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Old thread: >>1506735

=Search terms=

Agrarian - Agriculture - Agrology - Agronomy - Aquaculture - Aquaponics - Berkeley Method Hot Composting - Cold Frames - Companion Planting - Composting - Container Gardening - Co-operative Farming - Core Gardening Method - Cultivation - Deep Water Culture (DWC) - Dry Farming - Espalier - Farmer's Market - Forest Gardening - Forestry - Fungiculture - Geoponics - Greenhouses - Homesteading - Horticulture - Hot Boxes - Hugelkultur - Humanure - Hydroponic Dutch Bucket System - Keyhole Garden - Korean Natural Farming - Kratky Method - Landscaping - Lasagna Gardening - Ley Farming - Market Garden - Mittlieder Method - Mulching - No-till Method - Ollas Irrigation - Orchard - Permaculture - Plasticulture - Polyculture - Polytunnels - Propagation - Rain Gutter Garden - Raised Beds - Ranch - Rooftop Gardening - Ruth Stout No-work Garden - Sharecropping - Shifting Cultivation - Soil-bag Gardening - Square Foot Gardening - Straw Bale Gardening - Subsistence Agriculture - Sugar Bush - Truck Farming - Vermiculture - Vertical Gardening - Window Frame Garden - Windrow Composting

Agouti - Alpaca - Animal Husbandry - Antelope - Beefalo - Black Soldier Fly (BSF) - Brushturkey - Capybara - Cattle - Cavy - Chickens - Coypu - Crayfish - Curassow - Dairy - Deer - Donkey - Dove - Ducks - Fish - Game Birds - Geese - Giant Guinea Pigs (Cuy) - Goats - Grouse - Guan - Guineafowl - Hedgehog - Heliciculture - Honey Bees - Iguanas - Llama - Ostrich - Partridges - Pheasant - Pigeon - Pigs - Poultry - Quail/Bobwhite - Rabbits - Rats (Cricetomy/Thryonomy) - Sheep - Snails - Tegu - Toads - Trumpeter - Turkey - Worms

=Resources=

General Info & Anon-created Guides: https://pastebin.com/881uwKXG
Check >>>/an/plant for the non-food sister thread.

=Archives=

•1-161:
https://www.mediafire.com/file/t0rb5nuqbpq80ss/1-161.7z
•162-171:
https://www.mediafire.com/file/8c54zhwk8ddu7e5/162-171.7z
>>
Can I grow cucumber in a bucket? I know they're a vine plant but does the vine re-root at certain points of soil contact or can there be one "root core" that produces fruiting vines?
>>
>>1511530
They do very well on a trellis. A big container will be fine for them.
>>
>>1511340
Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuucccccccccccccccccckkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk


I forgot to put them in the fridge and the leaves were super unhappy when I got back home. I put some fresh water in the jars and put them in the fridge. Are they fucked? I don't want these for eating, I just want the bulbs to live through the following summer and winter so the patch can start growing next year in my forest.

I should just kms ffs.... such a tard.
>>
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WE HAVE THIS THREAD ALL YEAR
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>>1511589
Gardening is a year-round job. Even in the winter there's stuff to do.
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>>1511593
very true anon. First year growing parsley from seed, realized I need to start them early February.
>>
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Still cant believe how well the rosemary has done. I have them inside for the night as they were soaking up fert all day and didn't get any light.
>>
>>1511650
Damn, are those the same rosemary seedlings I saw being posted when they were a couple centimeters tall? They seem to have done well.
>>
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>>1511651
lol yes, this was from March 3rd
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>>1511651
I did find it quite interesting that when watered normally the leaves start to fold underneath.
In the current temps 50s-70sF I water them once per 2 weeks and they grow great.
>>
>>1511654
AFAIK they grow native in the dry parts of the mediterranean. They might not like excess water for that reason. I left my house for a week to go to the cottage and came to back find that the summer heat had obliterated all my herbs, except for the rosemary.
>>
>>1511655
yes it was interesting reading about it.
I have to go get some grow bags tomorrow for them. I've given away 5 or so but still have 8 left lol.
>>
>>1511656
If you live in a warm enough climate, they apparently are perennials. I live in the wasteland known as Ontario, Canada, so I bring my plants inside for the winter, but I've always wanted a rosemary hedge.
>>
>>1511657
I'm 5b so I think I'm going to need to bring them in for the winter. Though I was thinking about next year sacrificing two of them to see what happens.
>>
>>1511657
Have you considered moving to a first world country?
>>
>>1511658
You're in the same zone as me. I've tried it and they died. Maybe with enough mulch it could work, but I think the zone is just too cold for it.

>>1511659
Once I've finished my schooling I intend to get out of this wasteland of a country.
>>
>>1511662
>but I think the zone is just too cold for it.
probably, but I'm gonna try.
Everything I read said its difficult to grow from seed so I said fuck it and planted 20 seeds...
>they all came up
>>
is this thread welcoming of cannabis yet? I mean shit, I grow it amongst my vegetable garden
>>
>>1511673
Don't post anything that breaks federal US law. Seriously. It may be legal to grow at the state level in some places, but honestly just don't even bother. Give it another 5~10 years.
>>
>>1511673
There is one psychotic /pol/ack moderator who would nuke any cannabis posts. Don't know if he is still here after the 4chan - 4channel transition... I hope not.
>>
>>1511568
Just plant them and they should recover in a few says or less.
>>
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>>1511589
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>>1511673
No, fuck off with that shit. Entire threads turn into a fucking drama fest and half of it gets nuked later. Common sense says not to post it.
>>
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Jut finished this one yesterday. Took me 2 days to make it without power tools.
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>>1511820
That's pretty good. What will you be growing?
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>>1511820
Pretty precise cuts for a batonny chop chop, anon.
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>>1511589
>>1511817
yay
>>
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My cucumbers aren't looking too hot. Anyone know what's going on with them?
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>>1511896
were gonna need bigger sticks
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>>1511903
What do you mean?
>>
>>1511909
it was a joke, you had skewers next to the plants and it make me think about the movie Jaws.

I wouldn't worry, they look fine, mine look the same. New growth has good color.
>>
>>1511912
Alright I see.
Thanks for the help.
>>
>>1511896
Too much water and not enough sun. The soil need to drain well. Cucumbers are not that good for indoor growing.
>>
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The lotus seeds are in the pond and the water temps are warm enough. I put some fencing around the spot to prevent the water fowl from eating the seedlings. It is in a shallower area, but I'll dig them up and move them to a deeper spot in the fall before things freeze.
>>
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The main garden is moving right along. I still have tons of tomato plants to plant and soil to mix.
>>
>>1511922
That might be right, they're pretty damp.
I think it might still be too cold to have them outside yet.
>>
>>1511929
55F/12.7C night time temps is all they need. If it is like 40F/4.4C then you can simply cover them at night to prevent frost problems. Lower temps will need a piece of plastic to help warm the soil during the day, but vented to prevent them from cooking then closed off to hold warm air at night.
>>
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>>1511922
I fugged a few of mine.
Left them inside for 2 days with no light lol
They seem to be rebounding fine.
Thank god they grow so fast, going to throw some seeds in the ground as well.
>>
>>1511940
Damn. Yeah, they really don't like tiny pots either and need transplanted ASAP once they get 2 true leaves. They go into "mature mode" faster than most plants it seems. That changes their light and nutrient requirements and indoor lights/small pots make that apparent pretty quickly.
>>
>>1511945
nah, been doing them in soil blocks for years. Never had any issues other than my stupidity this time. We were going through plants and separating them for us and other people, completely forgot they were on the indoor racks.
We usually let them get about a foot long with roots popping out everywhere before planting them.
>>
>>1511948
tiny pots =/= soil blocks
>>
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ITS TOO COLD
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>>1511958
k
>>
>>1511962
I miss the sun.
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>>1511962
>65-75F at night all week
>49-32F in the next three days
>all plants are planted in open ground now
>>
>Chilli recovered from repotting trauma and is growing well again

Just hoping this weather improves
>>
>>1511972
I'm glad you are greening up that depressing view anon. Soldier on.
>>
Planted some sweet basil for the first time and it has been flooding somewhat ever since.
It’s supposed to rain off and on for at least a few more days, probably more, and I think it will be a couple weeks before the water disperses completely. I don’t think there will be standing water where I planted them, but do I need to worry? Most of what I read recommends that basil should be well-drained, but I wasn’t expecting this much water.
>>
>>1511988
You may need to plant them again. Something similar happened to mine last year.
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>>1511945
I think I made the mistake of waiting too long before transplant
I kept them in 1 gal nursery pots all the way until watering became an almost daily affair
>>
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Are there any good veggie plants that can tolerate partial shade? My garden backs up to a fence to the south(ish) that gets 4-5 hours of sun, and the typical crowd don't grow well next to it. Radishes are doing fine there, but I need something to fill their place over the summer months. Zone 6-7, depending on the weather.
>>
>>1512065
https://www.almanac.com/content/garden-plan-vegetables-grow-partial-shade
>>
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>>1511525
First batch of Cherry Tomatoes. It's now out of season here in Florida for them the plant is dying from the heat.
>>
>>1512129
Nice. Mine are just forming their first tomatoes. It gets 110F in the sun here in my garden, how hot does it get there?
>>
>>1512065
I happen to have this open in another tab.

https://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/shade-tolerant-vegetables-zm0z11zsto
>>
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Last year I bought a bunch of ramps off a local farmer and planted them in my relatives' forest. I spend the rest of the year freaking out about how they might have all died. Finally went to check on them and it looks like I had nearly 100% survival.

This year I added another 120 plants. Gonna add plants and sow seeds every year now until I have my own monster patch.
>>
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>>1512198
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>>1512199
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>>1512200
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>>1512201
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>>1512198
That's good to read, ramp farmer. They are really doing well. I wish I had a source for live plants locally. The ramp season is at an end here already. The ramp seedlings are starting to turn yellow while the mature ramps' leaves are already starting to rot (bottom pic). The place looks like some one threw out a bunch of banana peels. Hopefully, several of them will flower this season.
>>
>>1511530
yeah, however mine have not done anywhere near as well in containers

>>1511962
frost tonight

at least it will be sunny and warmer next week
>>
>>1512221
Hmmm, whenever I see yellow leaves I assume either over-watering or mineral deficiency. How is your soil? Is it really clay-rich or not very full of organic matter?
>>
>>1511589
New meme here?
>>
>>1512288
That is the normal life cycle of ramps. They only have leaves for a short time in spring, the leaves died back, and flowers pop up. There won't be leaves again until next year. Everyone goes out this time of year, harvests tons of wild ramps, and have ramp dinners and festivals.
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>>1512289
No, this >>1511817 has been posted for a couple years now
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How far should my grow light be from my seedlings? Most people seem to put them close as shit but this is an 8 bulb t5 and I feel like that would be too hot.

Middle left is tomatoes/tomatillos, middle right is cucumber and okra, sides are microgreens and random hydroponic stuff.
>>
>>1512406
t5s - 5-6 inches
>>
>>1512429
I feel like that would cook them, maybe with 4 lights it would be ok but with 8 the temp is upwards of 90 at that distance.
>>
>>1512430
with what you have your not getting the heat of 8 bulbs. 5-6 inches is what I do.
You can check guggle if you want.
>https://youtu.be/XEVDoJrnD7w?t=89
>>
>>1512434
lowered the light a bit and put a thermometer in, if they look good in the morning/the heat is decent ill lower it more. Probably around 10 inches now. Thanks!
>>
>>1512438
roger
>>
>>1511824
Haven't decide yet. I've been late with seedlings this year, so i think i will borrow some from my neighbors greenhouse.
>>
>>1512430
>>1512406
Check the manufacturer's recommendations, if you are using a legit grow light. When I used fluro shop lights I kept them about 2-4 inches away from the leaves and kept moving them up as the plants grew. They never burned so long as they didn't touch. Now that I have all LED shop lights the plants can grow up and touch the lights since there's almost no heat at all. Though, I try to keep them about 6 inches away for better coverage.
>>
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looking into getting into raised bed life and was sent here by /plant/ on /an/. are they legit or a meme and a bother to fill up? I'm looking to get one that is around 75cm tall. how daunting would that be to fill up?

can I fill half or 1/3 of it up with logs, branches and sticks etc then the next part with cheaper soil then finish it off with a premium soil? or will that just fuck with the growth?

I can just fill the bed up with stuff I would put in a compost bin right? before putting my premium potting soil on top to finish it off?

I currently have stuff going in pots but I want to try and get a legit garden spot set up. its autumn /winter here now so I am hopping to get something ready by spring

also people normally just fill it with potting soil as opposed to garden soil?
>>
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Not the prettiest garden out there, but it's getting the job done. The peppers have exploded with growth ever since I got them in the ground the other day. You can compare with the extra one that didn't make his way into the garden like the others as he doesn't have as much leafy growth. I suspect a lot of this has to do with the native soil I'm planting in. It's kinda hard to tell in this pic, but the soil it literally jet black. I'm not sure why this section of my yard has such rich soil; I've never done anything to it, but I'm not complaining.
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>>1512542
Raised bed anon here. Raised beds are a specific type of tool for use in specific situations. Thee are many types, but they basically boil down to 3 types: borderless, bordered, then hugelkultur or flat. You can use hugelkultur or flat with or without a boarder. Each version is a bit different. With such a tall bed as one of your requirements, a hugelkultur raised bed would probably be better for you. Doubly so because it uses logs, limbs, and branches as its base. They can be very tall. If you want a flat top bed then such a tall bed can be very specific due to the fact most vegetables don't need such a massive amount of extra root space and will do fine with a much shorter bed. My raised beds are 16"/40cm tall and flat topped. I can sit down on the block walls and work comfortably. Since that is what I intended, they work well for me. Other people prefer shorter beds or borderless beds for the types of gardening methods they use.

>a bother to fill up?
>75cm

At that height, it will take a long time to fill, but only if you don't have the materials to fill it right away. Raised beds are a once-and-done type of thing for the most part. They don't normally need to be tilled, especially if you rotate your crops and have tubers that need dug up in that cycle. In the end, they are less work over the long term, but more work in the beginning when building them. I suggest gathering up all required materials and building & filling them all in one go. Each season you will want to add a layer of compost about 2"/5cm thick over it. You can also use a thick layer of mulch instead of compost, which will decompose and help build the soil over the years.

>potting soil

Vegetables need a loam soil and not a potted plant soil. Loam is the "garden soil" you are referring to. If you choose to do hugelkultur I recommend that you don't dig a pit. That's just lots of hard work without much benefit.

https://www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/many-benefits-hugelkultur
>>
>>1512558
There may have been a garden there long long ago and the black earth is the humus that was left behind. It may also have been a burn pile area where a charcoal layer was left behind. There's nothing wrong with either, but you may need to amend the soil with some compost, sand, and/or clay depending on its current makeup. you should get a liquid soil test kit (Luster Leaf Rapitest Soil Test Kit). That can give you the best idea of the local soil and what you should do to make it better, in regards to pH and fertilizer. You can also do a, "percolation test," to see how quickly the soil drains.
>>
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>delivery of 13 tons of semi-aged cow manure

My back hates me, but my garden loves me.
>>
>>1512718
does anyone else get to score manure for free
>>
>>1512728
Story time, anon. Always interested in potential sources for free amendments.
>>
>>1512728
The manure is free for the taking, but getting it from there to here costs a lot of money. Either in fuel for my own vehicle or a delivery fee. The shorter the distance between A and B then the cheaper it will be all around.

>>1512750
>Always interested in potential sources for free amendments.
Drive around your local area and look for cows or horses. If there are horses then look for a barn, stables, or run-in they will spend lots of time in. In summer the run-in will be where they stay most of their time to get away from flies and that will be the easiest way to get piles of manure when there's no barn or stables. Just stop by the owner's house and ask about manure. You'll probably need to muck stalls for horse manure. For cow manure the farmers normally have equipment like tractors with front end buckets to pile up the manure. They can usually load up your truck for you or you'll need to shovel it yourself. Horse manure it really light weight when compared to cow manure. So, don't overload your vehicle with cow manure by accident.

Large chicken, pig, and rabbit farms will have lots of manure that needs moved. The really large chicken/pig farms will have a slurry pond that is pretty much liquid shit. You'd need buckets or drums with lids that seal correctly to harvest that unless you dredge for solid. Not a fun job. Rabbit manure is really easy to collect. Pig, rabbit and chicken manures are very nutrient hot and very high in nitrogen so it will need to age a long time or you will need to "side dress" it to prevent root burn in plants.

Most other farm animals aren't concentrated into smaller areas, but sometimes you can find a farm that does keep their animals in a smaller area and who need to deal with piles of manure. The general consensus is, "People keep stopping by and asking about the manure, but no one actually comes back to get it." Oddly enough, farms that sell manure actually move more manure out than those that give it freely.
>>
im currently experimenting with a raised bed in my back yard.

the yard wasnt maintained for years so it was 90% weeds. not much grass at all. im not sure how to go about preparing the raised bed though.

ive mowed the weeds down with the lowest mower setting and ive heard that you can lay newspaper down over the grass and cover it with soil to kill it. my problem is that i only made the bed 6 inches deep and I dont know if not having access to the soil underneath would ruin the whole thing.

my other option is just digging the crap out of the area under the bed and hoping for the best and/or trying to kill the weeds and roots with boiling water

im completely new and really have no idea what im doing so any help is appreciated
>>
>>1512774
>ive mowed the weeds down with the lowest mower setting

That was the first mistake. When cut, weeds and grass can more easily punch up through newspaper or mulch. Uncut weeds and grass that is laid over tends to be unable to punch up through. If you use cardboard as the bottom layer you probably won't have trouble. The newspaper and cardboard both rot easily enough. The vegetable roots will be able to easily penetrate that layer the following year. Since you will only have 6" of soil over that layer, you should consider using mulch during the hot season. That will cool the soil cool and retain more water. You will only need more soil if you are planting tubers, but even then you can mound up soil for those plants as needed. Each season you can add more compost & soil to build up and maintain the current level.

>digging and boiling water

That would work to some extent, but it is a lot of work. Using the mulching and layering method you can skip the work, kill the weeds, and not disturb the past 20 years of weed seeds still waiting below the original surface.
>>
>>1512786
thanks! im going to go with the cardboard route. heres my current plan, let me know if im making any more mistakes

lay down cardboard over area of the bed +1 foot on each side
lay newspaper over holes or thin parts of the cardboard
wet cardboard and newspaper
put down raised bed and fill with soil
>>
>>1512800
That should work, but try to use cardboard over the holes instead of newspaper. I'm usually able to get cardboard boxes from dumpsters behind stores after asking an employee and describing what I'm using it for.
>>
Any strawberry experts around?

I have a couple of strawberry plants in containers that I planted last year. The plants still appear brown and super dry, but there is new growth beneath. Do I cut away the old dried out plant to allow the new growth to get more sun?

Also, one plant has clear worms (or maggots) playing in my soil. I think they are feeding on the roots. Any advice on getting rid of them?
>>
>>1512831
Repot them, with new soil, trim the dead away.
>>
spray paint or use a brush to paint the top of my sun hat white?
>>
>>1512845
Spray is easiest and fastest for drying. Do 3 coats.
>>
>>1512851
thanks anon.
>>
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>>1512836
Thanks anon
>>
>first year starting from seed
>take ultra care in growing them
>after a month and something they are ready, transplant them 2 days ago
>hail just destroyed everything, not a single plant survived
how to cope
>>
I read that you can root tomato suckers for another plant.

Does this also work for determinate varieties?
>>
Is there any good way of removing lots of stones fairly quickly. Do you guys use buckets or a pickup truck or some combination of the two? I am trying to remove all the stones from a section of land where I just started preparing to plant and it is taking forever.
>>
What peppers are you guys growing this year?
>>
>>1512868
Plant more seeds and get some starts from a local greenhouse, nursery, or other store.

>>1512873
There's a small chance they will and a large chance they won't. Most people end up with a nice little plant that has roots, but no blooms and no more growth. If a blooming section is used there's a chance it will finish that fruiting cycle and do nothing more. I'm sure there's some chemical signal it needs in order to keep growing. It'd be interesting to figure that out.

>>1512882
I do it by hand for larger ones. For smaller ones in lose enough soil or other material I'll sift the gravel out. Hardware cloth, rabbit cage wire, and fence wire provide good sized holes for various sized stones you want to remove. Just put the "screen" over a bucket or wheelbarrow and shovel on the soil and shake. That is faster than any other manual method I know of. For my garden soil that isn't being used for seedlings in a tray I just remove the stones as I see them. That takes years since I'm not actively trying to remove them by tilling and searching. Large stones get removed ASAP since they can break equipment.

For moving them I use buckets, wheelbarrow, and rarely a truck. All the stones get reused for other projects. Small ones go into gravel paths/driveway, while larger ones go to piles for building things.

>>1512884
King of the North
Gypsy Bell
Hungarian Wax
>>
>>1512886
>Plant more seeds and get some starts from a local greenhouse, nursery, or other store.
Luckily i seeded 3x what i needed so i have enough leftovers to cover for it but it still sucks.
>>
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>>1512769
>read first sentence of reply
>instant light bulb.gif
Thanks anon. Just got back from neighbor's who will be dropping (hehehe) by next week with trailer full of horsey doody. Saves him time/expense of trip to transfer station. Agreed on another delivery in 6mos. and gotta referral for a source of hardwood chips/bark.
>Tip of the cap to ya

Finalizing drip irrigation for plants under patio. Wat a pain. Not nearly as excruciating as weeding, though. Finished with that last week. Ahhhhh, now to rest.
>>
>>1512907
Only the ones for the feel-good PR news articles are edible. None of the others are edible. I've yet to see one degrade within a single season.
>>
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>>1512903
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Another year, another progress pic in the making. This is 26 days of garlic growth, starting when the very first one popped out of the ground.
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>>1512886
Interesting. I might try it if there's a sucker with no flowers or after the plant is done flowering.
Thanks for the heads up.
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>>1512955
>after the plant is done flowering.

You need to do it before it ever flowers if you hope to get it to grow anything. There's something about the flowering/fruiting stage that stops the growth in the mature plant.
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My ducks are too dumb to go into their coop out of the rain. They don't like the rain but will sit under a nearby tree and sleep anyways.
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>>1512884
grande jalapeno
Spanish mammoth
bull nose
cayenne
banana
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>>1512967
Theyre ducks. Why would they care about sky water?
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Does anyone know what these bugs are called? I've always called them tomato bugs. They are all over my squash plants and there isn't any visible damage, but I'd like to know. Am in NW Florida zone 9a if that's needed information.
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>>1512998
https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/weekly_Q&A/p&dc_12.htm
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>>1513001
thank you, I really appreciate it.
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>Broccoli is flourishing with the constant rain.
Feels good man. I should plant more leafy greens next year, and expand my short beds for them.
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>>1513023
I've been eating a lot of wild greens as the mustard and chard in my garden grows larger.
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>>1513023
>Plant lots of greens last year
>They get toasted when the weather goes from winter to ultra summer in 1 week
>Say I'm never going to bother again
>See the extended cool weather this year

Sometimes I think the weather is out to fuck with me
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>>1512831
>Do I cut away the old dried out plant to allow the new growth to get more sun?
yes

mine are looking great with all the rain
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>>1513040
Grow them at the end of winter before spring inside cold frames.
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>>1511972
Do you add some Epsom salt when you repot things? Apparently it helps for transplant shock.
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>>1513080
Grow them year round,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qwyFEmTsmM
https://www.youtube.com/user/OneYardRevolution

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJxMDVLZH48
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChpjAlQ8EZ2BfShQlYzwUDQ
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>>1513095
>effectively turning zone 5 into zone 8
So if im zone 7 this turns it into zone 9/10 I can grow citrus or anything during winter with this?
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Anyone have stepover apples? I like the idea of fencing off my garden beds with apple trees, and I'd like to know if anyone has any experience with it. I've heard that M27 rootstock is needed, but I'm wondering if it could be done with other rootsocks.
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>>1513151
If the temps remain high enough during that time, yes. That's how greenhouses work.

>>1513164
That's pretty neat sounding.
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>>1512688
>At that height, it will take a long time to fill, but only if you don't have the materials to fill it right away.

thanks mate. for filling what I currently have are a bunch of chopped up branches. maybe 2meters by 30cm worth of logs which I can put in the base.

can I fill the rest up with shredded paper and cardboard before adding soil/potting mix for the final 1/3?

or is too much paper bad for it? I can probably fill up a chunk with yard scrap like weeds and stuff?
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>>1511525
I scattered 2 packes worth of corn seeds over a plot of squishy-clump soil, put some watermelons under 2 trees, put the peas wherever, and put some spinach in some pots. I will post the results in a month (probably). Thanks for everything bros.
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>>1513322
The birds are going to have a field day.
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>>1513336
>implying bords don't have a field day every day
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>>1513315
Yes, that would work. Just put a thick layer of soil over it.
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>>1513402think for my soil portion I can use a good chunk of cheap shit stuff then top it off with a better know brand soil or will the cheap stuff fuck it up for the rest of the soil lol
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>>1513405
>cheap soil

That's funny. Don't worry about it.
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>>1513413
Not all soil is created equal anon.
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>>1513436
Yeah, but price and even brand name doesn't mean a thing. You have to have it right in front of you in order to determine if it is any good or not. The same brand name in one state can have completely different soil by the same brand name in another state. That's because it is usually locally sourced from a variety of sources and only certain metrics remain the same like NPK levels and drainage.
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>>1511525
Also
>People laying down cardboard that are coated in chemicals to improve smoothness.
>They are going to leech formaldehyde and heavy metals into the ground for their plants.
Do whatever just don't give your tainted food to other people.
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>>1513440
pardon?
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>>1513449
scare tactic
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>>1513449
There's info on it in the OP pastebin under the bioremediation stuff. It isn't really worth concerning yourself with for the most part, but something you can easily avoid without problems.
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>>1513454
>>1513455
thanks for info
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>>1513440
what hell hole are you from that cardboard is coated in formaldehyde and heavy metals?
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>>1513466
its the same thing with anti vaxxers. They take any chemical name and make it sound like its deadly.
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>>1513466
Recycled cardboard has heavy metals in it.
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Is yellowing of the lowermost leaves a universal sign of nitrogen deficiency? It happened to my tomato plants a while back when they were still potted inside and some 1/2 strength 12-6-8 did them just fine.

Now my basil (also potted, indoors) is going through the same thing and I'm wondering if I can just assume that it's nitrogen deficiency and hop on the fertilizing train like I did for my tomatoes.
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Hydroponics Peppers Update.

Well they are well under way now.
Some flowers starting to appear.
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>>1513497
In contrast the ones on dirt haven't grow that much. Maybe I am underfeeding them but as I normally over-water everything I am playing safe with them.
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>>1513499
hydro tends to grow faster, I recently transferred a Carolina reaper that was tiny to hydro and growth has boosted.
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>>1513497
>>1513499

My guys in soil are growing pretty slowly since transferring them outside into aero-pots. They're all fruiting like crazy though so it sort of seems like, since being transplanted, they've just decided to put all of their energy into the fruit instead of growing more. We'll see how they turn out.
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Alright /out/doorsmen, those cunt squirrels have dug up my garden beds one too many times. My worthless cats won't bother with them, so I need to do something about them. I've heard spreading cayenne pepper deters them, but I've never tried it. If I buy a bulk container at costco or through work would that be effective or should I go hotter? I could grow the most insanely hot peppers I can get my hands on and make my own powder for next year (I have a dehydrator).

How do I stop these little bastards? They can't keep getting away with this.
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>>1513489
Could be overwatering too.

>>1513497
>>1513499
Oh god, bright sunlight! I haven't seen the sun all week! Looks good either way, but those Kratky ones are great.

>>1513539
Fencing, electric fencing, squirrel traps, bait station, .22LR, etc. You can also spread urine around the ground nearby. If you use urine or hot pepper, you'll need to reapply it after each rain and every few days. Thus, using hot pepper powder will be prohibitive in the amounts you'll need to use all year. I've read some people grinding up whole chicory plants, brewing a strong tisane with it and spraying plants. Chicory has like 8-9 distinct bitter compounds in it with 2 being the primaries. The older the plant the more there will be in it. I don't know the success rate on that though. I just use a .22LR and a frying pan.
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>>1511896
Cant be below 14 degrees C at all
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Dropped temperatures.
Cloudy skies everywhere here.
The chard grows larger.
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>everyone else just raises pigs no problems
>get pigs both immediately die from some malady
>get ducks
>one go missing no noise no feathers anywhere


Im so shit at everything
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Got some aphids in the garden, looks like they're clustering around the snap peas, mostly. Both the snap peas and lettuce are coming out super soon, leaving behind kale, tomatoes, zucchini, and carrots, plus my peppers in buckets next to the bed.

Are those things that remain susceptible to aphids? Should I go for some soap treatment or just leave 'em be with the lettuce and snap peas coming out in the next week?
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>>1513555
Sudden pig death usually occurs from bleeding out via ulcers in the stomach and from lung infections. "Twisted gut" is also a quick killer.

>ducks
What breed? Some just fly away. Larger breeds like Peking can't fly. Muscovy, despite being large looking, can fly fairly well to get out of enclosures. I find it is best to baby them and give them treats 3 times a day while they are in a pen that has netting on the top. That way they get used to the fact there's plenty of food and I am not a threat. Then they get let out into the main fenced field and pond after a few days. I keep up hand feeding whenever I go out into the field or to the pond.

>>1513561
Use a stiff spray from a hose to knock off all aphids then spray with a "mild soap" and water mixture. Spread some diatomaceous earth around the base of the plants to help keep the ants farming the aphids away. Then just use a spray hose to knock of repeat offenders later on. Don't leave the aphids for later, get to it now.
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>>1513555
If your pigs just immediately died, the person who sold them to you might've known they were sick. I'd've gone to get my money back, because that's bullshit.
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>>1513477
How much?
>inb4 "a lot" hurrr
>>1513499
These guys don't look like they're happy. I'm seeing some yellowing. Have you tested the water and soil? TDS, pH, cec and so forth.
>>1513539
Forget about powders, even any you make. Deterrents don't work. Pick a lethal option if you're serious about removing the problem.
My squirrel problem increased tenfold several years back when doggo died. Neighbors on three sides of me have dogs so the furry tailed rat population exploded on my property. Deterrents were a joke and baits were meh. Zinc phosphide showed some promise early on then disappointment with continued use. Switched over to trapping with a product called squirrelinator and efficacy picked up. High maintenance tho. Also, used a tube trap made outta 4"PVC that worked good, but still high maintenance.
Now I dispatch with electrons. Took the guts from one electric fly swatter, juiced it up, and built a baited trap that dispatches the carcasses into a garbage can. Highly effective and low input.
Check out mousetrapmonday.com/category/mousetrap/ for inspiration. jootoob has endless clips of diy setups for even more ideas.
I've also lined one small section of my yard with half-inch galvanized hardware cloth. It encases a 20'x20' sq area and extending down three feet. Weed barrier below and drip irrigation above. Covering it all is red lava rock. There is a fig tree, a plum and non-fruiting plum and no more issues at all. Research showed they burrow 2.5' deep. That was of shitton of work tho. Had to move the rock prior, but them bastards were destroying the trees. Dogspeed.
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>>1513539
Shoot them and eat them. I use a pump BB gun.
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>>1513658
Get a dog sounds like a shitpost, but it is probably the most effective means of mammalian pest control (especially squirrels and rabbits, seriously fuck those bastards). The absences of predators will lead to those kinds of populations to explode to the point where they stress their environment to the point of a cascade failure. The greatest deterrent to vermin is the blood of their kin.

I also had a fenced in fruit tree orchard and raised bed vegetable garden. I even ringed the entire fence with aesthetic thorn bushes that supposedly deterred vermin. But only my Jack Russel Terrier eliminated the problem.
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>>1513539
Pellet Guns are like 300$ and the ammunition is relatively cheap. I get paid to remove rodents and squirrels and thats legit all i do. I find, I shoot, i cook, i eat.

they pay me to eat dinner
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>>1513658
>Have you tested the water and soil?
nope. It is 1/3 coco, 1/3 perlite, 1/3 normal pot mix. I really think I am underfeeding them. Also as coco adsorbs Calcium I was planting on adding that later but may try adding it on the next feeding to see if that helps.
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>>1513773
>1/3 coco, 1/3 perlite, 1/3 normal pot mix

Yeah, I think you are correct. That's essentially hydroponic growing medium. lol
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>>1513784
Yes correct. I am following one of Dr. Kratky papers on ginger but applying it to pepper as I remember he saying somewhere else that it also worked for tomatoes. I didn't want to go full force hydro feeding because of the 1/3 pot mix but I am starting to see that I am wrong and should just use nutrient mix all the time instead of alternating with just water.
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>>1513708
Sounds like a dream job, do you charge by the hour or by the carcass? Have you ever though about doing something with squirrel pelts?
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fuck, marry, kill
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>>1513773
>>1513787
The coco could be problematic beyond sequestering Ca. Even more so if using tap. TDS and pH meters are inexpensive and invaluable in such circumstances.
https://web.archive.org/web/20100529160537/http://www.usu.edu/cpl/PDF/CoconutCoirPaper.pdf
>>1513704
>>1513704
>most effective means
No doubt dogs are the best solution, but I can't commit to another friendo atm.
>squirrels could give a rats ass if their buddy's blood is nearby.
There is a vacant lot across the street filled with them where, in the past, I've tossed half eaten bodies and every once inna while a hawk will drop one. Doesn't phase those punks.
Kinda ambivalent on the bunnies as they don't really wrek shit. They love the small putting green sized lawn but don't bother anything else really. Besides, where they take refuge not far from the grass under some lilacs they leave behind a crapload of crap. Toss that crap into the compost. I consider it rent. When their numbers start climbing any number of predators will come through and keep em in check.
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Any North American wild gardeners here?

After the success of my ramp patch, I'm looking to try some other North American wild foragables. I'm trying to get my hands on American Ginseng roots, and I have some wild North American onions and garlic (A. cernuum and A. canadense). Other than that, I don't know of any other choice wild plants I could grow. I'd be interested in non-edibles if they were super endangered, but otherwise I'm looking for stuff with culinary or medicinal value.

If anyone knows of some other choice wild foraging plants I'd be interested to hear.
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>>1513981
There's several edible species of oxalis and I think wild violet is edible too. Muscadines and mulberries are also both native to the Americas, though I'm not sure if they grow as far north as Canada. That's all I've got, since that's what grows in my backyard + black walnuts/pecans.
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How to properly store seeds?
How to collect them from plants?
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>>1513918
second third first
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>>1514019
freezer. depends on the plant. no expert.
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Vacant home next to me is a blight to the neighborhood for many reasons. Grass/weeds way overgrown and haven’t mowed yet this year. Any plant seeds I could throw in the yrd that would get into the foundation or otherwise make the property less livesble so the owner doesn’t import more trash to live near me?
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Sup lads. Here are my peppers (scotch bonnet, jalapeno, habanero, carolina reaper). It's getting to the point where I think maybe I need to prune the scotch bonnet and jalapenos to encourage bushy growth, but I really don't know what I'm doing. I've even watched a couple vids on it but still don't feel sure. They've got some flowers that are just starting, but apparently lopping off the first set of flowers is also useful?
Looking for any advice as to how I should proceed. I'm tempted to just go easy-mode this year and risk a reduced yield, and do the pruning at the end of the season when I overwinter them.
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>>1514019
Extract seeds
clean seeds
Let seeds dry completely for a week or more in a cool room temp shaded area
pack seeds into a container where they won't get moisture problems or something like moths eating them

You can go one more by vacuum sealing and freezing them. Though, they will need reopened and resealed to let a tiny amount of oxygen in once or twice a year.

>>1514034
You are better off buying it and using it as buffer property.

>>1514036
Looks good. You only need to pinch out the extreme tip top of the plant to stop it grow up up and for it to bush out. That's like 1/8" of material removed; just the bud on the end. You don't need to do anything else. The peppers will start growing a lot more once things are much warmer and sunnier. I find that when not pruning, yield isn't affected at all so long as they have sun, heat, proper watering, and good nutrients. I mean I have 3 inch tall pepper plants with 2-4 peppers on them, but its been really cold and rainy since forever here.
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>Brad's Atomic Grape

The first of the tomatoes are growing faster than I imagined they would. This cultivar is outpacing all the others. I noticed that this cultivar is skinnier, but producing already. While the others are much thicker and sturdier, but have only just dropped petals to grow fruit.
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Yo famalam if you live in the midwest the mushrooms are out! I went out this weekend and found a shit ton of half free morels sadly the veteran morel hunters got all the regular kind. But half free morels are good too. Anyone else go out hunting?
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>>1514069
wow
never heard of this
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>ywn have a garden this beautiful
https://youtu.be/6GJFL0MD9fc

Why live
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>>1514078
I'm sure they are not as colorful as the saturation rich promotion photos online.

>>1514081
Land is cheap. Save up some cash and buy some land. Get to work.
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>>1514081
>New Zealand in marine climate, which lacks a dry season.
Yeah try to do that here in Spain's Mediterranean climate and then I would be impressed.
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Every so often one of the hens lays a micro egg. Sometimes there's a yolk inside and sometimes there's not.

Left is a turkey egg.
Middle is the chicken's micro egg.
Right is a chicken's normal sized egg.
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>>1513981
There are some american dewberry species, but I have no idea how to tell them apart from any other.
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>>1513981
I have some general notes on some of the stuff I grow that is wild or naturalized. This isn't a complete list, but has the most in-depth of the notes I've made.
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>>1514119
>>1513981
Another old list, but without much notation. The ones with stars were the more choice ones at the time I made the list.
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>>1514019
completely depends on the plant
let me share my fun tomato trick, though the fermenting method (if that's what it's called) is probably better

Cut the tomato in half, rub and squeeze it onto a paper towel so the seeds and goop get on it. Let it dry and store it in a bag, plastic is probably worse because if there's moisture it'll probably go bad, but that's what I've done and it's been fine.
When planting, just rip off a section with a seed and put it in the ground.

The more traditional way is to soak it in water and keep replacing the water until the goop has all gone, and then letting the seeds dry. That's probably better, but I've had good luck with my paper towel technique and it's quite easy.
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lads, It's been over a month since I've planted my bamboo it's the meme moso type, how much longer do I have to wait?
also does anyone have any experience with ephedra or tasmanian ecualyptus?
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>>1514134
From rhizome or seed? How warm is the soil? The soil temp should no lower than 68F at night and up to 86F during a sunny day. Easy to remember 86-68 or 68-86.
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>>1513982
The black walnuts sound neat - there are some trees near my home, I bet there might be some young sapling I could try to abscond with.

>>1514119
>>1514121
Thanks, those are handy to have. I recognize a few of those from my area, gonna try the purslane and lambs quarters; those grow like weeds where I live.

>>1514111
I think my relatives have them at their cottage. They've given me free access to cultivate the land as I want, so I might make a dedicated patch of them.
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>>1514141
hmm, no idea about that, but it's about room temp
>>1514156
why would I?
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Hello friends, I think my tomatoes picked up some kind of disease (leaf mold?) but I can't really get a good match to any sample pictures. The lighter sunken spots on the top side of the leaves turn into these bumps on the underside if the picture was unclear. Does anyone here have a better idea of what this might be?
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>>1511650
My rosemary grows like cuts, I cut off big chunks all the time. It's a nice plant.
Peppermint also

added a video of my peppers
https://www.bitchute.com/video/1zDQhElLJwHF/
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>>1511896
>>1511922
>>1511940
>>1511945
>>1512016
you guys should grow achocha too
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>>1514270
It could be overwatering.
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I have some tomatoes that started ripening (3 atm), but I want to harvest them all at once (most of them at least). How long can I keep an already ripe tomato on the vine? Or do I have to pick them out as soon as they turn red?
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Any thoughts on the discoloration in the lower leaves of my banana pepper plant? My serrano has it, too.
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>>1514336
Nice plants and I like the tunnel.

>>1514431
You can leave them on fairly long. It will depend a lot with temperatures, weather, and pests as to how long they can last when they are their full ripe coloration. You'll gain more experience and figure it out. Rain, isopods, and gastropods are the enemy.

>>1514432
Probably just too much water. I have tunnels over mine now to prevent rain from rotting everything.
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>>1514434
>Nice plants and I like the tunnel.
the hoop house thing? thanks
I wanted to make it on hinges to flip open but it's too hard with vining plants coming out 1 side
>>1514432
just stop watering it, peppers can take dry really well
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>>1514450
Yeah, I have similar problems with tall plants in my tunnels. I have a chard from last season that could pass for a Triffid, which is too big for me to put plastic on that tunnel. Hopefully, it won't frost in the morning. The weather report is 42F as the low, but that usually means 32F.
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Hi all,

When is the best time to harvest ramp leave and stems? I want my plants to get as much energy as possible so they can grow, but I don't want them to go yellow and die on me before I harvest them. Are there any general rules of thumb I can follow to properly time my harvest? I am in zone 5/6 Canada, so my season is likely a few weeks or more behind the schedules of most American ramp growers.
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>>1514434
>isopods, and gastropods are the enemy.
We must resist the isopod threat. At least my Broccoli are okay, for now.
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>>1514477
haha that sucks, we had a 40 night the night before last. Now every day the next 10 days is 58 minimum. Idk why it was randomly so cold. The last 30 days have all been 55F+

I grew up in Colorado we'd get hail every june & july just 1 random fucking day, destroy all my plants. every fucking summer. That's all I didn't like.
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>>1514336
i like your plot
thanks for the vid
>>
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>>1508039
rain all week and low 50f/8c temps. im so sad bros
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>>1514529
It's supposed to be sunny all day tomorrow and I'm ridiculously excited about it because I feel like I haven't seen the sun in weeks.
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>>1514501
Once they are large and green you can harvest them. They don't change much and just get to large size pretty quickly. They also don't die when they turn yellow. They just go into bloom mode if able or stay dormant until next year.

>>1514503
Ouch. Netting can help with hail, it can be bird/deer netting that doesn't block much light.

>>1514533
I haven't weed the garden in days due to solid rain. The bind weed it taking over.
>>
Some of my plants are starting to flower, but they're still too small. I've heard that I'm supposed to pluck off the flowers to encourage vegetative growth, but will this hurt the plants if I do this?
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>>1514546
>Once they are large and green you can harvest them. They don't change much and just get to large size pretty quickly. They also don't die when they turn yellow. They just go into bloom mode if able or stay dormant until next year.

If I harvest them right away won't the plant miss out on valuable growth time? I'd like my ramp patch to grow over the years so that I can eventually harvest plants every year without having to buy replacements.
>>
is 5 days long enough to harden off little plants?
I was thinking about planting my peppers and tomatoes on saturday in pennsylvania
is it too early should I maybe take an extra week hardening them off
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>>1514562
Zone 5b in the Poconos.
5 days is calling it close, I'd say if you work from home and can monitor you could possibly do it. But 5 days is still difficult to harden off.
This last week was a great time to start, partly sunny most of the week, rain then some sun.
Do you use any season extension?
We use plasticulture and have had our tomatoes and peppers out for 2 weeks.
If you're not using season extension I would do you tomatoes this weekend and wait a week or two to plant the peppers.
PA is a large state, whats your last frost date? I'm assuming its this weekend as that is our last frost date as well.

40 currently going down to 38 overnight. I like to live life on the ragged edge.
>>
If i just plant seeds in soil and keep watering them then eventually some of them will sprout and grow, right?
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>>1514602
>https://www.dummies.com/home-garden/gardening/how-to-start-seeds-indoors/
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>>1514614
Its summer here, i didn't plant in spring. I decided "fuck it, i'll let fate decide".
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>>1514579
Nice plants
I had a difficult time starting indoors from seed and want to get these in the ground asap
In zone 6 near the border of 5b western PA
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>>1514551
No it wont. Theyll be fine.
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>>1513539
I know your pain. Little bastards have dug up my sunflower seeds so many goddamn times that I've run out. I put something over the spots where I planted them temporarily to prevent them from digging them up again, and so far it's seems to have worked. They also rummaged around a couple of my flower planters. Luckily, they didn't manage to disrupt the seeds in those.
>>
besides peppers what else can handle 100+ F summers
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Whats wrong with my tomato plant? Nutrient deficiency or an illness?
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>>1514554
>If I harvest them right away won't the plant miss out on valuable growth time?

When you harvest a ramp it kills it because you harvest the entire plant. If you are talking about harvesting only the tops then you can do that near the end of their seasonal cycle. The thing is, ramps are a very long term plant and only after about 7 years will they start to divide like how garlic divides. Then you can have new plants. The best course of action is to plant them, forget them, and plant an additional patch every year for 7-8 years. That way, by the end of the 7-8 year period you'll have 7-8 patches of ramps and the oldest patch will begin to divide. Then you can harvest the oldest patch, making sure to divide the plants, and cycle to the next patch the following year and so on.

When you transplant older ramps, from other people's patches, you will not know how old they are. When those divide whenever they divide. However, when you see flower stalks, in June, you will know that those ramp plants are mature already.
>>
>>1514562
Hasn't it been very dark and stormy in PA the past 2 weeks or so? The plant should need some full sun days of hardening off to make sure they are greening up enough to prevent sunscald.

>>1514602
>>1514633
Yeah, that is normally how it works. It also depends on what you are planting.

>>1514645
You can shade them as needed. It is only frost that is the major problem after that. If the last frost date has passed then today is probably your coldest morning until fall.

>>1514682
Do a search for, "Heat Tolerant" vegetables. Local cultivars that people in your area use are normally a good place to start. Especially, if someone has a landrace cultivar.

Okra
Armenian Cucumber
Malabar Spinach
Luffa
Sweet Potato
Asparagus Bean

>>1514709
Perhaps a bit of overwatering with high humidity and cold days?
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>>1514711
>Perhaps a bit of overwatering with high humidity and cold days?
Most likely, I assumed something along these lines, so its reassuring to hear. Thanks :)
>>
I was looking at my hydro tomato. And noticed some light brown on the roots. Is that just root matter ?
>>
>>1514740
>>
>>1514083
>saturation rich promotion photos
yeah no doubt it’s compromised
>>
>>1514711
thanks for the good information
>>
>>1514740
I'm not seeing too much of a problem. Just jiggle them apart, from each other, and see if they still look that way. Try changing the water and scrubbing the containers you are using. Also, take some good sniffs of the darker spots of the roots. do they have a rotten odor or different odor than the rest? Does the water stink like it shouldn't? Does anything feel overly slimy? Sometimes just showing the roots off, changing the water, and cleaning all the equipment will halt initial problems before they are out of hand. If you are using a bubbler, consider using a second one to maximize turbulation and oxygenation.
>>
>>1514740
>>1514741
>brown roots
i don’t see any anon
>>
>>1514741
It looks fine to me desu. But if you wanna be sure it's nothing, refresh the nutrient water (if it looks slimy) and add just a little bit of liquid mycorrhizae.
>>
>>1514645
are you getting sun today?
Still raining and cloudy until tomorrow.
One thing you can try. Do you have an area that gets morning sun say until noon?
I have a corner of my house that I put the plants so they get morning sun then as the sun moves they go into the shade in the afternoon.
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Alright lads, I've got this plant growing in my garden and I can't figure exactly weither it is a blackberry vine or some weird raspberry bush perhaps.
Ant ideas ?
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Bringing up the plants from the basement going to start hardening them off. Hopefully the cold is behind us.
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>>1514947
Delaying taking out the peppers
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>>1511525
So I have a small piece of land (maybe 250 sq meters) and was interested in designing it into something like a park.
My father and I had in mind, to plant hazels and walnuts and farm them. But I also suggested planting some conifers since they stay, well, green, during autumn.

How would we go on to do this in the most efficient manner? We live in a continental climate with some Mediterranean influence.

Any basic forestry books?
>>
>>1514952
ring/border it with some nice thick junipers that can form hedges
>>
>>1514949
Are those bells? Cause they don't look topped
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>>1514949
that some type of odd fern in the back there?
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>>1511968
Are you kidding? It hit about 60 F here today and I was out in shorts enjoying the sun.
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>>1515039
I really miss the sun!
>>
>tfw finally starting to harden off my plants tomorrow

So it begins again. Almost 32 peppers (22 for us, 10 being given away) will finally see the outside world for the first time in their lives. There are some others I'm keeping indoors and I'll probably try growing some indoor hydroponic arugula and romaine lettuce now that I'll have the extra space.
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>>1515039
I was talking about the constant rain and clouds rather than the temperature.
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I've gone way over my head and my garden is too big. How do I keep out the all the grass and weeds out?

My no cost method I'm thinking of is:
1. Trench around bed, so grass has to "leap" into the garden bed.
2. Mow every inch of land (that has grass that hasn't gone to seed) to pile up as much mulch as possible and drown the garden bed in it.

Thoughts? Nothing that requires money or more than 1-2 weeks wait.
>>
>>1515097
Just get a truck load of wood chips to use as mulch. Stop posting wojak shit.
>>
>>1515097
>no money
if you have some spare cardboard, you can cover a perimeter with it.

I also made the mistake of going full retard and converted my entire turf lawn into a vegetable garden. The weeds are just the start of it, wait until the vermin get into your patch. Rabbits are the fucking worst, they truly fuck shit up. And there isn't enough predator pressure to keep their numbers in check if they find a rich food supply. That growing season was a total shit show.

Now I have a fenced off plot the size of a two car garage on my acre of property. And it produces way too much food, so much so that I took up food preservation as a hobby. Canning, pickling, drying, and fermenting. The rest of the land is landscaped with drought tolerant native plants and a turf lawn that is as flat as Megumin's chest (the secret is to trench compost the low spots and frequently aerate the high spots).
>>
>>1515145
>the secret is to trench compost the low spots and frequently aerate the high spots
mind explaining this a bit?
>>
>>1514662

i am having the same problem with squirrels right now, they ate my entire bed of seeds and just left one little guy to sprout. i just resowed and covered the ground with some fine mesh that still allows sunlight to pass. will i be fighting these things away from the sprouts as well? at what point will my plants be safe?
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>>1515170
>at what point will my plants be safe?
Get a BB gun.
>>
>>1514662
>>1513539
>>1515170
Seriously, just shoot them and trap them.
>>
>>1515163
It's actually pretty simple, since trench composting adds mass to the ground, simply do it in places where you want that mass, such as the low spots on your lawn where water tends to pool during rainstorms. Just take a picture after a good rain storm to literally highlight where those spots are. A good trick is to collect the water from a low spot to know the exact volume you need the trench composting spot to have to level it out.

The high spots are harder to fix, as it takes a great deal more time. You are supposed to aerate your lawn twice a year, more depending on certain climate factors. But I just aerated two to four times more than that, but only on the high spots on my lawn. I used a manual aerator that takes plugs of soil out of the ground. Over time (literally two to three years) the high spots level off. If you really want to get autistic about it, you can collect the plugs from the high spot aeration sessions, and use them in your compost pile that you use or trench composting.
>>
>>1515172
they even make biodegradable bb pellets
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>>1515187
>tfw seeing your neighbor over at the McMansion with a literal giant steam rolling flattening out the entire 3 acre lawn

You could break an ankle on my lawn, but at least I have nut/fruit trees, lots of vegetable gardens, and fowl. Though, I am always filling in low spots and holes when I have some extra soil from a project.
>>
anyone know any content or urban farmers that use raised beds for urban market farms?
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>>1515192
I wouldn't be too worried about some tiny steel BBs in the yard
>>
>>1515184

on this note, what is the best way to clean them to eat? i have heard squirrel stew is pretty good
>>
>>1515239
It's more about personal responsibility you owe to leave the planet a (slightly) better place than you left it in, even though individual actions don't amount to much.
>>
>>1515235
Epic gardening - that Kevin dude knows his stuff
>>
What can I do to get better results with direct sow peppers in Central Florida? I'm trying to do Spanish bull nose bell peppers and I haven't had the best of luck with peppers. Do I essentially have to do them in containers or is there a trick to get them to work in the ground?

I have a garden bed with 2 inches of mulch that I'm going to part a row in.
>>
>>1511525
Why isn't trench composting more popular?

https://youtu.be/yQFB9M2UdK0
>>
>>1515170
Psycho cat
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>he doesn't shit in his garden
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Gettin'n real tired of this shit.
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>>1515337
I miss the sun.
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>>1515337
Damn, what hellhole do you live in that temps can't even peak above 70F?
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>>1515334
Because, that is not how it is done. There's lots of "humanure" information in the OP pastebin.
>>
>>1515244
There are lots of youtube vids on how to process squirrels and other animals, as well as tons of recipes.

>>1515272
Keep the top layer of soil well watered using a gentle misting. Don't let it dry out during the germination process. After that you just need to maintain enough watering to prevent their roots from drying out. This is why most people prefer starting them in trays. You can use humidity domes over the trays and control the water levels far easier. Just don't try to use humidity domes outside in warm Florida weather, it'd cook the seeds/plants.
>>
>>1515337
It's been a crazy several years. Don't know if it's the same for you guys, but where I am, it was insanely hot in 2016, insanely cold and rainy in 2017, hot and dry in 2018, and now it's back to cold and rainy. The weather patterns are so erratic.
>>
guys i left my seedlings outside for 2 nights. it went to 52-55 F. planning to transplant today. how fucked am i?
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how shit is this? thinking of last minute switch to black gold
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>>1515321
I really like core gardening, in regards to having a trench full of straw that absorbs water, so you don't have to water as often. Also burying an egg and banana near the plants to feed them for a whole growing season.
>>
>>1515469
Do they look kill? If not, don't worry. Just cover them at night.

>>1515471
That's for flowers, not vegetables.
>>
>>1515471
It's a cheap medium and like all cheap potting mixes it seems unreasonably heavy and waterlogged when its watered
If you're willing to spend the money the black gold will probably be way better
>>
>>1511617
Yeah. After harvest you need to prep the soil for next year. And in the winter you gotta plan the crop for the next year and even start some of the seeds.
>>
>>1511962
The cold managed to kill the chilies i started
ON THE WINDOWSILL
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Almost all done, some more cucs next week and were done for the summer.

>>1515608
Yea were starting to plan our fall garden but might start parsley early 2020
>>
Evening gents, I've never grown anything in my life. What's something I can grow super easy in May to eat? I don't have a garden so I guess I'll have to grow it in a pot or something
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>>1515621
Can't go wrong with microgreens.
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>>1515621
radishes. I use a cut waterbottle and clay pellets and it works fine.
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I think I might have a cucumber finally starting to form
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>>1515621
Make a pot of assorted herbs
Also blueberry since they're easy to clone and cost way too much, but you'll either have to suck it up and buy one to start with or snip a cutting and get that to work which might be a bit much for a complete beginner
>>
>>1515621
Radishes are a good option because many varieties can be harvested within 25 days and they have relatively low needs. French Breakfast is a good variety, I have better luck with root formation in long types. I've grown French Dressing, Cherry Belle, and Sparkler as well. I believe the greens are also edible on radishes. If you let some radishes go to seed(you wont want to eat the radish at that point) they will produce nice little flowers and edible seed pods from them that taste kind of like radish. Also, I'd try herbs like Basil because you can grow them in small pots. I'd highly encourage you to try out tomatoes as they are the best part of a garden. I've had great success even with my large indeterminate varieties in large pots.
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Making slow progress on the greenhouse as time allows. Im going to pad all the corners and try single handedly put the plastic up.
>>
>>1515611
Looking good. I wish all of mine were in the ground.

>>1515621
Mints are super easy to grow and are great for making tisane.

>>1515630
Mazel tov!

>>1515653
Remember the venting!
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>>1515630
Definitely looks like it. You'll be munching on the freshest green sooner than you think!
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Why are nightshades so fucking delicious, bros?
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>>1515717
They have that savory/umami thing going on.
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>>1515621
Any kitchen herb. Spring onions grow well in a pot as well. Strawberries (there are early, medium, late and everbearing varieties). Chili plants or tomato plants can be cultivated in a small space as well.
There are also some beans that grow in small bushes.
Some citrus can be grown inside in a big pot.
>>
>>1515668
>Remember the venting!

Any recommendations? Im not planning this project out well.
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>>1515736
Just make a window flap.
>>
>>1515621
If you have enough light (either outdoors or an indoor grow light), peppers are great. They're perennials as long as they're not exposed to the cold, are fairly forgiving when pruning, and pepper harvests can dry/freeze extremely well.
A lot of the Thai varieties are pretty compact and prolific, too.

Other than that, I'd go with what others suggested about herbs and radishes. Rosemary, mint, oregano, and thyme are very forgiving.
>>
>>1515748
Do you think that hydro peppers can be consistently grown in a gal container for long periods of time? I've come across peppers grown in barely any soil, and it had managed to survive and produce a large amount of fruit.
>>
>>1515756
the issue with small containers in hydro is they tend to run out of water real quickly
Root mass wouldn't be an issue tho
>>
>>1515756
Definitely. I've done it using a non-circulating Kratky method with fairly decent results, but it would probably be better to use other hydroponic methods, like deep water culture (which I'm planning to try this year).

Just yesterday I transplanted a hydroponic pepper plant from a Kratky container into soil. It's been very healthy and putting out flowers and fruits since last year. But I also had another pepper which didn't make it, likely due to root rot or some salt buildup in the container.
>>
>>1515768
>deep water culture
well I have it already in a gal container with an airstone so if that's what you mean by deep water culture. Also amended the solution with a bit of humic acid and mycorrhiza; which I do believe has boosted growth substantially. I change out the water every two weeks as to prevent root rot.
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>>1515774
A rampaging idiot destroyed the ghost pepper that was originally in this set up. So I transferred the Carolina reaper to hydro.
>>
Is pruning raspberries the same as pruning roses? They're part of the same family, and I'm curious, because the point of roses is to get a lot of blooms, and this is why we prune them so heavily, and the logical conclusion of a bloom is a fruit, which is what we want raspberries for.
I'm also curious about how to prune canes that have damage in the center but life above them--I typically read that you are supposed to prune back to living tissue so it can compartmentalize/heal, but if there is damaged/dead tissue below, is it possible it's girdled and on its last leg? How the fuck does girdling still allow trees to bloom/foliate? Where is the "energy" coming from?

Does a botany degree tell me any of this shit?
>>
>>1515775
>rip little ghost pepper
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>>1515736
Make a proper door and use it as the venting.
>>
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1st day of no rains. The manure pile is heavy and tacky, but I put a big dent in it anyway. I have half the new raised beds covered with manure. Hopefully, I can get a shipment of sand then start mixing before the next rain.

>>1515817
>Is pruning raspberries the same as pruning roses?
It depends on the cultivar of rose. Some are bushes, some are canes like raspberries, and some are climbers. Raspberries do fairly well when you prune the 1st year canes to make them bush out more. That helps conform them to a shorter trellis. You can do the same thing with blackberries.

>damaged parts
Raspberries are really good for propagating via cuttings so if the damage is bad you can simply cut it off and plant any pieces that are alive but now separated.

>girdling
The term you are looking for is, "cincturing." Which is very similar, but slightly different and that difference is what allows or triggers the tree to bloom and fruit. It reduces vegetative growth in vigorous trees and they focus on fruiting. Some cultivars and species need to have this done every single year.
>>
>>1515835
>Cincturing
This is really interesting.
Doesn't this prevent sugars from being put back down into the roots? Botanically, this is fucking wild to me.
>Raspberries are really good for propagating...
How do I plant the piece? Also, what makes damage bad? Let me get a picture of a rose bush I had this feeling on.
>>
>>1515857
>How do I plant the piece
Stick it in some dirt and add water.
>>
>>1515857
>restrict the movement towards the roots of carbohydrates produced in the leaves. This temporarily restricts tree growth, changes the hormone balance, and makes the tree more likely to flower.

Yup. Also propagating from cuttings is super simple,
https://homeguides.sfgate.com/plant-raspberry-cuttings-38806.html
>>
>>1515858
This blows my fucking mind.
How does it not get infected? Isn't the tissue just slowly rotting from that point? Does it form some sort of callus over the wound? I am new to pruning in general, but is that what happens to everything I prune on the rosebush?
>>
>>1515860
What do they do after the flowering? Do they just cut off that branch, nothing can get back down? Or can stuff get back UP, meaning buds can grow again? Wouldn't roots start growing from that cinctured spot if given enough moisture over time, or is this somehow very specially unrelated to air layering?
>>
>>1515865
Sometimes it doesn't work, so just plop more than one in. That's the method I've always used, anyway.
>>
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>>1515373
This is the case anywhere north of the 42nd parallel minus the midwest for some reason - where its 70+ at night.
>>
>>1515265
only seen a few videos so far but isn't he just gardener/youtube guy
i'm talking about market farmer/seller who grows in mostly raised beds
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>>1511525
Yes anons, AMA
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>>1515865
Sometimes things do get infected, but normally the plant is faster and heals up properly. Yes, that happens with anything you prune.
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>>1515866
It heals and starts growing normally. They don't cut the sapwood, like what is done in girdling.
>>
>>1515965
That will be me, soonish. I just need to make enough raised beds. Most people who sell stuff at the local farmer's market here grow in greenhouses (selling starts) and use standard industrial monoculture methods (long rows & flat ground). There are a few people who use raised beds, but not many. This is mostly because the workload startup for raised beds is the highest of all gardening/farming methods. If bed-forming machinery is used then it is easy for workload startup, but the machinery isn't cheap.

There are a scant few videos on youtube about the subject, but it is mostly filled with "how to make" and "this vs that" instead of "farmer's market raised beds" type of results. Those that do use them for commercial purposes almost always use bed-forming machinery and borderless beds.

>>1515967
That is off topic, both for this thread and for this board. The proper board is over on: >>>/ck/
>>
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>>1513539
Best $60 I ever spent. Had it for 1 week and have dispatched 7 of the fuckers already.
>>
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any ideas on how to get this banana tree going and multiplying? and rough idea on how long this process generally takes

background info
>supposedly had it for 2 years, given by a family friend
>originally had two but 1 died.
>before I started watering and adding mulch around the base it looked like just a brown stick lol

it started getting some leaves but they still look lousy. is there any hope?
>>
>>1516090
They are really heavy feeders and need lots of fertilizer every month. Use NPK 8-10-8 fertilizer or any balanced fertilizer. You should have bananas in a year.
>>
>>1516088
That's really nice to know. I may need to add one to my arsenal. I need to get some "racoon cuffs" too, before corn season.
>>
>>1515714
>You'll be munching on the freshest green sooner than you think!

Christ, cucumbers, zucchini, and summer squash grow super fast. Like in 3 days some of them are ready or starting to go too far for some recipes/raw eating. Then there are those you missed, hidden among the leaves, and were left to grow on their own which turn into monsters. Those are good for seed saving.
>>
>>1515668
>>1515736
>>1515820
Also remember cross venting. One door or vent on only 1 end will cause a high build up of heat in the other end. So, you can either have the ends vented or 1 end vented with a roof vent. For plastic greenhouses like that, it is best to only have end vents.
>>
>>1515648
>I believe the greens are also edible on radishes.

They are, but normally they are best eaten as a microgreen for fresh/raw salad type stuff while older leaves are best for pot herbs that get cooked. Just roll the older leaves up longways then slice into 1/8" to 1/4" thick pieces. That will create long strips while severing the stringy pieces so the mouth feel of the cooked vegetable will be good.
>>
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NEW THREAD: >>1516103
NEW THREAD: >>1516103
NEW THREAD: >>1516103
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>>1516093
>Use NPK 8-10-8 fertilizer or any balanced fertilizer.
I've never used fertilizer before. should I be using those liquid ones or the pellet ball ones?
>>
>>1515101
There is nothing wrong with Wojak, you pseudo-newfag.
>>
>apple blossoms just about to open
>-1C overnight low on Sunday
I hope I don't lose most of the blossoms like I did last year.
>>
>>1516705
>Spam-bot forced memes.



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