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I'm trying to prove a point in one of my classes and I need help.

What trees are god-tier? Good for firewood, not a fuckton of sap, etc.
Some trees are pussy and some are girthy motherfuckers, so what's the most chad type of tree you know?
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>>1505539
To me, it would have to be the silver birch, Betula pendula. It's just the best firewood around. And it produces its own tinder.
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>>1505545
yeah birch in general is pretty good
it's also edible. betula lenta is the most delicious
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>>1505572
That they are. They are probably the most useful trees, at least where I live.
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>>1505545
I thought about it and you're right. You are so fuckin right.
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>>1505582
It'll even catch fire when it's wet. That's what really sets it apart from everything else.
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Silver birch or western larch. Botg are beautiful and good firewood.

I burn wood for heat and used to work innawoods.
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Maple. Not particularly good at anything but for me, living organisms have more than just instrumental value for my own hedonistic purposes.
I just like maples very much.
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>>1505620
Kek. Maples are nice too.
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>>1505620
>I just like maples very much.
canadians can't disagree
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how about dis
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>>1505629
What the ass is that?
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can you plant different birch types in your garden? like silver, grey, sugar and himalayan?
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>>1505539
this is a camperdown elm
it grows like a willow but has big leaves that keep the under area nicely dry
it's the perfect natural shelter and the inner branches even grow high enough that you can have a small fire underneath in all but the driest months
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>>1505632
Now, that's fucking neat.
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>>1505632

Pretty damn neat anon.
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>>1505539
> Good for firewood, not a fuckton of sap

OH FUCK YOUR SHIT, OP!
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>>1505632
>small fire

Like a candle.
>>
>The Firewood Poem

Beechwood fires are bright and clear
If the logs are kept a year,
Chestnut's only good they say,
If for logs 'tis laid away.
Make a fire of Elder tree,
Death within your house will be;
But ash new or ash old,
Is fit for a queen with crown of gold

Birch and fir logs burn too fast
Blaze up bright and do not last,
it is by the Irish said
Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread.
Elm wood burns like churchyard mould,
E'en the very flames are cold
But ash green or ash brown
Is fit for a queen with golden crown

Poplar gives a bitter smoke,
Fills your eyes and makes you choke,
Apple wood will scent your room
Pear wood smells like flowers in bloom
Oaken logs, if dry and old
keep away the winter's cold
But ash wet or ash dry
a king shall warm his slippers by.
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>>1505620
Maple trees are pretty damn useful. Dcorns, sap, decent hardwood. Standard firewood around these parts.
>>
Stacking is an aesthetic and a practical challenge, so much so that in the late nineteenth century, in the heavily forested state of Maine, young American women considering a potential husband were advised first to consult a piece of folksy wisdom that revealed the young man’s character based on the way he stacked his wood. In all Scandinavia it is also common wisdom that you can tell a lot about a person from his woodpile. For those looking to marry, the following list may be used as a rule of thumb. Upright and solid pile: Upright and solid man Low pile: Cautious man, could be shy or weak Tall pile: Big ambitions, but watch out for sagging and collapse Unusual shape: Freethinking, open spirit, again, the construction may be weak Flamboyant pile, widely visible: Extroverted, but possibly a bluffer A lot of wood: A man of foresight, loyal Not much wood: A life lived from hand to mouth Logs from big trees: Has a big appetite for life, but can be rash and extravagant Pedantic pile: Perfectionist; may be introverted Collapsed pile: Weak will, poor judge of priorities Unfinished pile, some logs lying on the ground: Unstable, lazy, prone to drunkenness Everything in a pile on the ground: Ignorance, decadence, laziness, drunkenness, possibly all of these Old and new wood piled together: Be suspicious: might be stolen wood added to his own Large and small logs piled together: Frugal. Kindling sneaked in among the logs suggests a considerate man Rough, gnarled logs, hard to chop: Persistent and strong willed, or else bowed down by his burdens No woodpile: No husband
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I love the way an aspen smell when it’s first put on the fire.
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>>1505666
>tfw my parents have acres full of maples and I never got into making syrup
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>>1505682
Does it smell better than juniper? I don't have aspens here, so I wouldn't know.

>>1505683
It's never too late. It's a pretty comfy /out/ activity. I've been tapping birch trees and making wine and beer out of the sap for a few years now.
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>>1505631
yes i imagine you can. you may have to worry about controlling pests depending on your location as some may have little to no resistance.
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>>1505683
But are they sugar maple? Not every maple tree is good for syrup mon ami
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>>1505539
Like other people have said white birch is god tier for all purpose /out/ing, but black birch is a personal favorite. Grab a twig while hiking and chew on it, literally the tastiest tree there is
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>>1505767
Reading this thread kind of makes me wish there were black birches around my neck of the woods.
>>
If you want good firewood, no sap and easy cleanup in the fall: Honeylocust.

Unique trees: Tamarack and Ginkgo

Best Tree: American Chestnut

Worst Tree: European Buckthorn
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>>1505539
'best' tree is a tough one since they're so inter-connected to the native ecosystem and other species. E.g., Rocky mountain aspen aren't really that useful for anything, but they provide critical food for elk, bighorns, and mountain goats... plus they give me shitloads of edible mushrooms.
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>>1505782
I guess it just boils down to "what's your favorite tree?". I like the linden (T. cordata). It's been rumored to be able to fuck me up.
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>>1505545
You absolute birch loving FAGGOT! HOW DARE YOU choose the silver birch as the best tree.

Reported and reported.

FUCK OFF BIRCH LOVER!
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>>1505620
My /out/look is similar, and oak, for me. It would be tulip tree as far as practical utilization.
>>
West Coast perspective:
Best firewood: buckskin (standing dead or seasoned) Black Oak. High BTUs, low ash.
For construction: Doug Fir, Redwood, Cedar in that order.
Nigger-be-good sticks: Hickory, Ash, Maple
Your mom's dildo: Giant Sequoia
>>
Populus Tremuloides.
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Hands down evergreens, pines
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>>1506033
just made tea from the needles of a white pine sapling.
pro tip: if you get good needles the terpenes will produce a psychoactive effect not unlike a mild cannabis tincture.
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>>1506033
Agree with the evergreens, no tree that loses all its green parts in winter can be above C tier in my book. Pines though? The most basic bitch evergreen? Come on. For me, it's the Cedar. Big, smells great, makes great wood for construction materials, etc. etc.
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>>1505539
Among the wild trees, I'd have to go with rock maple: Great firewood, great for furniture, and then there's the syrup. Honorable mention to black cherry: the poor man's substitute for mahogany (you can also make a cough syrup and soda flavoring from the inner bark).

If we're talking domesticated, then apple wins hands down. Apples are so useful and versatile in the kitchen (some varieties also have the best winter keeping qualities of any fruit), while apple wood is excellent for smoking, makes a lovely firewood (for fireplaces and box stoves: it's wasted in a furnace), and is also one of the best woods for tool handles and such.

>>1505545
Most birches are really meh as firewood. Sure, they burn readily (too readily, in fact), but they burn out fast, don't leave a nice bed of coals, and don't give enough heat. Black (a.k.a. sweet/cherry birch) and yellow birch are better than the others.
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>>1505630
>>1505629

I think it's a buckeye/horse chestnut in Yurop
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>>1505825
Fuck me. This was such a nice thread, too.
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>>1505539
It’s obviously the sycamore. Fuckers are invincible
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>>1506137
God damn. That looks like it doesn't belong in our time period.
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>>1506137
They are certainly highly ornamental and the wood is useful.

Fun fact: "sycamore" can refer to at least three unrelated trees:

-the sycamore fig or fig-mulberry (Ficus sycomorus): a fig native to the Levant, Arabia, and Africa. This is the "sycamore" of the Bible.
-the "sycamore" of the British Isles: a maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) native to continental Europe and introduced to England in the Tudor era. Believed to have taken its common name (in Italian and French, as well as in English) from the similarity of its leaves to those of the true sycamore, but its Latin name comes from an even nearer resemblance (at least in the opinion of Linnaeus) to those of the planes.
-the American sycamore which you posted (Ptatanus occidentalis), a plane native to the eastern U.S.A. and the Ontario Peninsula in Canada. Probably got its common name from the aforementioned similarity of its leaves to those of the sycamore maple.
-the Oriental plane (historically, simply "the plane"; Platanus orientalis), native to the Near East and the Balkans, which is sometimes called the "Old World sycamore" in America by analogy with the native species.

>>1506143
The planes are generally considered "living fossils." Also, most of its nearest (extant) relatives are endemic to the Southern Hemisphere (mostly sub-Saharan Africa and Australia), while the genus Platanus itself is restricted to the Northern. They are actually more closely related to the water-lotuses than most other trees of the north temperate zone.
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>>1506137
Willows have to be the closest thing to invincible. They grow where most trees can't and when they break they can regenerate from their stump or just a twig. In the tundra they are tiny and in temperate climates they can be pretty much any size or shape.
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>>1505767
Fresh shoots are like wintergreen gum (both have methyl salicylate).
Boil them instead and you're left with a sweet tasting tea.
Or if you're really adventurous, add sugar and yeast for alcohol fermentation to make birch beer.
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>>1506164
>at least three unrelated trees
Er, make that four trees, only two of which are related.
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>>1506099
This man clearly does not garden the leaves are a godsend when it come to making good compost.
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>>1505539
>Some trees are pussy and some are girthy motherfuckers, so what's the most chad type of tree you know?
How can one sentence be so pathetic?
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>>1506190
Fuck off, we're having a wholesome chat about trees.
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>>1506193
You can have a conversation about trees without sounding like a retarded incubator baby that was produced on 4chan you sad cunt
The memes molded your personality into a piss filled maggot that makes mothers cry.
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>>1506197
Boy, that's a lot of assumptions you're making there.
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Scots Pine are often part of interesting landscapes.
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>>1506200
This looks exactly like Norway. Are you Norwegian?
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Gives an open feeling because there are only needles at the top. And they can look pretty odd
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>>1506202
There are more bushy varieties as well, which can look very pre-historic.
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>>1506201
It's in Sweden close to where I live and pretty rare for our landscape so it's become a popular place for families. E1 trail runs through it
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>>1506207
That type of landscape is rare there? Strange. Here, it's so common I'm honestly getting sick of it. I always come across some random-ass murky pond surrounded by a bunch of pine trees whenever I'm /out/.
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>>1505620
based
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>>1505539
I like maples and birchtrees. You all know why birch already. Both trees grow very fast and maples basically plant themselves everywhere. The seeds fly over long distances and have a higher chance of growing than other plants
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>>1506237
>the seeds fly over long distances
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>>1505539
Birch is great for when u really need firewood fast, Burns when freshly cut. Nur Not extremely well.
If you plan on putting wood aside for next winter you should really consider beech or even better: ash, best firewood no doubt.
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>>1506257
Birches are also pioneer trees,meaning they are one of the first trees that grows on freshly cut areas. Ashes are in danger because of the Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, thats why its a good idea to invest in ash planting so that they maybe gain immunity someday. Ashes and beeches also get way bigger than birches.
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>>1506240
In the wind they actually do fly. The wing on the seed will create lift to keep the seed on the wind longer. Seems retarded scientists just caught up with that fact or the blogshitter isn't keen on checking old papers for shit already published,
https://www.livescience.com/3672-secret-flight-helicopter-seeds.html
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>>1506261
Yeah, man, I know, man. Used to play with those all the time when I was younger. My post referred to the sexual innuendo.
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>>1506263
Then you should wait until someone posts about tree pollen covering every square inch of their neighborhood. Because, tree seeds are more like someone is tossing babies all over the place.
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>>1506266
>>1506263
>pollen season
>pollen = semen analogy
>have allergies to pollen
>i.e. have allergies to tree semen

I'm allergic to the gay.
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>>1506266
Yes. That is true. We still use the word "seed" for both things, though.
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>>1506269
Some of us are more botanically-inclined than most normies.
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>>1505539
the
larch
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>>1506266
My car was covered recently and I licked some off and felt sick after.
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>>1506284
>I licked some off and felt sick after
Fuck this board sometimes.
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>>1505825
How can you have anything against birch?
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>>1506292
Probably lives in Arizona or Nevada and can't enjoy them.
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>>1506284
You caught the gay, anon.
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Blood beech is the best. I'll post some pictures next time im at home in the forest and it looks incredible.
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>>1505779
American chestnut is virtually extinct- what was once millions is now in the thousands.
Nearly every surviving tree's location is known.
They are very susceptible to blight and rarely live past about 20 years.

And burr oak is the best tree.
Largest acorns in north america (they're like golf balls), amazing wood for building.
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>>1506514
stiffy time
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>>1505539
Pineapple trees are good and after they stop producing after a few years they make good firewood, they produce their own kindling and is self igniting if you ask nicely.
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>>1505545
How is Birch the best firewood??!? Do you live in an area of only coniferous trees?
When logging all you gotta remember: Ash is cash.
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>>1506876
Yes. Birch is the best firewood. Because it is extremely abundant.
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>>1505630
>>1506111
Sweet chestnut. The chestnuts are edible and considered a delicacy.
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>>1506200
Pines are my favorite trees. Just because they are so pretty.
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>>1506876
Got the paper skin to start easy
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>>1506876
Ash is gonna go the wayk of the chestnut soon.
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>>1506922
this.

birch is best. the wood is dense and burns clean and long. birch smoke is the overall tastiest and most versatile smoking wood (along with beech I must admit) and it also comes wrapped in highly flammable kindling. the real trick with birch is to make sure you peel all the bark off before cooking over it! that shit burns black and oily and will ruin any food. if you aren't cooking there's nothing to worry about.
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>>1506948
The ash borer infestation has mostly burned itself out in the Midwest by now. The bugs are still there, but their population has fallen way off and they've released parasitic Chinese wasps to control them.
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>>1507140
>parasitic Chinese wasps
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the java plum. I'd rather have fruit than sap. Or any tree from the rosacea genus because mushrooms
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>>1507146
Oh Jesus no, do not plant that tree.
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>>1507140
I'll give you a pointer. The entire emerald ash borer infestation seems to have come from one small population of insects from (likely) central China. This means the borer population in North America has extremely low genetic diversity.
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>>1505539
I'd like to go with Sugar Maple. Sure, they might be famous for their edible sap, but those things are beefy. They can grow pretty darn large and old, have great shade, and are decent for firewood. Maple's a nice wood for woodwork, too.

If it comes to trees that are just all-around good, but not necessarily god tier, I'd have to go with oak.
>>
Pine trees are hands down the best trees. They have edible bark, seeds, needles, sap, buds, and pollen. They grow quickly and easily. And their only real draw back is that their smoke can clog up chimneys.
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>>1505629
Chestnut in Central Asia and Eastern Europe is as common for furniture as red oak is in the US. Makes me sad to think the US had hundreds of millions of this beautiful tree until the blight killed them all. If you can find it now, mainly from old barn frames, it sells for around $14 a board foot. Ash may suffer the same fate.
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>>1506778
>They are very susceptible to blight and rarely live past about 20 years.

Certainly seems like they can be easy to find young, but get consumed pretty readily. Pic related, taken today, one at like 3ft height, another at 8-10ft.
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>>1507247
Without disturbance they can be a nuisance ecologically. They'll grow in a near monoculture and the only thing share tolerant enough to regenerate under them is more sugar maple
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Osage orange and black locust are some of my favorites that were not mentioned
>>
picea mariana Is based tree
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>>1507427
You should include common names, some people wouldn't even know black spruce isn't a pine. Also, it's pretty unremarkable unless it's a sphagnum bog
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>>1506778
Just because it's almost gone doesn't make it not cool. I've seen them do great in people's yards. I also disagree that Ash will go away. Some places take EAB seriously and treat infections before they decimate the area and there are some Green Ash that are resilient against EAB.
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>>1507140
I know the Wisconsin DNR is using the wasps in a town near Milwaukee but it has been really hard to get any info on how well that is going
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>>1507470
>I've seen them do great in people's yards
Outside of their natural range. Sure, you can grow American chestnut without incident in Oregon or something but in, say, Pennsylvania, it will be rapidly fucked. Red oaks also act as a vector for chestnut blight so if there's any nearby (and there will if you live in the vicinity of a wooded area) they will infect it.
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>>1507470
The ashes that got hit the hardest were ones used in landscaping which occupied sub-optimal environments that exposed them to pollution, road salt, and soil compaction, and where they were planted in huge numbers. Most of these were also a handful of horticultural cultivars that had extremely low genetic diversity.

Green ash is not a hugely common tree in natural environments and mostly occurs along bodies of water. It also doesn't form pure stands. So all those ashes planted in a parking strip outside Denny's were not exactly viable, healthy trees that had much chance of resisting pests and diseases.

Ashes in forest stands mixed with other trees seem to be fairly more resistant to ash borer, perhaps also because there's more birds and insects there for pest control.
>>
At one point, American chestnut comprised 25-30% of the entire forest cover in the Appalachians. However, this didn't happen naturally, it was the result of human activity. American chestnut is not a climax species, it's a fast-growing colonizer that establishes itself in disturbed areas and eventually gives way to slower growing species. In the Appalachians in particular, it took over after large amounts of Eastern hemlocks (which are a climax species) were cut down for the tannins in their bark (the wood was considered less useful).

They used to farm well up the side of mountain ridges in the Appalachians. As the soil became depleted, many people moved to the Midwest, and also after the Civil War, more people abandoned farming for industrial jobs in the cities. Those abandoned farms were reclaimed by forest cover, dominated by chestnuts. It's also quite likely that some farms had chestnut trees as a food source which could explain their rapid spread.
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>>1505539
cedar.
>>
They've since developed blight-resistant chestnut which is really a cross with Chinese chestnut, retaining the former's blight resistance but otherwise preserving most of the characteristics of American chestnut. The big issue is producing enough seedlings to plant. Probably most of them will end up being planted as landscaping trees by hipsters who want to be the first person on their block to establish a chestnut forest. And then they'll regret it when their yard gets filled with hundreds of spiny seed pods they have to rake up.

American chestnuts start producing seeds rapidly, on average when the tree is 7 years old. This is possibly why it hasn't gone completely extinct--saplings can produce some seeds before blight gets them which allows the species to continue. Given how fast chestnut grows, it may eventually with the new blight-resistant trees be possible to establish a viable chestnut lumber industry again. In fact, chestnut wood was still available on the market as late as the 1970s when the last dead trees were being harvested at the lowest end of their range.
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>>1507388
By sheer dumb luck one will be blight resistant, probably one in every 70 trees.
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>>1507236
Java plum is considered an invasive weed in Brazil.
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>>1507590
Boomers seem to like that term.
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>>1507594
"considered"?
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>>1507604
"Invasive" anything.
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>>1507462
>some people wouldn’t even know a black spruce isn’t a pine

I don’t care? Black spruce my fav that’s all I had to say
>>
For me no tree is the best in every way. They have so many different possible uses, it all depends on what you need.

If what you need is tea and medicinal properties, willows and trees of the Tilia species are what you want. Plus Tilia (cordata and platyphyllos) are excellent when it comes to honey; just as chestnut trees are. Chestnut trees are very a good, low maintenance species that quickly produces firewood, honey, chestnuts and even good quality timber if it grows in the right conditions. Not only does its timber have excellent mechanical properties, it's also so filled with tannins you don't even need to treat it before using it outside - it's VERY durable naturally, like Larch wood.
If it's musical instruments you want to make, then you won't use woods that are good for carpentry (such as Douglas fir, Chestnut tree or even Cedar) but the soft wood of Spruce or Acer pseudoplatanus (flame maple). Want to make wine ? Spruce won't help you, you'll need some oak.

What if you're having issues with erosion, landslides and avalanches ? You'll need trees that grow fast and have a solid root system, so forget all the trees that were mentioned, especially Silver Fir and Tilia, they'd be useless. Grow some pines in there, or Common Beech or Larch. If you want to protect yourself against violent winds, line up some Italian Black Aspen. If your problem comes from floods, then Willows, European Ash and False Acacia will be your best friends.
Hell, when it comes to symbolism and resilience to radioactive radiation, Ginko Biloba is fucking badass.

And I didn't even mention fruit production and resistance to insects.

TL;DR no tree is the best at everything. It all depends on what you want.
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>>1505620
>>1505669
based

>>1506107
>Most birches are really meh as firewood. Sure, they burn readily (too readily, in fact) but they burn out fast, don't leave a nice bed of coals, and don't give enough heat. Black (a.k.a. sweet/cherry birch) and yellow birch are better than the others.
This, birch is good for starting fires, like Spruce, not for fires that are supposed to last throughout the night. Among the trees whose wood has the best heat output/volume are common Beech (fagus sylvatica) and Hornbeam (carpinus). These are the ones that cost the most when sold as firewood in my region.
>>
The reed.

Prove me wrong.
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>>1505539
Aren't sappy trees GOAT for firewood?
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>>1505539
How can treelets even compete?
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The heat produced from dry osage orange wood has qualities often compared to coal. However, the wood actually burns so hot you can easily damage a wood stove if you're not careful. Instead of burning strictly hedge, mix it with other popular hardwoods like ash, beech or maple firewood.
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>>1508081
this intrigues me. also now i want a cuppa earl grey
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>>1505545
>birch is the best firewood
>laughs in osage orange
>laughs in hickory
>laughs in pretty much everything
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>>1508081
Downside of osage is that a lot of people think it looks like ass. I love it, but meh.
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>>1505539
God-tier: pine, cedar, fir, hemlock
Excellent-tier: oak, elm, hornbeam, holly
Good tier: maple, birch, aspen, hazelnut
Shit tier: the fuckmothering poplar and rowan
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>>1508002
>Among the trees whose wood has the best heat output/volume are common Beech (fagus sylvatica) and Hornbeam (carpinus). These are the ones that cost the most when sold as firewood in my region.
That's most likely because both are slow growing and not especially abundant trees.
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>>1508179
I can see that. But I don't have any of those where I live. Birch also isn't the best just because it's the best. Oak and beech are better as firewood, but birch is usually vastly abundant, and it's way better than any of the fucking conifers that grow here.
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Nobody a fan of juniper?
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>>1508231
I am. But it's not really considered a tree.
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>>1508224
But beech is one of the most abundant trees where I live.

>>1508231
Treelets are not welcome here.
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>>1505539
aspen aspen aspen
you can eat it burn it and it grows abundantly
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>mesquites
Beatiful wood
Edible beans
Can be used to smoke
Survive the arid weather
>>
I like juniper aka cedar. Rot resistance is a nice quality. Though I hear it is hard to identify some of them. I assume that the imported shrubs r poison. They seem like good windbreakers

>>Juniper “berries” have a fragrant spicy aroma and a slightly bittersweet flavour. Used with venison, they remove the gamey taste.
>>
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>>1505539
The best tree is objectivly the oak, namely Quercus robur.
There's the quality of firewood, the heraldic and history of it in europe and the sheer aesthetics.
>>
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>>1508884
>blocks your path
>>
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>>1508884
>quality of firewood
true
>>
>>1508242
Not in America it ain't. Beeches signified good soil so they were readily cut down for farmland.
>>
Norway maple.
>>
>>1509014
>Norway maple
...in Germany, not America.
>>
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Rot in hell.
>>
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>>1505667
how big do you really need?
>>
>>1508884
Plus, if you plant an acorn now, you might just get a big enough tree to last you a whole month just before you die.
>>
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https://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/misc/ag_654/volume_2/fraxinus/pennsylvanica.htm

>Due to its good form and resistance to insects and disease, it is a very popular ornamental tree
>resistance to insects and
>>
Looks like Australia and places like Brazil have the hardest woods. Anyone know how god-like they are?
>>
>>1509083
Green Ash is typically far more resistant to EAB than White or Black Ash and I don't think anyone knows exactly why.
>>
I would say redwoods, but oaks get the nod because deciduous, and sacred tree of the druids.
>>
>>1509135
Is this Bizarro World? The only North American ash that is resistant to ash borer is blue ash and that's because it's a different genetic lineage and not closely related to other ashes.
>>
>>1509245
Ashes in pure stands seem to resist better than those in mixed stands. It's thought that the trees can "communicate" with each other and when one is attacked, it sends a distress signal to other ashes to mount defenses.
>>
>>1509083
That's probably old as fuck.
>>
>>1507388
I have a chestnut tree in my backyard that is near 30 feet tall. Largest chestnut I've ever seen in the area.
>>
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Look at this pic of Chicago in the 70s and notice that the trees in the pic are green ash. Thus was the problem. Millions of the goddamn things planted all over the Midwest from the same handful of horticultural selections.
>>
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In Detroit, same thing. The entire street is lined with ashes exactly like was done with elms.
>>
Is it? Yep, it's a green ash.
>>
>>1509067
>planting trees for yourself
>>
>>1509287
Would you be willing to mail some seeds around?
>>
>>1509576
You would have to wait until the fall and chestnut seeds germinate immediately. They lose their viability in a hurry.
>>
>>1509586
Well if you remember in the fall make a thread it not like people leave this place. Ill be around.
>>
>>1509598
Unless its a horse chestnut or something.
>>
>>1509245
https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ecs2.1332
>>
>>1505616
>>1506274
>Larch
Came here to say this, excellent taste anons
>>
Cedar
>smells good
>naturally immune to weather (doesnt need to be pressure treated)
>beautiful color
>easy to work with
>>
>>1505539
Have you niggers figured out the best tree is Douglas Fir yet?
>>
>>1509977
>(genus) (species)
>>
>>1508942
Beech is still quite abundant in parts of New England. The are whole stands of it in several of my deer-hunting haunts (every once in a while you'll come across one with claw marks up it from where a bear has climbed it). The nuts are good to eat, but they are really fickle about producing.

>>1508796
And of course, they are the primary flavoring in gin.

Whole boughs of some juniper species are used for smoking meat and fish in some places. Used to be used a lot (sometimes in combination with oak) for hams.
>>
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Walnut and maple

>Wood is stronk
>Wood works predictably
>Wood is pretty, esp burls
>Burns hot and clean
>Both produce something edible
>Good climbing/shade trees for the chilluns
>>
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I find myself to be an engelmann spruce type of guy.
>>
There's a house in my town with a huge beech but it's not an American beech, it's one of those purple leaf European beeches.
>>
>>1510351
We call them "blodbok". Literally "blood beech".
>>
>>1510355
>>1510351
Seems that 4channel doesn't like my scandinavian antics. That was supposed to be "blodboek".
>>
European beech has deeper roots and you can garden under it, also it is far more tolerant of urban pollution than the American beech.
>>
>>1505765
Not only Sugar Maples are good, though. My family has made syrup with the Norway Maples the city planted by the side of the road and it came out fine and tasty.
>>
>>1505765
All maples can be tapped for syrup although most aren't as good as sugar maple. Also you pretty much can't tap maples in Zone 6 or up because they need really cold winters for the trick to work.
>>
Hedge apple is my favorite, good for literally everything. Close second to the black walnut and a distant third to wild cherry because I like them for woodworking.
>>
>>1510358
This. European beech is occasionally cultivated even in America (the Plant & Soil Science building at my college had one outside of it). American beech is pretty much exclusively a forest species.

European beech is also usually shorter and broader in habit than American beech, which tends to grow tall and straight, without any low branches.
>>
>>1510781
>All maples can be tapped for syrup although most aren't as good as sugar maple.
This.

Black maple is widely tapped by sugarmakers, and some will even tap red maple, although it always doesn't "run" as well and can contribute "buddy" flavors earlier in the season than sugar maple would. Box elder (ashleaf maple) will run as well or better than sugar maple, but the resulting syrup can have a weird taste.
>>
The Holy Trinity:

Douglas-fir
>Pseudotsuga menziesii
Redwood
>Sequoia semoervirens
Eucalyptus
>Eucalyptus spp.
go forth and harvest, my child
>>
>>1510922
>American beech is pretty much exclusively a forest species

It's a rather poor tree for landscaping. It doesn't grow very fast (though open growth beeches are faster than forest ones), it has shallow, greedy roots, it shades everything else out, and the nuts make a mess. It doesn't like pollution or soil compaction. Central Park has a bunch of European beeches in it because the American beech can't handle NYC and.

Beeches are long-lived trees and on paper can last 300+ years, but most never get that close because the thin bark gets damaged very easily, permitting insects and fungi to invade.
>>
>>1511126
> the thin bark gets damaged very easily, permitting insects and fungi to invade.
Not helped by the fact that (as I mentioned upthread) bears just love to climb them for the nuts.
>>
/out/ what wood is this? Is it oak? I got a smoker and need some smoke wood, will this do?
>>
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>>1511874
pic
>>
>>1511874
>>1511877
looks like some kind of pine/conifer in which case you will get sick if you smoke food with that
>>
>>1511880
They dont grow pinetrees here though I think. They cut trees sometimes and leave them for pickup later so I grab a bunch of logs and store them in my yard for the fireplace. I think they are oaks that they planted in the streets that's why I thought it might be oak.
What about this one?
>>
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>>1511890
ffs
>>
>>1511892
The dead leaves are a "red" oak but the green leaves are a "White" oak, so don't go by those leaves. The lenticels make me think that it could be buckthorn. I dont think it's oak. The other picture doesn't look like oak to me either because of the smooth red bark.
>>
American beech won't produce significant amounts of seed until the tree is 40 years old, although open growth trees may produce a few at 15-20 years old.
>>
Red mulberry is nice but I can't plant that because my town is full of Chinese mulberries and it will hybridize with them and create Frankentrees all over the place.
>>
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I like these
>>
>>1505539
As a kiwianon, I'm torn. Chaddest tree is Pohutukawa, aka ironwood; not particularly useful cus it's limbs grow in twisting erratic ways, but they are strong and the tree is rough as guts, they'll grow anywhere (were once thought of as weeds), near where I live fully grown trees 20m in spread have fallen off eroding cliffs and just taken root again at the bottom, not giving a fuck. Add to that around Christmastime their blossoms explode and the entire tree becomes the most beautiful scarlet. To top it off, pohutukawa honey is this sublime colourless very pure stuff.
>>
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>>1515377
(cont) But best tree I reckon is Manuka, grows near coasts but it's cousin kanuka can be more inland. P much ready-made walking poles and tent-frames, mean firewood, smells great too and is very good for smoking meat, coastal forests can be super atmospheric, the natural oils are really useful and are becoming increasingly sought after for skincare, and the honey is godlike. Love me my manukas
>>
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>>1505539
Oak
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9GYG86VgzQ
>>
>>1507140
It isn't working. Every ash you can find still looks like shit if it's even alive. Most ashes seem to survive, at least for a time.
>>
>>1507247
Sugar Maples are also one of the nicest looking North American trees during Summer and Autumn.
>>
>>1507531
While you are correct that the ashes in the forest look a lot healthier than the ones on streets, the loss of all the green ashes was a real tragedy because they were beautiful trees.
>>
>>1507556
They need to stop doing this shit. Hybrid chestnuts are not American chestnuts and they don't belong on the continent, and certainly not released into the wild.
>>
>>1507605
If you think boomers give a flying shit about ecology you're out of your mind.
>>
>>1509294
Yes retard, the problem is that people planted a bunch of native trees, not that some fucking chinks imported a deadly insect.
>>
>>1510931
Black maple is a variety of sugar maple.
>>
>>1505539
California Redwood.
>>
>>1516555
Historically, they have been treated as distinct species, and while in recent years some taxonomists have reduced the black maple to a subspecies, this hasn't been universally accepted.
>>
>>1516560
I was waiting for this greatness
>>
>>1516555
>>1516572
See, this is why we use scientific names. Common names are for retards who can't into latin or greek.
>>
>>1510932
>Eucalyptus
t. Strayacunt
>>
>>1518355
Wouldn't help us here, though, because there's still a disagreement as to whether to call it Acer nigrum, or Acer saccharum nigrum.
>>
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for me, it's southern live oak
>>
>>1505539
Hazel is nice. Fire smells like sex and it burn real hot!
>>
>>1505539
Last winter I really got into, Cherry firewood. Had a good haul of rounds we cut at work. Solid to split, spits a bit in the fire, burns hot and for a long time. And obviously the aroma is puka.
>>
Pinus sylvestris, ponderosa, nigra:Can literally live everywhere, from hot stoney places to the borealic colds. Fast growth, not much shadowing, so lots of nice stuff like blueberrys on the ground + often accompanied by birchs.
Prunus Avium: The most sexy decidious tree. The blossom in springtime is such a beautiful time. Also the bark is somewhat really nice. + often grows quite good in areas, where beechs and oaks start to suffer, like clay soils.+Birds love it, hence the name
>>
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>>1505539

For me, it's sugar maple.
>>
>>1516554
Actually they didn't plant native trees per se, but the tiny number of cultivars. These weren't grown from seed, but grafted onto an ash root stock, usually a seedless male variety.
>>
>>1507531
https://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/misc/ag_654/volume_2/fraxinus/pennsylvanica.htm

This link explains the ecology of green ash and that forest conditions are probably healthier for them than a parking strip outside Chuck-E-Cheese's.
>>
>>1523858
I've seen them in dry woods before.
>>
>>1516530
I wouldn't consider ashes an especially attractive tree. The main attraction of them was their tolerance of urban conditions rather than their ornamental value.
>>
>>1519240
Overplanted as fuck.
>>
I've seen a lot of ashes suffering dieback in Southeastern PA, but none of them have the bark damage associated with emerald ash borer, so whatever is doing this, it's something else. But apparently ash dieback has been an epidemic in the Northeastern US from time to time, there was a major outbreak in the late 50s-early 60s that killed an estimated 60-70% of ashes. And it's almost always open growth/landscaping trees that seem to be affected, never ones in a woodland.
>>
>>1516527
They need to last at least long enough to make seeds. I'm not sure exactly what the minimum seed-bearing age of ashes is though. But one other problem is that they're dioecious and have separate male and female trees, which means not all ashes will produce seeds like an oak would, and the seeds typically have to spend two years in the ground before they'll germinate (a few however will germinate the season after they drop from the tree).
>>
>>1516555
It has three lobes instead of five on the leaves and it's generally only found west of the Appalachians, but otherwise doesn't differ from sugar maple in any meaningful way.
>>
White birch and Jacquemonti birch are attractive trees but don't last very long in the US where hot summers and bronze birch borer quickly do them in. The suspectibility of Eurasian birches to the latter is kind of similar to North American ashes and emerald ash borer.
>>
Fuck Norway maple, fuck red maple, fuck pin oak, fuck Bradford pear, and fuck those dwarf weeping cherries.
>>
>>1524149
Unfortunately, landscaping tends to be prone to fads because scale of economics makes it easy to mass produce a few varieties of trees or shrubs and sometimes, like happened with emerald ash borer, this can have tragic consequences.
>>
How about planting Asian species like kousa dogwood on the West Coast where the summer conditions are bone dry? The damn things evolved for Japan's humid, wet climate so why the devil would you think they'd do well in 32 degree temperatures where there's hardly a drop of rain for three straight months?
>>
holly is good shit man burns almost twice as long as birch
>>
For me it’s weeping willows - intelligent, nihilistic and ready to fucking kill themselves
>>
>>1524149
Fuck crepe myrtles. Why does every other house in the South need one or five of them?
>>
>>1523880
Sounds like the tree is at an evolutionary dead end to me. Not at all evolved to withstand a threat like this. If you want to end it's lineage you have two whole years to infect it? Pathetic.
>>
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A lot of times retard plant tree without any consideration given to its eventual mature size.
>>
Scarlet oak is way underused and has much nicer fall color than pin oak.
>>
>>1507644
Based and bogpilled. My favorite is picea Mariana as well.
>>
>>1505539
>>
For some reason, the South tends to use the big oaks in landscaping a lot more than the Northeast or Midwest. Apparently they have some sort of perception that oaks are too big, although some of the habitually overplanted stuff like red maple are not exactly small trees.
>>
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>>1524460
just prune that shit. it's not like it sneaks up on you and is suddenly massive one day
>>
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>>1507140
>>
>>1505539
Oak
Amazing firewood, strong wood for building, and can even give a food source through acorns
>>
Western Red Cedar

You don't have to cut it for firewood because it sheds branches regularly. Great for smoking meats and fish. Rot resistant for construction. Soft enough to carve easily but sturdy enough to be useful. Produces fiber that can be made into cordage. Fast-growing. Basically, all the best things about softwoods and all the best things about hardwoods combined.
>>
>>1526775
Green ash seems to be the most vulnerable to emerald ash borer, although it's hard to say if this is inherent to the species or if it's simply due to the mass overplanting of them in landscaping. The white ash they're referring to were in a forest setting which is a healthier, more natural environment than a parking strip.
>>
>>1505539
Depends what the tree is for, where you are, what the local conditions are, how long you need it to live to produce what you need, and its other merits (habitat, food source for wild life, soil stabilization, etc).

Your question is extremely fucking stupid.
t. Botanist.
>>
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Shellbark hickory is the biggest and straightest-growing hickory. Unfortunately it has become rare in the wild as the wood is highly valuable and it's picky about its soil requirements, preferring wet, yet well-drained locations. Most were cut down for farmland and humans competing with wildlife for the tasty nuts may have also reduced the tree's ability to regenerate. It is also slow-growing (one foot or less a year).
>>
>>1505539
Live oak is chad as fuck, they’ll have branches extending horizontally bigger than most other tree trunks like it ain’t shit lmao.
>>
>>1505539
In North-Central Alabama, tulip poplar.

>70-165ft tall when mature
>grows up to 25 inches a year.
>Straight, no forking, and few knots
>Hardwood and deciduous
>Flowers for attracting tree-thots

Loblolly pine planting retards will never recover.

Pic related, boomer for scale
>>
>>1526845
You're out of your element.
t. Dendrologist
>>
Due to their fast grown, tulip trees are often used in forest regeneration programs in abandoned farm fields.
>>
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Pecan
>Arguably the greatest of the tree nuts
>Beautiful, hard wood makes awesome furniture (though admittedly difficult to mill)
>Flavorful smoke that's great for barbecuing
>>
It’s the cottonwood. Not only is it the official tree of the great state of Nebraska, it lets you know how great it is every year by jizzing all over your house, car, and family. And if that’s not based, I dunno what is.
>>
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>>1527106
There was one near my house, but bad ppl came and took it away.
>>
>>1508231
Hello, fellow bagworm
>>
>>1519240
best answer
>>
>>1527444
kek
>>
>>1508903
that looks so comfy. just imagine tucking your pants into your boots to keep leaves out and wading through that (following blazes of course so as not to damage the surrounding undergrowth)
>>
>>1505632

Sounds cool, but the description also makes it seem like there aren't very many of these innawoods

:(
>>
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>>1516527
>>
>>1531709
>>1516527
The idea isn't to save mature ash, they're already fucked, but to prevent emerald ash borer from attacking seedlings/saplings in the hope that they'll eventually mature and replace the dead trees.
>>
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This however seems like overkill. The ash borer infestation in the US mostly came from central China and the insects have a very low genetic diversity. What it means is this particular population of them is adapted to the climate of central China, which closely matches the eastern US between roughly the 43rd and 33rd parallel. It's been established that Minnesota is too cold in wintertime for many larva to survive and the Deep South and Western US are too hot/dry. It's kind of like how Dutch Elm Disease didn't get established in the Deep South due to the climate.
>>
>>1531728
Better safe than sorry.
>>
In maybe 20 years thanks to introduced parasites, young ashes may be mature enough to replace everything that was lost. But this will take time. I suppose it's a bit easier to defeat an insect pest than a fungus like chestnut blight.
>>
>>1507580
Go Native Tree Farms does it by growing a large lot of American Chestnuts and destroying any that get infected with blight. The ones that don't get infected are bred and sold.
>>
>>1505539
Yew tree
its basically magic
>good and sturdy for making bows
>like cedar cant rot
>makes natural medicine to heal the sick
>is beautiful and strong and wise
>>
>>1506137
>>1506143
the White tree of Gondor?
>>
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>>1506240
that.s how trees spread and make a forest
>>
>>1507472
>>1507140
Did they forget what happened with the ladybugs they brought in to control aphids? Now there's a whole 'nother infestation...
>>
>>1531924
These wasps were screened to confirm they won't target anything but emerald ash borer.
>>
Ash isn't a hugely abundant tree in the Northeast. They're around but you see way, way more black walnuts whereas the Upper Midwest (ground zero of the emerald ash borer infestation) is dominated by the elm-ash forest type.
>>
>>1506900
They taste like ass.
t. European
>>
>>1527106
>boomer for scale
kek
>>
>>1532510
>>1506900
Sweet chestnut is adapted to a Mediterranean climate, so California is the best place for it, but you can't plant it in the Eastern US anyway since it's not resistant to chestnut blight.
>>
>>1532410
>ground zero of the emerald ash borer infestation

To be honest these bugs don't seem to have a very sound survival strategy.

>eat your only food source to extinction
>starve to death when it's gone
It's like eating your seed corn rather than saving it for next year's planting.
>>
Walnut and Oak are probably the most god-tier trees if I had to pick but here are a few others. Ghost Gum and Weeping Willow for aesthetics. Cornelian Cherry and Ash for Spear/Poleaxe handles. Black Locust for insanely hot coals. Elm for roof beams.
>>
>>1508903
That's an artificial forest, I you'll be in absolute silence but I really don't like that
>>
>>1505539

All I know is that the oak trees here in Texas are dense mother fuckers that laugh at fire.



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