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File: campfire.jpg (170 KB, 1024x768)
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Campfire thread, post infographics and tips/tricks for making campfires.

It's the rainy season where I live and it doesn't freeze,so everything is constantly soaking wet. How the FUCK do make this shit light
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>>1452509
You need good dry tinder, dry kindling, and dry fuel. The key here is "dry". Normally, you'd at least bring starter tinder with you. Then you can add that to a locally sourced tinder bundle. Then start adding the kindling. Since it is wet there, like it is wet here all the time, you should look around for dead standing grass. The tops are usually the driest thing you can make a tinder bundle with that gets directly rained on. It helps to get stuff that is exposed to direct sun and not hidden back under something. Feather sticks are your best friend. Make them from sticks that are about two fingers thick. That makes it easier to do. You can feather up larger stuff and smaller stuff if required, but larger stuff can also just be split since the inside will be drier.

Papery tree bark usually has a layer you can fluff up to make tinder. I suggest making a nice big tinder bundle, even if you have stuff like lighter fluid. It make take 30-45 minutes to source everything and build the fire before you actually light it. You want to get it right the first time. If you have a magnesium fire starter, those are great for wet weather fire starting materials.

Basically, for everything wet, feather it and/or split it open.
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beyond what >>1452524 said, if its really wet, you may not be able to maintain best practices--that is you may have to cut branches or trunks of trees to get good fuel. dead trees preferable but live trees can work too. pine ends up being pretty decent since the sap is extremely water resistant and flammable. also always carry effective firestarting stuff with you--no shame in having petroleum products, road flares, etc with you.
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>>1452509
Gotta pee on it more
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>>1452509
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>>1452509
The penny drop moment for me figuring out fires was I wasn't taking enough steps in between tinder to kindling.
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>>1452606
thar be needin hella twigs my man
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>>1452509
axe/knife skills often go hand in hand with making a fire in wet conditions. Being able to fell standing deadwood, process large pieces into usable portions, split larger logs to get at the dry interiors, and create feather sticks with very fine feathering will greatly increase your ability to make a fire when conditions are damp. Where I live it's basically impossible to find dry wood on the ground year round in certain areas. If it is raining and there's a strong, dominant wind, you can use a tarp strung about 8 feet up or so angled against the wind to shield the construction of the fire, which shouldn't be directly under the tarp but on a diagonal in relation to the wind direction.



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