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At the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, Google CEO Sundar Pichai was asked some difficult questions. None was more difficult than Iowa Congressman Steve King's, however, whose question was literally impossible to answer.

King said that his seven-year-old granddaughter was playing a game on her phone before an election — most likely King's November 2018 re-election bid — and was shown a picture of the congressman that included some not-so-flattering language.

"I'm going to say into the record what kind of language was used around that picture of her grandfather," he said.

Then, holding up his Apple device, King asked Pichai, "How does that show up on a seven year-olds-iPhone who's playing a kids game."

To which the Google CEO answered, "Congressman, iPhone is made by a different company."

The Democratic staff table erupted in laughter at Pichai's reply, according to Business Insider's Joe Perticone who attended Tuesday's hearing.

Later in the hearing, Rep. Ted Lieu (CA) told the Iowa congressman that if he wanted "positive search results, do positive things." King has repeatedly found himself in hot water over his insensitive racial comments.

https://www.businessinsider.com/steve-king-asks-google-ceo-iphone-democrats-laugh-2018-12?utm_source=reddit.com
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>>325457
And people thought I'm crazy to think old white rich men in power is the most stagnant force on the planet
>>
That's hilarious.
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>>327301
Here comes Individual-1 bumping all the shit threads he's made over the last three days.
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>>327304
Trump is bumping anti-Trump threads? Huh.
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>>327341
It's how the person leading the campaign to post as many mass-manufactured anime threads as possible asked to be referred.

An inspirational McDonald's staff member with Down's syndrome has cleared his last table under the golden arches after 32 years working for the company.

Fifty-year-old Russel O'Grady first took on the job in 1986 at the Sydney West branch, at the age of 18, and was a popular employee among his colleague and customers.

His supervisor, Courtney Purcell, has called him an 'icon' and the 'best-known person in Northmead'.

She said: "We've got regular customers who come in to see Russell on Thursday and Friday, and the staff look after him, so we're going to miss him."

In his 32 years' service to the company, his family members have said the career has really changed Russell's outlook on his life.

His dad, Geoff, told Daily Mail Australia: "Somebody said to him, 'Are you handicapped?' and his answer was 'I used to be when I went to school, but now I work at McDonald's.'"

Geoff explained people have stopped in the street to shake his son's hand, adding: "He's very affectionate, dearly loved and appreciated, to such an extent that we just don't believe it."

Russell started working for the fast food restaurant at a time when it was less common for people with learning disabilities such as Down's syndrome to embark on career paths, but such is his popularity, his brother Lindsay said, he'll be missed at the branch.

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In the UK, there are approximately 40,000 people with Down's Syndrome, but only 8,000 are in full time employment. Fewer than two in 10 people with learning disabilities have jobs, but charities like the Down's Syndrome Association are working to improve the situation.

And two years ago, when Russell celebrated his 30th anniversary with McDonald's, the company had a special cake made for him.

But while he's loved his time working there, he decided that retirement was the best option due to his health.

He may be hanging up his apron for good, but he's an employee whose name will live long in the memory for his co-workers and customers.

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Rhode Island's Cranston School District hired a collection agency to recover unpaid student lunch balances.

In a letter to parents, Raymond Votto Jr., chief operating officer of Cranston Public Schools, said the district has previously tried to collect outstanding lunch bills "without much success."

"In an effort to reduce our unpaid balance, the District has retained the services of a collection agency. The company is Transworld Systems and they will begin their collection efforts effective January 2, 2019," the letter said.

Votto said between September 1, 2016 and June 30, 2018, the school district wrote off $95,508. He said the unpaid balance for the current academic year is $45,859.

"The District lunch program cannot continue to lose revenue," Votto said.

Lunch at a public elementary school in Cranston costs $2.50 per day. For middle school and high school students, it's $3.25 a day. Votto said parents who owe $20 or more and who haven't paid off the balance within 60 days will receive a letter from the collection agency starting next year.

https://www.wthr.com/article/school-turns-lunch-debts-over-collection-agency
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bump.
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>>325882
>muh tax dollar
price you pay society for being such a cunt basically
personally i'd gladly forgo the cash if cockbags like you would just kys en masse but so it goes
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>>324594
Fuck, their's is a buck cheaper than lunch for my kids. Cheap fucks deserve collections at their door.
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Grade schools still don't let kids store lunches in a fridge or cooler. School lunches are shit and usually overvalued.
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>>327337
Are lunchbags banned in the US? My lunch bag was always insulated

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A foul-mouthed parrot has been using his owner’s Amazon Alexa to shop online.

African Grey parrot Rocco has develop a fondness for the gadget, using it to order treats like strawberries, ice-cream, watermelon, raisins and broccoli.

Rocco, who had to be removed from his previous sanctuary for swearing too much, has been requesting food items from the AI device and owner Marion Wischnewski has often arrived home to find pending orders in her Amazon account for things such as a kite, light bulbs and even a kettle.

African Grey parrots are widely referred to as the Einsteins of the bird world due to their intelligence and talent for mimicry - and Rocco is trying to use his skills to his advantage.

But that’s not all he’s good at.

According to Marion, he’s also quite the dancer, telling Alexa to play his favourite tunes which is generally rock music.

Marion Wischnewski, of the Berkshire-based National Animal Welfare Trust, said: “Often I come home from being out all day and find romantic music playing.

“And he loves a boogie with Alexa. But it has to be something fast, like his favourite Kings of Leon.

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>>326668
There will likely be an upper limit based on what allele combinations are possible, so I doubt you could get that high without some form of genetic engineering to introduce novel mutations
>>
I just pictured a parrot in an empty room screaming in Gilbert Gottfried's voice "ALEXA! BUY ME A FUCKING KETTLE!"
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>>326640
185 IQ
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8inSl5xDY8I
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>>326680
>Outdated genetic theory
Wew lad

Paul Manafort, who served as the manager for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, provided advice to the president and senior White House officials on the FBI’s Russia investigation during the earliest days of the Trump administration. He gave guidance on how to undermine and discredit the FBI’s inquiry into whether the president, his campaign aides, and family members conspired with the Russian Federation and its intelligence services to covertly defeat Hillary Clinton during the 2016 campaign, according to government records and interviews with individuals familiar with the matter. Manafort himself was under criminal investigation by the FBI during this same time, a fact then known to the White House.

Last Friday, special counsel Robert Mueller alleged in court filings that Manafort told “multiple discernible lies” to FBI agents and prosecutors, in violation of the cooperation agreement between Manafort and the special counsel’s office. Among those, Mueller charged, were lies by Manafort to investigators that he had not been in contact with anyone in the White House.

“After signing the plea agreement, Manafort stated he had no direct or indirect communications with anyone in the administration while they were in the administration,” the special counsel said in a court pleading, “and that he never asked anyone to try and communicate a message to anyone in the administration on any subject.” Citing text messages, Manafort’s electronic records, and witness interviews, the special counsel wrote: “The evidence demonstrates that Manafort lied about his contacts.”

Those contacts continued after Trump and his associates knew that Manafort was under investigation by the FBI; after he was indicted by two federal grand juries on more than two dozen felony counts of money laundering, bank fraud, tax evasion, and obstruction of justice.

https://www.vox.com/2018/12/14/18140744/paul-manafort-trump-russia-mueller-investigation
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>>326898
Touche.
That future waifu can indict me for driving my hot rod thru her tunnel if you know what I mean
>>
Oh look, the obstruction of justice case just got bigger.
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>>327078
This is genuinely one of the biggest bombshells yet but there's been so many little bombs this week that people haven't fully noticed.
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>>327078
>bigger
SUBSTANTIATED is the better word. Up until now it's been things that MIGHT be OoJ, this most definitely IS OoJ.
>>
bump for truth

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A Halifax vehicle mix-up had a happy ending after a car taken by the wrong owner was returned with a full tank of gas.

Just after 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Halifax RCMP responded to a 911 call about a vehicle being stolen from the parking lot at a business on Hammonds Plains Rd. in Hammonds Plains.
RCMP say the case of a stolen car was quickly solved after the person who mistakenly drove off with it returned the SUV with a full tank of gas.

The woman caller told police that she had parked beside a car that looked identical to hers and entered the business, but when she came out her car was gone.

As it turned out, police said another man had left the business, climbed in the wrong vehicle, and drove off.

Halifax RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Dal Hutchinson said while such a situation is “very rare,” the confusion was understandable given that the cars were both white Hyundai Santa Fes (a 2016 and 2017) parked side by side.

A short time later, the man did discover he had taken the wrong car. However, he filled the tank before coming to the realization.

The vehicle was returned to its owner and police said the man was even reimbursed for the fuel he had put into the woman’s car.


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Although police said it doesn’t appear either vehicle was left running, and Hutchinson didn’t have more information on whether keys were left in the woman’s car, the RCMP are reminding drivers to make sure their vehicles are locked and not left running if unattended.

“We might run into a business while our car is running, and that’s an opportunity for people to pounce on, and unfortunately there are those that would take advantage, ” Hutchinson said.

“But in this case, it was one of those situations where it was an honest mistake.”
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>>327300
>I jumped in, turned quickly and looked—and the woman sitting in the passenger side wasn’t my wife. My wife was in the next vehicle watching this, laughing,” Hutchinson said.
What the actual fuck? No really, how in God's name did this mix-up happen if both vehicles had passengers in them? Fuck off.
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>>327311
I'm pretty sure the moment he started backing out of the parking spot he immediately realized his fuck up, then as an apology, he went to fill up the car, which is why he drove off still.
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>>327311
This is an example not the op article.
>To be fair, Hutchinson said it’s not that unusual to let yourself into a car that you think at first might be yours—he’s done it himself.
>>
>>327313
Haha what???
>>327314
I see now

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For the first time, researchers have identified that an immune cell subset called gamma delta T cells that may be causing and/or perpetuating the systemic inflammation found in normal aging in the general geriatric population and in HIV-infected people who are responding well to drugs (anti-retrovirals).

Even with effective viral control, HIV-infected individuals are at a higher risk for morbidities associated with older age than the general population. Unfortunately, the cell subsets driving inflammation in HIV infection and with normal aging are not yet understood. Also, whether antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppressed HIV infection causes premature induction of the inflammatory events found in uninfected elderly or if a novel inflammatory network ensues when HIV and older age co-exist is unclear.

To understand the cellular network that drives the onset and progression of age-associated morbidities in both ART-suppressed HIV and healthy aging, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) conducted a study that measured many markers on the surface of immune cells in the blood of people either with or without HIV (uninfected controls) that were sub-divided into two groups: younger (less than 35 years) and older (over 50 years) and compared that data with levels of inflammatory proteins in their plasma. This unique group of patients was recruited for the study by coauthor Nina Lin, MD, assistant professor of medicine at BUSM and an infectious disease specialist at Boston Medical Center.

Multivariate Computational Analysis of Gamma Delta T Cell Inhibitory Receptor Signatures Reveals the Divergence of Healthy and ART-Suppressed HIV+ Aging

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2018.02783/full

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-12-unique-immune-cell-chronic-inflammation.html
>>
Researchers found a marker on these gamma delta T cells, called TIGIT, that tracked significantly with plasma inflammatory markers in both the HIV+ and uninfected subject groups, and therefore could be targeted to potentially stop this "inflamm-aging" found in both HIV+ people and the general geriatric population.

"Our study indicates that there's a previously uninvestigated cell subset new player in the immune landscape that could be driving widespread illnesses and with targeted gamma delta therapeutics maybe there may be a chance of reducing onset, symptoms, and/or severity of inflammation-related diseases," explained corresponding author Jennifer Snyder-Cappione, Ph.D., assistant professor of microbiology and director, Flow Cytometry Core Facility at BUSM.

More than 50 percent of the HIV-infected population in the U.S. is older than 50 years and the world's geriatric over the ages of 65 and 80 is predicted to double and nearly quadruple, respectively, by 2050. "Revealing and therapeutically targeting the cell populations and precise immune networks that drive "inflamm-aging" both with and without HIV infection is a preeminent global health priority."

The researchers, which include first author Anna Belkinia, Ph.D., assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at BUSM, hope their study will spur new investigation and clinical trials targeting gamma delta T cell subsets to control unchecked inflammation and thereby reduce the onset and progression of many chronic diseases.

These findings appear in Frontiers in Immunology.
>>
bump!
>>
I wonder if this might help the multiple sclerosis people?

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President Donald Trump was upset after his tense Oval Office meeting with House Speaker-designate Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Tuesday. The revelation comes despite Trump publicly downplaying video footage of him and the two Democrats debating over the federal budget and funding for the wall Trump wants to build on the US-Mexico border.

During a heated meeting in which Trump threatened — and said he'd proudly accept responsibility for — a government shutdown, cameras caught a brief glimpse of the policy negotiations that have slow-walked the president's plan to secure funding for the wall.

"I am proud to shut down the government for border security, Chuck, because the people of this country don't want criminals, and people that have lots of problems, and drugs pouring into our country," Trump said during the meeting on Tuesday.

"So I will take the mantle," Trump added. "I will be the one to shut it down. I'm not going to blame you for it — the last time you shut it down, it didn't work. I will take the mantle of shutting it down. And I'm going to shut it down for border security."

Publicly, Trump said on Tuesday the discussion was conducted in a "friendly manner," despite protests from his Democratic colleagues in the same room. But behind closed doors, Trump was furious.

After the meeting, Trump flicked a folder so that papers were strewn around.

Trump is believed to have been particularly angry with Schumer, a fellow New Yorker, who despite being on the other side of the political spectrum, shares a friendly history with the president.

After being invited by Trump to give a few remarks, Schumer briefly stole the spotlight and delivered an impassioned speech on why a government shutdown would be detrimental.

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>>325928
>Mods decide to be gods instead of fags for once
A pleasant surprise the spammer got banned. Let's get back to discussing the news though and not giving him any more attention

>After the meeting, Trump flicked a folder so that papers were strewn around.
So after he got humiliated on national TV, he threw a folder to the ground. How presidential.
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wm-NtMkqz8
who was in the wrong here?
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>>325981
Trump, Pelosi and Schumer said multiple times they didn't want to have it on camera so they wouldn't have to humiliate Trump by calling out his lies in front of the public.

The fact that Trump was seething after the fact only proves they were right.
Also Trump's comically bad bluff that he has the votes in the house or the senate for his wall.
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>>325946
Knowing Trump it was probably also full of blank papers like that pile of folders he put next to his podium for a publicity stunt.

>>325983
Also, while I think it was a wise move to be civil in this case because it turned out so disastrous for Trump and led to him taking the blame for the shutdown, I really hope they're less coy about it in the future. Feel free to humiliate him, he's earned it. Trying to turn the cameras off only makes people think they're trying to hide something when in reality there's nothing to hide.
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Damn.

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The World Pie Eating Championship has descended into ‘chaos’ after contestants were forced to change their filling to chicken to stop them breaking wind.

It will be the first time in its 26-year-long history the competition has not used red meat and potatoes over fears the ingredients could cause some unwelcome smells.

The decision was made in the wake of a recent scandal at a darts event where a competitor said he was put off by another player’s farts.

Officials have said the move was necessary to make the event more enjoyable for onlookers.

The change has left little time for competitors to change their training regimes, and a former champion has claimed it could even mean (heaven forbid) a Southerner could take the title.

The 1992 pie-eating champion Dave Smyth said: ‘There is great skill in downing a pie without spillage, crumb splatter or swallow stall – talent developed over many years.

‘Chicken is less demanding and requires a completely different and less-challenging technique from meat and potato.

https://metro.co.uk/2018/12/14/red-meat-and-potato-banned-from-world-pie-eating-championships-over-farting-fears-8248484/
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‘The introduction of chicken means lower-level weekend competitors will be mixing it with the elite group.

‘I predict not just a shock win but an unrepresentative win, possible even by a southerner.

‘This last minute rule change is like swapping regulation footballs for plastic balls. Cristiano Ronaldo would not tolerate playing with plastic balls.’

The prize will be awarded at the 2018 competition taking place at a pub in Wigan on Tuesday.

Tony Callaghan, owner of competition venue Harry’s Bar, said: ‘The surprise element for many pie purists is that we’re going chicken.

‘We’re steering things away from red meat content this year for health considerations, and also to avoid the methane issue.

‘The warnings about greenhouse gasses from cattle, and the controversy involving farting at major darts tournaments which recently distracted players.’

The winner of the contest is whoever eats a standard pie the fastest.

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>>326622
>chicken
The farts might be less frequent but they're going to smell alot worse.
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Someone's backside will be blasting like an elephant gun if that chicken ain't cooked right!
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>>326622
Nice double dubs
Fuck the brits the make whites look bad.
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Someone is clearly trying to bury this thread.

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Third time's a charm.

A federal judge declared the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional Friday, ruling that the entire law must be struck down because Congress invalidated the tax penalty for not buying health insurance — the basis for the Supreme Court's 2012 ruling that declared the law constitutional.

Why it matters: The long-awaited ruling by the Texas judge isn't the last word on the issue. A spokeswoman for California Attorney General Xavier Becerra says the state is already planning an appeal, per Bloomberg. But it leaves the entire future of Barack Obama's health care law uncertain — and is sure to put President Trump and congressional Republicans on the defensive, as it would mean the end of protections for people with pre-existing conditions.

The backstory:

>The ruling was issued in a lawsuit by a coalition of Republican-led states led by Texas.

>O'Connor had already signaled in a September hearing that he was open to the red states' arguments.

>The ruling comes one day before the last day of open enrollment for ACA coverage for 2019.

>In an interview with "Axios on HBO," President Trump said he'd reinstate protections for pre-existing conditions if the lawsuit gutted the ACA. But as Axios' Sam Baker notes, Republicans have never come up with a replacement plan that would offer the same level of protection as the ACA.

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>>327046
If it was socialism there wouldn't be private insurance companies involved. Actually learn what socialism is you ape.
Nonetheless, I don't really like ObamaCare. I, like 70% of Americans, want medicare for all.
>>
>>327158
They're trying to turn socialism into a word with a negative connotation that scares people away even though it can be implemented correctly, like communism.

Thankfully it's not working.
>>
Remember when Jesus didn't heal people because they didn't pay his exam fee?
Or when Jesus only gave fish and loaves to those who could already afford it?
How about when he avoided whores and tax collectors?
Supply side Jesus for 2020!
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>>327160
>They're trying to turn socialism into a word with a negative connotation that scares people away even though it
The right wing has been doing that shit for decades. In fact they called Medicare Socialist Medicare and said it would lead to a dictatorship. And who said that? Godfather of trickle down economics and head of one of the most corrupt governments, before Trump, Ronald Reagan.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bejdhs3jGyw
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>>327164
I want Al Franken back...

One emailer wrote: ““You are a disgusting, vile Jew … This is OUR country: you’re merely living here (for now).”

A caller said: “You should have died in the Holocaust with the rest of your people.”

But the calls that most disturbed Tanya Gersh consisted only of the sound of gunshots being fired.

The terror campaign — known as a “troll storm” — was the result of Daily Stormer publisher Andrew Anglin’s December 2016 directive, urging hundreds of thousands of readers to harass the Jewish woman and her family, according to court filings.

Gersh sued the known neo-Nazi. On Wednesday, a Montana federal judge denied Anglin’s motion to dismiss the case, holding that speech in encouraging anti-Semitic harassment was not entitled to First Amendment protection.

The Montana mother found herself in Anglin’s crosshairs in late 2016, after Richard Spencer, a household name in the alt-right movement, gained notoriety when a video of him shouting “Hail Trump!” at a conference of nearly 300 white nationalists — and the Nazi salutes it elicited — went viral.

Spencer’s mother, Sherry Spencer, owned a ski home in the otherwise idyllic town of Whitefish, Mont. After facing local protests related to her son’s views, she reached out to Gersh, who in 2016 worked as a real estate agent, about selling the property.

Subsequently, court filings allege, Sherry Spencer decided not to sell. Months later, she published a blog post on Medium, accusing Gersh of extortion, threats and denouncing her son’s views.

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>>324444
That would be a shame for the 1st amendment if any of your points were true since Anglin defamed them based on their ethnicity/religion and doxxed them for their personal information (including a child's), but you'd have had to read rather than take some anon's low hanging idiot fruit. But hey, if I just say the reason they're in court is because they said mean things and not anything else that transpired, it's just babies who don't understand free speech in the US.
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>>324459
Most people who invoke the first amendment do not understand it.

Yourself included, it seems.
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>>315167
>“Are y’all ready for an old fashioned Troll Storm?”
The problem is trying to tease apart intent. We can predict from his actions in the past that it's not unlikely he's using coded language to encourage people to make threats against others.

And if there's any dispute I tend to think we should side with the first amendment, but ultimately we have to recognize a grey area because language isn't always clear.

I think perhaps in this case, authorial intent shouldn't matter given that it should be reasonably obvious to Andrew that a significant portion of his audience would read into his speech that he wanted them to make threats, and Andrew never made a reasonable attempt in good faith to request that they not make threats.
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>>318099
there's a report option for both doxing and call to raid, and i think those are actually taken seriously compared to a lot of garbage rule-breaking mods dont bother to delete. for that reason alone, Hiro is probably decently protected from something like that
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>>326381
I dunno, one retarded mod once banned me for "doxing" because someone posted a Reddit screenshot with usernames unblurred to try and "prove" that liberals were mad about something, then I linked one of the profiles that was in the screenshot and pointed out it was some false flagger who regularly posts on The_Donald because these people are retarded enough to use their main accounts for trolling. And for some reason I got a ban for that. No personal information or anything, literally just linking someone's publicly available Reddit profile. And before you say "then why are you posting", the ban is long over. Heh. My point is, I don't think the mods even bother reading the reported posts sometimes, they just (wrongly) assume the janitor is doing his job correctly.

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>Eleven die and dozens ill after eating rice at Indian temple
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-46573273
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Eleven people have died and dozens more have fallen ill after eating rice at a temple in India, police say.

About 70 people have been admitted to hospital after eating the food following a ceremony in the southern state of Karnataka.

A police spokesman told the BBC that 11 patients are in a critical condition.

Two people have reportedly been arrested following the incident, and one health official told local media that the food may have been poisoned.

"We were offered tomato rice [which] was smelling," one person who attended the ceremony told reporters.

"All those who threw it away are fine," they added. "Those who ate [it] started vomiting and complained of stomach pain."

The incident happened at the Maramma temple in the Chamarajanagar district on Friday, where a special event was taking place.

The rice was reportedly served as a religious offering to the congregation as they left the temple.

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An ancient, dolphin-like marine reptile resembles its distant relative in more than appearance, according to an international team of researchers that includes scientists from North Carolina State University and Sweden's Lund University. Molecular and microstructural analysis of a Stenopterygius ichthyosaur from the Jurassic (180 million years ago) reveals that these animals were most likely warm-blooded, had insulating blubber and used their coloration as camouflage from predators.

"Ichthyosaurs are interesting because they have many traits in common with dolphins, but are not at all closely related to those sea-dwelling mammals," says research co-author Mary Schweitzer, professor of biological sciences at NC State with a joint appointment at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and visiting professor at Lund University. "We aren't exactly sure of their biology either. They have many features in common with living marine reptiles like sea turtles, but we know from the fossil record that they gave live birth, which is associated with warm-bloodedness. This study reveals some of those biological mysteries."

Johan Lindgren, associate professor at Sweden's Lund University and lead author of a paper describing the work, put together an international team to analyze an approximately 180 million-year-old Stenopterygius fossil from the Holzmaden quarry in Germany.

"Both the body outline and remnants of internal organs are clearly visible," says Lindgren. "Remarkably, the fossil is so well-preserved that it is possible to observe individual cellular layers within its skin."

Researchers identified cell-like microstructures that held pigment organelles within the fossil's skin, as well as traces of an internal organ thought to be the liver.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181205134118.htm
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Taken together, the researchers' findings indicate that the Stenopterygius had skin similar to that of a whale, and coloration similar to many living marine animals -- dark on top and lighter on the bottom -- which would provide camouflage from predators, like pterosaurs from above, or pliosaurs from below.

"Both morphologically and chemically, we found that although Stenopterygius would be loosely considered 'reptiles,' they lost the scaly skin associated with these animals -- just as the modern leatherback sea turtle has," Schweitzer says. "Losing the scales reduces drag and increases maneuverability underwater.

"This animal's preservation is unusual, especially for a marine environment -- but then, the Holzmaden formation is known for its exceptional preservation. This specimen has given us more evidence that these tissues and molecules can preserve for extremely long periods, and that soft tissue analysis can shed light on evolutionary patterns, relationships, and how ancient animals functioned in their environment.

"Our results were repeatable and consistent across labs. This work really shows what we're capable of discovering when we perform a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional study of an exceptional specimen."
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When i hear 'blubber' my mind immediately flashes back to that silly Bill Nye song about it.
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>>326266
Mine yo that one scene in orgazmo
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>>326320
There was a blubber joke in orgazmo?
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Soft-tissue evidence for homeothermy and crypsis in a Jurassic ichthyosaur
Journal Reference:

Johan Lindgren, Peter Sjövall, Volker Thiel, Wenxia Zheng, Shosuke Ito, Kazumasa Wakamatsu, Rolf Hauff, Benjamin P. Kear, Anders Engdahl, Carl Alwmark, Mats E. Eriksson, Martin Jarenmark, Sven Sachs, Per E. Ahlberg, Federica Marone, Takeo Kuriyama, Ola Gustafsson, Per Malmberg, Aurélien Thomen, Irene Rodríguez-Meizoso, Per Uvdal, Makoto Ojika, Mary H. Schweitzer. Soft-tissue evidence for homeothermy and crypsis in a Jurassic ichthyosaur.

https://www.bbc.com/news/amp/world-europe-46537552

The road was closed in the western town of Westönnen late on Monday after a tank of chocolate in a factory spilled and poured into the street.

The chocolate quickly solidified. About 10 sq m (108 sq ft) was cleared by 25 firefighters using shovels, hot water and blowtorches.

Employees of the DreiMeister factory also helped with the sugary emergency.
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>>325818
I hope some people just took some home.
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>>325831
It probably wasn't very good. After flowing over several hundred feet of factory floor and road, I can't imagine it was just chocolate.
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>>325838
Yeah but it’d be fresh as fuck though
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bump

The prosecution’s star witness — a forensics specialist named Herbert MacDonell — set out an array of props before the jury: a medicine dropper, a mirror hastily yanked from the wall of the courthouse bathroom and a vial of his own blood, drawn that day at a nearby hospital.

It was a strange sight in the 1985 Texas courtroom, and the jurors, the judge and even the defense attorneys watched, rapt, as MacDonell laid the mirror flat and then climbed up on a chair, holding the vial and dropper.

MacDonell’s expertise lay in an obscure discipline known as bloodstain-pattern analysis. He claimed he could reconstruct the events of a crime by reading the bloodstains left behind.

Like a professor performing a classroom demonstration, he dipped the dropper’s tip into the blood and, with a practiced hand, released a single drop onto the mirror. It landed with a muted thud, forming a perfect crimson circle.

Blood landing on a flat surface should not spatter, MacDonell told the jurors with satisfaction. He let another drop fall onto the white shirt he was wearing. Blood lands differently on fabric, he showed them.

A defense attorney shot up from his chair in protest. This was a murder trial. There was no mirror at the crime scene. No medicine dropper. The demonstration was not reliable science, he argued. The judge disagreed.

MacDonell’s testimony would be pivotal to proving the Fort Bend County prosecutor’s theory that 21-year-old Reginald Lewis had murdered his family, shooting his mother and two brothers, and setting his father on fire. MacDonell had identified dozens of minuscule blood spots on Lewis’ clothing, and he said they placed Lewis at the scene during the crime



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The jurors gave Lewis four 99-year sentences.

“MacDonell kind of took over the courtroom,” Lewis’ attorney, Donald Bankston, recalled, his disbelief still fresh. “It was almost like having Mr. Wizard.”

But MacDonell’s testimony that day did more than mesmerize the jury. It gave bloodstain-pattern analysis its first toehold of legitimacy in Texas courts, spreading it quietly, but surely, further into the justice system.

Two years later, Texas’ 1st Court of Appeals ordered a retrial because of evidentiary flaws (two retrials ended in hung juries), but it expressly rejected Lewis’ argument that bloodstain-pattern analysis was a “novel technique” that should never have been admitted and was not “scientifically recognized” or reliable.

“MacDonell’s studies are based on general principles of physics, chemistry, biology, and mathematics, and his methods use tools as widely recognized as the microscope; his techniques are neither untested nor unreliable,” Judge James F. Warren wrote for the court. To support his decision, Warren cited four other states — Tennessee, California, Illinois and Maine — that had already affirmed bloodstain-pattern analysis’ use at trial. Two of those states had based their decisions on court testimony by MacDonell.

Warren’s hearty defense of MacDonell and his methods percolated through Texas’ courts, reassuring hundreds of the state’s judges that bloodstain-pattern analysis was reliable enough to be admitted at trial. They would allow it, again and again.

Over time, a parade of spatter experts, often trained by MacDonell — or by someone he trained — dazzled juries across the country with their promise of scientific surety, often tying bows of certainty on circumstantial evidence. Judges in Minnesota, Idaho and Michigan would rely on the Texas court’s decision when deciding to admit blood spatter in their own states in the 1990s. Those decisions, in turn, would be relied upon by other states.
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Blood-spatter testimony spread through courtrooms across the country like a superbug.

Its path — the steady case-by-case, decision-by-decision acceptance of a new forensic science by the justice system — is one that’s rarely, if ever, been retraced. But it reveals the startling vulnerability of judges, and juries, to forensics techniques, both before, and after, they’ve been debunked.

Although the reliability of blood-spatter analysis was never proven or quantified, its steady admission by courts rarely wavered, even as the technique, along with other forensic sciences, began facing increasing scrutiny.

In 2009, a watershed report commissioned by the National Academy of Sciences cast doubt on the whole discipline, finding that “the uncertainties associated with bloodstain pattern analysis are enormous,” and that experts’ opinions were generally “more subjective than scientific.”

Still, judges continued allowing spatter experts to testify.

Subsequent research, funded by the Department of Justice, raised questions about experts’ methods and conclusions. But little changed.

All along, attorneys like Bankston continued challenging the admission of bloodstain-pattern analysts. But they came to learn that a forensic discipline, once unleashed in the system, cannot easily be recalled.



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interesting, but not news.
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>>327149
It is completely news.


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