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File: Primitive_tools.jpg (116 KB, 800x600)
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Remember no gear. Post things you've made with natural materials or guides to making things.
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>>1516886
Are those... Fucking bone knives?
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>>1516886
I'll bump this.
>>1516887
looks like it, and they look badass. I am now inspired.
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>>1516897
>looks like it, and they look badass. I am now inspired.
Yeah, they're making me hard. I'm going to go make knives out of the bones of my enemies now.
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>>1516886
Gotta keep your campsite clean, anon.
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Need help getting rid of these FUCKING mosquitoes
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>>1516946
Throw that coniferous wood and needles on the fire.
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>>1516947
fresh birch too
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>>1516975
Cool. Didn't know about that.
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>>1516946
make big smoke, zzzz no come
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>>1516916
mirin
>>
I envy you. I wish I had the time and energy for stuff like this. I be been wanting to make a primitive handle for my izula but I'm too lazy for even that
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>>1516916
I'd rather fly coach.
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>>1516946
You can use some plants for that, some of them work great. Look it up.
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>>1516886
yesterday my Girl built a tea kettle:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_3XdKFMvyI
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>>1516886
My nigga. Have you ever made any slings. I wove some out of twine years ago. I uses to practice quite a bit till I almost killed myself. Didn't see where the rock was flying till it landed a few inches in front of me. Fun as hell tho.
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More people need to post things they've created.
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>>1516886
i made this spoon from an mussel shell i found at the beach, attached it with pine sap glue i made, dropped it once and it immediately broke
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>>1517385
it had a horrible mouth feel but could hole a decent ammount, if i could figure out a better way of attaching it to the handle as well as smoothening out the edges of the shell better, i tried rubbing it on rocks but it would just chip and become even sharper, perhaps another type of shell?
>>
have made (and used) a spearchucker from bamboo, and knapped a blade from rock. I was taught to practice with glass (as it cracks evenly and is more predictable than rock), but I haven't done much yet. after getting the initial blade you use a technique called "pressure flaking". look it up on youtube.
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>>1517353
More pics of the whistle? Also any pointers for others looking to make one for the first time?

>>1517385
>>1517388
Many sad faces on the drop and break situation. I made a primitive "knife" out of a very large river mussel shell. It was/is quite sturdy. Perhaps pics later. But I could imagine forming a functional spoon out of a smaller mussel that would be a little more durable than the oyster shell.
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>>1517568
>More pics of the whistle?

Nope. I'm not even sure where it is. I made like 10 of them. If you have a drill bit, it can be pretty easy, but splitting a piece of wood hollowing it out, and gluing it back together isn't too hard. Look at this image,

>You have to get the opening, where the air comes out perfect and all corners sharp. Make it small then enlargen it as needed to change the tone. The plug you put into the end must be air tight all around it except for the sliver you cut off the top. Make sure the plug is pushed all the way to the start of the opening where the air comes out. The plug end inside needs to be perfectly flat. Make sure there's no air escaping anywhere at all other than where the whistle noise will be made.

>Check out the top whistle. The bottom just has all the special terms for the parts. The sound changes when you change the "bore" size/length, the "blade overcut" angle, the "block" distance in-out of the bore, the size of the exit hole, and the size of the "duct."

You can also try this, with a few different tree species,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cy5AVgF8a8
>>
>>1516946
Tobacco keeps them away. Any smoke works, but tobacco works the best. If you are in North West America you might find some growing wild, or you could just buy the dry leaves online.
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>>1517618
Seconded. Smoking a cigar while fishing has worked wonders for me in the past.
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>>1517318
Wait, how can you kill yourself with a sling? I don't understand
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>>1517641
He probably tossed it straight up.
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>>1517641
Some people who haven't done their research have the instinct to spin slings vertically before throwing, and thus, end up either throwing the stone/bullet straight up, or smacking themselves in the head.
As a foot note, slings are supposed to be held above your head and spun horizontally.
>>
>>1517646
>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfVlC-BFZMo
anybody can do it
>>
>>1517775
Yes. Although these mongoloids are slinging their rocks at tanks and armored personnel, the sling is a great weapon if you're good at it.
>>
>>1517641
ROCK GO UP GRUG NOT SEE ROCK GO BACK DOWN
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>>1516886
>tv dinner next to some homemade shit weapon or gear
/out/ in a nutshell
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>>1518310
>tv dinner
lol Is that what that black tray thing is? I thought it was something to mix the pine sap/charcoal glue used to glue the heads on the tools.
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>>1518310
>this gay fucking puritanism
how about you show us YOUR tools, big boy
oh, you cant because you sit in your basement all day, but thats okay :) you can make yourself feel better by projecting online !
>>
>>1517314
Cool
>>
>>1516916
based
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>>1518743
He's keeping his raw rocks in it you retarded boy
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>>1519207
Looks like bologna and comdiments.
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>>1519211
Eat that bologna, and you'll be shitting bricks.
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>>1517314
>would racemix
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>>1516886
Went a walk and just kept adding to this. Split the wood with some rib bones and found some twine and cloth
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>>1519395
Did you take this picture jumping off a train?
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>>1519404
Yes.
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>>1519395
was this photo taken during an earthquake?
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>>1519404
>>1519427
don’t make fun of his Parkinson’s, anons
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>>1519395
>snaps pic
>looks at result on phone
>nailedit.png
>myworkhereisdone.mp4
lmaoooooooooo
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>>1516898
Bonus points if you lead with "I am the bone of my sword..."
>>
>>1516886
Wow I really like those flint knives
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>>1517353
from the thumbnail that looked like a violin. I was extremely impressed.
>>
>>1519852
kek
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>>1519845
kek
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>>1519395
theforrest.jpg
>>
>>
So you can make candles from beeswax, but what can you use as a natural wick you can gather easily?
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>>1520800
Just about any cordage will do as long as it can burn. You may need to braid it, depending on its wicking ability. Adding stuff like salt and borax to treat it isn't needed, but that will make it last longer.
>>
No pictures but I made birch bark snow googles for a fellow traveler who didn’t have shades and was hiking along with me that day after we got a half meter of snow dumped on us the day before (in mid September). They worked pretty well and he wasn’t snow blind after 2 days so I’ll count that as a win.
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>>1520269
the fuck was that
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>>1519395
What the hell is that
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Made some flint arrow heads today, all out of a sheeps shoulderblade.
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>>1521328
>I made some flint arrowheads
>out of bone

I think theres a flaw in your logics sir
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>>1521328
your toe to the right of your big toe on your right foot looks like E.T.
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>>1521351
Please ignore, I meant primitive. Heads all over the place, I think I should sleep

>>1521354
Kek, thanks.
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Do you know how hard it is to dig a simple hole with rocks and sticks in the hot sun! GODDAMN.
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un a slightly related note, found this shittily built chair at a campsite once, made with bullshit cheap nylon rope and paracord

having fun is fine and its a cool project, but clean up after yourself

>>1521328
neat, i sure wouldnt wanna get hit by that!
>>1521974
imagine the smell
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>>1521988
the rope work was atrocious
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>>1521988
Looks like a tool, instead of a chair. Like some native American drag sled-chair hybrid gone wrong.
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>>1516975
Tree bark goes great in fires too
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>>1522021
its definitely a "Bushcraft chair"
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>>1522034
It still looks like an abortion of fatherhood.
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>>1522036
i think that forced meme is shit, but yes, i agree
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>>1522038
Once you learn how to make a, "plank chair," using only an axe, you tend to never go for cordage chairs.

>forced meme
Eh, which one? I'm not up on my meme speak.
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>>1522041
the "absentee father" meme going around /out/, yea the "Viking Chair" is great
>TFW was very involved with bushcraft back in the day
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>>1522044
Glad you know what one is. I did a mock up of the easiest kind to make. No need for special hole drilling tools when you can just notch them and slide them together. Sorry for the terrible perspective (10min in paint.)

>the "absentee father" meme going around /out/
I'll take your word for it.
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>>1522048
>Sorry for the terrible perspective
you shouldnt be. thats a great job, one thing you can try is to increase the angle of the peice you rest you back on´s bottom a trtangle, so it digs into the ground. less portablebut more 90 degree back
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How does one make a loincloth?
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>>1522052
Yeah, that is what I mean. lol They naturally go 90 degrees when put together unless the notches are all messed up. you can make those things like 70-80cm tall if needed.
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Okay, ive been salting some rabbit paws for some time, is there anything i can do with them instead of just doing it or for the novelty?, can i put it in liqour like worms or scorpinds lol
>>1522064
its a very stable design
>>
>>1522059
Kill an animal with skin that makes good hide and gut or sinew that makes good sewing string. Tan the hide (for buckskin) or dry & salt for making a fur (remember to work it so it becomes soft), make the sewing string from the gut or sinew. Crack one of the animal's bones to make a needle. Cut out the leather cloth shapes and leather thong strings needed and sew them together using whatever design you are going for.

>>1522067
>is there anything i can do with them instead of just doing it or for the novelty?
They really are just for decoration and superstition purposes.

>liquer
Er, I'd not. lol

>its a very stable design
Tell that to my drunk friends.
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>>1521990
I hope you took that sweet tan paracord home.
>>
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Early primitive project. Found the mussel shell on a riverbank while canoeing. Ground down with various river stones. Cordage from pine root harvested by hand with a digging stick.
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>>1522143
Closer pic of shell. Debated grinding it down further and attaching to a wooden handle but it fit the hand so well I decided to leave it. Tip is super sharp. Not like steel obviously but can cut skin with moderate pressure. Usually use for removing bark, splitting roots, and other moderate slicing/scraping tasks.
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>>1521988
>neat, i sure wouldnt wanna get hit by that!
Thanks anon! Im hoping to hunt dear with them once I build a new bow. Sadly the old one snapped.
>>
>>1522143
>>1522144
FYI, depending on where you live, owning muscle shell parts may be illegal. That's something to remember if you are wearing it/using it and a game warden asks about it. Just say it is a sea shell from some beach you went to 10 years ago or whatever. Otherwise, they can be real dicks sometimes.
>>
I need help on clay. My natural deposit of clay is shit and I can't find another by digging or looking in River banks. The only thing I can do is filter the clay but I want to know how ancient people used clay when it was shit. How did they filter it, How they contain and boil water, etc?
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>>1523807
You can make a slurry and allow it to settle. You can do this by just digging a hole, filling it with water then dumping in your crappy clay and stirring it up until it is nothing but soupy water. Not sludge mud, it needs to just be "dissolved" in the water. Then you leave and come back when the water is completely clear. The clay in the poor clay will settle to the bottom in a layer you can meticulously remove. Repeat until you have enough. As you do this you'll get used to how to tell what is okay and what is really good in the layers that settle on top of each other. This process is known as "slaking" which makes the clay into a, "slip", but those terms seem to be interchangeable depending on who you ask. Slaking clay chunks is easier when you use bone dry clay chunks to start with. Clay chunks that is already wet really doesn't like to slake very well and can be time consuming to slake. Slipping clay "mud" is pretty easy.

You may want to check out backroads for well sites, ATV trails, farm trails, etc. The vehicles tend to really churn up the ground and leave behind ruts that become puddles. These puddles, when driven through while wet, begin to do their own slaking and slipping of clay. During seasons that are dry you can just pick up chunks of okayish clay you can further process into better clay. Old ponds and lakes may be your best bet to dig up some clay. For streams and rivers, you may need to look for ox-bow lakes or places where the river/stream had meandered 100s-1,000s of years ago.

You can also slake/slip general soil to get clay out of it. There's more work involved, but it is doable. I've actually make pottery from clay soil from my yard after slipping it in a tub forever. You can also use a filter method by slaking clay chunks then pouring it through some type of fabric. The filtering may take a while if you don't scrap off the clay from the sides every so often. That will be a faster method of getting the clay from slip.
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>>1516887
The fucking bone is actually called the penis and contrary to the erroneously named "boner," it does not contain a bone.
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>>1523921
>baculum
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>>1523921
in some animals there is a bone.
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>>1523888
Wouldn't heavier sediments sink to the bottom first though? What happens to those? And what about dirt from the hole mixing with the clay or the water being soaked into the ground?
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>>1517353
I have failed more than once to make a working whistle. Very nice anon. Tips?
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>>1519395
Anon..did I take that shit photo for you?
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>>1526174
It all works out into layers. You should give it a try, in only a glass of water. Mix it then come back 12-24 hours later to see the sediments stratified into layers. That will help you gauge how much clay is in the sample before wasting your time.
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>>1526181
Mine fail most of the time due to holes in the wood that I didn't really detect at first. Once those are plugged up everything goes well, normally. The air hole looks more complicated than it really is.
>>
>>1526174
Here's a pretty good link on the subject:
http://www.practicalprimitive.com/skillofthemonth/processingclay.html
>>
>>1526217
>>1526213
How would I get the clay water out in the context of a hole in the ground. I can't exactly pour it into another hole and I think removing the sediment by hand would only mix it again
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>>1516916
Nice
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>>1526265
Percolation allows the water to drain out over time leaving everything behind. Just scoop it up.
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>>1517318
Me too, I unpack my sling anytime I see a cairn, it's more fun than just kicking them over.

Slinging.org
>>
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I made more charcloth
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>>1527554
>>
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>>1527555
Surprise. It works
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>>1527554
>>1527555
>>1527557
as far as i understand and can figure out, the only reason to use denim is that it is less brittle and that it is flat, dont get me wrong, the denim is great, but if you take a ,meduim bracket mushroom and char it it will smolder for SO fucking long its ridiculous. so dont feel like you are forced to use unnatural materials.

being able to lay in flat on the flint when strike with the steel is nice, but not necesary
>>
>>1527554
>>1527555
>>1527557
Very nice. FYI, you don't need to make a hole in the can. There's always plenty of venting around the lid and it will never cause a problem. It'd need to be mason jar sealed levels of tight in order to pop.

>>1527568
I have a tin packed with old towel strips I've been meaning to char and try out. I'll have to get it out and get things going now...
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>>1528333
>FYI, you don't need to make a hole in the can. There's always plenty of venting around the lid
are you sure? that tin was water tight before the hole?
>I have a tin packed with old towel strips
im guessing they are gonna be too brittle, but definitively report back!
>>
>>1528420
It depends on the tin obviously.
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>>1528430
but you are right yea
>>
Any tips for primitive fire making? Located in southern New England and while I cannot say I have spent a TON of time on it, the little results I have obtained are far from flame. Recommended wood types for spindle and board? Best/easiest cordage for bowdrill? Hand drill preferred? Techniques?
>>
>>1528924
>Recommended wood types for spindle and board?
I was about to pose that same question the second I saw "primitive fire making". My interest is piqued.
>>
>>1528924
bow drill method would be easiest, and avoids blisters. make the drill and board out of same wood (ray mears says that you don't need different hardness of wood and I trust him). try and concentrate on technique while doing it rather than brute force. it's actually pretty easy but can be frustrating before you have the technique down.
>>
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>>1528924
>Any tips for primitive fire making?
Bring a friend.
>>
teach me
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>>1529944
Lmao go outside
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>>1529944
I'm not your father, anon.
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>>1529187
I've always wondered why none of the idiots on shows like Naked and Afraid never do this. So much better than taking turns on a bow drill. Morons.
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>>1530051
Ignorance and their frame of mind for their imagination isn't up to par. Figuring something out like that without someone teaching it to you often times requires an epiphany. Which is normally crushed in modern schools along with imagination. Also, if you make things too easy on reality TV you tend to lose viewers, or so goes the mentality of the producers behind the shows at least. Most of the crap I've seen on those shows stems from ignorance, inexperience, and/or outright drumming up drama for viewers. As such I make sure not to watch that shit and I advise you not to watch it either. Instead, I suggest you search up "Ray Mears" tv shows. There's tons of them of all kinds. Some have some really good insight, skills, and methodologies.

>Ray Mears - Wildlife - Bush-Craft - Survival - Woodsman - Up To
>39.24 GiB
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:80e1ae4fb0e6c4f8cdee023dabdbb61af28d80d6&dn=Ray+Mears+-+Wildlife+-+Bush-Craft+-+Survival+-+Woodsman+-+Up+To+&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.leechers-paradise.org%3A6969&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fzer0day.ch%3A1337&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fopen.demonii.com%3A1337&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.coppersurfer.tk%3A6969&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fexodus.desync.com%3A6969

>The Ray Mears Collection
>25.86 GiB
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:487f2cf2f1db2af6ce74bea666a54c95f9235325&dn=The+Ray+Mears+Collection&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.leechers-paradise.org%3A6969&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fzer0day.ch%3A1337&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fopen.demonii.com%3A1337&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.coppersurfer.tk%3A6969&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fexodus.desync.com%3A6969

I think rarbg also has some of the Australia tv shows he did, but I'm not sure how good those are.
>>
>>1528924
Material selection is 90% of the battle. If it aint dry, you aint gonna get it burning. Take time to find dry materials because it will save you a lot of stress later.

Learn how to make tinder if it isn't readily available in your area in all seasons. Things like feather sticks, char cloth etc.

Always make sure you have about 10x as much tinder and kindling available as you think you'll need. Nothing worse than getting a coal going (after much effort) only to have it go out because you didn't have enough fuel prepped and ready.

If you're going to do anything more complicated than a hand drill or fire saw/plow, bring your own cordage. Field made cordage is shit and breaks way to easily. Paracord is cheap and there's no reason you shouldn't have some with you while /out/.
>>
>>1530062
I've seen these links before but don't understand how to use them. Can you explain?
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>>1530063
Is plant fiber cordage really shit? From what I've seen it works just as good as your average rope
>>
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>>1530080
Magnet links are used with torrent programs. Like utorrent (only use version 2.2.1), like so, or other such program. You can also have your web browser automatically send magnet links and .torrent files to your torrent program; so that when you click on them/paste them into the browser address they automatically load into the program and start downloading.
>>
>>1530082
>Is plant fiber cordage really shit?

Not at all. It all depends on how well you process it. Some of the processing is chemical, not just physical. Like fermentation is needed for flax (called "retting") to release the fibers correctly. For others you need to use an ash solution (lye) to soak it in, like when making cordage from willow bark. Just learning to make whithies from thin tree limbs requires a correct technique and lots of practice. Regardless of the type of cordage you are making you will be putting in lots of work, skill, and knowledge to do it. When done correctly, and the right cordage is paired to the task needing to be done, it will work well. You must also keep in mind that bad techniques, when using cordage, can also play a huge role in how it will perform. For instance, with a bow drill, you must angle the bow just so-so then the cordage won't be rubbing against itself. If you hold the bow at a 90-degree angle to the spindle then the cordage will rub against itself, get hot, shred itself, and eventually break. If you don't know that then you can break cordage all day long and think that paracord, which will have less friction due to its "slickness", is the only thing that will work. It too can be worked incorrect, and it will eventually break, if you keep using it incorrectly.
>>
>>1530102
This is good tips thank you.

>>1530063
I found a decent piece for a hand drill and have had it indoors since last year. Just haven't been pursuing primitive tasks.

If I can get the tiniest spark or ember I can make flame. Of this I am confident. Been making fire practically since I could talk and just have never conquered the primitive methods.

Regarding bringing cordage that is cheating. Primitive is primitive.

>>1528985
But bow drill requires cordage. That shit doesnt happen fast.

Does fire plow compare to hand drill in efficiency/function? Anyone with experience?
>>
>>1530234
>Anyone with experience?

I highly suggest making cordage instead. However, just a hand drill will top everything in simplicity and speed of material gathering/making. The problem with using a hand drill is that they can seriously wear your hands out. You can rub your hands to bleeding blisters in a matter of minutes if your hands are not toughened up from experience with a hand drill. Even with lots of experience the materials might not be just right and the process of making fire might take a much longer time; which will start to blister your hands. Some flat types of shoe/sandal soles can work, just wear the shoes on your hands and go at it, but usually you are not wearing that type when innawoods (and don't use your shoe/boot laces a cordage for a bow drill unless you have a spare set). Leather gloves and rubber gardening gloves can work well, but their fit can cause blisters if they are loose. snow gloves don't work well at all and you'll just tear them up.

So, if you are going to be doing ANY hand drill fire starting in the future, I suggest you gather up some materials, take them home, and practice in your living room making embers with them. Go slow at first so you can learn how to correctly spin the spindle without screwing up your hands. Once you are confident, go faster. Remember, a bow drill will still be more forgiving on your hands even if you need to make 3 lengths of cordage in the end. Because, blisters on your hands is really something you do not want innawoods. So, get good at both making cordage and just hand drilling.

Now, the fire plough, egads I hate those things. They wear me out far more than a hand drill does, but they don't produce blisters. If you have lots of food to spare then a fire plough will be just fine if you want the workout and don't mind spending the extra calories. If your hands are hurting or blistered then using a fire plough may be the way to go if you can't make cordage. They are easy on the hands at least.
>>
>>1530251
Thank you for the info!

I have decent experience with making cordage out of grasses or pine root and will have to just give it a shot making a fire bow with some. Any other recommended cordage materials for southern New England? I have heard willow bark is the best but they are rather uncommon in my area and would feel badly killing a tree just for a non essential activity despite it being a practical skill to develop.
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>>1530732
Stinging nettle will be the best that is easily grown and replenished. You can also eat it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQHvqWCN5Eo
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>>1530732
>>1530746
I also forgot that Dogbane is also really good for making cordage during the late fall, winter, and early spring. You need to use the dead stuff from the previous season.
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>>1530062
I downloaded "The Ray Mears Collection" and i got just some corupted videos :c
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>>1530234
there's a technique i saw ray mears do that just required some feathered bamboo I'll look it up. here ya go https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iorMVR7a4zY
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>>1530234
>That shit doesnt happen fast.
nothing happens fast. if you are going primitive, you don't have a knife so you need to knap one first. then find wood that you can split with it to make your friction plate, cordage isn't that hard, most time would be spent finding the correct plant fibres. you can make stuff that is pretty close to paracord strength i believe.
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>>1531223
Try the other magnet link and only have it download the ones that were corrupted.

>>1531261
>you don't have a knife so you need to knap one first.
The first edged tool you should make is an "Oldowan" They are fast and simple to make and you can knap one out in a few seconds. It will be more than sufficient to help split a small piece of wood for fire making. After that you can make something more refined and useful around the campfire.
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>>1531261
You dont need to knap out a tool for those tasks. Just smash a couple rocks and take a few sharp pieces that are shaped for your needs. Also new England has shit for knappable stone. But for me the practice of primitive skills is the ultimate preparedness for survival situations and the less involved the creation of a fire tool the better to my mind.

>>1531272
Cool bit of terminology. Now I can sound fancy when I tell people about making a stone tool. Thank you.
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Everytime I learn about something primitive it gets more complex like: I can make cordage from plants, then I need specific plants, and even then some require treatment and soaking in water for hours and even after all that you have learn to use the cordage correctly so you don't break it.
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You guys think I good tame a squirrel or cat for foraging and hunting?
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>>1533831
No this is real life not an anime.
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>>1533831
Yes,... but you'll need to be good with training animals and all that. The best you can get from a cat will be rabbits, but you really are better off training a dog to hunt with you. Then it can tree an animal and you can shoot the animal. A squirrel will require more feed than it can harvest for you, but you can still train it to gather things for you. These are not easy things to accomplish.

>>1533827
Yeah, people throw the word "primitive" around as though modern tech is less complicated. Regardless "doing it" and "doing it right" are two different things as you are learning. Some of this stuff is so specialized that the entire village would have 1-2 people who could do those things really well and everyone else mostly went to them for those products or training. Later comes trade when one village does better at one thing than everyone else and has a product to trade for. Thus, arises civilization.
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Why do all the primitive type threads drop to the 10 page so quickly?
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>>1535980
Cus shits gay
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>>1535990
you're gay, faggot
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>>1536271
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>>1535980
I would wager a guess that the main reasons are that there are no products to shill or obsess over and all the activities/projects take a fair amount of time and effort which alienates a lot of people.

>>1536271
I always forget about this method. Probably a lot less rough on natural cordage as well...

>>1536272
Has anyone tried this with other materials? Bamboo is not something available in my area and I would be curious what alternatives people have found functional. I would imagine dried out pine roots could work rather well. The thicker ones you wouldn't even need to manufacture. Down side being the dry out period.
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>>1537795
>which alienates a lot of people.
I agree. I like these threads because I like learning new things, I like teaching things that I learn, and teaching things to other people is another really good way to better understand the things you learned. Though, the latter aspect is better done in person of course.

>a lot less rough on natural cordage as well...
It really is. There's is almost no friction on the cordage. though, I think they are better used as a drill instead of a fire starter, unless you happen to have one you already made and need a fire,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEl-Y1NvBVI

>Has anyone tried this with other materials?
You don't need to use bamboo, thankfully. I've not personally tried it myself. I tend to stay away from things that look like extra work or extra weight. I think the bamboo fire saw is one of the ones you sorta need bamboo (pic).
https://www.primitiveways.com/Fire%20Thong.html

Have you tried the Fire Roll/Rudiger Roll method? There's quite a few tutorials about how to do it,
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9uyOhEgnig7r56r6g-qNuw
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How do I make ice fire for summer and food preservation?
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>>1539633
>ice fire
?
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What do u guys think of this
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More grass rop
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>>1522090
You bet I did, took all the cord home. Used the real shitty string for pea trellis and even today I carry some of it on my keys every day

On another slightly unrelated point, some of the paracird was kinda stiff, but I often keep a small hank I'm my pocket just to play around with knots when I'm bored, any way, recently washed a pair of pants with a hank of it still in pocket, and th3 cord came out supple and workable

Not sure what that means or the heat of the wash has impacted the strength of the cord, I would assume so
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Primitive "tech" is a meme
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>>1541856
>.t 64th poster ITT



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