[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Search] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/news/ - Current News

Name
Options
Comment
Verification
4chan Pass users can bypass this verification. [Learn More] [Login]
  • Please read the Rules and FAQ before posting.
  • There are 40 posters in this thread.

05/04/17New trial board added: /bant/ - International/Random
10/04/16New board for 4chan Pass users: /vip/ - Very Important Posts
06/20/16New 4chan Banner Contest with a chance to win a 4chan Pass! See the contest page for details.
[Hide] [Show All]


Janitor acceptance emails will be sent out over the coming weeks Make sure to check your spam box!



Alan Jamieson remembers seeing it for the first time: a small, black fiber floating in a tube of liquid. It resembled a hair, but when Jamieson examined it under a microscope, he realized that the fiber was clearly synthetic—a piece of plastic. And worryingly, his student Lauren Brooks had pulled it from the gut of a small crustacean living in one of the deepest parts of the ocean.

For the past decade, Jamieson, a marine biologist at Newcastle University, has been sending vehicles to the bottom of marine trenches, which can be as deep as the Himalayas are tall. Once there, these landers have collected amphipods—scavenger relatives of crabs and shrimp that thrive in the abyss. Jamieson originally wanted to know how these animals differ from one distant trench to another. But a few years ago, almost on a whim, he decided to analyze their body for toxic, human-made pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, which have been banned for decades but which persist in nature for much longer.

The team found PCBs galore. Some amphipods were carrying levels 50 times higher than those seen in crabs from one of China’s most polluted rivers. When the news broke, Jamieson was inundated with calls from journalists and concerned citizens. And in every discussion, one question kept coming up: What about plastics?

The world produces an estimated 10 tons of plastic a second, and between 5 million and 14 million tons sweep into the oceans every year. Some of that debris washes up on beaches, even on the world’s most isolated islands. About 5 trillion pieces currently float in surface waters, mostly in the form of tiny, easy-to-swallow fragments that have ended up in the gut of albatrosses, sea turtles, plankton, fish, and whales. But those pieces also sink, snowing into the deep sea and upon the amphipods that live there.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/deepest-ocean-trenches-animals-eat-plastic/583657/
>>
Brooks eventually found plastic fibers and fragments in 72 percent of the amphipods that the team collected, from all six trenches that they had surveyed. In the least polluted of these sites, half of the amphipods had swallowed at least one piece of plastic. In the 6.8-mile-deep Mariana Trench, the lowest point in any ocean, all of the specimens had plastic in their gut.

Does a single fiber really matter amid all the sediment and detritus that amphipods regularly swallow? Jamieson thinks so. For a start, PCBs and other toxins can stick to plastic, turning fibers into sinks for other contaminants. Also, many of the pieces that his team found were relatively huge. “The worst example I saw was a purple fiber, a few millimeters long, tied in a figure-of-eight in an animal no longer than a centimeter,” Jamieson says. “Imagine if you swallowed a meter of polypropylene rope.”

If trenches from places as distant as Japan, Peru, and New Zealand can be contaminated, it’s likely that humanity’s plastic fingers have stretched into every part of the ocean, including habitats we have barely begun to understand. No marine ecosystem is untouched. “It builds upon a growing body of evidence suggesting that the deep sea, by far the largest habitat on the planet, may very well be the largest reservoir of plastic waste on the planet,” says Anela Choy from the University of California at San Diego.

“It’s not a good result,” Jamieson adds. “I don’t like doing this type of work.”

When he submitted his findings to a scientific journal, the researchers who reviewed the paper reasonably asked how he could tell that the fibers were actually plastic. “Our response was, ‘Some of it’s purple!’ ” Jamieson says. “There’s bits of pink in there. This doesn’t come from animals.” To satisfy the critics, his team chemically analyzed a subset of the fibers and found that all of it was synthetic.
>>
They also took steps to ensure that they hadn’t inadvertently introduced plastic into the trenches. The landers that they used to collect the amphipods have some plastic parts, but they are all bright green and yellow, and no such colors were found in the specimens. Even if the amphipods had eaten plastic from the landers (or from the bait used to attract them), the team only dissected the last of the creatures’ several stomachs to avoid sampling their most recent meals. And they performed those dissections within a special chamber, where continuously rising air stops fibers from their equipment or clothes from settling in the samples. Given these precautions, Jamieson is confident that the fibers he found had sunk into the abyss on their own.

Other scientists have also found plastic litter in the deep; just last year, one team documented a plastic bag at the bottom of the Mariana Trench. Until now, no one had shown that abyssal animals were actually eating those fragments, but in retrospect, it seems obvious that amphipods would. They are exceptional scavengers that excel at finding food. By deliberately pumping water over their body, they can detect the faintest plumes of odor, and with taste buds on their legs, they can forage with every footstep. When a morsel hits the ocean floor, amphipods turn up in droves. “We can catch 10,000 in one day with just a pipe, some bait, and a funnel,” Jamieson says.

Food is scarce in the deep, so amphipods can’t afford to be fussy. They’ll eat pretty much anything, which makes them particularly vulnerable to plastics. And since they sit at the bottom of the trench food webs, their catholic appetite can doom entire ecosystems. “They’re like bags of peanuts,” Jamieson says. “Everything else eats amphipods—shrimp, fish—and they’ll end up consuming plastics, too. And when the fish die, they get consumed by amphipods, and it goes round and round in circles.”
>>
“What you put in the trench stays in the trench,” he adds. Which means that the plastic problem “is only going to get worse. Anything going in there isn’t coming back.”

That’s a hypothesis the team can test in later studies. If Jamieson is right, then amphipods from deeper parts of the same trench should have higher levels of plastics than those from higher up. But Choy says, “We certainly don’t need decades of further scientific study to necessitate more responsible behavior and policies now.”

“I imagine pollution in the Mariana Trench is an abstract concept for most people, but for those of us living in the Mariana Islands this has consequences for what ends up on our dinner plates,” says Angelo Villagomez, an indigenous Chamorro from the Mariana Islands who works for the Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy Project. “So what can we do? The International Union for the Conservation of Nature recommends we protect 30 percent of every marine habitat to address human impacts, but that will only help if we’re also sustainably managing the remaining 70 percent, reducing carbon emissions, and limiting the pollution being dumped in the ocean in the first place.”
>>
Go talk to China and India about this. America is throttled with environmental protection regulations. It the chinks and poos using the ocean as a land fill.
>>
>>364949
Everyone is to blame, especially with how the Trump Admin and Republican are poisoning their own people.
>>
>>364949
>America is throttled with environmental protection regulations
Some of those were removed earlier in this term.
And really we're not and could stand a few more with ease.
>>
>>364949
These plastic bits last a while, the whole world contributed to this shit.
>>
Kaiju when
>>
>>364953
>especially with how the Trump Admin and Republican are poisoning their own people
how?
>>
>>364994
Trump has been rolling back EPA regulations since he got into office, at the scientific recommendation of no one

If you're a trump supporter, how could you not know that
>>
>>364999
So you lied, and the Trump Administration is not actually poisoning anyone? Maybe you should tone down the emotionally charged rhetoric if you want to get anywhere.
>>
>>365002
american denial tactics in action as per usual
go infect your kids with measles and breed out of the gene pool already
>>
>>365014
My kids are vaccinated, sorry.

What evidence do you have that rolling back the specific EPA regulations will "poison their own people"?
>>
>>365020
The fact they were implemented in the first place.
>>
>>365023
So you are also in favor of reinstating miscegenation laws for the protection of our youth?
>>
>>365024
Outside of a logical fallacy, I don't see how that's relevant.
>>
>>365028
Shame. I really was hoping you'd be logically consistent.

I asked for evidence rolling back these regulations would poison people. Your "evidence" is the mere fact that those regulations were implemented initially. Following that logic, any regulations that have been rolled back must be damaging people. Unless you have something else you'd like to add as evidence.
>>
>>365037
Specifics not being applicable to generalization isn't inconsistency.
>>
>>364994
Just the first results of 'EPA allows poison'
https://www.thenation.com/article/trumps-epa-is-poisoning-our-children/
https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/03/29/521898976/will-the-epa-reject-a-pesticide-or-its-own-scientific-evidence
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/28/climate/mercury-coal-pollution-regulations.html
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-11-12/the-epa-can-t-wait-to-reopen-the-mine-that-poisoned-north-idaho
https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/1/26/16936104/epa-trump-toxic-air-pollution

I expect extreme goalpost moving or poisoning of the well.
>>
>>365037
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/10/05/climate/trump-environment-rules-reversed.html
Here you go you lazy cunt, literally took me a minute to find.
>>
>>364905
So... Poor man's solution.... Take a shitty ass boat out and grab whatever plastic you can off the garbage patch.
Haul it in, recycle the plastic to make nets. Use nets to go out and multiply your farming stats on the garbage patch, haul three times as much home.
Start to profit
Do it for the g ood of all, Take donations, if no donations, DO it cause it must be done.
Live your life cleaning up someone elses mess
Realize you played a part in the mess
Have existential crisis of Religion, Politics every ism under t he dying sun
Have nothing better to do with life, keep farming plastic
Realize that there is a finite amount of plastic, realize ther e is a calculationfor man hours per measurment of a lot of plastics.
Calculate conventional rate of plastic reclamation return per poundage
Where Do we go from here?
>>
>>365100
Got a boat?
>>
>>365102
Too poor for a boat Anon, Thus the problem. Who knows... Maybe in thirty years they will have reality tv about Pacific Plastic fisherman who haul in the big catch despite the dangers of whatever they catch on film.
>>
what if the price of plastic per pound was higher than the price of fish per pound? Think that would change anything?
>>
>>365107
Would help replenish some of those ecosystems tbh.
>>
>>365111
SO price of plastic is around $0.11 for (Grade A Film) while average pound of fish is around $5.99
>>
>>365112
The price of fish will continue to rise as they die off while plastic will get less profitable the more is produced and not recycled.
>>
>>365100
plastic bits are too deep and too small to be recuperated without killing basically the entire sea fauna
most of it isn't recyclable as well
>>
>>364953
>everyone is to blame
>especially with how the Trump...
No. Full stop. Fuck you. You are so wrong it's not even funny. And to fully prevent you from being able to feign more "but trump!", I'm going to fill the rest of this post with sources.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/06/90-of-plastic-polluting-our-oceans-comes-from-just-10-rivers/
"According to the UN Environment Program head Erik Solheim... China is the biggest producer of plastic waste"

The Indus and the Ganges, which flow through India, carry the second and sixth highest amounts of plastic debris to the ocean.

Several years ago, the Indian government launched the Namami Gange project in a bid to clean the Ganges, but recently the National Green Tribunal, India’s dedicated environmental court, said that “not a single drop of the Ganga has been cleaned so far”."

First discovered in the early 1990s, the garbage patch's trash comes from countries around the Pacific Rim, including nations in Asia and North and South America, said Laurent Lebreton of the Ocean Cleanup Foundation.
But specifically, scientists say, the bulk of the garbage patch trash comes from China and other Asian countries.
This shouldn't be a surprise: Overall, worldwide, most of the plastic trash in the ocean comes from Asia. In fact, the top six countries for ocean garbage are China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam, Sri Lanka and Thailand, according to a 2015 study in the journal Science.
https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2018/09/07/great-pacific-garbage-patch-where-did-all-trash-come/1133838002/

It does go on to say that the US produces an estimated 242 million lbs of plastic a year, but the total amount flooding into the oceans is 8 to 12 million *tons*. Let's use the super conservative number of 8 million tons, or 16 Billion pounds, otherwise read as 16 000 Million pounds to keep it with the same wording.
US's 242 Million lbs / (conservative) Total 16 000 Million lbs = roughly 1.5%
>>
>>364999
its necessary to compete with other countries
>>
So what let the dumb animals die.
Humans don't need nature, well figure out other ways to make clean air water and food. If the stuff around us can't survive it's not our fault if it's too dumb to keep up with us.
>>
>>365218
>trust the democraps to ruin the planet
>>
>>365219
Lol im not a democrat.
My political ideology centres around the idea that whoever can defend the means of production deserves them. I believe that war will solve all of our problems.
>>
>>365218
I think nature doesn’t need us, but we sure as hell need it. I doubt we’ll ever be independent from it
>>
>>365220
War can’t get you a gf cuck
>>
>>365208
trump backed out of the paris climate change agreement. it could have been the start of a global effort to put pressure on countries like china, but he backed out.
>>
>>365223
What you think r8 is below me?
Whoever can defend the means of procreation deserves them.
>>
>>364910
>“What you put in the trench stays in the trench,” he adds. Which means that the plastic problem “is only going to get worse. Anything going in there isn’t coming back.”


>I don't know what subduction is because I'm a marine biologist.
>>
>>365247
No, it will eventually be pulled into the subduction zone and destroyed. The marianna trench is the best place in the world for us to dump trash.
>>
>>365357
>The marianna trench is the best place in the world for us to dump trash.
Planning rubbish disposal on a geologic timescale is fine if you don't care about any environmental consequences in the 1 million years leading up to the partial subduction of a tiny amount of the dumped rubbish.
>>
>>365372
Go bury it in landfill then so that it stays there forever, Mr. Environmentalist.
>>
>>365381
Personally, I have to wonder about if chucking trash into a volcano would work for out our pollution problem.
>>
>>364905
We're so fucking fucked. If you're not prepping now you're a deadman.
>>
we've come a long way, in the bad old days they blackballed Hutchinson and shilled "conspiracy theory" and the like.
now refinements like optical tweezers and resonance shattering or liquification are known and accepted.
there is no trash, just things a ai will be able to liquefy or break into dust, sort the particles, and organize them into raw materiels, or later turn directly into useful product at which point we will be in a Star Trek like utopia, well at least for a few milliseconds until the ai becomes a nazi, decides to eliminate the jews, then decides killing the rest of humanity is acceptable collateral damage in the name of efficiency, and 3d prints a bioweapon wiping out humanity.
>>
>>365225
>Trump backed out of a deal that would force the US to suspend free speech and agree to open borders in order to appeal to globalists, all while doing absolutely fucking nothing to mitigate pollution on a meaningful level
spotted the globalist shill
>>
>>365381
It's much more environmentally friendly building a landfill capped with clay or concrete away from sensitive environmental receptors than dumping it in the ocean mate.
>forever
Regardless of what you're dumping in landfill, it will be broken down by soil microbes in less time than it takes for the Mariana Trench to subduct it
>>
>>365002
>>364994
>>365002
>>365020
see
>>365061

scaling back pesticide regulations, reducing incentives to go green, legalizing asbestos use. Bitch please. You're not going to find Mitch McConnell, or Scott Pruitt literally poring cyanide into a babies mouth. They dont want to do that. They dont want to poison people!

Old men only care about making money. They do not care about this shitty world. They want a bitching wife, a huge gov. salary and loads of money and stock options from lobbyists in big oil. They want to bring in tons of cheap mexican labor (no wall, no family separation- those are just a big show- family separation cut immigration by 95% and they stopped doing it for no reason at all) to work on pesticide fueled farms so they can stock up massive supermarkets where most of the food is just thrown out for meager profit margins that only support a tiny elite.

They are living the dream. But it doesnt have to be your dream. They dont give a fuck about you.
>>
>>365523
>Old men only care about making money.
I.E- Bernie Sanders
>>
>>365534
>make money by fixing the broken energy industry
vs
>make money by fucking the planet up to the point only twats in doomsday bunkers will survive to the next century
stop being a nigger and think. if you're truly in this for yourself and your useless bloodline, then make sure said bloodline doesn't need to be trapped in tiny biodomes that aren't going to work too good anyways
>>
>>365225
>it would have pressured china to
no. it would not have. it would have taxed the US and given the money to china so that they -might- be willing to clean up their act.

It would be a repeat of this from my earlier post:
>Several years ago, the Indian government launched the Namami Gange project in a bid to clean the Ganges, but recently the National Green Tribunal, India’s dedicated environmental court, said that “not a single drop of the Ganga has been cleaned so far”."
exchange india with china and "Namami Gange" with "Paris Accord".
>>
>>365665
China cares more about climate change than you might think. The Gobi desert almost engulfed the country. Look up great green wall. Or the four pests campaign. China is very aware of what humans can do to the environment and signed the Paris deal willingly afaik. China is a very new country and some would say still developing. The fact that they are trying to move off coal at all is pretty important. The USA is a hundred years ahead and still uses mostly coal.
>>
>>365037
Just cause hitler was an uber clean freak doesn't mean everyone in favor of environmental purity is into racial "purity"

Are you really suggesting that racemixing is poisoning the youth?
>>
>>365100
In terms of plastic reclamation above the deep sea level, this isn't a bad solution, but I imagine automated plastic harvesters would fare better than human ones.

When going down to and below deep sea level human driven reclamation is probably entirely not worth it, unless you're talking remote controlled operations.

Farming plastics isn't necessarily a money sink either, as that plastic can get reused properly, though PCBs would have to be excluded from that recycling process, so all the plastic would need to be properly analyzed and sent to the proper facilities.

I guess where we go from there is figure out exactly what to do with the PCB plastics
>>
>>364949
There definitely needs to be something done about those nations too, but that doesn't mean the US shouldn't also do something about it.

And doing something about it isn't the same as having regulations. We need an environmental protection industry that actively finds and implements solutions to fix the mistakes of our past. Im not even entirely sure CO2 should be our biggest concern at this point, though the data on the effect of CO2 on coral is pretty disturbing.

The oceans are more than the canary in the coal mine, they're more like the heart of the global ecosystem itself
>>
>>365100
You know I've had this exact fantasy. The end game would be a giant floating station in each ocean, like an oil derrick, dead center in the ex-garbage patches that would regularly scoop up new trash as it came in and just monitor the place in general. Beyond that you'd have to oust the industrial chink companies (and the government really since that's the root cause) since they're rats who'll cut every corner at the cost of everyone else up to and including the planet itself as per commie culture.
>>
Fuck the flooding /pol/pet
>>
Bumpage
>>
MODS YOU HAVE TO DELETE THIS THREAD
THE ARTICLE WAS OVER 48 HOURS OLD WHEN POSTED
MODS MODS DELETE MODS MODS DELETE MOOOOOODS
>>
>>367289
Cry more /pol/, your flood attempt failed in the end.
>>
How is clean water a good thing

I swear people are so partisan their is people trying to have high minded talk about how polluting the ocean is a good thing

Can we just try to keep the water clean

Wanting our respective "teams" to win is trumping common sense .
>>
>>364949
>It's was those guys
>*first world excess intensifies*
>>
Best way to deal with garbage is to load it up on a rocket and launch it into the surface of the sun.
Grabage turns into a plasma soup, and only alters the sun's composition by less than 0.000000000000000000000000001% (real good maths, trust). The only side effects are pollution of our atmosphere launching the rocket (can be fixed by creating more efficient methods of transport - I suggest building some sort of space elevator with carbon nanotubes once technology allows it), and maybe some sort of weird garbage solar winds that the sun can burp up when the garbage is burned up. Either way, earth's magnetic field protects us from that, and if the sun changes slightly it would probably be over time scales we cannot comprehend.

That or everyone go back to living like cavemen and bush craft everything.
>>
>>364949
america is currently aggressively removing environmental regulations and restrictions and your blaming chinks and poos, which isnt wrong because they contribute a fuckload more pollution than the US, but america is going toward their direction of as little regulation as possible to give corporations unlimited rights to pollute and not clean up their shit
>>
>>365703
>china is very well aware
yeah, since their cancer rates went up by 400% and they're trying their best to avoid (another) violent regime change.

>and signed the Paris deal willingly afaik.
Yes, of course, that's the point.
"china, we will give you tons of money to think about changing environmental policies'
we say think because there is no way for us to enforce those policies. not just from international politics, but from the paris accords themselves.

China still has bile bears for god's sake. Any "environmental" protections will be completely lost on them as a people. I honestly have no idea what to even suggest.
>>
>>368030
Currently it takes about $10,000 worth of fuel to boost a pound of cargo to Earth orbit.
>>
If u see trash Pick it up and throw it away
>>
Sillica from the Space Station explosions no one is covering because we have been getting told China and India are at war. Or that it was a Volcano. Or an Alien! Or a thing that cleans the ground out for us or something.

THEY WERE EXPLODING MAYBE! MAYBE THAT THING IN THE JAPANESE CHANNEL FELL FROM SPAC AND COLLIDED WITH THE TRENCHES?!?!?!?!? COME ON KIDS


those are new blobs btw and they only work out of 0x8. Something we are not allowed to use because Stallman's blobs made up an encryption that creates itself later and only allows him to use it through government tooling. We have been fed to China since he was 18. He didn't know that, though, right?!



Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.