Nuclear.
>>
>>3740947
They aren't the only place we can go, just places we can set up with less trouble.

Only India and China are off the list.

As in we need to reach 10/10 for big satellites before we can launch any decent one with large space telescopes and have good receivers and transmitters for connection.
>>
>>3741002
Were does it state we need 10/10 to do that
>>
>>3741041
No where specifically, but where are we going to get a decent space telescope to look at the sky in the 90's that can fit in a small cabin in a communications satellite stealthily?
>>
>>3741261
fair. i just assumed that we could if geist didn't say otherwise. How about if we cant we switch the three launching the satellite to researching satellite.
>>
>>3741490
Hmm, that's not necessarily wrong, Just it never seems to be quite the case.

Thought it may be more likely now that I've re-read some of the older posts.

In thread 6 for large satellites
>However, you're confident that nobody will catch on: your plan works well for the usual suspects in the aerospace pork farms who were starting to get a little lean after a decade of no Cold War to sell missile designs with, it works well for the GSA because it gives something to do, and most importantly, it works well for you because there's quite a bit of room in the "substation" design for you to install covert secondary channels, celestial telescopes that just so happen to be able to focus on Earth and let you count the hair on someone's head, potentially even bunker busters

Thread 7 with micro satellites
>Having an eye in the sky (your satellites have too low a resolution to show much other than a few smudgy pixels indicating the presence of vehicles on the desert road) lets you know that the intent of the raid is depredation, not destruction; there are a number of trucks and a couple of technicals hiding behind the dunes.

It could just be that micro satellites are to small to put any decent camera in, and that where I thought we didn't have the tech yet, but for the medium and larger ones it may be possible simple because micro sats are about the size of a coffee mug and part of having good range and site is having a decently sized lens and optics, which the larger "soviet style module" will be capable of.

I'd give up building the base for now if we could spend one or two personal actions recruiting some spooks or speak to the drone guy Zevos.
>>
>>3741524

how about we do:

> 4 teams make factories in Russia.
> 3 team make network node place in north south america
> 1 team make network parts place in china
>3 teams launch a large satellite with Ryan on it. Make sure to have the telescope to point up as Carla suggested
>3 team with Aki to research AI
> Have Robertson draw up a nuclear generator we could set up and test soon for lots of power we dont need to pay for.
>have Moira and 4 teams work on jobs if a nuclear option is available take it
>factory make network parts deploy in north east Russia
> tell Ryan to start on extracting uranium from our mine.
>have Aki look over the list of miracles if anyone is gonna pice it together its her.
>us practice meditation
>us talk to Zevos
>>
>>3741568
I'd rather we put the factories in one of the America's.

I believe the main issue is automation somewhat, which would not be a problem. I'm fairly certain I can talk the foreman guy down.

I'd like to set up our factories in St. Louis next to the Mississippi river. Ideal strategic location.

Also we should place a network node in Russia since we canceled on them last time.

>3 teams launch a large satellite with Ryan on it
For some reason I thought you wanted to send Ryan up to space. Would be funny to see how he reacts if he was drunk on the job and found himself up in space the next time he woke up.

Ryan can only do one thing at a time I think, so either mine or launch rockets.

I'd like to Speak to Zevo and Hire a Agent this turn, after that we can mediate and train next month hall we want.

If I'm not mistaken, Ben Tysion can do the mind voice control thing right? We can test it on him rather than our boss. The stakes would be much lower.
>>
Is there a tutorial for this quest? I don't want to read thousands of posts to get up to speed but I'd like to know what's going on.
>>
>>3741656
I mean if we can put it in america surem but as far as i iniw we cannot as we were blocked from putting it anywhere but south america before amd we were only told we could put it in those two places. Ruasia dosnt even know that amd as well we were just installing a network part to the exsidting node in russia wich we are doing this turn anyways.

Would be funny to see ryan in space.

Well what kind of agent should we hire then? I dont know what else we could use.

I dont think ben tyson can yet unless thats how hes converting people.
>>
>>3741675
>When you get back, Andrews tells you that he's identified a couple of places where an automated factory can be set up. India and China are out of the question: the people there would actively resist automation, and Domai is sure to get in his way, and yours. Your best bets currently would be Russia and Japan - the population in these territories is relatively scarce, so automation would be welcome. Both cultures are fairly well primed to a cybernetics-based approach to production.

China and India are no goes.
America seems like it be a coinflip, with everywhere else being iffy or questionable except for Russia and Japan, which are probably more certain. Both require decent shipping. I'd like to put it next to our base in Russia but that area has poor infrastructure and no warm water ports except for Sevastopol.

We are making factories for ear gear wear correct? Well maybe we can set up two in Russia for the market touching Asia, middle east and Europe. Then set up two more in America. I want to use the inland waterways.

Now While I would perfer Japan, Russia may be safer since Japan and China have the same Ruler so that may cause problems? But setting up in Russia brings other problems such as poor infrastructure.

I suppose we can set one up in the European part of Russia and cater to a mostly European market.

>>3741675
Looking for one that can do Counter-Intelligence and Operational Security. So more of a FBI type I suppose, with some mole hunting abilities. We may have to get a Fed and a Glow spook to cover all our bases so two guys at most.

>>3741659
Your going to have a hard time with this quest then. I've reread it twice and I still make mistakes.

Rules: http://emlia.org/pmwiki/pub/web/LeftBeyond.Quest2Rules.html
Datalinks: http://emlia.org/pmwiki/pub/web/LeftBeyond.Quest2Datalinks.html
Tentative timeline: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1BlMOSEOxSihj1gdagq7yxCjONaRBgcdlRxnc68uWf0A
>>
>>3741699
Geist was pretty against factory anywhere before so im not sure it would change now. Unless he specifies otherwise im pretty sure we can only do russia amd japan because thats how it eas before this turn. Im fine with doing in russia near our logisits base. The factoires just produce 1 value of any good we assign them to. They will be good for network parts aerospace parts nomencaltures and so on.

Ill change personal actions to visit russia as i dont think we ha e yet and look for a counter intellegence type and talk to zevos.
>>
>>3741659
Its kinda hard to get being thrown in.but if you look at the map we have money and work teams. We assign work teams tasks of a complicity. The compexity determines how many work teams it neeeds to have a 100% chance of success every work team working costs 1 money. I would read like the first thread to get an idea of it.
>>
>>3741727
Actually, It should be fine to set up all 4 factories in eastern Russia.

We can always build more factories I suppose.
>>
>>3741727
Geist said
>One is a good start. To be allowed to do all this without being fingered for diverting effort from your duty as a Global Community public servant, you'd have to be on very friendly terms with a subpotentate. Allying with one will do that; subduing one, or replacing them with a puppet ruler, will also do that.

I think we should build maybe one or two in Russia. Unless we can figure out a better way to hide them. It actually may be better to build them in Siberia since there would be very little "oversight" there.

I seem to keep thinking he said at one point " one factory per region is okay" before it may draw to much attention or something?
>>
>>3741659
If you read the report at the start of the thread, you'll get a general gist of things. I'm still figuring out things myself, particularly allocating resources.

>>3741699
I wonder if the Kuril Islands belong to 'East Asia' or 'Russia' in this Universe. They've been disputed by Japan and Russia so depending on who has ownership... it could be a good spot.
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>>3741761
>Kuril Islands
>>
>>3741737
So i dug it up and the text is

"You've already set up a factory in Santiago's territory - she wants to see what it does before allowing more, especially since to a layman Synco and the MCP don't look very different."

So its the potentate that prevents us from having more then one or any factory at all.
>>
QM turned into a bear and went into hibernation.
>>
Rolled 38, 78, 21, 75, 25 = 237 (5d100)

>>3740403
(You're right about the research, of course)

>>3741659

I wrote the rules down as best as I could. http://emlia.org/pmwiki/pub/web/LeftBeyond.Quest2Rules.html

Basically, you have to decide what to do month by month. There may or may not be an ultimate time limit / finite number of turns. You allocate personnel (including yourself), teams of mooks, and money/resources in order to complete your assigned objectives while setting aside assets to complete your own.

Are you familiar with the game Evil Genius?

>>3742033

Corazon Santiago is a bit skeptical of both the MCP and your system, although she's willing to give you the benefit of the doubt because, well, you haven't tried to brainwash her. She's worried about humans becoming slaves to machines.

In Japan, the existing culture is already fairly pro-automation (especially since the Event, which exacerbated their "depopulation bomb" problem), while in Russia, you're betting that Subpotentate Zakharov will welcome the investment.

>>3741761
>>3741764

The global government under Carpatescu seems to have caused this sort of land dispute to simmer down a little... but only a little. It might be possible to maneuver Zakharov and Yang into declaring the islands extraterritorial, in which case they would default to Carpatescu's control - which would let you take them over de facto. As of right now, the Kuril Islands are effectively under Chairman Yang's control, simply because Zakharov hasn't really bothered asserting a claim.

Sending a security team to stir trouble might be a good idea, if you have a plan.

>>3741699

Your automated factory system, currently named can produce a variety of things, including consumer-grade (non-stealth) Nomenklators. You've also used it to construct additional pylons.

>>3740262
>>3740403

(Yeah, having China and Japan be the same region is stupid. I blame the source material, which is fairly clueless about non-American cultures... Just assume that this is taking place in Stereotype World, which if you read the books, isn't far from the truth).

Let me combine your plans as much as possible (this will be processed):

> 4 teams make Synco factory in Russia.
> 3 team with aki to research AI
> 0 Aki to look over the list of miracles if anyone is gonna pice it together its her.
> 3 teams launch a large satellite with ryan on it
> x have moira and 4 teams work on jobs, with a preference to taking nuclear-decommissioning work
> 0 Have Robertson draw up a nuclear generator we could set up and test soon for lots of power we dont need to pay for.
> 0 factory make network parts deploy in east russia
> 0 tell ryan to start on extracting uranium from our mine.

This leaves 4 teams to be allocated.
>>
Rolled 66, 88, 3, 8 = 165 (4d100)

>>3744598

>>3741524

Larger satellites have room for larger cameras, yes. You've done wonders to encourage the spread of some technologies (such as phones with cameras, data, and keyboards) but the average phone camera is still around one megapixel or less.

Your security forces see themselves as "the good guys", given how they have been deployed so far: while they likely will accept one or two unsavory assignments, you can imagine that they may refuse shooting unarmed people or similar orders. On the other hand, their morale is stellar, and they have as much espirit de corps as an old first-world nation's army would have. They see themselves as the shields of freedom of information, rather than as a mercenary company.

You realize that you may someday need an operative who can handle unsavory work; Moira is a former IRA agent, and therefore not above using terrorist tactics, but she's very much an idealist. She'll demolish a school tomorrow if you tell her to, but only after triple checking that nobody's in it.


When it comes to designing large satellites, you find that you're in a good spot. There's a fair amount of space nuts in your engineering corps, happily enough. Without you asking, they bring a proposal for a Salyut/Almaz derived large satellite to be deployed in Molniya orbits that cover a large swath of an entire region. The system would allow one or two occupants to inhabit the satellite for a few days at a time, for maintenance or upgrading. An advantage of this system is that due to its high mass and orbital parameters, very little stationkeeping would be necessary, with the onboard hypergolic fuel being sufficient to handle pretty much any emergency save for a direct impact. Since the mini-stations have two docking ports, it becomes possible to connect them together. Incidentally, the Mir space station is still up there; the current acting head of the Global Space Agency, Xavier Maclachlan, has been extremely indecisive about whether the program should be terminated or not.

Cost to launch: 3~5 aerospace parts
Cannot be rushed (preparing a Proton rocket takes time)
Must be launched from Baikonur
Components: 3~5. Types:

Repeater - Adds (1) to satellite coverage in that region, in any territory. For example, you could launch a above New Babylon, with 3 repeaters, and instantly bring up coverage to 5.
Camera array - Allows for close surveillance on a territory, OR early warning for asteroid strikes. Santiago is likely to object to one deployed over her territory.
Hydrazine tank - Allows for moving the satellite to a different orbit. One shot.

Future plans include data vaults, orbital network nodes that cannot be damaged, deployable mirror arrays to light up an area at night to help rescue efforts after a natural disaster, and the like. Out-there ideas include "the Ion Cannon from Command and Conquer", electromagnetic pulse emitters, guided tungsten rods, something called a gap generator, and the like.
>>
>>3744604
Is there any benefit to have more then one camera array?

> lets launch it over new Babylon with 3 repeaters 1 camera array and a hydrazine tank as we have the parts for it.


>>3744598
for the last 4 teams I vote
> 3 teams researching cellular solar
> 1 team make network parts place in china.
>>
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>>3744598

Subpotentate Zakharov seems a little miffed that you are sending a third of your workforce to his territory without going along. Your workers report that the man seems to have gone a little funny; he's been deploying his own upgrade of the Nomenklator within his administration, with a homegrown add-on 3D video module that looks like a pair of stereovision movie glasses (and mostly gets in the way, as far as your guys can tell) and his latest treatise on the philosophy of science, "For I Have Tasted the Fruit", which is otherwise selling pretty well, tends to harken back to Lysenkoism and other scientism nonsense, at least according to Dr. Robertson, who's actually read it. He figures that a man can be a good scientist or a good statesman, but should not try to mix the two.

Nevertheless, your men find working in Russia extremely easy; Zakharov sends an ornate letter - on some sort of flat LCD, for some reason - letting you know that he would greatly appreciate closer cooperation, and chiding you for not having captained your "expedition" to his territory. "Science was invented and built by men, it’s not by invitation - nevertheless, here is yours", the note ends cryptically. On the other hand, it came with excellent Volga caviar.

The new Synco system is put in place quickly; some of the systems are still using 1973-era code and design, and integrate surprisingly well with the old Soviet teletypewriter network whose landlines are still in place in many structures. Older workers are used to this sort of top-down dirigist approach, but distrust it, since it led to low productivity back before 1991. Your workers assure them that having an algorithm in charge of day to day management is a lot more fair than having a commissar, and your reputation for getting things done quickly and well assuages at least some of the skepticism.

(What was the alternative name for Synco by the way? Some Celtic Goddess? I can't find it. Please do feel free to rename it, if you like!).

The arrival of prefab Cellular-Solar pylons from Chile do the rest; they're done well, the local manufacturers are given access to the bills of materials to see that they were done cheap, and while government-contract money isn't the best around there, it's quite decent and most importantly shows up on time every time.

Zakharov insists in having a Synco "bridge" installed in his office in Akademgorodok, going as far as fishing out old Kosmicheskaya Militsiya props and using them as part of the furniture. Your work teams come home with video rips of the Soviet-era Star Trek ripoff, and before long there are MST3K-style riffs of it circulating on the net.

The installation went excellently; you will be able to use the Russian factory to help with aerospace parts, as well.

>>3744636

Adding cameras to the array does have a benefit, but there are diminishing returns, especially for surveillance.
>>
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>>3744598

As always with Aki, you tell her what you would like done, and make sure that she doesn't hurt herself (Carla is still recovering from when she got stuck in one of the vents; by the time help showed up, she had worked out a "perfectly safe" way to cut her own legs off so she could disentangle herself). Aki is technically on work-release from prison, but she's stopped wanting to leave the building around the time you worked out a reasonable intersection between foods she likes and foods that are healthy for her. She's long since cannibalized her ankle bracelet into some contraption or another anyway.

The bad news is that her team doesn't get very far with improving your logistics AI; while their monthly reports indicates that they have been hard at work integrating the various disparate components of it, which your technical background lets you know that it's something that needed done at some point lest the system grow unmanageable, actual performance is unchanged. Even so, it has been doing an excellent job managing your fleet assets without incurring additional costs. While there was no large qualitative improvement, your control over the electronic market grows a little.

The good news is that analyzing Chaim Rosenzweig's list of miracles has produced some results; the team has modified one of the neural networks used in your logistics system to cross-correlate Chaim's list (which turned out to be just that, a list, indicating date and time of supposed miracle, faith of provenience, and likelihood of authenticity) with medical and news databases.

Of note, the meta-analysis shows that up until a little before the Event, prayer had no effect on long term health. However, things changed markedly at that point; you find that Remnant prayers are, to put it bluntly, effective, to a degree. Interestingly, the effect predates the Event by 6 to 9 months. The next logical step would be to perform experiments, which would be remarkably tricky - there's really no way to tell when and where a miracle would occur, of course - if it wasn't for the fact that Chaim's list ends with every documented instances of the "two witnesses" erupting fire from their mouths or apparently causing heart attacks. Aki opines that the latter can be mitigated by preemptive installation of a ventricular-assist device and DBS system: a volunteer could go heckle the Two Witnesses, be killed by them, be revived, and the process could be repeated multiple times to obtain first-hand information. She volunteers, obviously. Carla tells you that encouraging her to stick wires in her own brain would be a very bad idea, not so much because it's unsafe - this particular operation can be done safely - but because it sets a bad precedent.

# Approve it.

# Do it to someone else.

# Do it to yourself.

# Let's not and say we did, okay?
>>
>>3744680
Do it to someone else. everyone draws straws and whoever wins "looses" gets a ice-cream Sunday and a bonus check after the deed is done.
>>
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>>3744598

The final part of the Russian operation is handled by Andrews, who has a lot of good things to say about the dynamism of younger Russians who grew up post-Communism. He mentions one George Fomitchev, who tried to sell him designs for a solid-state laser cutter which had in fact been developed as a spinoff of your own work with ground-to-satellite optical links. It's an obvious ripoff, but Ryan Andrews declares himself impressed by the fact that Russians have left behind the collectivist mentality. The laser itself works - well enough to make a hole in plastic, at any rate - for a few minutes until the diode avalanche cascades, just as basic circuit theory predicted since Mr. Fomitchev stripped off the thermoregulation in order to decrease manufacturing costs.

You make a note to avoid "Endurance Lasers" should you ever need directed-energy systems. Other than this small bit of disappointment, the retrofit work for one of the old Almaz/Salyut test article goes well, and a Proton rocket is readied for launch at the end of next month. Subpotentate Zakharov, of course, takes the opportunity to throw shade at the Global Space Agency, which is mostly staffed with ESA and JAXA engineers under a former NASA administrator.

* Choose how many aerospace components to use.
* Choose what they will be used for. Further research will unlock more modules. You get a small hab, basic solar power, and two docking ports for free.
* Choose the region above which the large satellite will be launched.

>>3744598

Dr. Robertson has, in fact, directed his students to come up with a small reactor or RTG design that makes use of the changes in nuclear physics. He says he has a prototype, but he is reluctant to show you it.

# Please, let's see it.

# If it's ready for production, I don't care what it looks like.
>>
>>3744690

Support ONLY if we are included in the straw draw. It sounds like the MEC, or the revive system for M Byson in Street Fighter. This is a chance to get an extra life!

Alternatively, let Aki have it as long as a proper doctor does the operation.

Or we just say we'll take the risk ourselves, praise the Omnissiah.

>>3744721

Lets see it. What, it looks like a Mr Fusion?

>>3744636
>>3744680

Support for the satellite. 3 repeater, 1 camera, 1 tank.
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>>3744721
>Why are you reluctant to show me? if there is something wrong with it you can take more time.
>>3744725
Of course we are in the draw its unsportsmanlike like to not be.
>>
>>3744737

Eventually you talk Dr. Robertson into showing you a picture. "Because it looks like a friggin' movie prop, that's why!"

You note that this is possibly a good thing when it comes to marketing, but the good doctor is still embarassed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stirling_radioisotope_generator

"The disadvantage of this system is that, unlike a traditional RTG, it has moving parts, so it will eventually require maintenance. The advantage is that the number of moving parts is in the single digits - and it produces about four times as much power as a RTG. This thing will run for years on pretty much any form of nuclear fuel that we can reprocess. Now, it's still not nearly as powerful as a nuclear reactor. You wouldn't build a power plant by stringing together two hundred diesel generators of the type you see at construction sites, diesel generators don't scale up that well. This has the same problem, unsurprisingly - not to mention that after the Event, very few people would buy these things, everyone's more terrified of nuclear power now than when it was, well, actually more of a threat."

# Show it to Carpatescu, if there is anyone who can talk people into anything, it's him. Even if he takes the credit. This will let us sell the things, and in time it will do for power generation what Eden did for agriculture.

# Let's make them for internal use. You get the credit, and once people are less irrational about this, in a few years, it'll translate into a sizeable royalty check.
>>
>>3744757
I want to be able to sell them but im not sure Carpatescu will let us or be happy about nuclear. what do you other anons think?
im voting for
> lets make them for internal use.
>>
>>3744771

We're going to fight Carpatescu eventually, let's not give him nukes. As much as it would be cool to have a Jetsons style utopia when TurboJesus comes back, we don't have the time.

> lets make them for internal use.

>>3744757

I was today years old when I learned that the arc reactor is a real thing apparently
>>
>>3744771
Yeah, I'm not sure Carpatescu (or rather SATAN) will approve of our Nuclear shenanigans. This is the same genius who thinks cavalry charges and bronze ages tactics are a viable military strategy - at least judging from the books this setting is inspired from.

>>3744646
I think we were discussing something like Bochica, the metal-working deity worshiped by the Musica people of Colombia?
>>
Rolled 9 (1d13)

>>3744737
FFAAMRRSCXXXX

>>3744636
>>3744725

The large satellite design takes relatively little time: much like everything else you've been doing, losing a little bit of efficiency for the sake of modularity has paid off in speeding up deployment time greatly. The satellite will hold a large amount of repeaters - essentially, the guts of three of your microsat swarms, set to pop out of the repurposed space station module and then sit out on semirigid tethers - and a telescope camera.

# Let Carpatescu know that he has an eye in the sky over his own backyard, and ensure that he has the codes to control it.

# Say nothing, letting you spy on your boss, but risking that he might catch on.

# Announce that New Babylon now has an early warning system against meteor impacts, and lock the lenses to look outward.

>>3744802

(Thanks, couldn't find the name! I kept thinking Boudicca for some reason)
>>
>>3744811
> Announce that New Babylon now has an early warning system against meteor impacts, and lock the lenses to look outward.
>>
#Say Nothing.

Knowing Carpatescu, he'll do something stupid when we'll need such tools for upcoming Fun Times. Perhaps the Left Behind Devil is kind of clueless when it comes to the space age, still operating on a system of rotating spheres where the Earth is the center of the cosmos.

Also, I'm paranoid that letting the world know about our new toy will make it subject to Narrative shenanigans. In some scenarios based on Revelations, the Two Witnesses directly caused a number of the Trumpet judgments to occur. Either way, they're sort of YHWH's mouthpiece (and eyes and ears); we probably shouldn't broadcast we have such a powerful tool.
>>
>>3744838
>>3744835

I'll second say nothing. If he asks, we tell, if not, not.
>>
>>3744835
>>3744838
>>3744886

The launch is scheduled for next month; you let it go unannounced, figuring that the people of the United Carpathian States will appreciate the extremely cheap satellite internet, and not ask questions.

>>3744811

Looks like Moira drew the short straw. Right now, however, she's deployed; you'll have to wait before you ask her if she wants a secondary heart.

Your security forces are currently deployed in (Pick four: an asterisk indicates that they are in the Garibaldi's range, which gives them a boost).

# wrapping up the Egyptian job; nearly everyone who could move to Cairo has... nearly. Reward: 1BN *

# Using the Garibaldi to take Lybian refugees to Sicily. Reward: 1BN, but Od Gustav might object. 1BN *

# Assisting Fulcire in tracking down Mainyu Mazda, OR assisting Mazda in evading detection. 1BN

# Transporting nuclear fuel to New Babylon for safekeeping from Nice, France. 1BN, chance to grab fuel *

# Intervening in the Central African mess, which has flared up again: Hutus and Tutsi tribes are being prodded by someone to resume their war. 2BN to help either group subdue the other, 1BN to try and negotiate a ceasefire

# April and Rebohoth are feuding by proxy, using fishermen, over Gilbraltar. Keep the peace (1BN) or intervene in favor of one or the other (1 fleet asset) *

# A pirate radio on Rose Island in the Adriatic sea has required protection from the Peacekeepers wanting to shut it down. (1 fleet asset) *

# Speaking of pirates, the drastic reduction in the world's air forces has resulted in a strange situation: cruise ships going from Venice to Greece are being harassed by air pirates using old flying boats, demanding that passengers leave behind their valuables on a rubber dinghy lest the ship be strafed. Provide escort (1BN guaranteed) or end the threat (2BN). *

# Related to the above, Risto Shipping is offering the same bounty to look after a particular cargo ship - they won't say why, though. *
>>
>>3744999
>wrapping up the Egyptian job
>Transporting nuclear fuel
> end the threat of air pirates use 2 teams for this
>>
>>3744598
>>3744636
I'm good with this.

Just wanted us to recruit some people.
>>
>>3744604
>Global Space Agency, Xavier Maclachlan, has been extremely indecisive about whether the program should be terminated or not.

Ask him if we can turn it into a communications maintenance and control hub if he does.

What was the alternative name for Synco by the way?
Dunno but I'd like to call it Siri or Cortana. Probably the former and then develop a one named the latter.

# Approve it.
Scream SCIENCE! and have Dr. Robertson and Aki work on it and watch the fun!

>>3744721
# Please, let's see it.

>>3744757
Ask him if he wants to take some more time to redesign it to look more "cool".

Dunno if we should or not, mostly worried he will steal our head scientists than anything else.

>>3744778
But his thing is so far from a nuke, it would be dubious of him to even somehow turn it into one?

>>3744802
We should gather up all the spider tank designs we can find and send the guy who keeps spamming all our work emails with the stuff and crazy note ramblings to our boss. Let him plague Carpatescu!
>>
>>3745090
Carpastu is one of the people who pushed the anti nuke narrative. Hes also the anti christ so anything thats not in the *plan* im sure he would be dubious of.
>>
>>3744811
# Say nothing, letting you spy on your boss, but risking that he might catch on.
How exactly would he catch on? Just claim we never spied on him our anywhere near New Baby.

>>3744886
Just say its pointed towards space and this violates no safety or privacy issues.

# Transporting nuclear fuel to New Babylon for safekeeping from Nice, France. 1BN, chance to grab fuel *


# Assisting Fulcire in tracking down Mainyu Mazda, OR assisting Mazda in evading detection. 1BN

# April and Rebohoth are feuding by proxy, using fishermen, over Gilbraltar. Keep the peace (1BN) or intervene in favor of one or the other (1 fleet asset) *
April

# Related to the above, Risto Shipping is offering the same bounty to look after a particular cargo ship - they won't say why, though. *
>>
>>3745095
Well I think hes more pragmatic in this sense for the political capital and desire to taking credit.

And the design is not really possible to turn into a nuke, they could however re-discover the new physics and try to make a bomb like we did.
>>
>>3745100
How about next meeting withhim we broach the topic but not make it evident we did anything just that we looked into it alittle to gauage his reaction
>>
>>3745121
I'm fine with not telling him at all.

Partly want to do it to gain favor, but we lost favor with him apparently, Not entirely sure why? Maybe I had a bad write in.
>>
>>3745099
There is the possibility of moles in our operation.
>>
>>3745130
he didnt like that we brought up schooling and that we were listening in. He wants the schooling done a specific way for anti christ reasons and us talking about other options also annoyed him. next time lets not make it obvious we are spying.
>>
>>3745132
Not possible, we total are immune to that. Nope! Try again.

>>3745144
>he didnt like that we brought up schooling and that we were listening in.
Wait wut? I totally missed that.
>>
>>3745149
>"I would like to tell you what you are going to never do again. Eavesdrop on me. Not by your ears, not by machine. You exist to serve me. Damosa exists to serve me. I exist to serve-" and his face changes expression quickly, almost like a glitch "-mankind. Now get out of my office before we forget that we need you."


He was talking to another official about schooling we walk in and say that way of schooling is bad. no shit he thought we were listening in.
>>
>>3745149
We're immune to the possibility that someone inside our organization is sending him information?

It's quite plausible we have someone on the inside who could be keeping tabs with the guy handling the expensive IT equipment. It could even be someone low tier, like a custodian or secretary, who has access to resources and an easy way to bypass our security; Insider Threat.

Its like Hunt for Red October where the cook was a KGB agent or the like.
>>
>>3745156
Still not possible.

Its like we could have done something about it but it never came up so it will never be a problem because god wills it.
>>
>>3745153
Oh shoot! I sped read through that didn't think about the implications.
>>
....

How exactly is it not possible?

It's quite probable. In fact, its Carpathia's modus operandi for compromising the Remnant in the books.
>>
>>3745199
If it was remotely possible, then why haven't we ever tried to do anything about it? Its not like we ignored it and did other things until it became a problem right?

That's just silly.
>>
>>3745208
This is why i voted for the canera to only look up. Sow e are above board on visible projects
>>
Alright I've returned from the void and I love what has happened in my absence. I'd offer you a toast but all I have is shit beer. Give me a minute to comment and catch up.

>>3744598
>She's worried about humans becoming slaves to machines.
Might be a good idea to point out to her that with automated production systems, less urban populations need to exist since factories require only a small population of specialists and maintenance personnel. Meaning that more people can be her idealised "independent" sorts. Plus it's not like the centralisation and automation of the economy is something she can avoid, it's us or Carpatescu and lord knows, she can stop us far easier than she can stop him.

>>3744604
>Since the mini-stations have two docking ports, it becomes possible to connect them together.
Hm, certainly something we could take advantage of.

>Incidentally, the Mir space station is still up there; the current acting head of the Global Space Agency, Xavier Maclachlan, has been extremely indecisive about whether the program should be terminated or not.
I still say we should look into infiltrating this organisation and appropriating some of it's resources for our own uses. Imagine if we could offload some of our orbital shit to these guys...that'd be a massive saving and if nothing else would secure our control over space. Still, we've got higher priorities.

>Repeater - Adds (1) to satellite coverage in that region, in any territory. For example, you could launch a above New Babylon, with 3 repeaters, and instantly bring up coverage to 5.
I presume we can re-aim repeaters to focus on different territories in a region? That might be useful for certain...black ops missions where our enemies having cellphones or any internet connections would be bad. If we can disable the ground network (blaming it on hackers or something) and use the orbital stuff for our guys-on-the-ground's needs.

>orbital network nodes that cannot be damaged
That'd be good for africa and would certainly be useful if we ever go open-war against anyone, literally or figuratively, since it keeps our assets out of reach.

>something called a gap generator
Do you mean a spark gap generator, the thing that (to some degree) jams all radio communications?

>>3744646
>Subpotentate Zakharov
Oh god, he's been made into a apple fruit. He's obsessed with looking futuristic but not in actual functionality or efficiency. Well at least it'll make him easy to manipulate.

>(What was the alternative name for Synco by the way? Some Celtic Goddess? I can't find it. Please do feel free to rename it, if you like!).
Like >>3744802 said.

>>3744680
# Do it to yourself.
# Do it to someone else.
# Approve it.

Assuming the cost is negligible / recoverable by our healthcare plan, anyone who is willing can now opt into the "struck-by-god" protection plan.
>>
>>3744636
I support this plan for the satellite, it covers all our bases and worst comes to worst we can detach the fuel tank later and replace it with something else.

>>3744757
>it produces about four times as much power as a RTG
Damn that's a decent amount of power for something that is essentially a shelf-stable source for years (with proper maintenance).

# Let's make them for internal use. You get the credit, and once people are less irrational about this, in a few years, it'll translate into a sizeable royalty check.

I'd imagine making these too common would get more people to notice the changes in how nuclear physics works. Which kinda works against us for some shit.

>>3744811
# Say nothing, letting you spy on your boss, but risking that he might catch on.

Don't tell him dick about shit, worst comes to worst when he asks we just tell him we were asked to put it on by our disaster relief specialists (who would back us up).

>>3744999
# wrapping up the Egyptian job; nearly everyone who could move to Cairo has... nearly. Reward: 1BN *

# Using the Garibaldi to take Lybian refugees to Sicily. Reward: 1BN, but Od Gustav might object. 1BN *

# Transporting nuclear fuel to New Babylon for safekeeping from Nice, France. 1BN, chance to grab fuel *

# April and Rebohoth are feuding by proxy, using fishermen, over Gilbraltar. Keep the peace (1BN) or intervene in favor of one or the other (1 fleet asset) *

I'm thinking we side with April, drop the fleet asset as payment and instead see if we can get her permission / support to construct a factory in her region. Failing that being a possibility or even needed to build a factory there, I'd support:

# Speaking of pirates, the drastic reduction in the world's air forces has resulted in a strange situation: cruise ships going from Venice to Greece are being harassed by air pirates using old flying boats, demanding that passengers leave behind their valuables on a rubber dinghy lest the ship be strafed. Provide escort (1BN guaranteed) or end the threat (2BN). *

Fact is we've got the aircraft to do it (we did get round to buying guns for the antonovs right?) so it should be reasonably safe.

>>3745149
>>3745177
Mate OP has told us multiple times that it is entirely possible that if we hire anyone new that they'll be a plant and that the only thing we've got going for us is that we've a good culture in our offices and teams where people who've been here awhile can be trusted. That and generally our encryption and shit is good.

You know what we lack? Op-sec and division of labour: our engineers talk to our scientists talk to our soldiers talk to our logistics talk to our salesmen talk to us talk to our heroes. Everyone knows anything they reasonably ask about and no one is being purposefully kept in the dark.

>>3745208
>That's just silly.
It's at this point, in my slight drunkeness and extremely tired mind, I can't tell if you are actually joking or serious anymore.
>>
Rolled 43 (1d100)

>>3745090

You attempt to schedule a meeting with MacLachlan; he doesn't seem to want to talk to you unless Carpatescu is present, since "there are obvious conflicts of interest in play here".

# Petition Carpatescu for a joint meeting, to happen on the regular schedule.

# Let the new large satellites speak for themselves.

>>3745031
>>3745055

The first iteration of the CellSol pylons is as good as it's going to get; by now, an engineer and two workers can install one on a utility pole in minutes, allowing them to be distributed around the countryside in batches.

Spread-spectrum transceiving technology has finally reached the point where it's commercially viable; you tell your engineers to include it in new designs, estimating that it will give you significantly more bandwidth. You figure that said bandwidth should go to

# improved mesh networking, to make CS pylons significantly more disaster-resistant

# general use, for a one-time bonus in connectivity speed for data applications

# digital voice compression, for a one-time bonus in connectivity speed for voice applications

>>3745031
>>3745099


>>3745130

Enmity or friendship will revert towards baseline, eventually. Gratitude doesn't last long with professional politicians.... Also why you've only gotten one assassination attempt from Rebohoth so far, rather than a stream of them (Note that you're back up from zero to one star with him). There's also that he was somewhat annoyed at being eavesdropped on, as >>3745144 points out. Your alliance with Corazon Santiago, and the fact that you've caused a lot of investment to happen in her territory (and removed a post-hypnotic trigger from her head!) ensures that relations with her will remain high unless you clash.

>>3745156

Your SIGINT is unparalleled, but you don't really have much to stop a traditional mole. Putting a bit of research time into defense will help.

>>3745729

You've noticed a bit of histrionics from Zakharov, but in lesser measure from other subpotentates, yes - including Santiago. In her case, you were kind enough to snap her out of it, and she's been smart enough to not let Carpatescu in on that, at least so far.

>>3740262

You make contact with Patrick Zevo, who is willing to meet at the end of the month. Cursory tracking confirms that he is suffering from clinical depression after the death of his siblings Leslie and Alsatia right after the Event, and has not really recovered. He used to be an Army Ranger, but failed the psychological part of the Peacekeeper entrance exam.

>>3744999

(Doing the Nice covert op since everyone agreed on it, what wll you do for the other 3?)
>>
>>3747479
# improved mesh networking, to make CS pylons significantly more disaster-resistant

Improving the network isn't as important as making it disaster resistant. Fact is we can always add more nodes and pylons but we can't as easily sustain it through a major disaster. Plus this also should help it route around attempts to control the network / the flow of information which will help in the war for the cyber economy.
>>
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Rolled 2 (1d100)

>>3747479


>>3745729

Installing a ventricular-assist device and pacemaker will take someone out of commission for a month. Since it's a precaution rather than something that they need to live, it can remain dormant and won't need to be charged up until it's put to use, but that person is still going to need immunosuppressants as long as the implant is present. On the other hand, it makes them noticeably harder to kill if shot center-of-mass, and immune to heart attacks. Installing the system will cost 2BN to contract with a hospital to set up the facilities, and then 1BN per individual, or 3BN per security team (due to economies of scale).

You all drew straws, and Moira got the short one. Aki keeps volunteering and Carla keeps telling her that she should take unnecessary major surgery seriously.


>>3747479

Ferrying nuclear fuel from Nice to New Babylon is fairly routine for the Garibaldi; she has no bulk cargo capability in the current configuration, but all that's required is room for a few barrels and an armed guard posted for the job.

# Complete the job as normal.

# Skim some nuclear fuel off the top (+0.25)

# Stage a fake pirate attack and lose! (-1BN, +1 fuel)

>>3745781

Your factories can now produce Stirling radiothermal generators. They effectively replace other power systems for most of your purposes, and require no refueling for the foreseeable future (five years or so). It took exactly 2 days for people to start calling them "arc reactors" and 4 for someone to build a DVD burner laser diode into a Nintendo light gun and run it off a SRTG. Deploying SRTGs instead of diesel generators in your existing installations is going to cost you 3BN and 1.25 units of nuclear fuel in total, but will greatly improve disaster preparedness.

You also have the option to nuclearize the Garibaldi, for the same expense. While SRTGs are not going to be able to replace her gas turbines, they can be installed in the engine room replacing one of them, making sure that the ship requires no fuel to operate while stationary. This will drop her top speed somewhat, but it's not as if an aircraft carrier is supposed to move quickly anyway.

>>3740403

Restarting uranium extraction from Effincold is met by some resistance, and Ryan Andrews asks you to move the "goon squad" from making sure nobody interferes with Dr. Robertson to providing security and enforcement for the nuclear mine.

# Okay.

# Hand off one of your security teams instead.

# It will not be necessary; worker morale is high anyway.

# Address the workers' concern in full: hand off 1BN of budget per month to go towards extended care for the workers, a pension fund, and using automation as much as possible.

Yield is expected to be 3 units of nuclear fuel per year (0.25 per month), with 1 unit defined as "the minimum necessary for a uranium hydride bomb, plus a little bit extra to ensure initiation". You may be able to improve yield if you were to get a hold of a bucket-wheel excavator.
>>
>>3747479
> improved mesh networking, to make CS pylons significantly more disaster-resistant

im still voting for >>3745031

>>3747514
> skim some nuclear fuel
> Address the workers' concern in full: hand off 1BN of budget per month to go towards extended care for the workers, a pension fund, and using automation as much as possible.
>>
>>3747514
>ventricular-assist device and pacemaker
True, we should really get the bio-research program set up. That might help reduce some of the immune-suppressant needs and if nothing else would make the surgery safer. Good to know it'd also make us harder to kill.

# Skim some nuclear fuel off the top (+0.25)

This is the same as a months production from our mine and takes us closer to nuclearising our entire system.

>DVD burner laser diode into a Nintendo light gun and run it off a SRTG
Good to see our energy weapons research proceeds at full speed.

>3BN and 1.25 units of nuclear fuel in total, but will greatly improve disaster preparedness
Excellent.

>making sure that the ship requires no fuel to operate while stationary
Certainly sounds like an interesting idea but I honestly see little benefit given we've never had issues with it's operational endurance.

# Address the workers' concern in full: hand off 1BN of budget per month to go towards extended care for the workers, a pension fund, and using automation as much as possible.

To be fair, automation is ideal since it minimises the risk of a mole.
>>
>>3747479
Just finished reading up and absolutely loving it, great job OP. Speaking of Jobs, what is yours/what did you study to built satellite add-ons and robot fish? I'm currently studying a technical subject and would love to do that kind of work. Your technical knowledge is pretty apparent all throughout the quest and makes it just this much more immersive.
Also, you have mentioned Ayn Rand/atlas shrugged a couple of times (kind of mad I wasn't there to call Dimmer out on quoting the bad guy to support his point, dumb of him to quote Ayn Rand in favor of government interference at all), what's your take on it?
While I think her world view and philosophies are overly simplistic, pretty self absorb and her interest in kinky sex is a bit to obvious at times, I still found it a captivating read and pretty thought-provoking. If you would run a quest based on it, as you mentioned before, I'd absolutely be down for it. It sets up a very strange post apocalyptic setting with a very intense and unique feel. The players could control a small group of people that have quit society around the time Rearden disappeared and have now set up camp in Oregon/ are starting their little capitalistic commune.
Thanks so much for running and now for my votes:
>Let the new large satellites speak for themselves.
>improved mesh networking, to make CS pylons significantly more disaster-resistant
Since we are headed for a major disaster that seems like the best option.
>Skim some nuclear fuel off the top (+0.25)
Getting one moth worth of mining output for free is a pretty sweet deal.
>Address the workers' concern in full: hand off 1BN of budget per month to go towards extended care for the workers, a pension fund, and using automation as much as possible.
This should be the best way to prevent information leaks.
>>
#Improved Mesh Networking

This is the Apocaylpse after all...

#Skim some nuclear fuel off the top

#Address the worker's concern (Also >>3747582 makes an excellent point on automation reducing risk of insider threat.)
>>
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Rolled 18 (1d100)

>>3747582
>>3747550
>>3747656

Ryan Andrews shows just how weasely he can be; to the workers he paints the budget increase, pension fund, and additional automation effort as concessions he won arguing against you, then has the gall to send an email bragging about it to Mr. Domai. At least, he's smart enough to not mention uranium; as far as most anyone knows, Effincold is a silver and cobalt mine.

You intercept Domai's answer and are impressed by just how much vitriol the stereotypically polite and formal Indian English idiom is capable of. On the other hand, it's possible that you might be able to play them against each other...

Mr. Andrews does mention that he has a lead on a bucket-wheel excavator, essentially a half-size version of the Bagger 288, but since it's in Germany, getting it to Northern Ontario would be a major project in itself. The advantage is, of course, that with it ten men can do twice the work of forty using regular earthmovers.

>>3747582

You haven't yet started a directed energy weapons program, although you may do so at any time.


>>3747632

--- OOC START ---

I'm an electrical and computer engineer in my mid thirties and moved to the US under a NIW visa. If you want to get into robotics, my suggestion would be EE or mechatronics, for a college major.

I've read most of Ayn Rand's stuff because I did have an Objectivist phase way in the distant dialup past. Rand, much like LaHaye/Jenkins, suffered very much from having such a devoted fanbase that nobody dared to be an editor to their work. I think that Atlas Shrugged would make for a good mix between cowboy and post-apoc setting, in that there's no one big disaster but rather a series of small ones. I've written a worldbook for that at http://emlia.org/pmwiki/pub/web/IronLegion.IronLegion.html

--- OOC END ---

>>3747632
>>3747550
>>3747490
>>3747656

You figure that the extra bandwidth should be saved for a rainy day; should CelSol pylons that are normally connected to the data grid find themselves separated from it, they will use it in order to automatically find their nearest neighbor and attempt to reconnect to the net at large. Between this and relay satellites, you are quite confident that people who have started depending on the internet's availability for daily life (You mildly regret not buying Pets.com stock, since they're doing swimmingly and even have started an app-based dog-walking service) will be able to keep finding it dependable, rather than a luxury. Since cellular net speeds are still lagging behind dialup, you've noticed that there has been a mini-boom of minimalistic Web pages modeled after the Datalinks look. People with older, black and white cell phone screens probably appreciate it.
>>
>>3747677
>Ryan Andrews shows just how weasely he can be; to the workers he paints the budget increase, pension fund, and additional automation effort as concessions he won arguing against you, then has the gall to send an email bragging about it to Mr. Domai. At least, he's smart enough to not mention uranium; as far as most anyone knows, Effincold is a silver and cobalt mine.
Christ he's a prick ain't he.

>You intercept Domai's answer and are impressed by just how much vitriol the stereotypically polite and formal Indian English idiom is capable of. On the other hand, it's possible that you might be able to play them against each other...
We should get him and put him in charge of the auto-factories. That should lead to good productivity and higher approval from the workers.

>You haven't yet started a directed energy weapons program, although you may do so at any time.
I know, I was trying to be funny.
>>
>>3747677

(To any newcomers: Bad rolls like this are pretty common.)

"Boss? We got a problem". Moira's accent is usually a welcome sound in your ear, but not now. "Derf - that's Fred Ritter - got caught with a hand in the cookie jar."

The nuclear fuel being brought to New Babylon for disposal came with an engineer and two guards, as is standard operating procedure for this sort of thing; so far you've gotten away with diverting a bit of the stuff by counting on the fact that they would want to share guard duty shifts, and acting when one of your men was standing watch. Unfortunately, not this time: one of the guards went off duty a little early, after "bargaining" with a replacement, to tour the aircraft carrier - the guy was former French Navy, and had an interest in the ship's structure, which would have worked fine for your purposes - but came back early.

"Anyway, we're on red alert, Derf's in the brig because I really couldn't figure out what else to do to avoid giving the game away, and the site engineer is hopping mad because he can't phone home since Cap'n Steele put the comms on lockdown, just to be safe."

# Sacrifice Mr. Ritter by generating evidence that he might have been a nationalist or Remnant symphatiser, or a would-be lone wolf terrorist, and have him executed after a drumhead trial.

# Have the two guards and the site engineer suffer a deadly accident while underway. It's entirely your call whether they'll be sleeping with the fishes for real, or staying in the Garibaldi's brig in their underwear until you work out what to do with them while some random fisherman finds their uniforms.

# Lock up Mr. Ritter, but do not hand him over to the New Babylon authorities upon arrival. This is likely to invite an audit.

Since the seals on the nuclear fuel drum have obviously been tampered with, as there was a brief scuffle, it will not be possible to skim anything off the top as the stuff will be weighed with a precision scale on arrival. At least you should still get paid...

>>3747709

Mr. Andrews is a prick, but at least he's a honest one; he's always said that he's in this for himself. His long-term plan is to lobby for CATS' privatization, at which point he will be in an excellent position to succeed you, for most intents and purposes. He's smart enough to understand that none of this is going to happen for the next ten years or so, though, since Carpatescu seems to be fairly dirigist when it comes to handling things like public utilities.
>>
>>3747717
Well shit, we've got 3 choices: kill 1 of our own; kill 3 innocents; risk an audit being the end of us. I think we all know that the audit ain't a realistic option, at least until we clear house a bit for some of our more "out there" work. Yet I don't feel comfortable killing three civilians just to save one of our own just as much as I don't feel comfortable about killing him.

I'll support whichever other anons choose but I ain't making the call.

>Mr. Andrews is a prick, but at least he's a honest one; he's always said that he's in this for himself
Aye but my only issue is him lying like that. I don't mind more or less anything else he's done but you don't lie to our god damn workers like that.
>>
>>3747717
>Have the two guards and the site engineer suffer a deadly accident while underway. It's entirely your call whether they'll be sleeping with the fishes for real, or staying in the Garibaldi's brig in their underwear until you work out what to do with them while some random fisherman finds their uniforms.
Fabricate evidence against them, we own the internet, and so we can easily prove all their nationalist connections. They have tempered with the nuclear fuel and tried to escape to one of the by-boats when they were found out. Our security tried to stop them and a firefight ensued in which they all were killed, it was inevitable as they refused to surrender and fought to the death. Their bodies fell overboard/out of the by-boat they were already in (they are in the brig in underwear), you can't just turn a ship like ours to look for bodies, so we didn't get the corpses.
They were found out as they were trying to erase evidence of tempering, the fuel was stolen before we loaded it (we steal it now, when we have to "kill" 3 innocent we might as well get fuel). That's my evidence erasing and getting fuel plan, tying up loose ends.
Get them and the fuel we stole of the ship before arriving.
We get fuel, they live, everyone wins.
>>
>>3747717
>>3747753
ill support this
>>
>>3747753
>We get fuel, they live, everyone wins.
I'll give it my support. If nothing else because it makes sense.
>>
>>3747753
Get them and the fuel of with a by-boat, claim it was the one they tried to escape on and it drifted away after they were killed. Once we have transferred the hot-stuff, it can drift ashore with some blood in it.

Also, I realize stealing the fuel will cause suspicion but suspicion that is not directed towards us and three dead nationalist will cause a shitstorm regardless. Let's hope everyone involved will try to put it under a rug.
>>
Rolled 68 (1d100)

>>3747771
>>3747753
>>3747783
>>3747805


"I don't know, Boss. We'll have to stage a firefight... Heh, actually that sounds like fun. AVAST YE SCURVY DOGS!"

Time to shitpost on some forums and Geocities guestbooks and the like, messing with timestamps so it looks like a pattern over time, to make it look like the attackers were

# nationalist holdouts

# Christian Remnants

# just plain nutcases. When in doubt, blame videogames!

and, to increase the chances of success,

# just get it done quickly.

# pull a work crew out of rotation to play hacker and ensure that there are no discrepancies with said shitposts in case someone goes looking (you currently have 4 unassigned; this would leave you 3)


Moira has two men she trusts blackjack the engineer and guards, stages a firefight, and actually gets one of the Garibaldi's dinghies sunk; today the fact that most cell phone cameras are low resolution works in your favor, and so you have video of the shooting, shooting back (courtesy of an alarm clock, a piece of string, and a blow-up doll belonging to one of the sailors), and sinking in glorious 144p.

# Dump one of the containers in the Mediterranean, in case someone checks for contamination - the radiation level is a lot less than what it should be, but that if anything makes this even more important.

# Deliver what you can and note that one of the drums had opened (steal the fuel).

# Deliver what you can (don't steal the fuel, dump a little bit of it in).

# Take the opportunity to dump the empty drums in the sea, and steal all the fuel (+1.0). As per the terms of your contract, you can show that you tried to stop the attackers - if they believe it - but the insurance company will take it right out of your budget, to the tune of 3BN.
>>
>>3747815
# just plain nutcases. When in doubt, blame videogames!

Maybe imply they were looking to sell it to the Black market or something? That or they were believers in the idea that the Event was the rapture and thought exposing themselves to it might enable them to be rapture'd too.

# pull a work crew out of rotation to play hacker and ensure that there are no discrepancies with said shitposts in case someone goes looking (you currently have 4 unassigned; this would leave you 3)

Make it as convincing as possible, we've got to sell this.

# Deliver what you can and note that one of the drums had opened (steal the fuel).

We've went to all this risk for some god damn fuel, I'd like to think we'll bother to steal it in the end.
>>
>>3747815
>nationalist holdouts
The big boogie man makes an organized effort to get nuke fuel believable, I also don't want to start shit with the Christians.
>pull a work crew
Unless this fucks up some other anons plans?
>Deliver what you can and note that one of the drums had been opened
Those evil nationalists must have already gotten some of it, must have sunk with their boat..... (should not be as bad as stealing all of it)

Anyone got plans what we do with them in the long run? Maybe dump them on Santiago as she is already taking care of our would be assassin (would tip her of to our nuclear plans)
>>
>>3747815
>nationalist holdouts its the most realistic.
>pull a work crew out of rotation
> set the last 3 work crews on researching cellular solar.
> Deliver what you can and note that one of the drums had opened (steal the fuel).
>>
>>3747834
>Anyone got plans what we do with them in the long run?
Well we could probably explain that they are now dead to the world and that everyone thinks they were terrorists. So we're the only thing keeping them alive. Then I suggest sending them to a nice little farm somewhere in the mountains of Peru or Bolivia.
>>
>>3747844
>set the last 3 work crews on researching cellular solar.
We should probably invest some research into regular espionage defenses to prevent moles. We are squarely in "getting liquidated" territory with a lot of our activities if the wrong people learn of them, we need to run a tight ship.
>>
>>3747883
Yeah but our current objective is to set up cellylar solar to 2 globally. Id like to assist that. We can divert the AI researchers to defense once that is done.
>>
>>3747844
>>3747834
>>3747830

Nationalist holdouts haven't been in the news lately - they've largely been rounded up - but they are known for attempted nuclear attacks, and defeated revolutionists turning terrorist is something everyone with a cursory knowledge of history can understand.

At the end of the day, the Garibaldi makes it to Beirut port; the story has hit the news about a day before the ship arrives. To your good fortune, one of the execs of the company responsible for dismantling the reactor admits that their background checks was thorough but did not include online presence. CATS gets a little bit of blame for making anonymity online easy to attain, but it's nothing your PR people can't handle; however, you can expect this sort of operation to be more difficult from now on.

Moira flies back to HQ by private plane; she's made sure that the prisoners were brought in anonymously and were treated reasonably well. Thing is, you (and some of your people - you did pick the ones you can trust for certain) know that they didn't do anything wrong. For now, you put them in your warehouse, one shipping container each for a cell, and make sure they are well fed and get all the TV channels they want (no internet, obviously). They are competent people, or they wouldn't have been given the job of guarding nuclear fuel in the first place! Eventually, they'll run away...

# Tell them that the whole matter up as some sort of big hush-hush global security sting operation, offer them plastic surgery, new IDs, a boatload of money, and a plane ticket to anywhere in the world as long as they don't go back to Europe. This will cost 4BN total.

# Sorry guys. The needs of the many outweigh the end of the few. Euthanasia, and your families will be compensated. (1BN total).

# Aki, did you say you wanted someone to experiment on? We brought you a gift from France!

# Blam, blam, blam. As Stalin supposedly said, no man, no problem. You can do the deed yourself, or ask Moira to do it; nobody else would (save for perhaps Aki, but giving her a gun would be a bad idea) - your security guys trusted you enough to arrange a "Desaparición", but their ethical standards are too high to consider killing innocent unarmed people.

# Let them in on your plan; they may be the types to understand that saving the world is worth a new name and a new face. (1BN total, and three new hires, but can you trust them?).

# (I will accept a write in, and calculate a cost).

You've recovered the fuel (+0.25), but the payment for the operation is stuck in limbo due to the insurance company having started litigation with the LLC that formally owns the Garibaldi and hires her crew.

(What will the other 3 security teams do?)

>>3747883

(Defense R&D will cover this. It is currently at 2/10)

Once you deal with this little crisis, you've secured an interview with Patrick Zevo at the Zevo Toys factory site. You've also found a non-woo-y meditation teacher.
>>
#Nationalist Holdouts
What about Islamic extremists? With Jerusalem now in the hands of Israel and given certain parallels between both Christianity and Islam's view of the End Times, it could be plausible that there are some cells eager to wage war against "Al-Masih ad-Dajjal".
>>
>>3747939

That's a good point!

Strangely enough, most Muslims have joined the Ecumenical Council; a few Muslim Brotherhood types had joined the Egyptian insurrection, but they were in the minority.

There is a current of Muslims, primarily Shi'ite, who have been practicing a withdrawal from the global economy in opposition to Carpathian globalism.

One interesting thing is that the teaching of Sai Baba have experienced a resurgence of sorts, to the point that there are now official Zensunni representatives at the Council.

(Given that the latter half of the Left Behind books were written right after 9/11, there's a surprising dearth of vitriol against Islam in them. The authors are more concerned with invectives against Catholics and secularists for some reason. Think late-nineties Chick tracts).
>>
(What is said meditation teacher's background?)

#Let them in on enough of the plan and promptly reassign them to Antarctica or whatever passes for that in this organization until they pass strenuous background checks.

Of course they can always refuse and wind up getting sent to the cornfield I.E. the middle of some Third World wasteland with no IDs, no money, no shoes, and no way to tattle to the folks upstairs that the IT has gone rogue...

Too harsh?
>>
>>3747965

> stranding them in the middle of africa
> where they can be picked up by Rebohoth

Uhm, let's not and say we did?
>>
>>3747931
Really tempted to give aki them to experment on. Fuck it. I vote for that.
>>
>>3747965
Seems reasonable. I mean I was genuinely considering the Aki option but we'd reasonably need to have set up a proper blacksite for that.
>>
I wasn't thinking Africa so much as the Gobi desert, the Amazon basin, or some shrinking sandbar in the Pacific....
>>
Hmmm.... On second thought give the non-cooperative ones to Aki.
>>
>>3747965
This, recruit them and keep them on ice (maybe our nuke fuel mine?), we aren't doing anything evil, and they are intelligent enough to understand that, maybe have Robertson talk to them. Keep them in the dark about who knows what, who ordered what and who has actually fucked them. This way they won't know who to rat out and who to run to. Eventually give them perceived freedom, should one try to rat us out, we block the attempt and give him to Aki for experiments.
>>
>>3748006

Can we keep to the "we aren't doing anything evil" a little longer? We're a people, not an AI.
>>
>>3748013
Agreed. I still say sending them to a nice farm in the hills of Peru is a good plan.
>>
>>3748050
Fine not be evil send em to a farm
>>
South America works.
>>
>>3747479

# Let the new large satellites speak for themselves.
# improved mesh networking, to make CS pylons significantly more disaster-resistant
# Skim some nuclear fuel off the top (+0.25)

# Hand off one of your security teams instead.
# Address the workers' concern in full: hand off 1BN of budget per month to go towards extended care for the workers, a pension fund, and using automation as much as possible.

The Goon squad has seen enough.
>>
Man I'm really late to the party.
>>
>>3747931
# wrapping up the Egyptian job; nearly everyone who could move to Cairo has... nearly. Reward: 1BN *
# April and Rebohoth are feuding by proxy, using fishermen, over Gilbraltar. Keep the peace (1BN) or intervene in favor of one or the other (1 fleet asset) *
# Related to the above, Risto Shipping is offering the same bounty to look after a particular cargo ship - they won't say why, though. *

# (I will accept a write in, and calculate a cost).
Give em plastic surgery and new ID.
Put the new hearts in them and have them experience miracles.

Interview them to get to know them better.

Then pass on final judgment.
2BN? 3BN maybe for us to make some really good holding facilities on a blacksite somewhere on 24/7 watch.
>>
>>3747931
>What will the other 3 security teams do?

> Intervening in the Central African mess, which has flared up again: Hutus and Tutsi tribes are being prodded by someone to resume their war. 2BN to help either group subdue the other, 1BN to try and negotiate a ceasefire
Weakening our African friends position, collecting evidence of his incompetence

> A pirate radio on Rose Island in the Adriatic sea has required protection from the Peacekeepers wanting to shut it down. (1 fleet asset) *
Easy job and one that we are perfect for, might lead to unexpected rewards?

> Speaking of pirates, the drastic reduction in the world's air forces has resulted in a strange situation: cruise ships going from Venice to Greece are being harassed by air pirates using old flying boats, demanding that passengers leave behind their valuables on a rubber dinghy lest the ship be strafed. Provide escort (1BN guaranteed) or end the threat (2BN).
We good guys and 2BN is tempting
>>
>>3748185
Support
>>
File: images[2].jpg (11 KB, 300x168)
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Rolled 67, 15, 81, 2, 1, 3 = 169 (6d100)

>>3748062
>>3748052
>>3748050
>>3748013

You figure that if these people have to suffer for the truth, they might as well get all of it.

You tell them that your job is to keep the Internet going come the Apocalypse, and since you're giving it fifty-fifty that the Apocalypse is in its initial stages, you're taking no chances.

"So you're not building a bomb yourself?"

# Show them the Robertson papers; since one of them is a nuclear engineer, he'll understand them and explain it to the other two.

# Show them a SRTG prototype.

# Both.

# "I am, actually. We may need to blow up God or the Devil with it."

They ask what their options are. One of the soldiers just wants to go back to her family; the other lost his wife in the Event, and seems more persuadable when it comes to saving the world. The techie on the other hand seems interested in that nuclear engineering isn't a dead profession.

>>3748143

Plastic surgery, a new ID and hush money will cost 4BN total.

You have a logistics base in Siberia that would make for a pretty good black site, if it came to that - it used to be a Sharashka (research gulag) during the bad old days.

>>3748185
>>3748241

(These things aren't happening at the same time, so no quick decision is necessary)

You figure that the best way to cover your tracks is getting into a fight with these "air pirates"; if you manage to defeat them in the days following the nuclear fiasco, they will be blamed by association. By the look of it, they're using old WW2-or-thereabouts flying boats; a tiny bit of sleuthing finds that, save for a few people who lost some family jewelry, the cruise-goers actually loved the experience.

Having the Garibaldi physically around the cruise ship would prevent any attacks; you on the other hand want to find the pirates' cove. The solution is to mount floats on one of the Antonovs and tie it behind the cruise ship. The cruise company goes a little overboard, picking a Belle Epoque theme for their next Venice-Athens trip across the Adriatic and managing to avoid making Fascist references.

However, it's 1999, not 1929. A couple of the ladies on the cruise have been given jewelry boxes with GPS trackers.
>>
#Show them the Robertson papers. It's the most relevant to his interests and we don't want to reveal all our interests in case one of them speaks.

The woman is a liability. If possible, I would arrange for her family to move to Peru or Argentina. The alternative is 'disappearing'.

The soldier can be assigned to our logistic base in Siberia until we determine he can be trusted and find a niche in our organization.

The scientist we should likewise evaluate. If he proves trustworthy.... the more the merrier.
>>
>>3748250
>Show them the Robertson papers; since one of them is a nuclear engineer, he'll understand them and explain it to the other two.
Show, don't tell. Two of them are good, now for the family man... Can we disappear his family, (they were evil nationalists too and now have gone into hiding) so that he can have the ones he loves around, assuring his permanent loyalty.
>>
Moira could engineer a fake fire while a Covert OPs spirits the family into hiding.
>>
>>3748293
*woman *she *her
>>
>>3748250

(What are even these rolls?)

WIth all these things going on between Italy, Albania and Libya, the Adriatic sea is getting a bit too much attention. Your men on Rose Island - a cute idea, if anything, a depleted shallow water oil rig that was being slowly turned into a proper island by the simple means of dumping barges full of sand around the underwater gantry, and building a radio station and a casino on the superstructure - were expecting to have to repel Carabinieri, or perhaps rival seasteaders wanting to make a claim.

What they did not expect was the full might of the Peacekeeper air force, which is considerably smaller than most of the old world's military air arms, but can definitely make mince meat of anything like rebuilt 1920s seaplanes or Antonov 2's. You don't know how Od Gustav talked Carpatescu into letting him deploy it, but you figure that it might have been a combination of Rose Island claiming sovereignity and an excess of shenanigans in this part of the world.

Fortunately for you, your airplanes and IFVs were busy elsewhere; unfortunately, Rose Island is bombed to oblivion without even being given a chance to evacuate. The former oil rig is blown to bits by air-to-surface missiles.

Possibly the worst part is that the Garibaldi's radio picked everything up; the pilots were treating this as a rare opportunity for live-weapons testing. Reviewing the recordings that Capt. Steele sent you, they speak fast and coldly, with the sort of manic calm that heavily hints at amphetamine usage. Capt. Steele decides to send one of the Antonovs to the wreck to look for survivors.

300 people on that crate, including one of your security team. Of your people, one survivor, a former Coast Guard SCPO who happened to have combat diving experience and was thus assigned to lurk within the underwater part of the structure in case any frogmen showed up. Eventually, you recover the combat diver, who is all too happy to be debriefed. The diagnosis is burst eardrums - recoverable, although not completely - and plain old shell shock.

"They just... came. Right mid morning. No notice, nothing. Full afterburner. The Garibaldi heard them on the radio, I think that they tried to relay back to us, but there was no time, people were told to get indoors, I guess we were worried about strafing, not - not missiles! And then they just - They did it. They really did it. You blew it up! You blew it all up! You maniacs! Damn you! God damn you all to Hell!"

You leave behind a sobbing wreck. A few days later, you learn that a few of the survivors tried to sue the Global Community government. They are asked to file a formal complaint at a particular courthouse in Bulgaria, given first-class airfare there, and are not heard from again.

(Sorry, natural 1 after a 18....)
>>
>>3748185
No the pirate radio does none of that but hurt dissents that we should be supporting.

Taking out the pirates means less escort jobs for us.
>>
>>3748354
Man that is brutal.

We real;y need to pick up some nationalists. Organize a prison break and have them loot aircraft bone yards to get a better air force.
>>
>>3748250
# Show them the Robertson papers; since one of them is a nuclear engineer, he'll understand them and explain it to the other two.
>>
>>3748354


Elsewhere, the news aren't good either; the people you sent to Africa were starting to make some headway, until Raveshaw ambushed them. They barely managed to get out, with a few casualties and one IFV sufficiently damaged that it will have to be rebuilt. Raveshaw came prepared, at the head of a force consisting of both Peacekeepers and Rebohoth's guard. You suspect a mole, until you review the footage from your satellites and the camera phones that your crew left behind -- after driving off you and anyone who could reach wheels or escape into the brush, the Peacekeepers were directed to chase the stragglers while Rebohoth's personal guard began indiscriminately killing civilians from both tribes.

Debriefing indicates that Raveshaw's men have constructed 2 or 3 dedicated flame tanks for the specific purpose of scorching the Earth.

Thanks in part to the fiasco in the now defunct Rose Island, the caper against the pirates fails; udnderstandably scared, they don't show up. To salvage their image, the CFO of the cruise ship company asks the Antonov pilot to do a few flybys of the cruise ship anyway, for the look of the thing... and has to buy you a new Antonov from Poland when a modern warplane shows up and takes the floatplane out, again without warning.

You lose the pilot; fortunately, it's a resignation and not a death. The fighter pilot, having trained to go against comparable aircraft, misjudged the biplane's slow speed and tight turning circle. The Sidewinder missile impacts the AN-2's upper left wing before arming, and tumbles on, exploding harmlessly between the plane and the ship; the biplane crash-lands on three wings and the pilot swims to safety before the military jet turns around and sinks it by strafing it with its autocannon.

You also lose the weapons that had been mounted on the Antonov, of course.

In less than a week, your security force have gotten a reminder that they cannot go toe to toe with a modern military. Fortunately there's only one of those left on Earth.

Moira reports that morale is through the floor: there have been some resignations, and you've flat out lost one of your squads. Some of your men want revenge for their friends. Some want better guns . Some warn you that they did not sign up to go against a whole army. Some are appalled at the change of tack in Peacekeeper behavior. In this mood you go see Patrick Zevo.

The icing on the cake is a brief GNN interview in which Bruno Folgore mentions that "lawless elements at sea and in the air in Southern Europe have been dealt with decisively by our brave Peacekeepers. We do not abide terrorists, we do not abide fanatics, we do not abide any threat to the peace and tranquility of the Mediterranean or any other stretch of land or sea under Global Community authority. Ave Carpatescu!"

The potentate himself follows up by playing good cop, indicating that any family member of the deceased, including the guilty, may apply for redress.

by
>>
>>3748250
>Rolled 67, 15, 81, 2, 1, 3 = 169 (6d100)

shiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit

>>3748354

Put video of these atrocities up and have it show on every search that's even mildly related. And show it to our captives, too. We may be the bad guys but this is the alternatives.
>>
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>>3748408
>>3748293
>>3748288

"Judge for yourselves."

The engineer knows Robertson by reputation, of course; he quickly skims the paper, goes over a few sections in more detail, and tells the two guards that yes, there's something in this.

The guard that wanted to go home, well, still wants to go home; you'll have to deal with that. The other is willing to give this the benefit of the doubt. He understands the point of operational security, and claims to be willing to do duty in Effincold and not contact anyone.

>>3748456

You can, of course, decide how to shape the internet's response to these peacekeeping actions; broadcast media isn't really within your ability to control, other than to cut satellite feeds or "encourage" Captain Midnight copycats to alter it.

Rebohoth, as far as you can tell, is quite convinced that being shown to be a monster strenghtens his rule rather than weakening it; he's always ruled by terror. Carpatescu seems happy to play good cop, with the bad cop role being available to one of the many people who want it.

>>3748442

The Zevo Toys factory has been closed down in an orderly manner, not bankrupted; sweep the floors, cart away a U-Haul worth of dust, reconnect the power, and it could start hiring again in a week. Patrick Zevo, himself, is not in good shape, physically or mentally.

"I can't even eat. The food keeps touching. I like military plates, I'm a military man, I want a military meal. I want my string beans to be quarantined! I like a little fortress around my mashed potatoes so the meatloaf doesn't invade my mashed potatoes and cause mixing in my plate! I HATE IT when food touches! I'm a military man, you understand that? And don't let your food touch either, please?"

That's the sort of conversation you are having, eating microwaveable meals in a corner of the otherwise-deserted factory cafeteria. Looks like the man has been using it for his personal food stockpile; canned food, MREs, water. Notably, no guns. "Leslie hated guns..."

# Listen to his sob story. After the Event, almost everybody has one; the only reason why you didn't is that your family was all generally agnostic and weren't seeing anyone.

# I need drones, Mr. Zevo. You need purpose. We can help each other.
>>
And they worshipped the dragon which gave power unto the beast: and they worshipped the beast, saying, Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?

Rev 13:4

Ah..... But war is a complicated thing. Yes the Beast that is Carpatescu may dominate the skies and the sea, but we control a new frontier that neither it nor its master seems to fully comprehend.... Cyberspace.
>>
>>3748530

# Listen to his sob story. After the Event, almost everybody has one; the only reason why you didn't is that your family was all generally agnostic and weren't seeing anyone.
# I need drones, Mr. Zevo. You need purpose. We can help each other.

Doesn't hurt to listen to a guy who's secluded himself for a bit.

Then offer him purpose.
>>
>>3748544
and possible space itself!
>>
>>3748530
#Listen to his sob story. He can't be any worse than Aki
>>
>>3748550
INDEED~!
>>
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>>3748551
They would go perfectly together making little robot monsters.

We have to keep them far apart lest Small Soldiers become based on us!

It wasn't a movie, it was just security cam footage of the little robots that got loose!
>>
>>3748551
>>3748547

You expect to hear a broken story by a broken man; what you get is a remarkably precise report.

Kenneth Zevo, died in 1991. His desire was that instead of his son Leslie succeeding him, it would be his brother, Leland, who was a lieutenant general in the US Army. Even Leland was unsure of this, pointing out how Leslie has been apprenticed at the toy factory most of his life. Kenneth agrees Leslie loved toys and his work, but his childlike demeanor would not help him to be a successful business leader. Leland reluctantly takes control of the factory. Leland's first thought is to simply allow Leslie and his sister, Alsatia, continue to design new toys and effectively run the factory. From Patrick, Leland gets the idea of building war toys in the factory, even though Leslie points out Zevo Toys has never made war toys due to Kenneth's dislike of war in general.

Leland offers to drop the idea of Zevo Toys making war toys, but asks Leslie if he can partition off a small amount of the factory to develop toys of his own. Leland uses the space to develop miniature war machines that can be controlled remotely, aspiring to sell these to the military. When Leslie sees children being led into one of Leland's secure areas, he finds a way to sneak into the space. Inside, he discovers Leland training the children to operate the miniature war machines with arcade-like interfaces so the children would not be aware they are actually operating real war equipment. Leslie flees before he is discovered, barely escaping the "Sea Swine" amphibious drone guarding an exit; he is aware that Leland has seen his actions through spy toys monitoring the area, and prepares to stop the drone army.

Leslie, and friends, including Patrick who feels that his father may have lost a few marbles, go to the factory to fight against Leland, using regular toys' movement and sound to confuse the autonomous drones. Leslie manages to get to Leland, and turns off the mainframe which coordinates the drones; Leland is hospitalized, and Leslie takes over the toy factory. Patrick, having been assigned as liaison for this operation despite the obvious conflict of interest, is reassigned soon after.

Unfortunately, Kenneth's prediction comes to pass: Leslie is an excellent toymaker but a poor manager, and with the advent of more realistic videogames - Patrick tells you about the genuine wonder he felt after seeing Doom for the first time, about a year after this mess - the factory goes through financial troubles. The Event seals the deal; the market for toys has suddenly dried up with the disappearance of the world's children. Leslie and his fiancee Gwyn had been trying for a child for years; the fetus, now on its 7th month, disappeared from Gwyn's body.

"She died of systemic shock and a broken heart; he died with her, he walked the earth for maybe another month, but it doesn't count. And here I am. They also serve who only stand and wait."
>>
Ask Mr. Zevo if he would like to build for our team. The event might have emptied the world of children for now, but that doesn't mean the spirit of fun and whimsy should disappear with them.
>>
(Now I'm curious if Robin Williams is alive in this timeline... ;) )
>>
>>3748686

Everyone lost someone in the Event, one way or the other. The human race, collectively, had to square its shoulder and soldier on. This particular soldier served with as much distinction as he could in a peacetime Army, according to his record, and was give a honorable discharge shortly after the Event's aftermath required his deployment on a still-classified mission in Panama.

"You've seen what's going on in the world, Mr. Zevo."

"Yes, I have. What can I even do about it? There is no Army anymore - there is no America anymore! That all-hat no-cattle good-for-nothing Dimmsdale asked me to enlist, can you believe that? I'd start off at E-8, train people in camo, that's my specialty..." He gestures at your phone. He doesn't have one. "For what? Setting fire to straw huts with women and children inside? I can't tell who the good guys are anymore. And I can't fight the bad guys by myself. I'm only one man. The Punisher's a comic book, Mr. Foreman. You know what I'd want to do? Teach. There's plenty of older teens who grew up with no younger brothers or sisters to look after, that's just not natural, it isn't. The Boy Scouts have gone to pieces, and it'll be a few more years before there can be cub scouts again. I'd do something like that, wilderness training, for, you know, older teens, twenty somethings that can't find honest work. That I know would help people. It won't being Leslie and Gwyn back, but... Oh god, I wish they could see that people are having kids again. I should-"

>>3748711

# Well, sell me your factory, and you can set that up if it's what you want.

# I'm sorry for your loss, but I'm here because I am interested in your drone tech. Can you make more for us?

# You can take up your cousin's legacy; the world will need toymakers again, in just a couple years.

>>3748717

(I was going to not dwell on that, honestly. I can't imagine someone like him reacting well to the effective death of every kid in the world. I didn't mean for this bit of the quest to turn all dark, but... well, it happened).
>>
An idea occurs to me.

In exchange for providing his drone technology to our cause, we can work with him to set up a program where Mr. Zevo can train older teens and young adults how to pilot the drones as a sort of mock war games. Something in the vein of FIRST Robotics, Cyber-Patriot, or Drone Races.

It's great PR for our organization and gets us drones and it gives Mr. Zevo purpose and a means to help children.
>>
(Also sorry about that....)
>>
>>3748754

that's literally what his dad wanted to do. I know that it's what we want the tech for ultimately, but we'll have to use a different angle with this guy.
>>
From my understanding is Dad was trying to trick kids into using the drones as weapons.

What I'm proposing is using the drones as a teaching tool to raise interest in robotics and aviation. Similar to how FIRST robotics has children building droids to solve puzzles.

No subterfuge, but it could be a means to find new talent in the coming years.
>>
>Leland
that guy.

Looks like you guys want option 3?

We could hire this guy as a training instructor for our men.
>>
>>3748841
Essentially yes.

Ideally, I like the idea of introducing drones to the population, similar to how Misrayim had the robot fights and the Maker Spaces to promote science.

What I'm trying to propose is having Mr. Zevo start a drone subculture among teens and young adults to promote interest in aviation and robotics.

This would have the following deliverables:

1) Increase the pool of potential science recruits among young adults. We need soldiers but we also need engineers, IT professionals, and other techies to build SCIENCE

2) It gives Mr. Zevo (and ourselves) an opportunity to help the communities impacted by the Event and WWIII.

3) It secures a means of producing drones
>>
>>3748896
Sure, But i still want this guy training our men, maybe even support a new boy scouts of America.
>>
If we can set up a community and do old skool type corporations with jobs being careers and setting them up for life, we'd have a very loyal workforce.
>>
Rolled 12 (1d100)

>>3748754
>>3748841

"Here's my proposal, Mr. Zevo. You reopen the factory - not sign it over to us, reopen it - and we help you get the business back on its feet.

You quickly find a relevant picture on your phone - to your mild annoyance, it's off the phone of that female guard in your custody; it shows her youngest cousin with friends. "I don't blame you if you retreated from the world after what you've seen. Many did. But we, as a species, are moving on. Once it became obvious that people could have children again, well, they got busy. Look here." You point at one of the faces. "Cindy Jospin is one of the first children conceived in France after the Event. She is healthy, smart, and probably excessively pampered, growing up without an older brother or sister or cousin who's not past the Event gap of thirteen years. Society is, because it's what we do, likely to cater to her every whim in her formative years, because children are rare, and this will make sure that she grows up getting exactly the wrong message about the world and how to do well in it."

You explain Carpatescu's plan for a unified world school curriculum beamed in classrooms via satellite, and add that you are not in favor and have put up a few token technical obstacles against it. "Carpatescu respects free enterprise; would you like to help offer an alternative that isn't run by religious fanatics?"

Patrick asks you for some statistics; thanks to the Nomenklator, you give them without braking eye contact. "There are 20 million kids in the world now, Mr. Zevo. What you do about it is up to you."
>>
>>3749716

"What can I even do about it? I'm... I'm obsolete! I'm a soldier, and there's no more countries, and... just look at what happened with the Peaceekeepers. If that's what it means to wear a uniform no, I don't want any of it. My family were toymakers, and we were struggling even then, now kids are just going to want high tech stuff and they can just get it in Japan..."

You let him drift off before replying.

# You said it yourself: few kids means lots of money per kid. If there's ever been a time to resurrect high quality, semi-artisanal manufacturing, it's now. Maybe countries are on the way out, but Made in America can still be a thing.

# You know, I happen to know a PMC who could use a man like you, if you can get your ass in gear again. They have a great record of being the good guys. We can help you set up a trust for the factory.

# High tech stuff like first person view remote controlled aircraft that you've had the tech for for years? They don't have to have guns on them. You want to teach, great! Let's make sure that the new generation has the tools to learn.
>>
>>3749727
# You said it yourself: few kids means lots of money per kid. If there's ever been a time to resurrect high quality, semi-artisanal manufacturing, it's now. Maybe countries are on the way out, but Made in America can still be a thing.

# You know, I happen to know a PMC who could use a man like you, if you can get your ass in gear again. They have a great record of being the good guys. We can help you set up a trust for the factory.
Give him both offers. Let him choose, but sort of push for the former, but let him have a comfortable fallback as the latter.
>>
>>3749716
> Cindy Jospin

She's important later in the books. Must protecc.
>>
Rolled 41 (1d100)

>>3749733
>>3749734

Mr. Zevo thinks about it for a little bit. "You make a good point. I can at least try to reopen the factory. As for what I'll do with my own life... I'm not sure."

You mention your PMC, which, of course, isn't yours, on paper. He seems unconvinced. "Mercenaries. How can anyone trust them?"

"Do you trust the Peacekeepers more?"

"Not from what I've seen online lately, no. Mind you, a global defense initiative is a good idea. It's just... Iit could have been implemented a lot better. Then again - I guess it's good that people know what's going on now. I've seen a couple of things that I never want to speak about, and we WERE the good guys, by and large. The world's really gone topsy turvy, hasn't it... Heh. I guess the banks are still at the top of the heap. I'll have to get a loan, and-"

"You don't need a bank. I guess the world's gone THAT topsy turvy."

# Offer a loan on very generous terms (no interest) to reopen the factory. You figure that it will be easier to do business with him once he's out of his funk.

# He can get starting capital by selling you the old drone designs. Better do it before Dimmsdale or Carpatescu confiscate them and use them for who knows what.

# He can get starting capital by becoming your covert-ops instructor, with the added benefit that it will give him a reason to get some muscles back on his bones.
>>
>>3749754
# He can get starting capital by selling you the old drone designs. Better do it before Dimmsdale or Carpatescu confiscate them and use them for who knows what.
Seed money
# He can get starting capital by becoming your covert-ops instructor, with the added benefit that it will give him a reason to get some muscles back on his bones.
More money to cover any shortfalls. But mostly this would be good for you to get out again.

He can just give over most of the stuff and have the company ran by us or some people we select and he can retire wealthy by still owning it.
>>
Rolled 17 (1d100)

>>3749759

(I respect your wish to go middle of the road, but choosing more than one option lowers efficiency considerably, like in the previous quest)

"You've got a point about the robotics stuff. I think I should just get rid of it. I'm sure with how computers got faster and cheaper since then, someone'll reinvent it soon enough, but I don't want blood on my hands. Now - I've actually seen what happened in central Africa, and I admire your friend wanting to play peacekeeper when the Peacekeepers aren't. But they bit off more than they could chew - you can't go after a whole army head on with some security guys, it's as stupid as ordering a cavalry charge on a tank division. No, what they need to do is learn how to be invisible. Insurgency methods - counterinsurgency, too. If it's ten against fifty, you want to tire them out, steal their gas at night, that sort of thing. I think I'm going to hit the gym for a few weeks and then give your friend a call, who did you say it was?"

# Moira.

# A former private investigator.

# A former soldier.

# A former debt collector.

You intend to tell Patrick's future contact to project the sort of persona that Mr. Zevo may be likely to get along, of course, without outright lying. Right now your forces are demoralized, but you can tell the contact t play that up and earnestly ask for help.

As far as Mr. Zevo destroying the drone designs, you figure

# you gave it a good try. It's probably for the best.

# you can make him a good offer.

# you're going to take Patrick's own advice and just hack them out of the factory mainframe before the hard drives are destroyed - all you need to do is find a way to get it powered on and stay on for a hour or so.

# You don't have anyone qualified to play Spy vs Spy against this guy and break in to steal the designs, but staging a robbery is possible, albeit unlikely to work.
>>
>>3749765
>>3749716
>>3748250

THE DICE.
>>
>>3749765
Can we do one option like get him into shape, then the other when he doesn't look like a rabid canine?

# A former soldier.
Not sure if we should say Moira. Shes suppose to be in jail, and we have her do naughty thing all the time. She mostly leads since we lack anyone else as a named hero to be a team leader....

# you can make him a good offer.
Just be upfront and honest with the guy. All destroying them will do is delay our research.
>>
#Follow Patrick's advice and hack the factory mainframe.
>>
#Former debt collector

Soldiering is nice and all, but a debt collector with an understanding of people who've faced economic woes from Black Swan events (I'm pretty sure the Rapture qualifies) and recuperate might help him change his tune about drones and robotics.
>>
>>3749785
But hes a former soldier, and made a rant about soldier stuff earlier.
>>
>>3749765
>A former soldier.

>you can make him a good offer.
Be totally honest and don't forget to pint out that we wouldn't just use the drone designs for weapons, maintenance and other kinds of jobs will probably be one of the first applications. Should he still be unwilling we will respect that and start our program from scratch, something we can also tell him.
>>
Rolled 23 (1d100)

>>3749910
>>3749774
>>3749783

"You're right; given how much cheaper sensors and processors are, replicating your family's effort would not be difficult. I'm offering to buy it for two reasons. One, it becomes a lot less valuable as soon as someone else gets there, since no patents were taken, so it's either sell now for a lot, sell next year for a little, or sit on it and get nothing. Two, we're a public service agency. If we have access to the sort of small robots your family pioneered, we can use them to repair underground cables, inspect bridges after an earthquake instead of sending a man, you name it. How would you feel about long-range toy helicopters carrying transplantable organs quickly between an airport an a hospital?"

Mr. Zevo says that he'll think about it - and not destroy the designs in the meantime. For now, you give hm the business card of one of your security people, telling him he's the head of the PMC. The paperwork doesn't quite match, but for mercenary companies, it's not as if it ever does - the person actually in charge is rarely the person who signs the checks, for liability reasons.

Your Nomenklator operator tells you that assuming optimal negotiation, reactivating the factory will actually be fairly cheap, to the tune of 2BN or so, after which you will still not be able to build drones until your people have had time to reverse-engineer the old designs, replace obsoleted components and standards, and the like. Fortunately, that's only a few weeks' work. The question is, what will he want for it?

# Make an offer to Mr Zevo here and now.

# Shake hands with the man, and let him know that you will have an offer in a couple of weeks.
>>
>>3749946
>Make an offer to Mr Zevo here and now.
Better to know what kind of cost we are looking at
>>
#Make an offer to Mr Zevo here and now

Also there is no guarantee he'll be alive in the upcoming weeks - This is the Apocalypse after all.
>>
>>3749946
# Make an offer to Mr Zevo here and now.
Less likely for him to back out or scrap any blueprints.
>>
Rolled 98, 95 = 193 (2d100)

>>3750041
>>3750010
>>3749995

"You know, I ought to thank you for the kick in the pants, Foreman. I've let myself rot. I'll contact your mercenary friend when I'm ready to do so. As for the robots, all the blueprints and programs are in the factory computer. I don't expect you to promise me you won't built war robots, and I know all too well that whatever I get you to agree with, you've got dozens of lawyers to weasel out of, and eminent domain if they can't. So I'm going to try to trust you. You can have the whole thing for" and here he highballs a little, asking for about twice what you calculated.

# Take it.

# 4BN is too much, I can do 3.

At least, you reflect, your meeting with Dr. Jewell a few days earlier went a lot better; she taught you a few basic yoga positions and, perhaps most interestingly, the neurological basis of mindfulness, helping you separate woo and historical mysticism from actual brain science. She's a Taoist, personally, but sees it more of a life philosophy than a religion (she's also enough of a Star Wars fan to make a quip about blasters). Even with just a few days, you took full advantage of her time to

# guide you through some meditation exercises, which you hope will help with Carpatescu, or the two witnesses if you choose to go that route.

# help Aki come down from her frequent manic states in a way that doesn't leave her unconscious for a day at a time or crying for six hours because she killed a mosquito.
>>
>>3750146

(NOW you roll well... baka)
>>
#Take it

#Help Aki come down from her frequent manic states. Time to tame the monkey mind.

Neurological Scientist isn't bad. While it isn't Zen classic (i.e. Zen instructor slapping the back of your neck with a stick when your posture slacks) at least it has a grounded basis in psychology, rather than mystical woo involving crystals and distorted Tibetan customs.

Would you say Dr Jewell emphasizes more of the Rinzai School (emphasis on koans and mindfulness at work) or Soto (emphasis on maintaining the lotus position and emptying thoughts).
>>
>>3750146
>4BN is too much, I can do 3.
>help Aki
>>
>>3750146
>take it
> help Aki come down from her frequent manic states in a way that doesn't leave her unconscious for a day at a time or crying for six hours because she killed a mosquito.
>>
>>3750146
# 4BN is too much, I can do 3.
If the endeavor fails or we have to cut you loose, I'd throw in the last 1bn as a golden parachute.


# help Aki come down from her frequent manic states in a way that doesn't leave her unconscious for a day at a time or crying for six hours because she killed a mosquito.
>>
Dr. Jewell mostly does seminars for people in place like NY and LA to learn how to practice mindfulness at work; her yoga routine is designed to be doable on a lunch break, if the office is fancy enough to have a gym. She confirms to you that Aki is bipolar, suggests that she be given a nurturing environment, and goes through the basics of self-centering with her. You aren't sure how much it will help, but Carla is grateful for you trying.

You haggle a little with Mr. Zevo, in a way that suggests that you are mostly doing so for the look of the thing, and are mildly surprised when he agrees to your terms.

The Zevo Toys mainframe is pretty old; you notice that it's essentially the bargain-basement version (which would still have cost seven figures in old dollars at the time, of course) of the setup that Carpatescu has for his office. You tell Patrick that you mostly need the hard drives for now, open up the old cabinets, and put them in your Pelican case.

And that's when the earthquake hits. Mr. Zevo may be out of shape, but he stays on his feet like a cat; you feel pushed against a wall and protect the case with your body, sustaining a bruise. All around you, windows that simply weren't designed with earthquake resilience in mind shatter; the lights go off for a moment. Good thing you didn't turn the system on!

Problem is... you're in Moscow, Idaho: an earthquake here should be impossible.

The Nomenklator operator tells you that the Earth literally shook: rather than seismic faults releasing their pressure, this was a global phenomenon, as if something had gone through the crust and mantle to grip the planet's core and twist it.

Between the Nom, you smartphone, and your laptop, you can actually direct CATS' response from here; enough CelSol pylons fell that there is some service degradation, of course, but you have the same priority as first responders', so you are not affected.

The earth rumbles again. An aftershock?

Mr. Zevo encourages you to go outside; the factory is the only building in a fairly large grass field, and it's early evening so there's still light. However, you are in a concrete building, which should be safe to be in now that the windows that had to shatter shattered.

# Stay, you have network and power, and will need to coordinate.

# Go, safety first.

The Nom operator reports that your orbital tracking antennas seem to be experiencing a malfunction; is the Earth indeed being shaken by a giant hand?

Fortunately, your work on disaster preparedness pays off. You are largely given reports of stopped trains and widespread blackouts, rather than derailments and fires.

There's static on the Nom, and a different operator updates you - the servers in your HQ are having their hard drives spun down, which required turning off some of the communication systems. Between operators, you end up picking up the GNN feed at quarter volume, as a default failover. It was reporting on the Two Witnesses.

"The Wrath of the Lamb has come!"
>>
>>3752519
Wasnt expecting the hand of god to literally shake the earth
>stay we need to coordinate.
>>
So the Sixth Seal has been opened which means sunlight will be significantly reduced, (the sun turning black as sackcloth, moon turning to blood; fun times ahoy~!)

I agree we need to coordinate, ensure who is safe and accounted during this event and coordinate rescue operations.


SPEAKING of the Two Witnesses.... What branch of technology would sonic weaponry be under? I seem to recall the Anons in the last campaign utilized it to great effect there.

Imagine if we could arm drones with that sort of technology to subdue supernatural entities like the Two Witnesses? Is it rendering harm if no blood is spilled?

But anywho, first things first.... Survive the earthquake (and possibly meteorites?)
>>
>>3752519

# Stay, you have network and power, and will need to coordinate.
Stay with Zevos
>>
>>3752519
# Stay, you have network and power, and will need to coordinate.

We can't be blind at this point in time, too much shit to manage.

>"The Wrath of the Lamb has come!"
We really need to start investing in countering this shit, next up is the meteors aye?

>>3752613
>So the Sixth Seal has been opened which means sunlight will be significantly reduced, (the sun turning black as sackcloth, moon turning to blood; fun times ahoy~!)
Good thing we've got reliable nuclear power sorted so our networks should be entirely capable of surviving should power start failing.

>SPEAKING of the Two Witnesses.... What branch of technology would sonic weaponry be under? I seem to recall the Anons in the last campaign utilized it to great effect there.
Energy weapons I presume but personally I'd prefer laser or other such weapons. Something with a bit more lethality.

>Is it rendering harm if no blood is spilled?
I mean if we're going by that logic why not just electrocute them?

>But anywho, first things first.... Survive the earthquake (and possibly meteorites?)
Meteors are a separate wrath so they should be a separate event. We do need to prepare for them though, aye.
>>
>>3752883
In this event, alternative power should be sufficient. Some people interpret the celestial events to be a solar and lunar eclipse. In future events, such as the Fifth Bowl, we'll be dealing with a supernatural darkness that may very well affect technology... although in this version of the Apocalypse the effects may just be regional (to New Babylon).

The problem with lethal force against the Two Witnesses is that they have superatural protection that sort of Insta-Smites those who will them physical harm. In the first campaign there was a similar conundrum where harming Christians resulted in divine smiting. The anons got around the barrier with sonic weapons that used vibration to render people unconscious.

The Sixth Seal involves a massive earthquake with the sun darkening, the moon turning to blood, and stars falling to the earth.... which can be interpreted as meteors...


You are correct that meteors feature in future event, particularly the Second and Third trumpet judgment, involving destruction of a third of the world's shipping and Wormwood poisoning a third of the world's drinking water, respectively.
>>
>>3752907
Destruction of shipping? So just like ships and trucks. That seems like a strange specification. A third isn't even that terrible.how are they supposed to go. Should probably get preparedness up more to get water filters.
>>
>>3752907
>In this event, alternative power should be sufficient. Some people interpret the celestial events to be a solar and lunar eclipse. In future events, such as the Fifth Bowl, we'll be dealing with a supernatural darkness that may very well affect technology...
True, if nothing else we can expect that solar is no longer going to be a viable method of off-grid power for our remoter bases and pylons. The real question is if the effect on solar emission occurs in earths atmosphere or at the sun as this could effect our satellite network's power supply.

>although in this version of the Apocalypse the effects may just be regional (to New Babylon).
If that turns out to be the case then we're basically fine.

>The problem with lethal force against the Two Witnesses is that they have superatural protection that sort of Insta-Smites those who will them physical harm. In the first campaign there was a similar conundrum where harming Christians resulted in divine smiting. The anons got around the barrier with sonic weapons that used vibration to render people unconscious.
Oh I was there for that and I remember. I mean admittedly my method for getting around it in this time line would probably be using excessive amounts of pepper-spray style gas to basically prevent them from talking by irritating the throat, lungs and vocal cords. It shouldn't count as harming them by biblical standards hopefully.

>The Sixth Seal involves a massive earthquake with the sun darkening, the moon turning to blood, and stars falling to the earth.... which can be interpreted as meteors...
True and if it then god help us if they hit urban areas.

>You are correct that meteors feature in future event, particularly the Second and Third trumpet judgment, involving destruction of a third of the world's shipping and Wormwood poisoning a third of the world's drinking water, respectively.
Yep. My personal opinion is we've got to stop both of those no matter what. Not even from a "disrupting narrative" perspective, just to avoid the human losses and disruption to the global economy.
>>
>>3752983

The second angel sounded his trumpet, and something like a huge mountain, all ablaze, was thrown into the sea. A third of the sea turned into blood, 9 a third of the living creatures in the sea died, and a third of the ships were destroyed.

10 The third angel sounded his trumpet, and a great star, blazing like a torch, fell from the sky on a third of the rivers and on the springs of water— 11 the name of the star is Wormwood.[a] A third of the waters turned bitter, and many people died from the waters that had become bitter.

I'm not quite familiar with how the Left Behind books interpreted the Second Trumpet, but most interpretations have a third of all boats being sunk, a third of all marine life being killed, etc. Typically, it involves an asteroid crashing to earth.

However, I can't help but feel I'm metagaming a fair bit here, seeing as our collective PC hasn't been too invested in examining the ramblings of the Remnant. I think we did see a chart? The Dispensationalist one with the road map of the tribulation?

>>3752993

Stopping the meteors is definitely a must. We should exercise extreme caution with Wormwood, however. In many versions I've encountered , people try to 'nuke' it from orbit only for the destruction to be the very cause of it unleashing its payload.

But again... not sure if this is metagaming. >.<;;
>>
>>3753030
Our map of the trumpets includes those events aye. Don't worry about meta-gaming too much.

>We should exercise extreme caution with Wormwood, however. In many versions I've encountered, people try to 'nuke' it from orbit only for the destruction to be the very cause of it unleashing its payload.
My presumption is that god isn't going to will it into existence inside of near-earth orbit. Meaning that we may very well be able to avoid it by redirection into a slingshot or even a stable orbit (unlikely but hey it could be done).

To do this however, we'll need sufficient orbital camera assets to detect any such body approaching or appearing within a certain distance of the earth as well as a craft capable of preventing it's impact or eliminating it as a threat by another method.


Realistically, we can't afford to do this. We're talking a rock that makes it's way though atmo, unless it's incredibly dense and well-cored, it will be massive (specifically mass-ive) and hard to slow or change the course of.


Therefore our best hope is to pray god is slinging from the hip and just taking a rock from the solar system. If we can monitor it's course in that case, then even a few kilo-newtons of force might be able to save us.
>>
>>3753030
>>3753066

Considering how it is I dont think we can really stop any of these if they explicitly state. So we have work around it, god is just brute force it intk happening like the earth quake. So we are going to need water purifiers, beach all our fleet assets before the second trumpet. Reccomend others beach them as well, the wormword star dosnt explicitly state its going to hit anything so it may be possible to push it. But then again the hand of god may just push it back. More water purifiers for bitter water.
>>
>>3753082
True but we should still give it a shot. If for no other reason than the fact that it would avoid the issue entirely unlike water filtration and such which merely mitigate damage.

Plus we've got to save the whales and dolphins, their immense power will defeat god for us if we do.
>>
>>3753082
>>3753066
I vote take a middle of the road approach. Some disasters (like the Earthquake going on now) are out of our league at the moment, so its best to have contingency plans. For these we should invest in food stockpiles, environmental controls for both heating and cooling, etc.

Others though, the ones involving supernatural entities like Apollyon and the four angels of the Euphrates.... these can probably be tackled. You guys took on the freaking Angel of Death in the last campaign.

Then there is the tricky matter of the Mark of the Beast.... If we embrace it, we become subject to a number of the Bowl judgments but if we don't we essentially become outlaws cut off from the legal economy. It could also make us extremely susceptible to the Beast's narrative control....

>>3753097
Agreed. Save the whales!
>>
>>3753097
Its a waste of resources though if it fails. Im not sure how we would fullstop anything but the asteroid anyways
>>
>>3753108
Could you go over the details on mark od the beast? I dont know much about it.
>>
In Left Behind's interpretation, at the midpoint of the Tribulation, the Antichrist gets assassinated (via head wound) only to revive three days layer possessed by Satan.

His deputy, the False Prophet, will impose mandatory worship of him through a mark, described in Revelations as 666. Without the mark, people cannot buy or sell. Furthermore, those without the mark are executed via decapitation.

However, those who DO receive the mark are no better off. Not only are they damned to Hell, but they also are subject to the Bowl judgments: painful sores, extreme heat, painful darkness, etc.

The Antichrist dies sometime after the Sixth Trumpet (demonic horsemen plague), also around the same time the Two Witnesses get snuffed by the Antichrist.
>>
>>3753142
>In Left Behind's interpretation, at the midpoint of the Tribulation, the Antichrist gets assassinated (via head wound) only to revive three days layer possessed by Satan.
Reasonably speaking I don't think we can avoid this but we must try. Even if all we can do is kidnap and store him in some bunker in some fuck-off-nowhere place, it'll at least buy us time.

>His deputy, the False Prophet, will impose mandatory worship of him through a mark, described in Revelations as 666. Without the mark, people cannot buy or sell. Furthermore, those without the mark are executed via decapitation.
Presumably this refers to the Pope, given it's the "False Prophet" and that is somewhat an accurate description of what the pope ("The voice of god on earth") is.

>However, those who DO receive the mark are no better off. Not only are they damned to Hell, but they also are subject to the Bowl judgments: painful sores, extreme heat, painful darkness, etc.
Yeah we've got to avoid that. At best we can go into hiding and having our people represent us instead. We'd have to fake a murder or assassination but still.

>The Antichrist dies sometime after the Sixth Trumpet (demonic horsemen plague), also around the same time the Two Witnesses get snuffed by the Antichrist.
Yet another thing we might want to stop. Also those demon horsemen are gonna be interesting.
>>
I really think a good deterrent to the Supernatural is to get a Jewish theological expert. Revelation makes a lot of interesting nods to Old Testament writings possibly including apocryphal texts like the Book of Enoch which makes reference to angels, the Grigori, being sealed.

>>3753162

Actually, it isn't the Pope surprisingly enough, but one of Carpathia's toadies, Leon.

I'm really interested to see what happens if we nudge a prophecy of the rails. Our GM has put a lot of care and detail into world building a setting that originally had all the flavor of an oyster cracker.
>>
>>3753142
So basically make sure the antichrist dosnt die. I hope we can accomplish that. What month should it happen in? We are on month 28 i remeber somthing like halfway through year 3 so month 42?

We could also suggest a mark for government workers and hope as its not the msrk of the beadt we will be ok?
>>3753176
Of just discredit and remove leon. If the antichrist dies there will be a power vaccume we could try to take control during that and freeze Carpatescus body.
>>
>>3753180
Month 42 sounds about right, although we might need to adjust based on when the Tribulation officially started.

You make an interesting point about the mark. Since we're being tasked with setting up the new economy (of which the mark is based) we might be able to tamper with it. Maybe we could cause some sort of Supernatural compiling error where the Mark no longer equals 666. Maybe with Kabbalah?

The problem with taking control during the vacuum is that we're not that high up in the pecking order to start calling shots. That would be the Subpotentates. While we COULD place one of them as a puppet.... but there are other snags there too.

YHWH is the sort of GM looking to railroad the plot. If we freeze Carpathia or prevent his assassination, what's to stop another from taking his place? Say a subpotentate?
>>
>>3753204
>Month 42 sounds about right, although we might need to adjust based on when the Tribulation officially started.
I'd argue we should always assume that these things are occurring far sooner than seems reasonable, that way we're always prepared for them when they do.

>You make an interesting point about the mark. Since we're being tasked with setting up the new economy (of which the mark is based) we might be able to tamper with it. Maybe we could cause some sort of Supernatural compiling error where the Mark no longer equals 666. Maybe with Kabbalah?
Potentially, that or we make them lack economic control and thus they can't enforce that section of it? That's the current plan anyway but you get my point.

>The problem with taking control during the vacuum is that we're not that high up in the pecking order to start calling shots. That would be the Subpotentates.
Reasonably speaking it would come down to a vote between subpotenates. Given this fact our best method of ensuring a proper replacement is to get one or two more SubPotenate's on side and hope they can swing it.

>While we COULD place one of them as a puppet.... but there are other snags there too.
True. Like if Carpatescu leaves definite orders for who is to take charge.

>YHWH is the sort of GM looking to railroad the plot. If we freeze Carpathia or prevent his assassination, what's to stop another from taking his place? Say a subpotentate?
Aye he railroads but there is a limit to what he can do.

For example, he has to obey christian literature / the acts-of-the-story that he is empowered through. This means however we can cheat by sealing Carpatescu away or killing his replacement. As the fact remains god can't control anyone that the mandate doesn't exist for, meaning that we could just prevent a successor being elected and instead form a counsel of SubPotenates which would therefore avoid "a" false prophet being a thing, hopefully.
>>
>>3753228
Council seems like a good idea. The more decentralized we make it the mpre we can break the direct influance. It would be good if we can just prevent the mark of the beast by preventing it from being made as a policy decision.
>>
>>3753270
>Council seems like a good idea. The more decentralised we make it the more we can break the direct influence
Agreed, plus it makes us more powerful if we can make some pawn-SubPotenates like replacing Africa or getting North America on side.

>It would be good if we can just prevent the mark of the beast by preventing it from being made as a policy decision.
True but to prevent it would basically require eliminating a high ranking government member no matter how you cut it.
>>
>>3753228
There's another to consider though: In a number of Futurist interpretations (such as Left Behind) a number of Subpotentates are killed off, based off an interpretation from the Book of Daniel. Although they die around the time the Mark is implemented.

In other words, a coup might be playing directly into the narrative. But then again, there are a lot of opportunities that might come up between now and the 'Indwelling'.

But yeah, I definitely agree that a strong priority should be to undermine the Mark of the Beast system when we can.

Furthermore, there might be other players aside from the False Prophet and the Subpotentates if memory serves. The people who brought Carpatescu to power and bankrolled him. We might need to do some digging, see what dirt we dig up.
>>
>>3753308
Thats a good point we should try to find any background figures are running the show see if a coup is going and have dimsdale and our girfriend work together to protect the americas.

We need to talk to dimsdale more see if we can fix him up more.
>>
>>3753308
>There's another to consider though: In a number of Futurist interpretations (such as Left Behind) a number of Subpotentates are killed off, based off an interpretation from the Book of Daniel. Although they die around the time the Mark is implemented.
True.

>In other words, a coup might be playing directly into the narrative. But then again, there are a lot of opportunities that might come up between now and the 'Indwelling'.
True but it's less so a coup and more so subverting the narritive's coup.

>But yeah, I definitely agree that a strong priority should be to undermine the Mark of the Beast system when we can.
Agreed. Undermining cent-gov's control and reinforcing our own control of the economy is a good plan especially since it will enable us to hide parts of our organisation, our budget and our activities far easier. Potentially enabling vast expansion and less careful operations without it getting noticed.

>Furthermore, there might be other players aside from the False Prophet and the Subpotentates if memory serves. The people who brought Carpatescu to power and bankrolled him. We might need to do some digging, see what dirt we dig up.
True but digging up that sort of dirt is likely to see us getting a shallow grave. We'd need to do it as discretely as possible.

>>3753329
>Thats a good point we should try to find any background figures are running the show see if a coup is going and have dimsdale and our girfriend work together to protect the americas.
We already know of some of the background actors between that Christian remnant organisation and some of the other groups we've dealt with.

>We need to talk to dimsdale more see if we can fix him up more.
Aye. Honestly any SubPotenate we don't plan on having replaced we should do that for.
>>
Agreed.

Anywho, we should survive the Earthquake first.

If our IT infrastructure can endure the calamity and play a key role in search and rescue, we might be able to secure more funding and possibly favor from Carpatescu, which in turn secures more capital to prevent the Apocalypse.

Furthermore, if my knowledge of Apocaylpse is accurate, this won't be the only massive quake either (although the other ones don't have meteors, I believe). We should definitely learn what we can from this disaster and implement it for future quakes.

It can also help the morale of our troops playing peacekeeper, saving lives, being the 'Good Guys'.
>>
>>3753308

Jonathan Stonagal, Capatescu's mentor, died (murder-suicide) shortly after the Potentate was first elected UN Secretary. Interestingly, William Cameron may have been present at the event. Unsurprisingly, he didn't write about it.

>>3753204

Your theology research has derived a rough timeline; if the Remnant theologians are correct, your own mandate began roughly six months before the beginning of the Tribulation proper. However, your estimates are off by as much as 8 weeks.

Tentative timeline: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1BlMOSEOxSihj1gdagq7yxCjONaRBgcdlRxnc68uWf0A

>>3753180

Leon Fortunato is Carpatescu's second-in-command. Due to his boss' peak-human stamina, he doesn't actually do a whole lot; he's essentially being functioning as the mayor of New Babylon, so far. Carpatescu prefers to meet with the subpotentates in person, and with nobody else present.

Pope Peter Mathews is also head of the Ecumenical Council, largely by reason of seniority. He is likely to be replaced by the Patriarch of Constantinople or the Grand Imam of al-Azhar, dependng on who happens to be oldest at the time.

Christian Remnant adherents refer to the EC as "Enigma Babylon One World Faith" due to its logo supposedly containing the letters EBOWF instead of EC/CE if you read the decoration as cursive letters.

>>3753030

The current head of the Global Space Agency has expressed an interest in scaling back human presence in space in favor of an asteroid redirection program, but hasn't DONE anything with it.

Large satellites carrying extra propellant have a chance of "catching" metors; depending on how early they are caught, they may be able to push them off Earth's atmosphere entirely, or at least redirect them from land to sea or viceversa, depending on what would do the least amount of damage - assuming that you intend to go for the least amount of damage. Fortunately, your AI modeling is top notch, so calculating the most efficient use of a satellite's limited delta-V is easy.

>>3753030

You did see a chart, and even derived a tentative timeline from it. This took interacting personally with Bruce Barnes, which wasn't too bad, and Tsion ben-Judah, which was about as creepy as dealing with Carpatescu in person.

Note that Tsion has been trying to convert Chaim Rosenzweig, and also Dr. Robertson.

Tsion has been accused of murdering his wife, children, and chauffeur, and has gone into hiding. As far as you can tell, he is using Community Co-Op internet resources to communicate with the outside world; having to go through a poorly-esigned blog, his preaching has not been particularly effective.

>>3752993

Pepper spray is available to you as a matter of course, unless you want to buy it by great quantities - for example, getting a hold of a tanker truck full of it would likely require some ingenuity, or handing over some cash to Klaue.

>>3752983

Your fleet assets are currently sufficient to your needs, but without much in the way of spares.
>>
>>3752883

Directed-energy research will cover such things (and also things that aren't related to weapons, such as cheap laser or plasma cutters or ultrasonic cleaning of surgical implants). Turns out that the physics and engineering involved in sending a lot of power through a laser diode or an ultrasonic transducer are at least cognate, if not outwardly similar.

>>3752645
>>3752544
>>3752613

Patrick Zevo tries to grab you and run outside, but he's been letting himself go for too long, and can't quite manage. "It's an earthquake! We gotta get out in the open!" His failed attempt to fireman-carry you made him realize just how long and how much he's been letting himself waste away, by the look of it.

"This is a concrete building, it's safe, and you have power. I need to coordinate my disaster-response teams, and this is a good place to do it from."

Your matter-of-fact answer made an impression on the retired Army Ranger.

Between your laptop and the Nomenklator, you can in fact direct most of the response from anywhere there's a network connection; you mostly want power, since your gadgets are optimized for performance rather than battery life. To your surprise, Mr. Zevo starts unplugging the company's old servers, explaining that their utility panel has "some sort of big battery in it" and you're welcome to use it. Hopefully a UPS from 1992 will still be any good.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_August_11,_1999

You quickly learn that the shocks followed the eclipse's path of totality, starting on the North American east coast and quickly cutting through England, Europe, the Middle East, and India. A number of aftershocks followed, and are still following - as if they were spreading from the path of totality. Fortunately your laptop uses a solid state drive.

Reports are contradictory: some say that the Yellowstone supervolcano has erupted, other that this happened with a volcano in Iceland. A GNN commentator is indicating that the Burj Carpathia's anti-seismic measures have worked perfectly, while a local TV anchor is showing the giant spire shaking.

The first few minutes are crucial; you tell your people to focus on

# cutting the chatter, ensuring that the global media broadcasts what's going on
* accurately.
* optimistically.

# checking on the automated shutdown systems and turning off power and gas manually in areas where they did not trip correctly; this will prevent fires.

# your own people's safety. Chicago and other areas that aren't normally in earthquake dangers seem to have developed a lot of sinkholes as the soft terrain under pavement and roads liquified.

# taking over the various digital TV feeds and piping in local evacuation instructions instead.

# securing food, water and fuel supplies before they are looted; the aftermath will be tough.
>>
>>3756250
>However, your estimates are off by as much as 8 weeks.
Which is a major weakness of ours, we realistically have to be prepared long before it might end up being needed and therefore waste opportunity-time to ensure we're able to be ready.

>Pope Peter Mathews is also head of the Ecumenical Council, largely by reason of seniority. He is likely to be replaced by the Patriarch of Constantinople or the Grand Imam of al-Azhar, dependng on who happens to be oldest at the time.
Might be a good idea to meet with those two and see if either of them would be a suitable replacement. If nothing else, we can probably kill the pope far easier than Capatescu and doing so should weaken his control.

>The current head of the Global Space Agency has expressed an interest in scaling back human presence in space in favor of an asteroid redirection program, but hasn't DONE anything with it.
What a fool, with the combined resources of the entire world he wants to scale back? If the Soviets and NATO could both maintain a reasonable orbital presence then together we should be able to maintain more or less any effort.

>Large satellites carrying extra propellant have a chance of "catching" metors;
I've got an idea, what if we just make one large satellite filled with extra propellant as much as possible and then every other one we just fill with observation / network stuff. That way when we need to intercept we can throw as much D-V at the target as is reasonable.

>Pepper spray is available to you as a matter of course, unless you want to buy it by great quantities - for example, getting a hold of a tanker truck full of it would likely require some ingenuity, or handing over some cash to Klaue.
Damn. You'd think there'd be less restrictions around a irritant substance in copious amounts.

>>3756288
# checking on the automated shutdown systems and turning off power and gas manually in areas where they did not trip correctly; this will prevent fires.

We should minimise the damage as much as possible. Then we can look into providing information or taking control of the narrative.
>>
#Check on automated systems and manually turn off power and gas in areas they fail to trip.

>>3756302
I have an idea that might involve Pope Peter the Rabbit. As we enter the Trumpet Judgments we will want to look into protections for the supernatural. Despite what Tim Lahaye might be aware of, the Catholic Church has been pondering over the Book of Revelations long before the Protestant Reformation. If anybody has any juicy knowledge that might be of use against angels, demons, and all things in-between, it would be the Vatican.

Also, what is Dr. Jewel's academic background? Neuroscience of some sort? If so, she could come in handy outside the meditation sessions....
>>
>>3756288

Mr. Zevo has disconnected the company servers, meaning that their UPS battery - some big lead-acid job somewere in the basement - is all yours.

The shocks continue; worryingly, they aren't diminishing in intensity. By now all the glass that had to break broke; a few fluorescent bulbs fall from their housings.

You confirm that the Icelandic volcano of Eyjafjallajökull has erupted, as well as Stromboli in Italy, Santorini in Greece, and...

That's not good. You're getting unconfirmed reports that the Yellowstone caldera has gone up. At least the Cerro Galán caldera, as far as you can tell, has not.

>>3756302

"All right. Shut down everything."

"Foreman?"

You begin to give your orders to the people in your HQs in Chicago and Chile.

"Emergency power grid cutoff across the board. Close all propane and city gas valves we have access to, vent the gasometers if necessary. CelSol pylons and network nodes on local batteries only. Power lines will fall, we must make sure they aren't live. Restrict all cell phone access to text message only except for 911 and 112 calls. As we can, re-enable phones belonging to first responders by cross-correlating with any employment databases we might have..."

You only can do small things, but they happen all over the world. A panicked mother's call to her daughter is hung up so that the precious bandwidth can go to an old man being told by a 112 operator that he should go in his car, get out of the garage, and wait. Swaths of traffic and street lights come off, increasing panic, but saving a few lives after the continued shocks fell power poles; those hit by the whipping wires suffer bruises and the occasional broken finger or ankle, rather than electrocution.

A gasometer in Vadodara cannot handle the sudden pressure when the electrically controlled gas valves shut all at the same time, and blows its top. Two technicians die of carbon monoxide poisoning. Hundreds of others whose gas pipes burst don't.

Several beautiful castles in France and northern Italy, not designed to deal with earthquakes, crumble. The Duomo di Milano, gird by scaffolding due to its notoriously slow and corrupt maintenance schedule, doesn't.

You are in the middle of nowhere, but police and fire truck sirens play out in your mind, just below your hearing threshold - maybe the Nomenklator microphone is picking some up.

Your second priority is to

# see to your own people's safety.

# handing over the airwaves to first responders.

# ensuring accurate reporting.

# ensuring optimistic reporting.

# securing supplies.

It's getting dark outside - large clouds are amassing, and the air feels the sort of dry and thin that precedes a thunderstorm.
>>
>>3756344

Dr. Susan Jewell is a neurosurgeon; she started practicing meditation and yoga in order to regain the extraordinary manual dexterity that the job requires, after she lost some of it in a car accident. The regimen worked.

>>3756344

The Garibaldi is in the Mediterranan; a global catastrophe is an excellent time to raid the archives, or else to ensure that the Church owes you a favor.

While you've deployed most of your workers and all your troops for the month, the disaster means that everyone has plenty of adrenaline going through them to put in additional effort.
>>
>>3756354
>ensiring optimistic reporting then
>see to your own peoples safty. We have plenty of supplies built up.
>>
#See to our people's safety. I know most of them are tough bastards and can handle themselves, but I can't help but grow attached to our crew of misfits.

>>3756360
Brain surgery is nifty, although what I'm thinking is getting someone to look into psychological concerns, memetics in particular.

Can belief shape reality if enough people believe hard enough? Are we dealing with the real deal or has two thousand years of worship given birth to some sort of nascent Chaos God?

Questions worth investigating I think.

As for the Vatican, we can offer to help the Church with making records of the precious artworks and such, in exchange for a look at the Vatican archives.

Might want to deal with an underling, though. Maybe the Camerlengo?
>>
>>3756354
# ensuring optimistic reporting.

Panic is our biggest enemy now that most of the potential for damage has been secured and we've re-routed most possible bandwidth.

Admittedly it would be tempting to just say "in order to facilitate emergency services, network activity has been restricted entirely to them" and turn off news broadcasting entirely perhaps besides a telecast service of advice or something. That way we avoid damage and focus as much bandwidth as is physically possible into the hands of those on the ground.
>>
>>3756360

(Actually a friend of mine; yes, the Dr Strange reference is intentional, and yes, it did happen to her. We've been ribbing her about it since the movie came out. Sadly she doesn't have any magic powers unless you count the ability to drive a Nissan Leaf from LA to SF without destroying the battery).

You get a video of the view outside your HQ's office building. Suddenly the heavens opened. Monstrous black and purple clouds rolled upon each other and seemed to peel back the very blackness of the night. Meteors came hurtling down, smashing everything that had somehow avoided being swallowed. One landed next to a Range Rover, punching it out of the ditch. You get a glance at the driver. He was dazed, but he knew if he stayed in one place he was dead. He climbed over the seat and got behind the wheel again. He strapped himself in, thinking how flimsy that precaution seemed against the greatest earthquake in the history of mankind.

The earth continued to shift and roll, but the car just kept going, out of range. Through a skewed lens you see people running, hear them screaming, see in low-res what you suspect are gaping wounds and blood. They tried to hide under rocks that had been disgorged from the earth. They used upright chunks of asphalt and sidewalk to protect them, But just as quickly they were crushed. A middle-aged man, shirtless and shoeless and bleeding, looked heavenward through broken glasses and opened his arms wide. He screamed to the sky, “God, kill me! Kill me!” And the man was swallowed into the earth.

Looks like the strange earthquake is causing a number of sinkholes. Reports are contradictory, but it seems that Santorini and the second Yellowstone caldera have blown up, resulting in suborbital bolides hitting a few cities, notably Naples, Chicago, and New Babylon.

You receive confirmation that the Burj Carpathia spire is broken, the giant skyscraper broken in half; dozens dead, hundreds evacuated.

Your inability to take a batch of CellSol pylons to Russia a couple months ago comes in handy; the things are in your Chicago warehouse.

# Order them deployed immediately around Chicago, starting as soon as the quake subsides. It will ensure uninterrupted operation for you next month, and will make you look good to Dimmsdale.

# Prepare them for shipping to patch the worst holes in the coverage mesh, once you know what they are, hopefully in a day or two. It will help with damage control.

>>3756402

Good questions! As a low-level cabinet officer yourself, it would be easiest to work with someone of the same rank in the Church, the Camerlengo is a good choice, so would be the head of Edizioni Pauline.

>>3756386

(This is an emergency situation; you'll want to do those things, but the order in which they are done is important. Which first?)

>>3756421

(Handing over the airwaves to local first responders is an option; you did something similar during the bombings)
>>
>>3756444
>Order them deployed immediately around Chicago
>>
#Order them deployed immediately around Chicago.

Well crap.

Was expecting the meteors, but was not expecting the sinkholes. This must be a reference to people wishing for mountains to fall upon them. Let us hope the feeling of despair isn't a compulsion...
>>
>>3756492
I'll be honest I was kinda not considering that a literally global earthquake would risk volcanoes activating. It didn't even occur to me as a risk. In hind sight, this is going to be a serious change in how the world as a whole is balanced since america is going to be fucked by Yellowstone even if it doesn't go off fully.

It's not like we could've saved anyone from the debris. Let us just take solace in those we've saved by our other efforts.
>>
>>3756515
We definitely saved thousands if not millions, I can't think of anything we could have realistically done better
>>
>>3756525
At best we could've spent more in researching disaster preparedness and then preparing the actual regions we expected to be damaged. That and stockpiling more supplies.
>>
>>3756492
>>3756481

(if you had earthquake in areas where it doesn't make sense for there to be earthquakes you'd get soil liquefaction, and thus, in places that have been paved, sinkholes).

>>3756386
>>3756421

Mindful of what Carpatescu said last time you took over the airwaves, you let the GNN reporters do their job on sat feeds, before telling your people to get some rest - tomorrow will be hard.

>>3756481

Eventually, the aftershocks in Chicago subside. The last damage report you get is that apparently one of the bolides has taken out New Hope Village Church. You're okay with that.

Elsewhere.....

They dropped their axes and crept back to the upturned pavement that had served as Loretta's street not that many hours before. Through a gouge in that fortress they saw the GC copter settle next to a toppled utility pole. A high-tension wire snapped and crackled on the ground while at least a dozen GC emergency workers piled out of the aircraft. The leader communicated on a walkie-talkie, and within seconds power was cut to the area and the sparking line fell dead. The leader directed a wire cutter to snip the other lines that led to the power pole.

Two uniformed officers carried a large circular metal framework from the helicopter, and technicians quickly jury-rigged a connection that fastened it to one end of the now bare pole. Meanwhile, others used a massive earth drill to dig a new hole for the pole. A water tank and fast-setting concrete mixer dumped a solution in the hole, and a portable pulley was anchored on four sides by two officers putting their entire weight on its metal feet at each corner. The rest maneuvered the quickly refashioned pole into position. It was drawn up to a forty-five degree angle, and three officers bent low to slide its bottom end into the hole. The pulley tightened and straightened the pole, which dropped fast and deep, sending the excess concrete solution shooting up the sides of the pole.

Within seconds, everything was reloaded into the helicopter and the GC team lifted off. In fewer than five minutes, a utility pole that had borne both electrical power and telephone lines had been transformed.

Cameron turned to Tsion. “Do you realize what we just saw?”

“Unbelievable,” Tsion said. “It is now a cellular tower, is it not?”

“It is. It's lower than it should be, but it will do the trick. Somebody believes that keeping the cell areas functioning is more important than telephone wires.”

Cameron pulled his phone from his pocket. It showed full power and full range, at least in the shadow of that new tower. “I wonder,” he said, “how long it will be before enough towers are up to allow us to call anywhere again.”

Tsion had started back toward the garage. Cameron caught up with him. “It cannot be long,” Tsion said. “Carpatescu must have crews like this working around the clock all over the world.”

...

Eventually, the earth calms. "You're a good man" Mr. Zevo comments.
>>
Right. Time to assess damage and do damage control with out teams in the coming months.

A chance for good PR with the locals and morale boosting with the team members. We're going to need it in the days ahead. The End Times are dark and full of terrors.
>>
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Rolled 47, 94, 20, 71, 16, 43, 84, 89, 47, 81, 71, 81, 67, 85, 98, 63, 75, 93, 58, 26 = 1309 (20d100)

>>3756536
>>3756525

You make it back to Chicago by turboprop; by the time you've arrived, civilian traffic is still blocked, so you end up getting a helicopter ride back to HQ.

You are encouraged at having seen very few fires on the trip back; large swaths of the affected areas are without power and water, but ordering a shutdown prevented structural damage to the pipes. Hospitals and fire stations have power;

By the look of it, you've lost some of your emergency stockpile - it's not so much that it was looted violently, it's that given the circumstances, people who knew where MREs and water bottles were figured that they should take some home. Actual looting episodes were kept down by the Peacekeepers with brutal efficiency.

Your casualty list is tiny; notably, Donny Moore is dead. From what you know elsewhere, Leon Fortunato is missing; the official story is that he stayed behind during the Burj Carpathia evacuation. Carpatescu addresses the world briefly, by recorded message, from what looks like a bunker built between Baghdad and New Babylon.

“I can sympathize with your grief,” Nicolae says. “Perhaps you can understand my own feeling of loss over the many lives this calamity has cost. It was worldwide, every continent suffering damage. The only region spared was Israel. I have heard from those claiming that this was the Wrath of the Lamb: surely they do not lay at the feet of some Supreme Being an act so spiteful and capricious and deadly as this. Know this: reconstruction has already begun. We are the Global Community, and we are alive.”

Interestingly, you got an email asking you to be ready to join the subpotentates and other notables, including Peter Mathews, for a summit in Carpatescu's backup HQ in the bunker. It indicates that one of Carpatescu's priorities is rebuilding and strenghtening the communication network,

# so you give standing orders and get ready to leave.

# so you answer that you will take your orders in writing, if you may, since the summit would take you away from reconstruction efforts at a critical time.

----

The global butcher's bill is severe, in the hundreds of thousands, mostly in hilly regions, with as many as two million missing.

"It was like a giant worm chasing us underground... The last time I saw my sister, I could only see her head. Neck down, she was in the moving mud," the 18-year-old student told The Straits Times at a shelter on a windy hill near the remnants of her village in Central Sulawesi.

"I held on to a log of wood with my right hand, while my left hand was paddling to stay afloat. That lasted for several minutes, and my clothes were torn off in the process. I was nearly naked when I was finally rescued," said Ms Sunarti, who like many Indonesians go by a single name. Three of her neighbours who struggled close to her did not make it.
>>
>>3756650
# so you give standing orders and get ready to leave.

He told us not to weasel out of another of these meetings and more importantly we want to be there to capture further footage of him mind controlling people so we can use it against him in turning the subpotenates to our side.

Also we should make sure to bring a spare set of the covert Nomenklators and that they are as charged as possible. We'll need every bit of battery life we can get to be safe and worst comes to worst we'll change our pair when we go to the toilet or something.
>>
>>3756650
That is abnormally high.hopfully this means good things

>so you give stabding orders and get ready to leave. Try and get in contact with dinsdale and south american leader. I forget her name to make sure neither get brainwashed
here.
>>3756668
Yeah being a spare few one for dinsdale amd extra for us and some other extras.
>>
#Give standing orders and get ready to leave - With charged nomenclatures. Mind voodoo aside, there might be opportunities to cast feelers for who-is-who in this organization.

Make some allies. Hatch some schemes.

(Also who is Donny Moore again?)
>>
>>3756650
>so you give standing orders and get ready to leave
>>
>>3756650

Your preparedness effort has paid off; infrastructure damage was substantial, but little of it affected your work. You will have to perform substantial repairs to the network in Western Europe and India, but your decision to privilege mesh networking over faster internet speed has paid off - connectivity will go back to normal in a matter of days, which should help keep people's spirits up and let them organize reconstruction without waste. On the other hand, you worry about conspiracy theories spreading; with the recent brash actions on the Peacekeepers' part, it's understandable that people would turn away GC-backed medical or reconstruction teams... and that's without counting the truly crazy people.

# Censor the Web to some degree - prevent new uploads to the Datalinks unless they have been vetted, have most website providers run in read-only mode for a few days, and so on. This will slow down the spread of

# Get back to business as usual as fast as possible. It'll make you look good, and help with rebuilding. The world will have to deal with more nutcases claiming that mandatory shots are the mark of the beast though.

>>3756674
>>3756668

You pack the entire supply of stealth Nomenklators in your bag - they won't be available for use by your field teams, but it's better than you or Corazon Santiago getting brainwashed. The things by now look like workplace earplugs if they had been redesigned by Neiman Marcus circa 1980.

Carla warns you that if the conference is in a bunker, you may not have access to most Nomenklator functions, although the noise distortion system "should still work properly" since most of its processing is local. A quick patch to your cell phone's operating system lets it turn on on cue, given that Carpatescu's hypnosis always seems to start with the same words.

>>3756680

Donny Moore was one of your procurement people. You caught him stealing CATS property, but with insufficient proof for pressing charges. Instead of firing him, you let him fail upwards, giving him a lead programmer job and then immedately handing him off to Carpatescu so he could work on the MCP.

>>3756668
>>3756674
>>3756680

You've packed relatively light; Chicago O'Hare is reopened for business remarkably quickly, although the main lobby has sustained enough damage that it's been closed to the public so all airline business is handled in a few of the surplus maintenance hangars from when the airport was a Pan-Continental hub. The ordinary security measures have been replaced by gruff, heavily armed Peacekeeper who apparently have been flown in from the East, since they speak no English or affect not to.

You've learned that Harriet Durham is among the missing; however, she's been texting... Apparently she's been staying in a clinic in Denver, where she is being encouraged to abort her and Carpatescu's child due to possible genetic abnormalities.

# It's her business.

# Good data to trade.

(I gotta do a bit of math, give me a bit)
>>
>>3756735
# Get back to business as usual as fast as possible. It'll make you look good, and help with rebuilding. The world will have to deal with more nutcases claiming that mandatory shots are the mark of the beast though.

>You pack the entire supply of stealth Nomenklators in your bag - they won't be available for use by your field teams, but it's better than you or Corazon Santiago getting brainwashed. The things by now look like workplace earplugs if they had been redesigned by Neiman Marcus circa 1980.
Christ I knew there was something we'd been forgetting, we've not been equipping our teams with Nomenklators which we can do for free at 1 team per month. God dammit.

>Apparently she's been staying in a clinic in Denver, where she is being encouraged to abort her and Carpatescu's child due to possible genetic abnormalities.
I've no idea which option to choose for this one so I'm staying neutral.
>>
# Get back to business as usual as fast as possible

#Good data to hold on to. No need to be mean spirited, but genetic abnormalities could be something useful to know.

Donny's Carpatescu's jurisdiction then? I would propose we search his property for classified data, less it fall into 'nefarious hands'. Maybe even volunteer the services of a 'reputable contract security team'. To dispose of the data of course.
>>
>>3756783
>>3756772

The intercept was as follows:

"Dear C, I didn't know who else to turn to. Well, actually I did. But I got no response from A at the private number she gave me. She said she carries her phone all the time, so I'm worried what happened to her. I need your help. I lied to my former boss and told him my people were from Denver. I'm at a reproductive clinic here. Now, don't overreact. Yes, they do abortions, and they're pushing me that direction. In fact, that's mostly what they do. But they do also ask every mother if she's considered her options, and every once in a while a baby is carried to term. Some are put up for adoption; some are raised by the mother. This place also serves as a safe house, and I am here anonymously. I'm scared. I'm confused. Some days abortion seems the easiest solution. But I'm already growing attached to this child. I might be able to give it up, but I don't think I could end its life. I told a counselor I felt guilty about becoming pregnant when I wasn't married. She had never heard anything like that in her life. She said I ought to stop obsessing about right and wrong and start thinking about what was best for me. I feel more guilty about considering abortion than I do about what you would call immorality. I don't want to make a mistake. And I don't want to keep living like this. Say hi to everybody. My love to L. Love, H."

You make a point of looking into Hattie and Carpatescu's history - medical records are largely transferred by fax still, and thus difficult for your people to intercept, unless they know when they are being transmitted in which case it's trivial. Carpatescu's medical history is, of course, classified even to you, but that of his parents was not. For now, you confirm that Mrs. Durham is in good health; any genetic problems are very likely to come from the father's side.

You make a point of declaring the internet open for business as soon as it's significant to do so: your boss gets most of the praise, unsurprisingly, but you do catch an op-ed on the Global Weekly.
Before leaving, you'll have to issue orders to your teams. Carla recommends keeping a covert team in reserve in case you have to be extracted - at the very least they will be able to cause a distraction so you have an excuse to leave.

Fortunately, the large satellite launch is still a go: the Baikonur cosmodrome was designed to survive a nuclear war, so any damage was minimal and Subpotentate Zakharov put it near the top of the to-repair list, for reasons of prestige.

Moira has agreed to have a ventricular-assist device and pacemaker implanted; if you do it this month, she'll be ready to go for the next. "Well, if you're SURE we can't just blow 'em tae fuck an be done with it, aye, ah can investigate 'em first. But are you REALLY SURE we cannae jes blow 'em tae fuck?" You reply that the last thing Jerusalem needs is suicide bombers, to which she agrees that the last thing she needs is to be a suicide bomber.
>>
Hello, Foreman! You are planning CATS' operations for the month.

Rules: http://emlia.org/pmwiki/pub/web/LeftBeyond.Quest2Rules.html
Datalinks: http://emlia.org/pmwiki/pub/web/LeftBeyond.Quest2Datalinks.html
Tentative timeline: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1BlMOSEOxSihj1gdagq7yxCjONaRBgcdlRxnc68uWf0A
Performing an action outside of your home territory will also require the availability of (complexity) fleet assets, OR renting them at the cost of 1/asset

You can deploy yourself on TWO actions for a small bonus to all rolls Your Nomenklator system can be issued to ONE team per turn, for a small bonus to all rolls

Dr Robertson can be deployed on ONE action for a large bonus to R&D rolls or a small bonus to any non-covert rolls

Ryan Andrews can be deployed on ONE action for a large bonus to construction rolls or a small bonus to any non-covert rolls

Moira McSingh can be deployed on ONE action per turn, for a medium bonus to covert rolls or a small bonus to all rolls; She can give basic combat capability to a work crew

Aki Lattinen can be deployed on TWO actions per turn, for a medium bonus to R&D or construction rolls; She will hack into things if bored

C0 (Free):

Move the Garibaldi (Mediterranean, Arctic, Atlantic, Indian, Pacific)
Track someone (max 3)

Buy equipment on the open market:
Power generation 1
Small arms 1
Network equipment 2
Fleet assets 2
Aerospace part 3
Supplies (food, fuel etc) 1

C0 (Agent):

Survey a territory for opportunity using an agent. The earthquake has reset survey opportunities.

Construct a CellSol pylon (Needs 1 network part)

Undergo combat training (Max 1 per month)

Tail someone
Meet with someone

Buy equipment on the black market:
Small arms 1
Squad weapons 2
Stimulants 1

C1:

Reconfigure the Garibaldi (generic, cargo, hospital, strike, orbital)

Tail some1

Survey a territory for opportunity using a team

Hire out a covert operations team for a situational reward

Construct network equipment

Construct nuclear generators

Procure network equipment and construct a CellSol pylon

Make and sell consumer-grade Nomenklators (Net gain 1BN)

C2:

Do research (1~3)

Construct an aerospace part

Construct a logistics hub (cap 1 fleet requirement for that territory; can deploy covert teams there with no notice; costs 1 power; stores supplies)

Study the USB drive

C3:

Recruit a work team

Schedule a satellite launch, which will happen at the end of NEXT month Requires an aerospace part

Do research (4~6)

Start DEW research

C4:

Recruit a covert team

Do research (7~9)

Construct a network node (unifies cell and net; costs 1 power, 1 network)

C5:

Rush a satellite launch, which will happen at the end of this month Requires 1 aerospace part

Construct a base and a network node at the same time (2 power, 1 network)

Do research (10)

What are your orders?
>>
>>3756903

Since you are going to the summit, and coordinating reconstruction for the usual myriad of small jobs that popped up after a crisis, you will not be able to deploy yourself this month.

Moira can be assigned to be fitted with the secondary heart, pacemaker, and spinal stimulator, which of course takes her out of commission for this month.

Aki can be assigned to use ONE or BOTH actions to reverse-engineer the Zevo Toys drone systems.

Dr. Robertson is not a robotics expert, but he is an excellent lab manager, so he can be assigned to use his action to lead a team of his own people to reverse-engineer the Zevo Toys drone systems.

Given that your two researchers have very different styles of operation, you can expect different results depending on who you assign on it.
>>
>>3756903
>Your Nomenklator system can be issued to ONE team per turn, for a small bonus to all rolls
It's a damn shame we never got round to establishing a auto-application system for these so it didn't matter if we forgot but oh well.


Any way, I've got a few ideas for what we should focus on this turn and I'll do the math for them in a minute but I want to know what you guys want to focus on: personally I am of the opinion we should expend all of our work teams making network equipment to reinforce or restore the global network; meanwhile two teams of our covert staff will do missions for rewards and the last cover team acts as overwatch for us in case some shit goes down.

The logic being that we want to restore as much of the global network as fast as possible impress our overlord and justify two things: an extension on the mandate since we've been set back by this disaster; an increase in funding to harden the network against something like this happening again.


Hopefully we'd be able to get our budget raised by another 7-8 Bn and be able to use those funds to expand our efforts by just purchasing from the open market various supplies, freeing up teams and factories for other affairs.
>>
>>3757023

That's certainly feasible (I will gladly allow "Give it to whoever's doing research with no other bonuses" or "Give it to the first covert team we deploy", but not "Give it to whoever needs it the most" because that would involve retconning).

This month, as an exception, you will not be able to use the squad Nomenklators for the simple reason that you're taking most of the earsets with you in your diplomatic pouch, since their batteries are tiny and don't last long.

(Anyone minds if I write the airplane cutscene in the meantime while you decide deployment?)
>>
Have Moira undergo surgery.

Have Aki reverse-engineer the Zevi Toys (1 action) while also continuing Zen meditation with Dr. Jewell.

Have Dr. Robertson continue his research, see if Physics have again changed since the earthquake. Given it was on a global level....

>>3757023

If I follow your thinking, put work emphasis on global IT structure? That can work for now. From my understanding of Revelations (and Left Behind) I hypothesize we are on the threshold of the Seventh Seal; Silence in Heaven and the rise of the 144,000. We might have a bit of a respite for now.

The next major disaster is the First Trumpet - A rain of blood and fire that destroys a third of all trees, and all the world's grass. If you follow certain definitions of grass that includes quite a number of plant species.

To prepare, we should definitely invest in fire fighting procedures and environmental protection.

Since Tsion Ben Judah is basically Zod's radio, telegraphing upcoming events, we should follow the blog. Probably more feasible than listening to two pyrotechnic crazies at the wall. Less dangerous too.
>>
(Go ahead Geist~!)
>>
>>3757241

If we're having the mad scientist rather than the sane scientist start a robotics program, I vote that she put all her heart and soul in it (both actions). It's one of those opportunities that don't show up often so JUMP ON IT.

>>3757023
>>3757241

Ecocide sounds like where we have to go full bunker mode... Also did you notice that the price of supplies has gone up from 0.5 to 1? IDK if it will come down, but if it doesn't we will regtret not buying now.

Fuck it's like buying bitcoin.
>>
>>3757254
I like Aki continuing the studies as it builds a relationship with a potential asset and all benefits her health.

But I'm fine either way.

The first Three Trumpets are essentially targeted ecocides:

First Trumpet - Vegetation - 1/3 trees, the entire grass

Second Trumpet - Flaming mountain turns 1/3 oceans turn to blood killing ocean life and destroying ships

Third Trumpet - Wormwood poisons a third of all fresh water sources, killing those who drink them.
>>
>>3757284

That's a good point, Aki isn't exactly sane. I think that we have to balance getting the most out of her versus burning her out. The candle that burns twice as bright and all that. This quest looks like it's about hard choices so that fits the bill, we get a super genius but if we overwork her she becomes unusable.

OTOH I think that this is the part where she needs to be used, this isn't a regular research program, it's one of those alien autopsy things. Can we give her a break next turn?

>>3757241

Yeah let's fix stuff. Pylons and network nodes this turn. At least it looks like we're working hard. I second using 2 covert for missions but let's take easy ones since their morale is still low. What's the rundown for those Geist?
>>
>>3757023
Generally i would say push ai to 10 and get network to 2 globally i just want the AI up to 10 before the money system kicks in

4 teams on the tech 6 on nodes 4 on network equoiment with the 2 factories. If we do that for 2 turns we will have it set globally. The network wont just be repaired but better then before.
>>
>>3757353
Sure, sure. This would be Aki's element and the good doctor did suggest we give her a nurturing environment.

Since things are relatively calm now (as opposed to, well, the Wrath of the Lamb) we can give her a break :)

>>3757362
Works for me.
>>
>>3757382
>>3756903
So then

>4 teams research AI
>6 teams place a network node in north south america and east north america.
>4 teams make network
> 2 factories make network

Spend 6 parts to repair west Europe new Babylon and india back to two


That leaves us with 7 locations at 1/1 and 2 at 1

Next turn we can make 2 more nodes then we would need 12 network parts to make it 2 everywhere being 16 teams or 5 nodes and 2 parts being 17 teams but easier long run.

We could move the 4 from ai to 1 node and 1 network part making it
6 at 1/1 and 1 at 1

Making it 6 nodes 1 part = 18 teams or 13 parts making it 11 teams which we can actually do

Nodes really cost 4 though so we are risking by under teaming it.


Bleh what do you anons think. Prioritize network over research?
>>
>>3757240
>That's certainly feasible (I will gladly allow "Give it to whoever's doing research with no other bonuses" or "Give it to the first covert team we deploy", but not "Give it to whoever needs it the most" because that would involve retconning).
Yeah fair enough. I mean it would've been nice if you'd always just asked if we wanted to stockpile them for next turn or something but I respect that we should've made a decision and all.

>This month, as an exception, you will not be able to use the squad Nomenklators for the simple reason that you're taking most of the earsets with you in your diplomatic pouch, since their batteries are tiny and don't last long.
That makes sense given how many we're taking that we can't give a new team any but it is odd how this particular part of the system has worked given we honestly should probably have enough in stock to equip all of our teams since we're supposed to be getting 1 team's worth per month and we have been for a fair while.

I wouldn't even ask for retroactive shit, just the assumption that this month we finally roll them all out or something since it seems weird to me that the production capacity to make them had to be used every month or it evaporated away into the ether.

>(Anyone minds if I write the airplane cutscene in the meantime while you decide deployment?)
Eh you could do what I used to when I wanted to write a detailed post and wanted to be able to still react to the thread: open a second tab that auto-updates and check it occasionally.

>>3757241
>If I follow your thinking, put work emphasis on global IT structure? That can work for now. From my understanding of Revelations (and Left Behind) I hypothesize we are on the threshold of the Seventh Seal; Silence in Heaven and the rise of the 144,000. We might have a bit of a respite for now.
Aye, generally we get breathing room between events just to let anons catch up and plan / discuss shit. Thank christ for that or we'd actually be unable to make any sorts of organised actions.

>The next major disaster is the First Trumpet - A rain of blood and fire that destroys a third of all trees, and all the world's grass. If you follow certain definitions of grass that includes quite a number of plant species.
Yeah that'll be interesting. I'm curious how god plans on making that work but I can think of one or two ways. I can't think of a way to stop it or avoid it's effects so I leave that to everyone else as a unsolved issue.

>To prepare, we should definitely invest in fire fighting procedures and environmental protection.
Oh certainly but that doesn't change the fact that we're talking 1/3 of all orchards and potentially grains and shit too just dying off.

>Since Tsion Ben Judah is basically Zod's radio, telegraphing upcoming events, we should follow the blog. Probably more feasible than listening to two pyrotechnic crazies at the wall. Less dangerous too.
True.
>>
>>3757353

Global Community personnel - not only Peacekeepers - are busy all over the world handling disaster relief, providing first aid, and the like. In some communities, Peacekeepers are not wanted - censorship of print and broadcast media hid the atrocities committed last month, but the internet didn't, and you've taken a lot of trouble to make it impossible for everyone to censor it - even for you.

The flip side of this is of course that there are all sort of conspiracy theories. GC doctors are injecting you with AIDS, not antibiotics. Tetanus vaccines cause dementia. That kind of thing.

This has caused an overnight demand for non-Peacekeeper military forces to escort medical teams.

# Take one or two of these jobs with monetary reward (1BN each).

# Take one or two of these jobs with reward in favor and other goodwill (max 1 per region).

These jobs are available in India, Tibet, Yemen, and Greece. Yemen is under Carpatescu's direct control; instead of currying favor, which would likely expose you, you'd have to accept the money.

As a complete aside, the situation in South Africa has deteriorated further - the earthquake left the urban areas in much worse shape than the countryside, exacerbating conflict. A group of Afrikaaners has hired a veteran helicopter pilot to guard their compound; the man has had some luck pushing back Raveshaw's forces.

# Send a team to hire him once he's done there! This will cost 2BN.

# Offer to take him out (and maybe rescue him from the wreck afterwards). This will bring in 1BN, but you will have to false-flag it since you will be working with Raveshaw, and he may catch on.

# Ignore it.

>>3757382
>>3757353

>>3757362

You are on the threshold of developing a fully automated logistics expert system smart enough to contract individual truck drivers or tramp freighters when necessary, which would essentially abstract fleet requirements for all your efforts, save for emergencies.

The next logical step, the capstone of the program, would be to package the software in such a way that it can be run on the world's most common operating systems. A simple "run this in the background, and you will get rewarded with a bit of e-cash" scheme would make your expert system impossible to shut down. Since it means setting up what amounts to an enormous legal botnet, you better be able to defend its command-and-control channels, lest someone take advantage of it.

--------------------

(PDF cutscene TLDR: You get to the airport and find that Tsion is back online, and get the URL for his bulletin board. board the Condor 216 plane, and end up in the "coach" section. You eavesdrop on Mathews and Fortunato a little, learning that Fortunato believes that Carpatescu resurrected him after he died in the quake, but there's no hard evidence or witnesses. You also learn that Mathews wants to integrates the Ecumenical Council more tightly, maybe asking for a tithe to be instituted).
>>
>>3757362
>Generally i would say push ai to 10 and get network to 2 globally i just want the AI up to 10 before the money system kicks in
Agreed we need to maintain our superior technical systems and preferably finally start taking actions to prevent cent-gov's economic control. Either shifting power to our or someone else's hands, preferably ours to give our organisation a bit more of a edge and some real teeth to drive into our enemies - or rather their checkbooks.

>4 teams on the tech 6 on nodes 4 on network equoiment with the 2 factories. If we do that for 2 turns we will have it set globally. The network wont just be repaired but better then before.
That works well and I agree to it. All that is left is positioning our heroes.

Given their specialities: Ryan can work on the nodes, Aki can do meditation-stuff + something else (she could be assigned to survey a territory for opportunity or a node team) and that leaves Dr robertson for research.

>>3757426
>Prioritize network over research?
Refer to my above reaction to your other post, my goal is to restore the network and get a bigger budget / other concessions from our boss to make things a bit easier.

>>3757438
# Take one or two of these jobs with monetary reward (1BN each).

We need the money. I'm thinking India and Greece.

# Send a team to hire him once he's done there! This will cost 2BN.

I know the lad you are referencing OP and he's a mad bastard. We could use such an experienced pilot and his lovely ex-soviet vehicle assuming he still has it.

>Since it means setting up what amounts to an enormous legal botnet, you better be able to defend its command-and-control channels, lest someone take advantage of it.
Got it, only set it up after further research into Defence and make sure that Aki understands she can't abuse the existence of this to run some next-gen game or some shit.
>>
>>3757438
>take for of these jobs for monetary support. We need the money we only have 18 bn this will not last us the two turns.
>>
>>3757445

Works for me but we have to decide if we want Aki or Robertson on reverse engineering Zevos drones. If we use Aki I vote we tell her to just go full bore on it.

In general I approve of her doing meditation every once in a while but right now we need to use all our trump cards. IDK what drones will do for us but I suspect drones + factories = fuck your army I brought mine.
>>
>>3757445
In that case
>>3757382
>>3756903
So then

>4 teams research AI with robertson
>6 teams place a network node in north south america and east north america. With ryan on it.
>4 teams make network
> 2 factories make network

>spend the 6 parts repairing west europe new babylon and india back to two.

>aki focus both turns on drones

>moira get the operation


This sound good for everyone?
>>
>>3757461
>>3757445

Speaking of which - you have two factories. They can each take on 1 point worth of production, be it network parts or power generators or even supplies (the assumption in that case being that they will produce things like water filters, and then trade some of them for food or diesel).

(I need to edit the skeleton post at a turn's beginning but it's getting too long for post limit!)
>>
>>3757461
I think having Aki inspect them will result in more interesting results but Robertson will probably provide far simpler but more reliable / cheaper shit.

>In general I approve of her doing meditation every once in a while but right now we need to use all our trump cards. IDK what drones will do for us but I suspect drones + factories = fuck your army I brought mine.
Yeah true. I mostly wasn't thinking about that until next turn / after once we understand just how the political field lies and shit.
>>
>>3757468

Works for me.

>>3757476

Yeah, SCIENCE!! vs science. Do we want to switch Robertson on it? I'm curious to see what Aki does with it honestly story wise, but Robertson may do something more reliable / less dice dependent. My guess is Robertson = modern drones circa today, what would Aki do though.
>>
>>3757486
>what would Aki do though.
It's probably going to be something that is genuinely technically superior but slightly inhuman in it's logic and they'd be more sci-fi shit than automated-things.
>>
>>3757506
Something that would frighten Satan himself
>>
As for drones, I imagine aerial versions would come in handy for recon.... and for the Fifth Trumpet.
>>
Rolled 74, 34, 97, 86, 89 = 380 (5d100)

>>3757445
>>3757461

You wish Moira good luck as she goes under - it's technically the first surgical operation intended for augmentation rather than mere repair, as far as you are aware. She flips you off, but laughs while doing so.

The operation is being performed at the University of Chicago hospital, courtesy of a major donation from you and under the guise of protecting first responders. The devices have been bought from reputable artificial heart manufacturers and only lightly modified.

# Ventricular assist and pacemaker.

# Ventricular assist, pacemaker, and anti-unconsciousness brain stimulator - the latter cannot be removed and will make it impossible for Moira to safely get a MRI, should she ever need one.

Carla tells you that Aki is a little jealous; she wanted to be the world's first cyborg (she doesn't think people like Stelarc and Kevin Warwick count). Hopefully diving into the Zevo hard drives will keep her mind off it; Patrick Zevo lets you know that he's been hitting the gym, and sent Aki a crate of old prototypes. By the look of it, Leland Zevo spread his research efforts a little thin; he wanted to build a strategic force of long-range drones piloted by children, and a tactical force of miniature tanks and helicopters carrying modified regular firearms and operating in semiautonomous mode. You tell Aki

# nothing, let her get inspired with whatever she prefers.

# focus on the telepresence stuff, since we now have the infrastructure for it that we didn't have in 1992.

# focus on autonomous systems, since she's already been messing with something similar.

For safety, the live weapons will be replaced by airsoft guns with lead ballast so that they weigh the same as the real things.

In the meantime, you send you orders to your teams (is this good for everyone? >>3757468 ) while on the plane to New Babylon. You realize that as much as the place looks a bit too much like a theme park, you'll miss its pristine appearance; it was a genuinely new thing.

In the meantime, on the plane, you decide to

# link up with Santiago by texting her, and giving her earpieces.

# Same, but with Dimmsdale - he isn't in on the whole thing yet though.

# Take advantage of the fact that all ten subpotentates are in one place and address them, even though it's against protocol.

# chat a little bit with Fortunato, since he's around.

# chat a little bit with Mathews, since he's around.

# chat a little bit with GSA head McLahalan, since he's around.

# peek around the Condor 216's systems, since you find to your great annoyance that the default admin passwords work. You can't fly the plane obviously, but you can mess with the PA and media system, to make an announcement or listen in.
>>
>>3757468 >>3757572

Works for me

>>3757572
#Link up with Santiago

#Chat with Pope Peter Rabbit, gradually bring up the possibility of backing up significant artwork at the Vatican using technology. Given the event of the earthquake (do NOT address it as Wrath of the Lamb), it would be a good idea to back up important art pieces and documents for the benefit of the human race.

(Also to earn a favor so we can dig in the archives for Supernatural data)

Fun Fact: 216 is 6 x 6 x 6....~!
>>
>>3757572
>link up with santiago and see if she can assist us with getting dinsdale on board
>>
>>3757601

Being as the Condor 216 was initially built as an Air Force One candidate, it features sufficient EMP hardening that it's safe to use cell phones on it. You aren't technically allowed in the forward section of the plane, but it's a simple matter to text Colonel Santiago and let her know you're aboard.

If she had put on any fat a few months ago, she's since shed it, and is now back to her taut shape. You do notice that her hair roots are a little greyer than they used to be, though.

The catching up doesn't take long; you swap numbers of dead and missing from the quake, and that says all that's needed to say. Interestingly, she knows of Patrick Zevo by reputation. "He'd have been the gringo Simo Häyhä if he could shoot worth a damn. As it is, he's the best spotter a sniper can ask for. Damn near invisible if he wants to be. I think his brother and sister went nuts after the disappearance or something like that."

She's pretty happy with the Bochica system so far; she wouldn't dream of turning over an economy to it, of course, but it fits well with the sort of culture she wants to foster. "No factory-manager fat cat skimming off the top does a great job keeping my socialist contingent in line, people remember Salvador Allende. Me, I'm glad it has an off switch, but I haven't had to push it yet." She admits that automation is overall a good idea; a lot of South American cities still use carbon monoxide for kitchen gas, and your automatic valves saved a lot of lives. She shows you pictures of the new schools; she's taken advantage of the Rapture gap by reforming secondary education, instituting Academies that are essentially combination high school, US-style community college, and boot camps.

Overall, she seems to have largely shed Carpatescu's mind control -- your brief experience with Dimmsdale and Zakharov shows that it's been slowly turning them into parodies of themselves -- although you didn't expect to see her out of uniform.

"Hey, when in Rome, drive too fast and ignore traffic signals. Carpatescu prefers an understated style, and I'm happy to play along."

You give her a couple of sets of earpieces, and load into her phone the program that activates their noise-canceling option upon Carpatescu's pre-hypnotic catchphrase. She thanks you; the Nomenklators you left her with rely on nickel-metal hydride batteries that don't keep a charge very well after constant use. Your people have been working on high current lithium cells, but they're still a bit too prone to catching fire. She tries them on. "Huh. Sounds clearer, I like it."

# Ask to link the old set to your phone until they crap out so that you can eavesdrop the front of the plane for a bit. Understandably, she won't agree to doing that to the new ones.

# Ask her to talk to Dimmsdale on your behalf.

She tells you that Rebohoth is on board, and suggests that you not confront him yet, unless you've got some way to give him a heart attack. Unfortunately, you don't.
>>
#Ask to link the old set to your phone until they crap out....

Do we know of her relationship to Dimsdale? They're both Subpotentates but that doesn't mean they're on good terms. I think Dimsdale can be gradually worked over if we play to his greed and business acumen.

What about Zharapov though? We seem to have a working relationship. Plus he seems eager to bring SCIENCE.

Also.... Rebohoth! Yeah, lets not trigger him :P
>>
>>3757706
# Ask her to talk to Dimmsdale on your behalf.

We really need to start getting more SubPotenates on side to neutralise Carpatescu (not kill, I just mean eliminate his actual control and shit).
>>
>>3757739
I totally agree! But we should also understand alliances too. Santiago is a military woman while Dimsdale is a capitalist.

I'm thinking if we invest some factories in America (Drone perhaps?) and bring is region some money, he'll be more eager to listen to the wild-eyed IT man than if we try to bring him to the alliance off the bat.

What's in it for him if he joins us? Carpathia's program is making him rich. Why toss out the goose that is laying golden eggs?

A thought though: We could also use our insider knowledge of upcoming disasters to help Dimsdale avoid disaster. Like, say, have him suspend shipping when the Second Trumpet strikes....
>>
>>3757784
To be honest, I'm more so interested in grabbing Zakharov and a few of the other more interesting sorts. Then we replace our dear african enemy and we've got a decent force to counter any threats.

Getting Dimsdale would be nice however so I imagine we could probably swing it. After all if we can convince him that what he is doing is harming america / isn't business-like and all that then he'd probably agree to help us.

Plus hopefully after this meeting we odd to have more evidence of Carpatescu's mind control to convince others to help or join us.
>>
>>3757601
>>3757693

You get a few minutes to talk with Pontifex Peter Mathews; he seems enthusiastic of the idea of digitizing the Vatican Archives. He's a lot less enthusiastic about bringing in anyone outside his organization to do it, however.

He asks you if there's any way to censor Tsion Ben-Judah's message; you point out that the internet has been specifically built to be uninterruptable, bringing up the fact that it largely kept running during the recent crisis.

"But surely you have the authority to flip the off switch?"

"There is no off switch, Pontifex. If there was, the enemies of the Global Community could force my hand and make me flip it. This way...."

"I see. Ingenious. But there must be something you can do."

# Haggle; this man is both the Pope and the nominal peer of Carpatescu in the religious sphere, he's got to have resources to spare.

# You have a specific mandate, and reason to think that if you disattend it he'll rat you out.

>>3757731
>>3757739

Santiago thinks most other subpotentates are idealistic fools - to be fair, they all think that of each other to some degree; in addition, her people aren't very fond of Nortenos. She will work with Dimmsdale, and has, but always behind a tall fence of healthy mistrust.

You do work well with Zakharov; lately, he's taken to privileging the trappings of science over its substance, sadly. Given what you saw happen to Santiago briefly, you suspect that this is due to excessive exposure to hypnosis. (Shit his thing should be at 4 stars not 3, sorry).

The South American subpotentate smiles, says that she wouldn't dream of setting up an eavesdropping device on this plane, and five minutes later she's hid the old earsets in some chewed gum and discarded them in the forward conference room's trashcan. You'll be able to listen in, and with any luck the batteries will last the rest of the trip.

# "Do you want me to tell him to come talk to you, or talk to him myself?"

Your eavesdropping doesn't do a whole lot, at least in the beginning: the subpotentates are discussing mostly matters of trade. You are irritated by how they occasionally throw in a declaration of loyalty to Carpatescu intended to one-up the one previous; to you it sounds like North Korean generals talking about Kim Jong Il. Santiago, unsurprisingly, plays along.

The first conference ends, and you get the chance to listen in to a discussion between the pilot's plane and Fortunato.

(TLDR: Fortunato knows that Steele knows where Tsion is, and wants him to know that if he agrees to a debate with Carpatescu, he will be given safe conduct. He also tells him to tell Mrs. Durham to stay out of the public spotlight, regardlss of whether she has the kid or not. Apparently Tsion is prophecied to go back to Israel either way, but you can't find that in your timeline.).

>>3757784

You have a timeline, although it's not perfect: who you share it with is your business, although you may want to prioritize allies.
>>
#Haggle - While we might not be able to censor Tsion's website, as per out mandate, that doesn't mean we can't keep tabs on who is looking at it, m'yes?

If he would be willing to let us work the archive deal, we would be willing to send a list of IP addresses of people who visit the site.

Something tells me he's not the most tech-savvy of Pontifexes. We give him a list of names, enough to keep him happy....

I'm sure we could get some bots to simulate traffic, yes?

Thoughts?
>>
>>3757982

Let's generate fake traffic for Tsion. If he thinks he's reaching a billion people he will (1) brag about it and look like an idiot to anyone tech savvy (2) not put in extra effort to reach more people.

no haggle though, let's not give this guy an excuse to tattle on us to Carpatescu. We have a mandate and we will follow it with 100% loyalty! (We can haggle after this meeting anyway)
>>
He'll only tattle if we get caught. However, as long as we don't reveal our true motive (scour the archives for secrets) he'll just think we're just trying to get a good business deal.

Of course it could also help if we had a handy scapegoat if we're caught. Like if turns out the fake traffic came from Nigeria or South Africa...

The Nigerian Prince Scam, that was around this time period, right?
>>
Although now that I think about it, weren't we originally going to barter with the Carmelengo? We probably should abort.
>>
>>3758044

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE-STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL

I am Dr. Bakare Tunde, the cousin of Nigerian Astronaut, Air Force Major Abacha Tunde. He was the first African in space when he made a secret flight to the Salyut 6 space station in 1979. He was on a later Soviet spaceflight, Soyuz T-16Z to the secret Soviet military space station Salyut 8T in 1989. He was stranded there in 1990 when the Soviet Union was dissolved. His other Soviet crew members returned to earth on the Soyuz T-16Z, but his place was taken up by return cargo. There have been occasional Progrez supply flights to keep him going since that time. He is in good humor, but wants to come home.

In the 14-years since he has been on the station, he has accumulated flight pay and interest amounting to almost $15,000,00 Nicks. This is held in a trust at the Lagos National Savings and Trust Association. If we can obtain access to this money, we can place a down payment with the Russian Space Authorities for a Soyuz return flight to bring him back to Earth. I am told this will cost $3,000,00 Nicks. In order to access the his trust fund we need your assistance.

Consequently, my colleagues and I are willing to transfer the total amount to your account or subsequent disbursement, since we as civil servants are prohibited by the Code of Conduct Bureau (Civil Service Laws) from opening and/ or operating foreign accounts in our names.

Needless to say, the trust reposed on you at this juncture is enormous. In return, we have agreed to offer you 20 percent of the transferred sum, while 10 percent shall be set aside for incidental expenses (internal and external) between the parties in the course of the transaction. You will be mandated to remit the balance 70 percent to other accounts in due course.


>>3758053

(Yes, but it so happens that Mathews is on this plane. So are others, including the head of the GSA, the Grand Curator of the Global Community Science Institute, and other agency heads who, as far as you can tell, haven't really done a whole lot to earn their pay).
>>
>>3758070
Fuck yeah im in. :p
>>
(I think I snorted water out of my nose, laughing so hard at that.)
>>
>>3757982
>>3758022

(Haggle or not?)

The Condor makes its way east; Rayford Steele may be a blowhard but he's a competent pilot. Below you, the earth turns. When it's dark, you see that there are almost as many lights as there used to be before the earthquake; you can almost tell yourself that the number hasn't changed.

# Get some rest before the meeting, you may need it.

# Talk to McLachalan.

# Talk to Fortunato.

# address the subpotentates, which will have to be brief since people are going to get some rest.

Santiago has talked to Dimmsdale and reiterated your warning about Carpatescu,

# and risked giving him a set of earphones

# but that's it for now.

An email tells you that Moira is out of surgery and is expected to make a full recovery. (Did you order the brain stimulator to be installed along with the VAD and pacemaker?)
>>
(Lets not haggle with Matthew. Save it for the Carmelengo.)


#Talk to Fortunato I guess?

#But that's it for now. No need to expose our ace in the hole until we're certain he's on our side.
>>
>>3758347

We should talk to the do-nothing NASA guy. We got meteors incoming.
>>
>>3758357

Oooh yes! Scratch Leon. Talk to Space Force!
>>
>>3756444
>the Dr Strange reference is intentional
Can't seem to find it. Must be going over my head, I'm not seeing it.

It's been a while since I've seen the movie though.

>>3756552
>>3756650
We need more helicopters!
>>
>>3757023
>auto-application system
What about something similar to disaster response and what to do with little to limited direction from us.


>Hopefully we'd be able to get our budget raised by another 7-8 Bn
Sounds good.

>>3756939
Can Dr. Robertson manage while Aki does the actual R&D?

>>3757284
Agreed.
We do need to stock pile more supplies. I was hoping it'd drop down a bit, but I guess we mostly forgot to buy.

>>3757241
>>3757435
>Destory all grass
We need seed and DNA vaults to save and preserve this stuff. Lets shoot it into outer space where it will be hopefully relatively safe so we can reseed later.
>>
>>3757572
>>3757706

>>3757572
>Everyone important all on the same plane.
At least were not one a Tu-154 heading for Russia.

>Rebohoth is on board
Lets take a tour of the cockpit.

If only we bought some stims and modified them.....
>>
>>3758311
# Talk to Fortunato.

# Haggle
Throw in an offer like our assistance in finding people or helping organize effective cost saving organizational skills to something of his. Making or building something for him. A Network tower near a place of his choice for good connectivity.
>>
>>3758311
>Talk to Fortunato.
Tell him that we are on his side and that we'll take in Mrs. Durham and keep her save, we may be able to use her or her spawn later (don't tell him that obviously) and we really don't want her dead.
>but that's it for now.
Can't reveal our hand to someone brainwashed
>>
>>3758311
>brain stimulator
Yes
>>
>>3759251
So what, we're going to announce to the Anti Christ's second in command that we've been spying on his private messages with his girlfriend?

Let's not and say we didn't.

,':|
>>
>>3758774

This is the 2nd time that everyone important is on the same plane - it's even the same plane as last time. Unfortunately, it's not possible to bring it down by hacking; due to development delays, it uses much of the same avionics as a Boeing 757, and most of those aren't reprogrammable remotely. A carrier launched cruise missile on the other hand might do the trick.

>>3759255

"So! I'm not going tae need this to live or anything, right?"

"No, absolutely not. Well, unless you've had a stroke and haven't recovered from it, but you're young, you don't smoke, you do drink a little too much but that's a problem for your liver not your heart. If you don't charge it, it goes into standby mode and the battery's good for about a month that way."

Moira is given a brief lecture about drinking in moderation, during which she reads the manual for the device, a Jarvik 2000 LVAD which has been lightly modified to be able to operate intermittently. There are notes in pencil explaining what the thing actually does; in case of a heart attack, it will take over and generate continuous flow past the left ventricle, while the pacemaker tries to reestablish pulsatile flow in the right. If that fails, it holds the right atrial and ventricular valves open. The device has an internal battery lasting about twelve minutes, and can connect to an external battery pack.

"Now this is important. The reason why we pass out from shock in case of severe trauma, is actually to increase our chance of survival in a group - you live longer on limited blood or oxygen if you're unconscious. What the stimulator does, is let you turn it off. The bad thing is that whatever is killing you - carbon monoxide poisoning, trauma, blood loss - will kill you faster. The good thing is that if you can still move, you may be able to get yourself to safety. We're hoping that this will allow first responders to enter collapsing buildings with more confidence, although the insurance company-"

"So I'm invulnerable for ten minutes, then I die?"

"Not invulnerable. You won't fall dead, is all."

"How do I avoid the dying part once I turn the emergency system on?"

"You get yourself to safety, turn it off, and hope they get you to a modern hospital very quickly."

Moira is going to take the rest of the month off to exercise, recuperate, and remain under observation in case she has an allergic reaction to the immunosuppressants she's going to have to take as long as the system is in place.

You find yourself musing that pairing this system with PCP or other stimulants would give you soldiers that can fight on for a few minutes after being effectively killed. Of course, that's the sort of unethical procedure that one would only consider come the Apocalypse, but...

(Note for LBQ1 peeps: This is not yet a MEC system, in that it doesn't disable the feeling of pain, which is the hard part. and yes, all this stuff exists. The LVAD in particular is exactly the same system that Dick Cheney has.)
>>
>>3758741
>What about something similar to disaster response and what to do with little to limited direction from us.
Fair but I was more so meaning "it's a shame we never managed to get this shit into the field and now reasonably can't without extreme cost given at this point we'd have about 9 teams worth, easy".

>>3759377
>(Note for LBQ1 peeps: This is not yet a MEC system, in that it doesn't disable the feeling of pain, which is the hard part. and yes, all this stuff exists. The LVAD in particular is exactly the same system that Dick Cheney has.)
Oh I know about the Jarvik 2000, I read about it in a British Heart surgeon's book recently. A fairly expensive piece of kit which explains the cost of this operation but it does have amazing potential if the NHS ever gets off their ass about shit like that.
>>
Rolled 28 (1d100)

>>3758662

Helicopters can be bought and are marked under fleet assets, unless you want something special like a Skycrane (which would be more expensive, and tracked separately) or a military helicopter (which would need to be acquired outside of the market economy somehow, since you aren't authorized to buy military equipment).

>>3758357
>>3758376
>>3759251
>>3759365

You hope that Dimmsdale decides to follow your logic - and his appetites - after seeing what you've accomplished in Santiago's territory; she's fairly charismatic, but her leadership shines in emergency situations, not in boardroom meetings.

For the next leg of the trip, you take the time to talk to James McLachalan, the head of GCASA (Global Community Aeronautics and Space Administration), which everyone has been shortening to Global Space Agency. You make a point of using the correct designation, and are treated to a five-minute tirade about the importance of proper acronyms anyway; you shudder to think what would've happened if you'd said GSA instead.

The man is, to put it simply, a martinet. After being nominated, he's spent the whole time decrying that the various space agencies under his control have very different cultures, and has been spending his whole time forcing people into endless meetings so as to establish a unified consistent process for doing things. Obviously, some of this is necessary after any corporate merger, but he's taken the extreme approach of doing little else: this has come at the expense of actually getting things done, to the point that completed test articles have been sitting idle in hangars, wind tunnels have been impeccably maintained but only spun up for scheduled turbine tests, and rockets have been left under tarps to wait a launch date that never comes. GCASA has so far only managed to launch a few weather satellites that were scheduled to go up anyway, and most other operations have ground down to a halt.

At least, this is what you know; to hear McLachalan talk, he's been undertaking the heroic task of getting scientists and aerospace engineers from different space programs to play nice with each other, consolidating redundant programs, and trimming the fat.

You do have to give credit to the guy for moving everyone, including NASA contractors, on the metric system. The main reason why he's been unable to launch any manned system in the last two years - it's been hard enough to keep the Mir space station in orbit, since its low orbit means that it occasionally gets some atmospheric drag and thus requires boost burns, which as far as you know means that its attitude control propellant tanks are slowly but surely emptying out - is that he is unable to get sufficient buy-in to standardize on Soyuz/Shenzhou or Space Shuttle. He hasn't considered simply using whatever happens to be available.

This has caused a significant brain drain, most of which went towards Silicon Valley, Bangalore and Shenzen, and a little bit of which went your way.
>>
>>3759401

You figure that this guy is self-important enough that he'll give you a lot of useful data if you let him talk, and he does. When you try to discuss scientific endeavors, he recommends you talk to Floyd Ferris of the Global Community Science Institute.

"I don't believe he ever was a first-rate scientist—but what a priceless valet of science! I know that he has been facing a grave problem lately. He's kept me out of it, he spares me all that, but I do hear rumors. People have been criticizing the Institute, because, they say, they have not produced enough. The public has been demanding economy. In times like these, when their fat little comforts are threatened, you may be sure that science is the first thing men will sacrifice."

Well, in fairness you can't really disagree with that. You ask him what he plans to do long-term; he indicates that he would like to build a larger space station, merging the designs from Roskosmos' MIR2 and NASA's Freedom, and deorbit Mir. "Frankly I would do that tomorrow, it's a liability and you have to learn Russian to do anything with it, but a segment of the public won't stand for us not having a permanent presence in space!"

His long term plans, into the 2010s, include sending more rovers to Mars, and a return to the Moon by building a lunar orbital platform gateway (LOP-G) and staging missions from there.

"I've got to be honest with you, Foreman: at the coming summit, I am going to recommend that the Potentate transfer your orbital operations to my administration. You have done an admirable job, but your startup mentality is deleterious at this point; we have the orbital assets, they simply need to be managed judiciously, and your mandate is already vast enough. Besides, the public insists on what would be called results."

# Actually, making satellite operation his problem (while retaining your current launch capabilities) isn't a bad deal, it would let you focus on other things.

# Tell him that he's welcome to take the credit for your work with the general public if he likes, but nobody's touching your budget or your mandate.

# Bully the guy a little - Carpatescu if anything is more likely to put YOU under HIM, given said results, so he better play nice.

# Point out that you're perfectly happy to share technology; surely microsatellites have uses other than communications.

# Take over your space division, eh? "You and what space force?"
>>
>>3759423
>point out that if we are talking results that the people can see that it will weigh heavily in our favor.
>we are perfectly happy to share the micro satellites technology but it is probably best if we separate the communications infrastructure part of space and the exploration/reasearch. Although sharing technology would be beneficial to us both.
>>
Rolled 7 (1d100)

>>3759423

While McLahalan bloviates, your Nomenklator reads you a text that you just got from Santiago. "Dimmsdale unconvinced. Cybernetic factory mgmt anti-capitalist. But will tour Synco after summit. Rangers vs Spartans vale tudo shud be gud!"

Well, it was worth a try, and he may change his tune when he sees what you and Santiago have done with the place - at this point it's a fair bet that Chile has a higher standard of living that some of the depressed areas in North America.

Your brief conversation with Mathews left things open; you may be able to speak more freely after getting marching orders from Carpatescu.

You are informed, by a very poorly written text, that thanks to the stimulator, Moira has experienced going from being ordinarily-blackout-drunk to having a hangover without losing consciousness. You can't really understand much of it, but it's apparently the worst thing in the world and she hates everything. Also send nudes. You figure she'll actually memorize how to turn the stimulator on and off, after this.

Thanks to your efforts in making the internet available everywhere, including on transcontinental airliners, you've officially gotten drunk-texted on the way to an international summit. Will the wonders never cease?
>>
>>3759444

McLachalan is unconvinced about the ability to use microsatellites for scientific experiments, although he concedes that they could be decent engineering platforms for testing systems such as ion drives or magnetorquers. You point out that magnetorquers are past testing; your microsats use them to keep their antennas aligned towards Earth.

"I will, uhm, postpone my recommendation, I think. I can count on you to send me the schematics for your standard microsat design, so that we may build upon it?"

# Sure, good enough. Maybe we can be friends, eventually.

# Are you still trying to play hardball? Give ME a reason to not recommend that your agency be brought under mine's authority!

# This is all irrelevant. We should both try to convince Carpatescu of the need for an orbital defense system, not argue with each other. Isn't inter-agency bickering the bane of your existence?
>>
>>3759468
>This is all irrelevant. We should both try to convince Carpatescu of the need for an orbital defense system,

If he disagrees/doesn't see the necessity of an orbital asteroid defense system we switch to
>Sure, good enough
He honestly is just pretty inconsequential to us.

>>3759365
Shit mixed him up with the christian pilot for some reason, yeah hard no to that.
>>
>>3759475
>He honestly is just pretty inconsequential to us.
Agreed, so long as he leaves us be then we've got little issue. At best absorbing his organisation would provide an increase in funding, and the number of work teams we can sustain before a audit, for our current plans.
>>
>>3758741

If you just want to shoot up seeds, it can be done with the large satellite launch scheduled at the end of the month; the seed packets don't need much in the way of maintenance, after all, and should last for years on the oxygen present in the capsule. You can even make it a contest for schools if you like - the overhead is minimal; unlike with microsatellites, the large build has some mass budget to spare, so even 20kg of seeds won't interfere with the launch.

If you want to preserve DNA, it'll need some more work.

>>3759475
>>3759493

Appeasing this guy's ego wasn't exactly difficult; you figure that, if it's even still relevant, you will absorb his agency as a matter of course since Carpatescu has been shown to care a lot more about media access than science or space exploration.

"Funny you mention that, Foreman. We have been asked to dust off some SDI designs from the 1980s specifically for that reason. I have here ready a Powerpoint presentation, it's for Carpatescu, clearly, but you just might talk me into letting you peek..."

You test the Nomenklator's active noise canceling function as this blowhard goes over his stupid plan to directly intercept killer asteroids using nukes at the last minuts, never mind that nukes won't fire. You object that something like this would be inefficient compared to an early-interception solution such as gravity tugging; he answers that he has to mind all the angles, including public perception. "The people of the Global Community want to feel safe, not only be safe. Surely you see that this" and he points to his proposal, a giant nuclear-tipped missile built from an Energia stack "is, well, considerably less wimpy than your complicated plan."

Ultimately, Carpatescu will have to decide.

# Work on a counterproposal that doesn't look like a Bruce Willis movie.

# Get some sleep so you can make said counterproposal on the fly, and generally look more professional than those who pulled an all nighter.

You're two thirds of the way to the summit when you finally get an official agenda: the meeting will occur in the bunker while New Babylon is rebuilt, and Carpatescu will be available for two separate meetings, one with the agency heads, and one with the subpotentates. There may be a plenary assembly "as time permits". Fortunately, you have a mole. Unfortunately, your Nomenklator will be able to noise-cancel and record, but not give you a link to the outside, since the bunker is unlikely to get cell phone reception.

# Instead of the two things above, try to talk to one of the other subpotentates.
>>
>>3759497
>Get some sleep
Unless some other anon wants to get something done
>>
>>3759497
# Get some sleep so you can make said counterproposal on the fly, and generally look more professional than those who pulled an all nighter.

We'll just bring up our paper explaining physics has changed, point out that we don't know what such a nuclear detonation might cause and that even under the best of circumstances relying on a nuke is risky. Maybe even imply we've still got some level of research going into it that implies current nuclear designs, reactors, rtgs and nukes, might not be working.

Generally just make it look like we've been trying to understand the world around us where as the leader of the space program hasn't been keeping up to date on this sort of shit and that we're more competent / prepared for everything.
>>
>>3759527
>>3759509

You reckon that the wise thing to do at this point is get some sleep. Carpatescu may only need two to four hours a day, and you're curious to see what Moira's implant will let her do once she's used to it, but you are a regular human being.

You wake up about an hour before the landing. You're flying over Israel; the drought predicted by the two witnesses is still in place, but between the Eden fertilizer and the desalination plants in Haifa and Hadera, you wouldn't be able to tell - you could be flying over Northern California in winter.

A nice thing about the Condor 216 is that even the back half of the plane has showers; it's basically a coffin with a sprinkler, but you're reasonably used to it after having checked out a similar system on the Garibaldi.

By the look of it, the majority of your fellow passengers stayed up late; you're one of the few who looks decent. The meetings are scheduled in the morning, so you don't regret missing out on some gossip or maybe a deal, since nearly everyone else is basically in zombie mode as they are shuffled off the airplane, through the airport, and onto the Land Cruisers that are doing shuttle service between Baghdad airport and New Babylon since the monorail track has fallen at several points. The airport itself is a beehive of activity; the earthquake damage was significant, but there are construction crews everywhere, and it's reasonable to assume things will be back to normal after a few days.

On the way, you receive an email indicating that the meeting with the agency heads will happen before that with the subpotentates, rather than the other way around.

The bunker is a little outside New Babylon proper, but you're close enough to see a forest of construction cranes healing the stricken city. Interestingly, none are on top the broken bulk of the Burj Carpathia; even with the upper third gone, and slightly bent due to the active anti-seismic measures having seized halfway, the immense skyscraper is still the tallest building in the world. It looks like a menacing, black claw sticking out of the earth now.

You were expecting an underground warehouse; what you find is a military base built twenty meters under the earth, fully encased in a steel frame that made it survive the quake by the simple expedient of floating above the shifting sands. By the look of it, the whole thing sank a little lower than where it was when it was constructed; a few ramps are mismatched and some of the surface doors are just a little below sand level, necessitating Peacekeeper privates in black-and-red uniforms to sweep the footpaths clean in the breeze.

The inside is steel, concrete, and tube fluorescent lights, with colored lines on the pavement to indicate various routes and not a single thought spared towards aesthetics. It reminds you of a 1970s sci fi film, except without people wearing tin foil.
>>
>>3759567


You disembark from the jeeps - the Peacekeeper troops have to rudely wake up a few of your fellow agency heads, who fell asleep during the trip - and are ushered into a conference room.

Unlike the corridors of the underground base, it's nicely carpeted, there is a small podium in one corner, and there are power and data plugs in the walls -- however, it's devoid of furniture. Overhead projectors show vistas from various cameras around the world - a few are copied over, which suggests that the camera intended to give that view is still down - to compensate for the lack of windows; the intent is not to give the illusion of being above ground, but it does help to push back any claustrophobia you might have.

A GC bureaucrat gets behind the podium and thanks all of you for coming. "We figured we would spare you the pomp and circumstance; this is a working meeting, after all."

One of the projectors changes views, and shows a formal reception that the subpotentates are getting outside the airport; they'll get here in about an hour. There's a red carpet and everything.

Once the stairs were in place, the band was finished, and the dignitaries were situated, the Global Community ambassador stepped to the microphone. “Ladies and gentlemen, ”'he announced with great solemnity, “representing His Excellency, Global Community Potentate Nicolae Carpathia, Supreme Commander Leonardo Fortunato!”

The crowd broke into cheering and applause as Leon waved and made his way down the steps.

“Ladies and gentlemen, the personal attendants from the office of the Supreme Pontiff!”

The reaction was subdued as the crowd seemed to wonder if these two young people had names, and if so, why they were not mentioned.

“Ladies and gentlemen, from Ecumenical Council, Pontifex Maximus Peter the Second!”

The band struck up, the crowd erupted, and Mathews stepped to the doorway, waiting for several beats and looking humbled at the generous response. He solemnly descended, waving a blessing as he went.

And so on. You cringe a little at some of the self-styled titles, but "Academician" Zakharov or "Chairman" Yang or "Commissioner" Lal aren't bad. Santiago is announced without a title.

Looks like Fortunato and Mathews will be attending the second meeting; with you are the heads of various global agencies such as GCASA, the Global Community Science Institute, and the executives of former United Nations System subsidiary agencies that kept operating throughout Carpathia's concentration of power with little more than a name change. In some cases, such as UNICEF, the "brand" was recognizable enough that the old United Nations name was kept.

None of you know what the agenda is, or who's setting it, so you assume that Carpatescu will be here shortly to conduct the meeting; you take a moment to examine the carpeting and find that ordinarily this room would have a table and chairs, but they have been removed recently enough that the imprint is still visible.
>>
>>3759588

Tick, tock, tick, tock. One of the projector shifts to an analog clock, and you can't shake the notion that the ticking -- which is of course done through speakers - and the clock-hand animation is slightly off. You take out your phone, which as you expected gets no signal, and read the subject lines of the emails that came in while you were sleeping; Moira is recovering, Aki has mounted cell phones on the old Zevo toy tank prototypes and seems to have dragged half of your IT specialists into a proxy nerf war, your covert teams report that they have reached the zone of operations and are escorting the medics to their jobs.

Tick, tock, tick...., tock.

A glance on the phone's clock app confirms that yes, the projector clock's seconds hand is off - it keeps time correctly on average, but each second will be slightly too fast or too slow, with no discernible pattern. The overall effect is quite unnerving.

https://youtu.be/KHKOhO_-hZY

Nothing happens for a long, awkward minute, except for the bureaucrat telling you that there is no cell phone signal here, and then excusing himself and leaving the room. People are sort of shuffling in place.

# Wait for Carpatescu, it'd be polite.

# We're not here to fuck spiders, Carpatescu's time is immensely valuable so let's get things started ourselves. There was a big quake; two million people died, many in the world's poorest regions. If it happened once, it can happen again. What can we all do to mitigate the impact of the next one?
>>
>>3759610
# We're not here to fuck spiders, Carpatescu's time is immensely valuable so let's get things started ourselves. There was a big quake; two million people died, many in the world's poorest regions. If it happened once, it can happen again. What can we all do to mitigate the impact of the next one?

If anyone has a complaint that we're not waiting for Carptescu, just point out that it would be nice to understand where we all stand relative to one another when he gets here so we can get as much discussion done as possible and avoid wasting his time.
>>
>>3759615

You get behind the podium and knock on it to get people's attention. "Potentate Carpatescu is likely handling some urgency in the city. Let's not waste his and our time, and get things started. We're all here because of the global earthquake; such a worldwide emergency requires worldwide solutions, and if this has happened once, it can happen again. We all know who we all are so let's not waste time with introductions. Dr. Ferris, of the Global Community Science Institute - do your people have any sort of indication what might have happened?"

"We will be pleased to assure the public that such an event is the result of an explainable natural phenomenon and should not be cause for alarm. Top scientific researchers have concluded that there is likely no connection between the earthquake and the eclipse."

That's not what you asked. "That's great, but do we have any idea of what's actually going on?"

"Thank you, Foreman."

Carpatescu opened the door and got behind you without you noticing. He looks at you; his face is gaunt, his gaze icy. He motions for you to move aside, and you do. The other agency heads form a semicircle with the podium in the middle, with you a little to the side.

"You, wait outside." It's an order, although not a hypnotic one.

# Do so.

# Point out that you were simply trying to save time.

# Do so, but eavesdrop.

His tone changes into effusive expansivity; he smiles - it looks sincere - and begins to address the other agency heads. "Ladies and gentlemen! I welcome the fingers of my right hand to this exalted assembly..."
>>
>>3759615
Why would we do that we know how carpastsu is about this. Just why comon dude. We already pissed him off earlier.
>>3759641
>do so but evesdrop. Lets please not make any reference to what we heard like last time and just have him fire us. This is getting embarrassing.
>>
>>3759610
Mabey wait for more then one vote. I onow its slow sometimes but like ive made a lot of mistakes a second vote would have fixed too. Its better for us to work together.
>>
>>3759681
>>3759686

(Good point on two votes. Anyway, you cannot be fired unless your favor with Carpatescu drops below two; you will get some warning. He's smart enough to not just get THAT mad from talking, although failing an audit or actively caught in a conspiracy is another story)

The soundproofing in this conference room is excellent; you wouldn't be able to eavesdrop if you didn't have the Nomenklator earsets, and even then, you have to hold one of the spares to the door hinge. You stand at parade rest to cover that, and hope nobody asks you what's going on.

"Ladies and gentlemen! I welcome the fingers of my right hand to this exalted assembly. Now, for the love of Mankind, can someone tell me WHY the only person doing ANYTHING but standing around like an IDIOT, was the cable guy?"

"Potentate, I..."

"Yes, PLEASE, go ahead, McLachlan."

"... We have been working on the orbital defense system you asked us to outline, and I have a presentation-"

There's a soft sound; it sounds like Carpatescu grabbed the printout. "It's too small! I want it to tower over what's left of my tower! I want it to tower over the rocket that took Americans to the Moon! I want it to BLOW UP A MOUNTAIN if that's what's coming for us! Got it?"

"Yessir."

"Now, YOU! I see here a fifty thousand children dead. Fifty thousand of our precious children! Explain that!"

"Sir, UNICEF's portfolio is nutrition and education, disaster preparedness is-"

"ENOUGH EXCUSES! Ahem. One moment. Gentlemen, please accept my apologies. I know the pain we share. I've made myself feel every death... see every innocent face. You understand, don't you? Good. Now I am going to tell you what you are going to do...."

That's the trigger phrase; the Nomenklator turns on noise canceling. Twenty seconds later, the door opens. You see the director of UNICEF walk out, as if in a trance, and move down the corridor in small steps, looking straight down. You peek into the conference room; the other agency heads are standing in a circle, looking down at a point on the floor; there's nothing there.

Carpatescu calls you back in; he ignores the other agency heads. "Foreman. I pride myself in choosing the best man for the job, but it would appear that keeping holdouts from the previous administration was a mistake. I am hoping that the relevant personnel will take a little bit of time to examine their consciences and come to the right conclusion. As to you, I was intending to commend you for your rapid response, but it seems that I have to also commend you for taking the initiative. I encourage this, but must tell you that it is essential that Humanity see a united front presented against the dangers that may come to it; on formal occasions, please follow protocol. For now, I'm asking you to keep it brief - we have further deliberations to make. You have a minute."

He claps twice. Everyone else turns towards you. They have a blank look on their faces.

"Listen to this man as you would me."
>>
Carpatescu may be an asshole, but he's not a melodramatic villain - yet.

# (Write-ins very welcome, but they should stay focused)

# https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Office_for_Disaster_Risk_Reduction Time to establish a global civil protection agency.

# We need a multi-pronged approach to asteroid defense. Of course we'll build a giant missile, but let's also...

# The earthquake showed us how vulnerable we are. We must secure water and power in case of an extended emergency rather than a momentary one.

# We need to build seedling arks and DNA banks, just in case.

# GCASA guy? I represent CATS. All your base are belong to us.

# Not gonna get another chance.... HE'S THE ANTICHRIST, BUM RUSH HIM!
>>
>>3759738
>>3759764
>>3759615
Oh fuck i was not exepcting this
Nevermind anon you did good im just an idiot about social situations as normal.

Fuck what do we want to say we need to plan somthing good.
>>
>>3759764
>We need a multi-pronged approach to asteroid defense
I'll vote for a better write-in
>>
>>3759764
>>3759800

Idea anons. What if we push to form the glabal covil protection agency, give ryan what he wants and reccomend him for our position and reccoemnd ourselves for the global civil protection agency. We can run both woth ryan being our headsman for the other organization and it will give us more power for seed banks asteroid defense earthquake etc.

Just need a write in that says all of that in a minute
>>
>>3759764

# Not gonna get another chance.... HE'S THE ANTICHRIST, BUM RUSH HIM!

YOLO

No, but seriously.

# "We need to understand that if this sort of global disaster happened once, it can happen again. My agency was prepared, yours were not It happened and what's done it's done. I hope that if there is ever another meeting like this, you will be schooling me rather than me schooling you."

Basically tell everyone to contribute to preparedness.

>>3759803

I like this, but I say we put Ryan on that agency and we keep running CATS. He's going to bleed everyone dry money wise but who cares, he gets shit done and keeps his promises. Plus he won't know we already made the deal, so we can haggle with him about it once the meeting is over and get good terms for the future (like charging friendly subpotentates less).
>>
>>3759764
> Brothers and Sisters of the global community, a disaster of unprecedented scale just shook our world. It is clear our current precautions are not enough to ward of the malice of mother nature. We need a deticated organization for disaster risk reduction and research. It is imperitive we find why and how this is happening and how we can prevent or prepare for it. We must protect our world and this global community and prepare for any further disaster so it affects our people as little as possible.

Im not a speach writer but I think thats a good gist of it if someone can make it better please do.
>>
>>3759817
Thats true we could put ryan on that. We should reccomend him to carpastsu here and talk to him separately and try ro work together as best as possible. I trust Ryan to do his job well and we should reward him for his great work.
>>
>>3759819
Supporting,
"UNICEF, GCASA we have been doing your job and you have done nothing, this ends now, your resources will become part of the joined effort and used for something other than jerking of your egos."
>>
>>3759831

Carpatescu just told the GCASA guy "build a giant rocket" though. It means we'd have to build a giant rocket. But we get to keep the rest of the agency. I'm torn.

>>3759825

Basically tell Ryan "Hey we are trying to get you your own global agency, we almost got it in the bag, we will close the deal if you promise to give us good terms once you get it". And only then tell him that the deal is done.
>>
>>3759847
How about we tell carpastsu we build it for show but its a terrible way to do it and there are far better quiter ways to fix it.
>>
>>3759764
# (Write-ins very welcome, but they should stay focused)

"Let's start with disaster prep. My people have saved lives by developing tech and releasing patents to the public to encourage adoption but our ability to do much of anything is limited by a lack of mandate and budget.

Solution? A global agency responsible for: developing improved disaster resilience; stockpiling critical resources; encouraging global adoption and hardening infrastructure. I propose my organisation's expert in disaster prep and related methods be considered as a candidate to lead as she is responsible for many lives saved in this and other disasters.

Also, we should look into establishing bio-diversity assurances: stores of viable seeds of rare species and genetic samples for cloning if worst comes to worst; last thing we need is to survive a disaster only to have entire swathes of the globe experience species die-off.

Also GCASA's plan won't work; my people did research into this already; our best method is orbital detection and re-direction. I imagine you'll want to see the numbers on that however."


I trust our disaster prep woman more than Ryan. Plus she's a genuine expert in the field so it makes sense to put her in charge.
>>
>>3759851

we build a big firework with no guidance or warhead, and use the money to build the real one and launch it 35 minutes ago. same as what we did with the datalinks satellite.
>>
>>3759854
Switching to this
>>
>>3759854

Switching to putting Carla in charge of disaster prep rather than Ryan. She'll do it well. Plus she's kinda played Alfred to our Batman the whole time, so let's put the designated only sane person in a position where she can do good things without our attention.
>>
I kinda wanted to work in a more direct dig against the GCASA in hopes of taking over them but I couldn't work out how or even if I'd actually want to.
>>
>>3759449
Did she actually send us nudes?
>>
>>3759854
>>3759864
>>3759851
>>3759819

"Brothers and Sisters; a disaster of unprecedented scale just shook our world. When there is one, there may be more. We must all give our best; today, I give the Potentate my best disaster preparedness expert, Carla Colombo, who is responsible for our quick response in the face of this crisis. I propose the formation of a global disaster preparedness agency, which she will head, and to which we will all contribute manpower and expertise.

I also propose that CATS and GCASA formally sign a collaboration agreement in the detection and neutralization of otherworldly threats to humanity. We will be the junior partner and handle operations, while GCASA as the senior partner handles management and strategy."

(Is this a good mix of what yall wrote?)

# Ask for a vote.

# Ask for Carpatescu's approval.


# Ask for a vote.

#
>>
>>3759896
What will that junior and senior parner info mean in game terms?
>>
Rolled 63 (1d100)

>>3759888

She asked for some. She did send a picture (that you guess someone else took), but it's less "sexy nude" and more "The patient is recovering well from the operation and there is minimal scarring, also some underboob"
>>
>>3759903

It means "we call the shots and you talk to the press and the politicians", mostly.

Your call if you want to

# let the head of GCASA save face by agreeing to a polite fiction that he's still in charge

# bringing him to heel by making it clear that he is subordinate; just swap "junior" and "senior" in that sentence in that case.
>>
>>3759896
>(Is this a good mix of what yall wrote?)
I mean mine can basically be broken down into 4 points:

1) CATS has done lots of good shit while everyone else is useless, give us more money pls.

2) Carla gets her own agency to actually do shit to avoid these disasters killing people and stuff. May or may not also be a way for us to get more teams, covert and work, that aren't part of our original agency so as to avoid an audit.

3) Get bio-diversity stuff set up.

4) GCASA plan is fucked, my people can prove it, follow us to get a better plan or just give us the god damn responsibility over space and their budget.


As for actually voting, I'm undecided as hell.
>>
>>3759904
Send her a photoshoped nude of Carpatescu.

>let the head od GCASA save face. We do better working slightly hidden.

>>3759896
I approve then. Look for Carpatescu's approval and ask for a vote as hes clearly controlling their vote right now.
>>
>>3759908
>let the head of GCASA save face by agreeing to a polite fiction that he's still in charge
We are out of the public eye anyway, he can do whatever the fuck he wants as long as we are in charge
>Ask for Carpatescu's approval.
He is the only one that matters, we know it, he knows it, there is no reason to pretend otherwise
>>
>>3759920
>>3759896
Perhaps we can do the vote by giving the mic to Carpatescu after we finish.
>>
>>3759920
>>3759923
Yeah that'd work too, we get control of the GCASA as an "advisor" or something but the guy gets to remain in charge nominally.
>>
>>3759686
I've done this too.

>>3759738
>cable guy
SAVAGE!

>>3759764
># Not gonna get another chance.... HE'S THE ANTICHRIST, BUM RUSH HIM!
Someone back at base should make a joke about this.

Darn a write in would take me almost an hour.

>>3759819
This would make a good intro.

>>3759904
>underboob
The best kind. Better than sideboob which is a close runner up.

>>3759896
>>3759854
I'm worried we may lose Carla from our team.

>>3759896
So long as they are "Senior Partners" in name only, I'm game.

>>3759908
Perfect.

# let the head of GCASA save face by agreeing to a polite fiction that he's still in charge
We bring him to heel in private.

Not time to play nice when the end of the world is at stake. He can hate us and suck sour grapes for all I care.
>>
>>3760003
>I'm worried we may lose Carla from our team.
Well yeah but if we can get her to set up her headquarters in North america or south america then she's still fairly close to us, hell she could set up in Boston or Washington and we'd be within a few hours of each other.

The benefit of this is we get a second organisation's resources to help our plans and that we can offload some of our research and deployment to another group.
>>
>>3759896
# Ask for Carpatescu's approval.
Doing otherwise may complicate our plans. We shouldn't let these things stand in our way of a well deserved power grab.
>>
>>3760012
Hmm. I suppose she can even take directives from us, and help by handling and sharing information with us on theological or supernatural research.

God knows that near the bottom of our list of research.
>>
>>3759915

(I think people want to go with yours so how about this)

"Brothers and Sisters; a disaster of unprecedented scale just shook our world. When there is one, there may be more. We must all give our best; I give the Potentate my best disaster preparedness expert, Carla Colombo, who has been key to our success. I propose the formation of a global disaster preparedness agency, which she will head, and to which we will all contribute manpower and expertise. It will coordinate responses to global disasters and set up a biodiversity vault so that the world may recover from anything.

I also propose that CATS and GCASA formally sign a collaboration agreement in the detection and neutralization of otherworldly threats to humanity. We will be the junior partner and handle operations, while GCASA as the senior partner handles management and strategy."

(56 seconds fwiw)

>>3759923
>>3759920
>>3759935
>>3760003

McLachalan is staring at you blankly, but you get a bit of satisfaction in letting him save face when people in his agency read the meeting minutes - while he knows perfectly well that he better do as you say or else.

A sycophant may say that you've gone from controlling one global agency, to three, in the space of a minute; you know better -- this took years of preparation and consistently competent effort.

>>3759924
>>3759920
>>3759923
>>3760019

You briefly bow your head to Carpatescu. "Thank you for the time, Potentate."

He does a perfect Spock impression at you, raising an eyebrow for a fraction of a second; he's clearly impressed. He clears his throat, loudly, and says "Let's proceed, ladies and gentlemen." The people in front of you snap out of their trance. "I am a servant of the people, not an absolute ruler; I will, of course, have to discuss the matter with the regional administrators. However, I believe that they will be more easily convinced if they hear the opinion of this deliberative body. Does this matter require... a vote?"

Apparently not; the other agency head agree with your proposal by acclamation.

"Excellent. I commend all of you for the work you have done. Our direction is set; we must keep cooperating with each other, for the future of humanity."

Your fellow attendees murmur in agreement.

"We are of one mind about this. The way forward is clear."

Nicolae gets back behind the podium. "Thank you for your time. I will send all of you a revised agency budget within the day. I must prepare for my other meeting; you are dismissed. If you had a meeting scheduled with New Babylon regional authorities, you may now attend to it. Foreman, you will be so kind as send me Carla Colombo's personnel file."

Carpatescu has reset the panic-inducing clock on the projector; you guess he wants to play a similar trick on the subpotentates.

# Warn a subpotentate.

# Look around the base.

# Eavesdrop on the subpotentates' meeting.

# Go look for the (presumably ex) director of UNICEF.

# Take a drive around New Babylon.

# GTFO!
>>
>"Does this matter require... a vote?"
>"Excellent. I commend all of you for the work you have done. Our direction is set; we must keep cooperating with each other, for the future of humanity."
>"We are of one mind about this. The way forward is clear."


not sure if XCOM bad end quote, thing that totally not satan TOL guy said in the old quest, or both
>>
>>3760036
Well we dont need to evesdrop Santiago will guve us a tdlr, if we have time share the meeting recording with Santiago then talk to McLachalan on how we are handling it.
>>
>>3760026
>Hmm. I suppose she can even take directives from us, and help by handling and sharing information with us on theological or supernatural research.
I meant more so she can take over defence and preparedness research. Perhaps even some degree of the logistics and cell-sol research too just in terms of making it more resilient / adapting it to react to disasters.

>God knows that near the bottom of our list of research.
It's still doing far better than directed energy.

>>3760036
>A sycophant may say that you've gone from controlling one global agency, to three, in the space of a minute; you know better -- this took years of preparation and consistently competent effort.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-B1sink-nY

# Eavesdrop on the subpotentates' meeting.

I'm assuming the same way we listened in on the agency head meeting when we were outside? If so we should probably formulate an excuse like waiting to talk to Carpatescu / one or more of the SubPotenate's on some matter of importance.
>>
>>3760065
Actually yeah this is a good point, we should probably grab the various agency directors, see if any want to go grab a drink and get some interdepartmental shit set aside and plan like fuck.
>>
>>3760036
# Look around the base.
I really want one of these back home in my back yard.
# Take a drive around New Babylon.
Hey look is that the UNICEF guy we saw earlier. What are the chances.
# Go look for the (presumably ex) director of UNICEF.
Want a job?

What if we told our boss about the new biotech heart we are developing? If we show him it, we can possible have him hand it over to others to develop and produce and proliferating for us.

Carpatescu would likely install one in himself and that would limit the avenues of of him dying to others. All without us having to have an awkward conversation about how we need him to put one inside himself because, we read the crazy rantings a of a dead dirty pastor who thinks your gonna die and get possessed by Satan and we want to stop that.

>>3760075
We should be the first ones to tell Carla of her new promotion and job over dinner.
>>
>>3760084
Thats a great idea getting him one of those hearts may save him fuck.

>yeah once we are out of the bunker give carla a call.
>>
>>3760085
>>3760084

good idea, but let's see if it fucking works first. losing moira = sucks but we'll live, losing arpatecu = game over right now, if he dies because of the implant, the first thing satan does when he resurrects, is incinerate us.
>>
>>3760090
Yeah honestly we need to make sure carpatasu does not die at all cost as of rn he is a decent leader. As long as he isnt possesed by satan he should be ok.
>>
>>3760085
Just make sure we show him some schematics, and a early prototype we have and not hand over Moira because he might want to "keep her" for study and SCIENCE!

Our boss is weird like that.

Part of the idea is that by showing him this he will take over its research and development saving us time and money. So the end product would still be fairly safe or something.
>>
Wow, this meeting went REALLY well t would seem. Nicely done~!

Satan probably won't incinerate us, but rather just replace Carpatescu with another potential host.

We could mention the heart, although I'm doubtful he'll take it.

A thought occurs to me though. If I recall Revelations, one of the key events that confirms the Anti-Christ is his murder of the Two Witnesses at the midpoint.

While they are 'protected' during their preaching, what if we kill them at the midpoint, robbing Carpatescu of his role?
>>
>>3760096
I doubt he would do that, may hand it off to some medical group just hoping he will want one. We can include under our disaster preparedness .

>>3760100
Is that before or after he is killed and resurrected?
>>
>>3760100
That just robs US of confirming if we failed our secret mandate or not I think.
>>
This event varies in different Apocalyptic fiction, but in Left Behind it happens before... I think it is the murder of the two that motivates his assassination.
>>
>>3760100
Let's hold of on the heart, we still have time and it's just conventional tech, he won't take it. Additionally, he will be killed by a head wound so a heart might not be the best way to keep him alive.
We'd probably become the Antichrist, which could work out in our favor?
>>
>>3760111
Indeed, or at least usurp the mantle. Interestingly, we did just gain a lot of power from this meeting.... Just thoughts, although it might be an interesting opportunity to usurp the narrative.
>>
>>3760111
If we become the antichrist what do we even do. Just go no satan thats bad and leave?
>>
To borrow a page from the Christ Clone Trilogy, the antichrist in those novels used the Trumpet Judgments as an opportunity to rise to power by effectively helping the world endure the impacts of the judgments. Interestingly, he was a minor functionary while the original candidate got killed by the Demon Horsemen. Like Carpatescu, though, he confirmed his position by killing the Witnesses at the wall.

Although, not sure if getting indwelt by Satan would be a wise move. It might cause a nonstandard Game Over.
>>
>>3760104
Well either that or give us more funding and people even if just temporarily for this one project to develop it well.

The other alternative would be to keep it for ourselves, then only would have it and introducing it later may be harder. Won't be "on his mind" as much.

>>3760111
Just an idea I'd throw out there.

>>3760143
Make earth a post apocalyptic shield world guarded and cut off from supernatural entities?
>>
>>3760144
We resonably should try to prevent the killing of the witnesses then. As anything we can do to break the narritive we should attempt.
>>
>>3760143

> become the antichrist
> arrange to get shot in the head by one of the christians who would probably want to raffle the tickets for it
> immediately get shot into space on a rocket bound out of the solar system
> blow up the rocket for good measure so satan can't saitama jump back to earth from it

dr. weird ending
>>
Technically we'd have to die from a headwound to be properly indwelt.

As long as we assassinate the Witnesses without being seen as agents of Carpatescu, we should be able to knock prophecy of the rails.... Maybe.

Unfortunately, keeping the Witnesses alive as an alternative is not a viable route, Aside from burninating the heathens and announcing the judgments, they also have a nasty habit of causing certain plagues.
>>
>>3760166
What if they are in high orbit? Or bound for mars?
>>
>>3760166
Well reasonably by the time they got assasinated they would have already caused all those plagues no? So eother we kill them before all the disasters or try to save them after. Anything to break the narritive
>>
Interesting questions, but then you have to consider how to ship two supernaturally imbued guys into space without being set on fire or having the GM pull out a 'Miracle' to save them...


God's the treacherous GM who'll spring a Tarrasque just to keep things on the rails. By killing them ourselves, we usurp Carpatescu's birth right while also playing according to 'God's plan'.

Then when Satan shows up, we give him the boot. We have some talented minds, including a physicists, neurosurgeon, and an Aki. If we invest in some suitable supernatural research we can give ol' Satan a boot to the head.
>>
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>>3760184
Maybe we should Hydra it and start collecting supernatural shit. Get the Heilige Lanze (Holy lance) as a starter, so that we don't just have the meteor sword to stab supernatural stuff with. The Egyptian cult guys seemed to think that artifacts could work, maybe it actually can. Maybe with physics going batshit they now have interesting emissions or something?
>>
>>3760227
Want to try stabbing the two witnesses with a regular sword the the metorite sword see what happens?
>>
>>3760233
Kind of, we should probably plan that out to get maximum bang and data for being smited.
>>
>>3760084
>>3760075

The agency heads don't particularly want to have a drink with you after having being chastised by Carpatescu, but they know which way their bread is buttered. None of you are in the public eye much, but bureaucracies have a way to sniff out who's in favor and who isn't, so being seen with you is good diplomatic currency right now, or it's about to be.

McLachalan points out that Carpatescu specifically called for the construction of a giant anti-asteroid missile, and going against that would be a bad idea; if you have a better method for knocking out meteors, he's all ears, of course.

The current head of the World Food Programme tells you that she is worried about the food price fluctuations; she is considering implementing a rolling damper on foodstuffs futures; the chief executive of the WTO points out that this isn't really doable.

You quickly realize that this is the meeting you guys SHOULD have had in the conference room, and wonder, before Carpatescu's rise, how much official business was in reality conducted at bars and in restaurants....

The bar inside the bunker is quite well stocked and furnished, but you can still tell that it's an officers' club. The Peacekeeper officers stationed here seem to be mildly resentful about having been displaced by you diplomatic types, but it's part of the job.

# Make no committments and let people try to impress you.

# Tell the space agency guy what you mean by "collaboration".

# Writein.

A few minutes later, the alarm sounds for a moment! It is quickly silenced, but you hear that apparently the former head of UNICEF stepped in front of a Humvee. Apparently, the last words were "No! Wait!". The driver is currently in the brig, as a matter of course, but apparently this happened at a turn inside the undergrounc complex, with poor visibility, and the former diplomat was walking in the middle of the street.

Hypnosis won't make someone kill themselves, but apparently walking in the middle of an unlit underground road is feasible.

You get a quick message from Santiago: "I'm okay. Long meeting. Details later."

After this, you're planning to see how New Babylon is being reconstructed before telling Carla that she's being promoted.... fired... transferred... both?

Notably, you get an official email from Carpatescu's office, containing your new budget; it will not take effect until next quarter, especially since right now any spare resource is going into reconstruction, but you can look at a roughly 15% increase, to 38BN.

>>3760227

That might be a thing to do if you manage to convince Mathews to let you root around; you can also start looking for such things - for example, it's known that the Ark of the Covenant is in Ethiopia (Or in some US government warehouse). Right now, you have the sword of Terry Pratchett in your possession; while it's not a mythical artifact of legend, some of your workers think it counts. For now, Moira is being prepared to confront the Two Witnesses.
>>
>>3760244
Give moira the two swords why not. Disguise some dudes as emts near by to wist her amd the swords away
>>
>>3760253
>have them impress and offer to give them any disaster preparness tech we already have to allow them to prepare better and try to organize seperate meeting between the groups seperatly so we can benefit the global community better. This can be done once a quarter as well.
>>
>>3760253
So no one wanted to find the UNCIEF guy? Well too late now. At least we didn't' run him over on our drive around the city.......

Ask each of them how we can integrate modern and efficient infrastructure to help make their operations smoother and what they are lacking, and how we can help in any shortcomings they have.

Ask to meet every nonth with them online via video chat in a table each with a monitor to each person so we can discuss strategy and how inter-agency co-operation can help not only us prepare for the future but to also help one another out with cross agency information, expertise, materials and, misc support.
>>
>>3760253
>Tell the space agency guy what you mean by "collaboration".
"Listen up your plan won't work, my guys looked into this stuff extensively already. What we are going to do, is build a big, fat, deadly looking asteroid defense rocket or maybe a satellite mounted silo, doesn't really matter it's security theater, the more effective it looks the better. Maybe it's going to have some level of functionality to serve as a backup plan, but for all I care it can be a giant Sylvester rocket. Our actual plan is going to be....(line out what we have agreed to be the most reasonable course of asteroid defense)
>>3760273
>>3760272
I support both of these as well
>>
Moira technically isn't one of the cyborg soldiers from the Millenial Kingdom. Openly attacking them with the Sword of Pratchett is going to get the Thumb of God pressed against our lovely Scottish Pyro. Also since they're on Zod's side, holy weapons are holy weapons going to be effective?

My ramblings are more crazy conjectures at this point; we should really focus on building up infrastructure (and seizing power) at the point.

Interesting.... So UNICEF has a vaccancy? They happen to have jurisdiction over a lot of world heritage sites including Temples, churches, mosques....

A benefit of this disaster means that some places might be under less surveillance. We could also see about slowly ensnaring them into our fold for the purpose of 'cultural preservation'.

---

#Let them impress us. If they prove competent, excellent!
>>
>>3760301
Well shes going to get smited anyways. May as well go the full mile and test what we can
>>
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>>3760273

(This is an excellent idea, but I hate you so much right now because that's a lot of NPCs to keep track of, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_System )

>>3760272
>>3760273

You point out that the Internet was developed specifically to let government agencies deal with the aftermath of a catastrophe - specifically a nuclear war - and just because it's a consumer good now, it doesn't mean that it can't still be used for that; it makes no sense that the World Food Programme communicates to the public and internally via fax while some random pastor in Chicago can get a hundred thousand clicks in two years just by running a bulletin board.

You find that a surprising amount of cadre personnel in GC agencies are very computer-illiterate, and recommend a training program.

# Hand over preparedness tech, with a not-so-subtle hint that it should be implemented pronto. This increases your legitimacy.

# Let Carla do it in a day or so, since she's likely to want to do that regardless. This increases her legitimacy.

The video conference idea is approved, although Dr. Ferris suggests that it only be a summit when necessary, otherwise the various vice presidents of each agency can handle it. That reminds you that you'll have to replace Carla at some point - your organization has a lot fewer layers of management than most of your counterparts' simply because, as your automation levels increased, you did not replace outgoing cadre. In general, each workgroup has a CO and a XO, who report to your department heads, who report to you.

>>3760301

The person currently in charge of UNESCO is here; his portfolio has been focused on preserving cultural legacies after the establishment of the Global Community Science Institute. He tells you that about half of the areas under his management are in Italy, which puts him at odd with Od Gustav and Peter Mathews, and seems genuinely happy to get ideas on how to handle both that and the fact that old buildings don't react well to earthquakes OR earthquake prevention measures.

>>3760301

(Arguably, Moira is the closest thing you have to a MEC trooper right now. The main difference is that she has never experienced death, is not immune to pain, and is basically a competent warrior with a cybernetic enhancement rather than some Robocop-esque abomination of science. Art by the Danielle Noir, you can find her work at http://emlia.org/dwiki/pub/web/Main.HomePage.html )
>>
>>3760331
>hand over prepardness tech.
Carla im sure can handle herself.
>>
>>3760331
>Hand over preparedness tech
>>
>>3760331
What if we met with them every other month?
>>
# Hand over preparedness tech, with a not-so-subtle hint that it should be implemented pronto. This increases your legitimacy.

Perhaps the UNESCO president can arrange a meeting with Od Gustav. Our work in preserving European and Italian landmarks might ingratiate him to our cause... and win him over.

It can also help open doors into plundering Vatican secrets although admittedly, there are also monasteries and libraries that could also have Catholic treatises on the Supernatural.
>>
>>3760331
# Let Carla do it in a day or so, since she's likely to want to do that regardless. This increases her legitimacy.
Tell her to implement it pronto over dinner.
>>
Building on that idea, we can also focus space, agricultural projects, etc. in regions by various potentates, slowly working them to our way of thinking.

We'll see what the agencies develop independently, rectify as needed, and then direct them in the appropriate direction.
>>
>>3760345
>>3760347
>>3760373

You email each agency head a link to your CVS repository, telling them that you're migrating to SVN so they should get an update at some point. It contains software, hardware designs for automatic shutoff switches and the like, and even early versions of your logistics expert system

# which they are free to poke at; you cannot count on a diplomat's gratitude, but you can count on the fact that everyone who needs to know, will know who they have to at least pretend to be grateful to.

# which they won't need, since you are pressing your advantage to ensure that they become customers of your current logistics AI. (This will require establishing a data center, but greatly increase the electronic market influence of Synco/Bochica versus Ikko and versus the MCP).

>>3760356

"Of course, Foreman. I'll be happy to arrange it."

Right now, you have a lot of "soft power"; it makes sense to use it before it dissipates.

>>3760289

McLachalan really has no choice but to agree; his men will get an Energia rocket out of storage and rebuild a nucear warhead for use against an asteroid, as a last-ditch interception system, while coordinating with you for early interception using

# a gravity tractor: this will work with every asteroid type, but need a lot of advance warning. It'll also need some work on the software side.

# laser ablation: your directed-energy research isn't really up to the task just yet... Actually, come to think of it, surely he has some to share? This will work with solid and aqueous asteroids, since dust formations are likely to be too reflective, but need some advance warning.

# land-and-push: this will work only with solid asteroids, but need the least advance warning. It also requires the least technological investment.

If you wish to tour New Babylon, a Humvee and a driver has been made available to you. There is enough road damage to make using a limo inadvisable.
>>
>>3760331
> thicc irish robocop

>>3760307

she's been risking her life for us on the regular. MUST PROTECC.
>>
>>3760430
>which they won't need,
>land-and-push
>>
So, assuming the blood rain of the First Trumpet isn't caused by an asteroid flyover, as was the case in Christ Clone Trilogy, we'll have to concern ourselves with:

A mountain of fire crashing into the Earth

Wormwood, which will poison the water supply

There is also a star mentioned in the Fifth Trumpet that crashes to earth and opens the 'Bottomless Pit'. Could be an asteroid. Could be something else.

We also must factor if Zod can materialize these objects out of nowhere or if they previously exist and are directed towards Earth.

#Which they won't need... Now, where to build a data center
>>
>>3760430
# which they won't need, since you are pressing your advantage to ensure that they become customers of your current logistics AI. (This will require establishing a data center, but greatly increase the electronic market influence of Synco/Bochica versus Ikko and versus the MCP).

How about a massive rocket guided on raids aimed at the sky?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4wDqSnBJ-k
>>
>>3760430
>which they wont need
>a gravity tractor. We should have plenty of advance warning.
>>
>>3760458
>>3760454
>>3760477


A couple of your supposed peers ask you if you're talking about Carpatescu's MCP, which he intends to use to run the cashless economy. You explain that this is a system to efficiently allocate resources and work crews, and rather than existing as one giant supecomputer, it's a piece of software that can be run on a group of regular desktop PCs, ensuring that there is no single point of failure.

Dr. Ferris flat out asks you what you plan to do with all the management redundancies that this will create. "I am in favor of a leaner agency, in theory, but this is going to diminish our payroll budget, and consequently our clout."

You point out that the alternatives are trimming the dead wood internally, in a manner that is controlled, or eventually having it done by decree from Carpatescu, in a manner that isn't.

"Won't that leave you in control of the allocation system?"

"The software is open source - just make sure you change the passwords, and you can lock me out if you absolutely want." That's technically true, but you are leaving out that you'd likely keep physical access to the systems, retain the ability to push system updates, and frankly you'd have an easier time intruding into their systems than the other way round.

You do a bit of mental math, and figure that building another five Network Nodes will give you enough computing power to do what you promise. Since you are working with global agencies, it doesn't really matter where you install them.

# Ask for a subsidy. This will decrease Network Node construction complexity by 1.

# Ask for nothing; they need you, you don't need them.
>>
#Ask for nothing.
>>
>>3760492
Does this reduce the total complexity by one or 1 per construction?
>>
Also I vote Gravity Tractor

Now that we have the GC Space Agency working for us, maybe we can find some brilliant minds to work the tracking mechanisms. The software we can handle I think.
>>
>>3760500

Network nodes will now be C3 instead of C4, at least the next five you choose to construct. They still require 1 network part and 1 power generaton part.
>>
>>3760492
>Ask for a subsidy
They might as well help us
>>
>>3760505

We already have 10 network nodes in place, we should build the other 10, it will be cheaper in the long run. With a budget of 38, in theory we can do it one trimester if we get lucky with covert ops assignments. Then it becomes super cheap to fulfill any mandate.

>>3760523

might as well assert dominance while we can.
>>
>>3760492

# Ask for a subsidy.

Build twice as many nodes for redundancy and stuff.
>>
>>3760492
>ask for subsidy. May as well honestly. Show that they can help us as well.
>>
Rolled 18, 2, 57 = 77 (3d100)

>>3760572
>>3760523
>>3760498
>>3760614


You get a sneer and a few knowing glances."Aaah, that's where the catch is."

Refusing you would be bad politics right now, so you get the other global agency heads to agree to subsidize Network Node installation in exchange for being able to run Bochica to streamline their own operations.

-----------

Your tour of New Babylon is relatively brief; with the earthquake and bolide damage, and the veritable horde of construction crews and vehicles that have descended on the place, the city looks more real, less plastic, somehow. It's probably the dust, and the road repairs that are already done being of excellent quality but not Disneyland perfection. You even get to see a brief fight between competing construction crews; unless you miss your guess, you figure that Ghilotti's probably has people here too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvOdHW7fttA

You find that the sporting goods store where you bought the mini-parachute (which you still have, and which has since been sewn into one of your dress shirts in a manner that looks only mildly obvious rather than extremely so) has survived intact.

Interestingly, it looks like Carpatescu has decided to not fully repair the Burj Carpathia, keeping the jagged edges of the broken-off top third "as a memorial to the cruelty of Nature and the resilience of Man" once they are encased in glass. His new office will be mounted right below the memorial floor.

You notice that some of the rich and powerful who have made New Babylon their home are making a big production of helping with the reonstruction efforts, although this seems to mostly translate into a hindrance for the actual construction workers who have to interrupt their labors and, at least in one case as you pass by, be replaced with male models for a photoshoot. All just so some rich guy or girl has something to upload on their blog...

Well, it goes to show that you're making a difference, you suppose.

A couple of emails, which apparently discuss something else entirely, confirm to you that your covert operations teams are in place, and performing guard duty for the people of Médecins Sans Frontières and other humanitarian orgs. It's a relatively simple job, requiring only the bopping on head of the occasional fanatic and having to profusely apologize after the occasional pat-down search offended local sensibilities. Hopefully this will be a casualty-free month. This sort of operation doesn't really pay much, but it's good for morale.

You tell the people who were ready to cover you that they can stand down; since it's the beginning of the month, they should be able to investigate the helicopter pilot in South Africa.

As for telling Carla about her promotion,

# you'll tell her in person once you get home, flying back on a regular airliner.

# you'll call her immediately so she can fly here and be ready to hit the ground running.
>>
>>3760628
# you'll tell her in person once you get home, flying back on a regular airliner.
Make sure we have good personal relationship with her so we have her as a solid ally.
>>
>>3760628
>call her immediately. Its best if its us she first hears it from we can organize a dinner meeting in the call.
>>
# you'll call her immediately so she can fly here and be ready to hit the ground running.
>>
>>3760628

(Holy shit, dice.)

Unfortunately, it's not all roses. Your people in Greece and Macedonia end up having to shoot a would-be suicide bomber; the homemade explosive goes off, wounding two of your people and killing one EMT. Ensuring that people get their shots becomes a lot harder after that.

If that's bad news, the news from India is worse: your team and a group of people from Medecins Sans Frontieres were on their way to Gorakhpur from Ranchi, travelling via the Maurya Express (Hatia-Gorakhpur). At a regular stop, a number of armed robbers surround the train and begin robbing the passengers of their valuables.

Your people are taken by surprise, and cannot mount an efficient defense without causing unacceptable civilian casualties; instead, they lead the healthcare workers under their protection out of the train. Unfortunately, it was a trap - your men and the medics are surrounded, disarmed (under threat of dropping live grenades in a third-car passenger car packed with innocent travelers), and held for ransom.

# Pay the ransom (2BN). You may get half of it back if you use your tracking capabilities to chase the bandits later on.

# Postpone finding the helicopter pilot, and send your third squad in. They'll be using an assault rather than an escort loadout.


>>3760648

You generally do; you've let her do her job, avoided pushing Aki (who Carla has semi-adopted) too hard, and showed up to get both of them when it was necessary after the bombings in England. You've also got her what she's often stated to be her dream job, being as she has often expressed frustration at other parts of the global government not following the civil protection measures that she was able to deploy with your people and assets.

>>3760662
>>3760648
>>3760667

"Boss, I... what?"

"I'm not your boss anymore. Technically, you slightly outrank me. If you take the job, that is."

"I don't know, I mean, working with Carpatescu directly..."

"We're letting other agencies use some of our tech. You personally would get to use all of ours, of course."

"... Yes, I think I can do this. Thank you. It's just a really big step. It's a lot more responsibility."

"You're the best person for the job. I considered Ryan, but he'd use the wrong approach. This needs an expert and you're it."

"When's the interview?"

"Oh, you know the Potentate. Whenever you can, no rush, don't let me detain you.... so, probably best if you start packing."

"... Right. When's the exit interview?"

"I can stay in New Babylon for another half day if necessary, so, tonight? Grab dinner over it maybe."

Carla laughs softly. "Foreman, are you asking me out to dinner?"

# Eh, why not. The world can wait a little bit.

# Sounds like we've got more crap to deal with - maybe some other time.

"Well... sounds like I better get packing then. Uhm, Foreman? Please don't let Aki hurt herself."
>>
We basically created an agency for her to lead. She may be suited and up to task, maybe not.

But its important that we tell her personally what her mandate and purpose is, so we say to her "I would like to tell you what you are going to Carla"....
>>
# Pay the ransom (2BN). You may get half of it back if you use your tracking capabilities to chase the bandits later on.

#Eh, why not. The world can wait a little bit... and we can coordinate a few things in private before she leaves.
>>
>>3760709
# Eh, why not. The world can wait a little bit.
Nothing to serious, but right now our imaginary waifu choices are Santiago (old) Moira (wild) and MAYBE Carla (proper?)
>>
>>3760709
We dont have the money i vote
>postpone finding the helecoptir pilot hopefully they live long enough for next turn

>eh why not the world can wait alittle bit.
>>
>>3760709
# Pay the ransom (2BN). You may get half of it back if you use your tracking capabilities to chase the bandits later on.

# Postpone finding the helicopter pilot, and send your third squad in. They'll be using an assault rather than an escort loadout.

Do both, Ransom for distraction and making it easier to track their movement and connections and families.

Helicopter rain hell on them and end them so they don't do it again.

Also give the security team a scolding when they get back.
>>
>>3760730
Also Aki... If you're into the Manic Pixie types who build phone droids
>>
>>3760743
I think we've been told that Aki was off the table due to how "eccentric" she is.

Like if we pull a bepsi out of our pants, she'd stick a mechanical ruby-Goldberg straw thing in the hole and clamp it with little taser robots.
>>
>>3760754
.... that will make it do a little helicopter dance.
>>
>>3760758

.... Is the safe word Tesla?
>>
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>>3760765
No, but close.

Its Electro Techno Coils!
>>
>>3760430
>while coordinating with you for early interception using
We'll want all of these at some point but ideally we can get the gravity tractor working. Since the last thing we need is to end up lacking a defence after we said we had a plan and shit.

>>3760709
>Your people are taken by surprise, and cannot mount an efficient defense without causing unacceptable civilian casualties; instead, they lead the healthcare workers under their protection out of the train. Unfortunately, it was a trap - your men and the medics are surrounded, disarmed (under threat of dropping live grenades in a third-car passenger car packed with innocent travelers), and held for ransom.
What are the chances of our assault going well?

# Eh, why not. The world can wait a little bit.
>>
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>>3760837

Pretty good if you are willing to accept a small amount of collateral damage - this is no longer a bloodless operation anyway. Assaulting the train does involve pretending to pay the ransom.

>>3760743
>>3760754
>>3760758
>>3760765
>>3760777
>>
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>>3760837
>>3760730
>>3760726

You spend the rest of your day in New Babylon working out a few minor deals with the other agency heads, and take the time to catch up with Corazon Santiago.

"You've got to learn how to read lips" she tells you. "Carpatescu got us all in a room, said that he wanted to centralize things - made the big MCP reveal, quite impressive, even if you know how it works. Then he tells us to sit down and work out how best to, well, do our business knowing that it's coming. So we're talking, and he takes each of us aside for a minute while the other nine sort things out..... Rebohoth is all worried because he's going to have to figure something else out for protection money, heh. I don't know what he told the others, but Rebohoth and Yang came back grinning like mad - everyone else, just sort of subdued. Your system works, by the way; Carpatescu looked at me and started with "I'm going to tell you...." and all of a sudden I got pink noise in my ears. So I stare at him and work out what he's saying, because there was nobody to read it back to me, and I don't think the voice synth thing I've seen on fighter planes works in reverse yet. So he tells me, Santiago, I want you to surround yourself with warriors of old, hand to hand champions, turn your capitol into a model of ancient Sparta if that is your heart's wish, and leave the drudge work to the bureaucracy."

You nod. "So what are you going to do?"

"Step up the combined arms training. See if I can get my hands on a proper air force. And build up a ceremonial guard, just for the look of it, ten or twelve boys should do. People will think I'm fucking them, heh, let them."

You aren't sure what that would involve, but you suspect that it would end with the other person being very exhausted and very happy, whoever they are. Santiago is easily fifteen years older than you, but can probably run as fast as you and four times as far besides.

"He also told us to stockpile food and water - then asked me to give everyone a primer on survivalism. Everyone had to do a little skit, basically. Zakharov on physics, Lal and Yang on philosophy, you get the drill. The worst part? We got into it! I don't know, even without the serpent eyes that Carpatescu got, I feel like I spent a day back in elementary school. I need a shower."

You tell her about Carla. "Good choice, she's sane. You need someone with their head screwed on tight for that job. I look forward to working with her."

She recommends a particular restaurant in New Babylon that has been built to the side of the artificial lake, and has a semisubterranean room with underwater windows; its construction and location made it fairly earthquake-proof because, like the bunker, it was built as a monolithic concrete box, so it only sank into the sand a little.

You spend the afternoon playing tourist and keeping an eye on Carla's inbound flight; eventually, you two meet up
>>
(Sounds like Carpatescu has 'inside knowledge' of upcoming events. Interesting to know)
>>
>>3760949
Carla has taken a brief detour to check out the damage before getting to the restaurant; you're waiting for her in the air-conditioned anteroom. It's pretty obvious that she is incredibly nervous, and hugs you with maybe a little bit too much vigor when you spot each other.

On one hand, she wishes she'd seen New Babylon in its pristine splendor; she travels a fair amount, but for one reason or another, she never came here before - there was no need.

On the other, she points out the difference in reconstruction speed between Chicago and Carpatescu's model city; the power of nature - or of God, according to the Remnant - hit both areas equally hard, but the power of money is in full evidence here, with basic services having been restored nearly instantly while back home hotels are still being used for hospital overflow and some homes have to share hot water - and both of you know that these are both First World examples with First World problems. Something in New Babylon's air, though, makes it hard to think about the poor parts of the planet; the gilded city, even wounded, clouds your judgement just a little. You wonder if that's how people who run banks or insurance companies feel all the time.

Mesopotamian cuisine has a long history going back some 10,000 years, and it's on full display here; after a few questions you're brought mujaddara and dolma, served on grape leaves that look almost fake due to their sizes. Carla, who has worked in the Middle East with a NGO before, mentions how odd it is to see wine being served, and picks a Napa Valley red who she assures you is just as good as if it came from the Tuscan hills where her own grandparents moved to America from.

You notice that only some of the rice and vegetables served here has the salt-and-butter undertaste of stuff grown with Eden fertilizer, and that people have gotten so used to it that now they feel something's missing if it's not present - every table has copious salt and butter available.

Carla's table manners are impeccable, to the point that you ask her to please relax. You know that she doesn't know about the issues with your covert teams; your organization has pretty open communication lines, but you asked people to make her last day at CATS worry-free, and it's not like she could go to India herself. Instead, you reminisce about a couple close calls, the time when the two of you held the fort during the bombings, and what went well. You don't have much of a family life after the Event; fortunately, neither did she. Her parents were Christians, and disappeared - she's felt that they went painlessly, at the end of a long life, and neither of them had to suffer through missing the other. "I wish they'd seen grandchildren, though. I just - I never felt I was ready to be a parent, you know?"

# She needs reassurance. Build her up.

# She needs a confidence boost. Hit on her, politely.

# She needs a roll in the hay. Hit on her, seriously.
>>
>>3761105
>build her up.
Santiago is my wifu.
>>
>>3761105

so are we going full dating sim here? if so Aki is definitely in play. according to a previous thread she's over 18.

(what, no gay route? Ryan doesn't count he probably looks like the Bioshock guy he's a ripoff of)

personal waifu list
aki. possibly with her android clone
moira in dommy mommy mode
carla is honestly meh tier but yay sane option
santiago last because she'll break our dick
>>
#Hit on her, politely

I prefer Moira (but fear her days might be short) and Aki, although she's on the eccentric route.

Ultimately, I envision the golden ending where we form a harem of all the possible love interests.

>>3761124
No love for Carpatescu?
>>
>>3761140
Frankly i would love the carpatescu route. We save him from death and possession from satan then we slowly fall in love trying to prevent the apocalypse
>>
Coming soon to a fanfiction site near you, the tragic tale of the leader of the free world and his forbidden love for his foreman of IT.
>>
>>3761105
#Hit on her, politely

>>3761124
>what, no gay route
We missed out on our gay option when we turned down the swole smiling socialist Asian.

Admittedly, we've got a lot of other opportunities now to recruit additional agents / heroes since the earthquake reset the events of every region meaning we can find new people and shit everywhere.
>>
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>>3761174

Your last sentence does NOT need an Oxford comma. Please.

>>3761156
>>3761149

You kid, but there's a fair amount of Carpathia/Buck slash for LB (I was going to model Young Foreman after Buck, Middle Aged Foreman after Rayford, and Elderly Foreman after Chaim). In fact it seems to be roughly half of the LB fanfiction on this site.

Also, did you know there was a comic? It didn't sell well so it only covers the first two books. It contains a disappointing lack of Nicholas Cage.

https://archiveofourown.org/works/11468118
https://archiveofourown.org/works/7401643
https://archiveofourown.org/works/2471612
https://archiveofourown.org/works/213766
https://archiveofourown.org/works/33749

And a good part of the M fanfiction on this site.

https://www.fanfiction.net/book/Left-Behind/?&srt=1&r=4


.... then there's THIS thing.

https://archiveofourown.org/works/4273185
>>
>>3761189
So what your saying is that we can get magical girls
>>
>>3761189
>Your last sentence does NOT need an Oxford comma. Please.
That was meant to represent a very short pause.
>>
>>3761189
Left in the behind. Im dieing.
>>
>>3761210
All the waifus as "Sailor X" with us as Tuxedo mask

>Moira and Santiago as the two lesbian ones.
>>
>>3761189

I found the comic in a library once the one where the Witnesses burninate a guy.

NOT surprised by the fanfics.

.... If we're based on Buck Williams, are we played by Kirk Cameron?

>>3761218
Is Aki Sailor Mercury?
>>
>>3761241
Aki is too incompetent at life to be anything but sailor moon. That way every time we see her and give her "advice / encouragement", it's literally just us shouting "don't take the toaster with you to the bath just to save time in the morning" or something similarly simple.
>>
>>3761247

"Don't take the toaster with you to the bath in an attempt to become one with it"

> wait foreman, does aki fuck toasters
> no that would actually be an easier problem to deal with
>>
since we're shitposting

https://leftbehind.fandom.com/wiki/Darryl_Henderson
>>
>>3761281

It's like the strange love child of Hunter S. Thomson and half the guys at my Alma Matter

"Wait! We can't stop here. This is locust country!"
>>
>>3761281

it's old man henderson!

>>3761105

hit on her politely. she is no longer an employee so it's not immoral
>>
>>3761218
>>3761189
>>3761124
>>3761114

My God! I've started the Waifu wars!

>>3761105
# She needs reassurance. Build her up.
A lil of both, see what she responds to, nothing to serious for now.
# She needs a confidence boost. Hit on her, politely.

Worried about children issues eating up our free time or actions per month....
>>
>>3761324
It was never immoral! We just were too busy enjoying Carla and Aki messing around.

Also may as well YOLO and put a a bun in her Oven.
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