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Ding ding edition

Last thread: >>1351697

/n/ Discord: https://discord.gg/z5pdNh2

Resources:
https://sheldonbrown.com/
https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help
https://booksdescr.com/item/detail/id/1444747

If you want help picking out a bike to purchase, ask in >>>/n/bbg
>>
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bicycle-Wheel-Spoke-Reflector-Reflective-Mount-Clip-Tube-Warning-Strip-12pcs-WL/192893793857?hash=item2ce95db641:m:mdLFjerFYTV696fyHjcncFw

does these spoke reflector tubes even work or is it crap?
>>
>>1354271
Looks like it's just reflective tape applied to little plastic bits that you can clip to your spokes. I don't see why it wouldn't help visibility. Some "commuter" type tires also have a reflective bit along the sides. Probably the most effective reflective thing is to get it on your ankles/shoes/cranks.
And get decently bright lights if you don't have them already.
>>
>>1354266
>https://www.skatehut.co.uk/brands/mafiabike/mafiabike_kush2_complete_bmx_gradient.htm

>https://www.skatehut.co.uk/bikes/bmx/venom_20_complete_bmx_red.htm

are either of these okay bikes just starting out doing bmx? what about used bikes?
>>
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How deal with rust?
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>>1354333
You don't. Its always going to be where steel ( scrached or otherwise ) is exposed to elements. Keep a bike in a dry place to keep it from spreading.
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>>1354333
>You don't.
Well that's shit Am I going to have to get a garbon fork?

> Keep a bike in a dry place to keep it from spreading.
This is my bad weather beater. It lives outside.
>>
Are 2015 super record brakes much better than 2012-2015 chorus and record brakes?
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>>1354337
The only way to deal with it is polishing and repainting, and that doesn't look bad enough to repaint the frame.
>>
>>1354333
I have seen people zinc-plating shit with zinc-battery shell and some zinc-containing soldering flux.
But I won't do anything, maybe add some grease there.
>>
What happened to chainless bicycles? thought that shit would be all over the place.
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>>1354469
Weight? Maintenance complexity? Availability? Trying to sell them at a huge markup for little to no benefit?
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>>1354480
That's what I'm wondering.
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>>1354469
Drivetrain loses and possibly long term durability concerns. With a chain there is more surface to transfer energy through because it wraps around the sprocket. With a driveshaft, the surface to transfer energy will only be where the bevel gear meets the ring gear
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this okay for getting into park bmx? dont know much about bmx or buying used
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Who's worse? Audiophiles or cycling weenies?
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>>1354670
Audiophiles cause the stuff they keep obsessing about is scientifically proven to make no difference.
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>>1354469
What benefit over chains do they have?
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>>1354690
Less maintenance
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>>1354688
kinda like weight weenies imo
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>>1354670
people who like bikes more than cycling or who like stereos more than music are equally as bad
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>>1354690
Less drivetrain losses. Its still in development by ceramicspeed, that shit takes some time. I'd expect more to come next year.
>>
Talking of chains, do chainguards actually make much difference in stopping the chain slipping off, or is their sole purpose to make it more difficult to fix it? I've had a couple of bikes with chainguards and I can't say the chain slipped any less regularly.
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>>1354706
they're to stop your pants getting dirty
chain catchers are to stop the chain slipping off
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>>1354715
Huh, never occurred to me. I guess it does do its job, then.
Though I think I'd still prefer being able to fix it quickly if it does slip off to keeping my trousers nice and clean.
>>
>>1354722
a well designed one also protects the drivetrain from dirt and stuff too so it runs a bit better
take/cut it off if you don't like it lol
>>
>>1354704
>Less drivetrain losses
Except it does literally the opposite.
>>
>>1354266

So, I'd like to get a one strap shoulder bag (messenger bag?) for my daily commute and rando cityslickin'. Any recommendation? What do you use for commutes/randoshit in the city to haul around your edc?
>>
>>1354737
>So, I'd like to get a one strap shoulder bag (messenger bag?) for my daily commute and rando cityslickin'. Any recommendation? What do you use for commutes/randoshit in the city to haul around your edc?

I was seriously annoyed by the reload one I had. constantly slipping forward when loose, restricting my breathing when tight. I recommend double strap backpack type
>>
I just got my bike, first one in 10 years or more. I can't figure out whether I'm just retarded or something's off with the bike.

On front I have 2 cogs, one is bigger, one is smaller. I should be able to change from smaller cog to bigger cog by using left levers on my drop handlebars, but when I do nothing happens.
I can hear clicking sound, but nothing happens.
I turned the bike upside down, started switching gears (to bigger cog and back to smaller cog) and it works. But it doesn't work when I'm riding.
I have Shimano Tiagra group set.
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>>1354738

My commute is so short, only 20km (roughly 12 miles) one way and I'm using a backpack now and don't get me wrong it works just fine, but I'd like to have a messenger / shoulder bag for the ease of access while riding.

Bummer though if it keeps falling/slipping forward all the time though...
>>
>>1354737
>>1354743
>Any recommendation?
Don't get a singlestrap bag unless you ride fully upright. Just get a rack and a bag that's easy to take on and off. Most basic/cheapest option is just to put a bag in a milk crate. There's also panniers that convert into something you can wear.
>ease of access while riding
Get a toptube or randonneur bag.

>>1354741
Did you buy it new? Bring it back and have the shop fix it. Otherwise, you probably just need to let the high limit screw out, just a little, maybe a quarter turn. You also might have to turn out the inline adjuster for your front mech to add a little tension to the cable.
>>
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>>1354744

>Just get a rack and a bag that's easy to take on and off.
>There's also panniers that convert into something you can wear.

You do realize these are both nerdy and embarrassing options, right? I'd prefer to keep my bike looking at least somewhat presentable, not dorky (pic related).
>>
>>1354748
It's got a sus fork and seatpost, which is pretty dorky. However, the only truly dorky look is being slow. You aren't slow, are you, anon?
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>>1354765

You sound like a cat6 desu. Have fun with that :)
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>>1354765
>However, the only truly dorky look is being slow. You aren't slow, are you, anon?


>>>/sp/
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>>1354744
I bought it new. Just checked it again. Front derailleur does not move at all. The wire that connects to it moves maybe by couple millimeters too.
Also chain rubs against it when I'm using the smallest cog on back.
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>>1354791
If you have a 5mm allen wrench, you could probably fix it yourself. Shift down all the way, open the clamp that holds the cable with the allen wrench, pull the cable through, then tighten the clamp again.
Chain rubbing on FD when crosschaining is normal.
>>
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> endanger your life for the cycling industry
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>>1354804
I don't really want to do much myself, too scared to damage 1000+ bike, but thank you for suggestion!
The funny thing is, I still managed to change the gear once or twice yesterday, now it doesn't change at all.
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>>1354748
sweating through the back of your shirt is pretty dorky.
as a former messenger with said bag, the advantage is being able to access it without taking it off so you hand off your envelope, whip out your clipboard, get your sig, put it back and re-sling the bag all while your feet are in motion.
it makes your back hot and sweaty on the bike but you're hot and sweaty for your job anyway.
now that I'm not a messenger, I keep my EDC and whatever I'm carrying on my bike, not on my back.
tl;dr I've done a lot of both but carrying on the bike is better if you're not hustling what you carry for money.
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>>1354815
the place you bought it from probably wants you to bring it in for a tune-up after a few weeks of riding anyways, they should fix it for free
>>
Quick reminder belt-drive is the superior transmission system.
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>>1354690
I imagine all the problems that chains exhibit (slipping, getting caught, falling off the sprockets) are practically eliminated like this. Yes the abovementioned issues can be prevented by better riding & maintenance, but I think even newbie riders don't have to worry about that with chainless systems.

I also imagine it's tougher against strain & stress but, as >>1354498 mentions, there are durability concerns. Then again, if the gears last at least a year then they're already a better investment because the amount of hardware and labor required to replace them should be much less.
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>>1354813
>living in fear of cagies & their cages
>implying I do it for the industry
I get it, you don't wanna die, but you're not gonna make any advancements toward better cycling conditions if you just shirk away from your right to road.
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>>1354870
>I get it, you don't wanna die, but you're not gonna make any advancements toward better cycling conditions if you just shirk away from your right to road.

Hmm yeah sometime else can do that..I discourage people from riding in the road in dangerous places. It costs lives and people pushing "cyclists rights!" on naive new riders without emphasizing the danger are culpable, including this comic artist
>>
>promise myself I'll buy myself a new bike if I improve my average speed by 1 mph
>improve personal record by .4, .1, and .7 mph in 3 straight rides
>jew myself out of new bike because it was too easy and $2k would stretch the budget pretty hard anyway

Is this what they mean by "buying speed"?
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>>1354837
k
>>
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>>1354266
Has anyone used one of these Velo Orange "quill-style" threadless stems? What are they like?
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Where can I get a bike that has handlebars as high as in the picture? Is there a specific term for this kind of bike?

(Pic is from https://youtu.be/eucwzfOGYa4?t=629 )
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>>1354333
soak it in evaporust, then wipe with a soft rag. this neutralizes oxidation without harming painted finishes.
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>>1354935
>Is there a specific term for this kind of bike?
Vagina Repellent?
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>>1354666
that bike is junk
steer clear of anything with a front brake, gyro, or one piece cranks
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>>1354666
You're 32 years old dammit, buy a grown-up bike.
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>>1354935
hi riser stem made by wald. I know they get up to 11" at least
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>>1354666
BMX is a lot of fun, don't let these assholes talk you out of it.
can you get fitbikes or s&m in your area? if not, maybe we can help you pick over your local classifieds.
>>
>bike paths are all crowded
>the roads that are smooth have lots of cars
>the roads that have less traffic or are designated bike streets look straight out of Basra

wat do?
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>>1354949
Montanbik with slicks and road oriented groupset.
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>>1354949
Install carbon fiber cowcatcher on bike, ride on path, disregard pedestrians.
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>>1354935
>load the rack
>weight biased backwards
>lax position
>weight biased even more backwards
I'd like to see that fag negotiate a hill with a 12 pack in that box.
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>>1354949
ride on smooth roads, don't let cars bully you out of your rights.
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>>1354266
what is a good HRM to buy? any recommends?
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>>1354974
hrms are unnecessary. If you're not lying on the ground in cardiac arrest, your heart rate is too low and you need to stop being lazy.
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>>1354974
I have a regular Garmin one (010-10997-00) and it has been good for a year of constant use. Stay away from their soft strap I only read mediocre to bad reviews about it. I'm not sure if they're phasing out the one I'm recommending but it's not as available online as when I bought mine. Groupon looks like it has the best price on it right now at $22. I didn't know they sold products, but that's a good deal.
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>>1354953
I don't think the purpose of that bike is fast riding. I've put a 24 pack on my rear rack and made it home just fine.
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Hi guys, I've got a 1982 Raleigh Clubman (pic related).

I'm aware that the standard "English" bottom bracket thread is 24 threads per inch (TPI). But Sheldon Brown says that Raleighs up until the 1990s used a special bottom bracket threading, 26 TPI. I bought a replacement cartridge bottom bracket, English threading, so now I'm not sure it'll fit.

People on forums seem to think English thread will indeed fit a 1980s Raleigh Clubman.

Any ideas where I might find out the truth on this? Thanks if anyone's got any ideas.
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>>1354725
You got any source on that? Ceramicspeed claims less friction.
>>
Are womens road bikes usually geared lower than mens road bikes?
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>>1354701
>people who like bikes more than cycling
I feel hit by that comment.
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>>1355032
By the late 70s Raleigh switched to 24 TPI BSA standard.

The lower end stuff had 26 TPI and occasionally they would throw a 26 TPI on a frame when they were short on standard BBs.

Don't just screw the fucker in, you could cause damage to the threading. You can take it into a bike shop and have them measure the threads. A good shop should be able to rethread the bottom bracket to 24tpi if you have an old weird standard.
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>>1354946
thanks. Id prefer to buy used as I dont have a lot of money to put into something just for fun. Im not worried about it being super high end, just usable and not junk

I live in birmingham in the uk. I dont know where to look other than gumtree, ebay and facebook marketplace tho. if you could look and pick out some bikes that look good near me that would be great. if thats too much to ask could you tell me brands or details to look for?
>>
>>1355063
Interesting. Is Sheldon wrong then? Because he says:
>Right through the 1990s, the bikes built at the mighty Nottingham Factory were made to Raleigh proprietary dimensions.
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/raleigh26.html

Although I'm pretty sure my frame was made at the Worksop factory due to its serial number beginning with W, so maybe that means it does have 24 TPI threading?

Which might make sense because he also says:
>In later years, higher-end Raleigh models such as the International, Professional, Competition, Grand Sport and other models built at the separate Carlton workshop used B.S.C. threading... These bicycles all used cotterless cranks.
He doesn't mention the Clubman by name, but I think the "Carlton" workshop refers to the Worksop factory, because it was formerly a factory owned by Carlton Bicycles, bought by Raleigh. Also my bike does indeed have cotterless cranks.

>You can take it into a bike shop and have them measure the threads
Yeah I could just take it to Halfords, apparently they can do a bottom bracket service / replacement for £25 (don't know if that includes parts or not). If it does include parts that's fucking good. If it doesn't then I guess it could still be a good deal if they just re-service the bottom bracket in there (replace the ball bearings and re-grease rather than putting in a cartridge replacement. Cartridge replacements are like £30 themselves.

Also I think the cartridge replacement I do have might be too short. I just tried measuring the spindle on my bike and I measured it to be maybe 128mm, give or take one or two. But the one I have (which I bought a few years ago) is 110mm. So I might be fucked there.

Dunno, I would like to do this myself, but maybe I'd just be creating a lot of trouble for myself?
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>>1355050
Not to my knowledge. The defining difference between men's and women's road bikes is the frame - each one accounts for the different ratios between torso and leg length that men and women generally have.
>>
>>1355050
>>1355089
Also I think women's saddles are different because their sit bones are wider apart.
>>
Lads should I buy my own tools instead of taking my bike into a bike shop for them to fix my bottom bracket?

Yes the bike shop is the more sensible idea. It's far less worry and hassle. I just give them the bike and they do it. Simple as fuck. And it's cheaper than buying the tools myself. But the tools would be an investment. And I'm impatient, and probably arrogant too. I know it will cause me all sorts of fucking stress if I do it myself but, y'know, it's an investment. The next time it happens, I'll have the tools on hand.

What do you reckon?
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>>1355099
I do all work on my bicycles myself, it’s nice not having to go through the hassle of dropping one off and picking it up after it’s done.
>>
what pedals / foot retention should I use with my fixed/single speed bike? It's my third bike and just something for *very* casual commuting, I don't want to use cleats, ever.

I bought some velcro straps and these things are fucking retarded, its about 100 times harder to use than single sided spd- sl pedals
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>>1355103
Cleats are fucking awesome but I understand not wanting to use them in a city. They're more suitable for proper road cycling really.

Just get pedals with straps, there are tons of them out there. E.g. this sort of thing.
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>>1355114
That;s pretty much what I have. I have an urban commuter I use for work with single side deore pedals and the cleat side always stays up, it's lovely.

But I'm just using this bike to pop in and out of the city centre to meet friends and stuff, so I only want to use sneakers or shoes, and the strap side is always hanging down (gravity, i know) but it's a real pain in the ass to get my foot in when I start riding
>>
is there a special tool that i need to work on the crank bolts? it sounds like its loose but the bolt does not really move without having my foot on the wrench. with such force the crank moves too and i dont have anything that would stop it other than trying to put something on the other crank.
>>
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>>1355117
this is what i use on them
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>>1355103
If you are riding a fixed gear bike you should get retention. If you are riding a single speed (aka you can coast and have a hand brake) retention is NOT needed.

You can

1) get a pair of toe clips that attach on the front of the pedals and on the front 1/3rd of your foot. These are comfier when you are wearing a pair of shoes that isn't just a pair of runners, think something leather.

2) foot straps looped through BMX pedals.

3) An SPD mountain bike 'shoe' that looks like a regular shoe and has recessed SPD cleats. Like the Shimano SP5 (looks like a pair of retro runners)- 85 bucks at REI plus a pair of SPD pedals.
>>
>>1355122
the shimano retro SPD shoe is the CT5
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>>1355091
they are wider and shorter
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>>1355119
hm.. the other side was more loose but some crank stopper woul still be nice.. im sure that someone makes something for that
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>>1355086
>Dunno, I would like to do this myself, but maybe I'd just be creating a lot of trouble for myself?

Given the odd issue with the threading I would go to a bike shop and have them install a BB. A square taper BB is $25 tops, plus whatever they charge for install. Make sure you drop it in a shop that knows what they are doing.

If you do have a 26 TPI thread you could just get the BB shell machined to accept 24 TPI. A quick google search indicates that you can have that done at a good shop that deals with older bikes and is around $40.

That way you could just use a standard BSA 24 TPI square taper and an antique crank....or upgrade to Hollowtech II and put a modern crank on it.

By the way, Raleigh sells a dead ringer for your bike, right down to the color, with modern gruppo called the Grand Sport. So it's not like you wouldn't be doing exactly what raleigh is charging 799.99 USD for right now.

Sometimes the thing to do with old cool stuff that isn't going to be showroom quality, hang on the wall stuff is to get the bad standard out of it. This is true for many things, like if you buy a late 70s Euro sports car with the biodegradeable wiring....just swap it out for modern.

A Claris crankset is $67 on amazon. A modern BB that isn't pressfit is the same price as a square taper.

So
>>
>>1355099
>What do you reckon?

I always have the bike shop do BB work, with BBs bought via online sources. They have the experience and the tools already and it is pretty cheap.

Plus you have someone to sue to take to small claims court if they fuck it up.
>>
>>1355122
>>1355124
I'm the guy that recommended this - >>1355114

The guy said he doesn't want cleats, and yes you can get relatively normal shoes with recessed SPD cleats, but these shoes usually have very, very stiff soles (intended for maximum power transfer when cycling). Which is great for cycling but uncomfortable when walking around for long periods of time. Maybe some recessed-SPD shoes don't have these stiff soles, I don't know. My old ones did though.

That's why I recommended something like these - >>1355114 - because you can use them with any shoes at all.
>>
>>1354932
yes
>>
should spam that fag ops discord with bots. its like these threads are always started by the same retard.
>>
>>1354996
I'm not talking about going fast
I'm talking about it being unable to climb a hill without looping out
>>
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>>1355128
$60 threadless vo bb
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>>1355143
I can climb hills with my basket full of shit just fine. I'm not sure I understand what you're envisioning to happen when the road tilts up.
>>
>>1355136
i started the thread, but it's not my discord, i just copied and pasted from the old thread
i personally think discord is fucking awful, mostly because it's always: join my discord and talk to a bunch of stupid assholes instead of looking up exactly what you want on a wiki or something
>>
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>>1355103
>>1355133
Threadly reminder that science has completely btfo the myth that you get any more efficiency with cleats and special $200 bike shoes than you do with cheap-ass flat pedals and sneakers.

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/7d97/74db73e911f70e7d4ab6719507ce243f65c3.pdf
>>
>>1355229
Did the study look at efficiency over a two hour ride? I think the comfort benefits of a nice stiff clipless shoe over regular sneakers would make a difference.
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>>1355229
I have no fucking idea what that's measuring so why don't you show me a fucking conclusion or something, dickhead.
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>>1355146
not with that bike
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>>1355249
>clicking links is hard
>>
Okay this is going to be a super autistic question, but does anyone know when the Elite Ciussi bottle cage first came out. I'm trying to make my bike look like a 1980s professional bike and I want to know if they were on the market in the late 80s.
>>
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>>1355289
Flat pedals are fantastic for many situations and the freedom from just getting on and off the bike with normal shoes is amazing. However.
>foot retention isn't helpful on a trainer
wow an utterly useless set of conditions for a test. The pulling up meme is nonsense anyway, unless you're riding fixed.

the problems with flat pedals over longer distances are: (i have ridden many centuries with flat pedals)

>When you're very fatigued your feet wander around the pedals wasting a lot of energy.
>smaller contact patch and more flexible sole creates painful hotspots in your foot and over multiple days foot pain in general
>casual shoes, especially with thicker soles, give you an effectively shorter crank length and you're not pedalling around the axis as much
>increase in rotational weight which does make a difference as you're constantly moving it around
>grip is an issue with many shoe/pedal combos esp in the rain and esp with thicker stiff soled shoes. Although not necessarily an issue.

I think the first one is maybe even the biggest. Being clipped in when you're fatigued or bonking even, is akin to having a friend support you when you're blind drunk.
>>
>>1355299
lol i doubt it. Ask them. They do look the part though. And they're great functionality wise and stronger than chinkshit cages.

Just take off the sticker
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>>1355300
Don't use $5 lumps of plastic from walmart, use flats with pins. Basically impossible to move your feet without lifting them straight up a half inch first.
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>>1355303
I do have flats with pins, nice ones. But full length pins do dig into any shoes thin enough to not add a large stack to your pedaling, and light enough to not be constantly spinning around an anchor and they eventually create hotspots on your feet.
So I took them down a little with an anglegrinder.
And they still have great grip.

It's not an issue of your feet sliding around though. Of course you have good security under normal circumstances. I said that. Grip is not necessarily an issue. It's about you moving them around when you're fatigued. Have you ever ridden a century?
>>
>>1355311
No, I own a car.
>>
>>1355313
So do I.
Why do you feel the need to constantly try to assert that foot retention is pointless when their major benefits aren't even for the kind of riding you do?
Do you ride fixed either?

It's like a roadie crying about how suspension or knobbly tyres are pointless.
>>
>>1355315
>>1355133 claimed it made you faster/more efficient. Science says no. If you want to ride in a hurricane or torture your feet and crotch for 5 straight hours that raises separate concerns which aren't relevant to 99.9% of the world.
>>
>>1355322
>Cleats are fucking awesome but I understand not wanting to use them in a city. They're more suitable for proper road cycling really.
that's what he actually said

>Flat pedals are fantastic for many situations
that's what I said

And the OP said he was riding fixed which is why anyone brought up foot retention to begin with.

Why do you feel so insecure about using flat pedals?
>>
>>1355322
If you don't race then you don't need clipless pedals unless you want them.
The benefits of clipless pedals are:
o You don't have to worry about your feet slipping off the pedals under any circumstances. Really bad road, bouncing you all over the place? Very wet out? Spinning at high speed? Not a problem.
o You can do a full-on hold-nothing-back sprint with clipless *safely*. You can't do that with platform pedals
o You *can't* produce power by pulling up on the pedals, that doesn't work -- but you *CAN* remove some of the *weight of your leg* from the pedal that's going up, which is a little less work for the leg pushing the other pedal *down*. That counts.

Note that foot retention has been around for a long time, since before we had multi-speed drivetrains. Clipless is just an evolution of that. Use it or don't, but be sure to respect other peoples' choices.
>>
>>1355328
>If you don't race then you don't need clipless pedals unless you want them.
Many serious road riders don't race and basically are fools to not ride clipless.
And imo touring long distances on pinned flats is also a fools errand although it's also awesome having one pair of shoes and being able to clamber over stuff with them.
>>
>>1355328
>but you *CAN* remove some of the *weight of your leg* from the pedal that's going up, which is a little less work for the leg pushing the other pedal *down*. That counts.
That's what happens on flats too, or else the power difference would be easily observable.

The sprint thing you mention is supported by the posted study, but it also says riding that way is inefficient. That's not always important though, ofc.

>>1355330
>all the other dentists would laugh at me if I didn't spend hundreds on shoes to go with all my other poser gear
>>
>>1355334
What bike do you ride?
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>>1355336
If he’s calling people dentists and posers for using clipless pedals is it even worth asking
>>
>>1355337
this conversation is like dejavu so i want to know more to stop history repeating
>>
>>1355084
you're gonna want at least a cromoly/4130 frame, 9t cassette hub (not freecoaster or freewherl), tires not worn out, 3 piece crank with mid BB, make sure wheels run true (no wobble), frame and fork aren't bent, and bearings are smooth, quiet, and free spinning.

check out pinkbike listings for your area, this is where "bike people" sell bikes. in bongistan there are a lot of good bikes right now between 150 to 250 gbp.

you can ask sellers about the stuff I mentioned, they will usually be helpful in answering questions
>>
>>1355135
I'm happy to hear you have experience with this product. Could I now trouble you to answer the other questions?

> inb4 no
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should just leave this stupid bike unlocked somewhere and buy a single gear/igh bike with rim brakes instead. stupid memes like disc brakes and derailers never work properly. disk stutters instead of slowing down smoothly like rim brakes and gears wont always shift but make some grinding noises instead and might shift when pedaling back or switching back to lower gear and then trying higher again. i never had these problems with the 3 gear igh system.
>>
>>1355063
>>1355102
>>1355128
>>1355132
>>1355144
Thanks guys for the advice yesterday on my bike here: >>1355032

So today I took apart the bottom bracket with my dad's tools he lent me.

Remember this is a cup and cone bottom bracket, not a cartridge one. One ball bearing in particular was very pitted and almost squarish, but the rest looked pretty okay. I degreased all the bearings and both cups and cleaned the all off, and the same for the spindle, then set about reassembling it with fresh grease. I moved the only really bad ball bearing over to the "non-adjustable" side (drive side) because it has a bearing cage so I thought its deformed shape would be less important there. Unfortunately after putting it back together it still grinds like a motherfucker and doesn't turn very smoothly. It does turn though.

Anyway, the main issue in the first place was that there was too much PLAY in the bottom bracket, and this was causing my chain to rub on both inside surfaces of my front derailleur. Turned out that tightening the non-drive side cup fixed this mostly - taking apart the whole bottom bracket didn't really do anything. However, despite tightening the adjustable cup to the point where I don't think there's any play anymore, it still sometimes rubs.

Also another issue is that my bottom bracket spindle seems to be a weird size. 124.5mm, size "3S". Weirdly, Sheldon Brown's Japanese bottom bracket size database has sizes for a 3S which don't match mine. BUT he links to an Indian standard sheet (which he says is the same) which has 3S sizes which DO match my spindle EXACTLY. So maybe I have an Indian spindle? Or Sheldon's table of Japanese sizes is just wrong. Because I have Japanese cups (Tange, pic related) and Japanese cranks (Sugino). Nothing on the spindle itself indicates a manufacturer, but it does have "3S" printed on it. Sheldon's database, with link to Indian PDF, here: https://www.sheldonbrown.com/bbsize.html
>>
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>>1355527
ANYWAY, here's the TLDR of all that (ignore the first post if you want):

1. Do modern front derailleurs have wider cages or something? My chain seems to fucking rub in at least one gear that I'm on while on a particular chainring. This can sometimes require "trimming" as Sheldon Brown refers to it (having to slightly adjust the front derailleur to prevent the chain rubbing when you're in a particular rear gear). I shouldn't have to fucking do this. Maybe if I get a newer front derailleur, it might have a wider cage and I can avoid this problem? The front derailleur I bought off eBay does specifically say "narrow" on it...

2. My bottom bracket spindle length appears to be 124.5mm. Weirdly this isn't a length offered by Shimano with their ubiquitous BB-UN55 cartridge English threaded bottom bracket which would probably be a good replacement for my ancient-style one. Their two largest sizes are 127mm and 122mm - quite a difference. Should I just measure my chainline and see if I could get away with one of these? Maybe I'll need to use spacers or something.
>>
>>1355531
>I shouldn't have to fucking do this.
But you do. Get SRAM yaw or quit bitching.
>>
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Is it safe?
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>>1355377
yes
>>
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New to cycling. First time cycling in 13 years.
My new bike came with fairly high saddle height (see the red line in picture). I found it to be too high and slightly uncomfortable.
I lowered the height by ~~2 centimeter (see the blue line) and it feels much better.
That being said, all the so called "pro riders" ride with height closer to red line.
Does it matter? Should I try increasing the height again?
>>
>>1355594
Your saddle should be at a height where you can just put your heel on the pedal at the lowest point.
How high that is exactly is different for every rider and bike.
>>
>>1355594
the ONLY height you should ride is the one that makes your leg come just shy of fully extending.
if your knees lock up, it's too high. if your hips have to rock back and forth over the saddle, it's too high. otherwise, go as high as you can.

if you're a noob, you can go a little lower than that with the expectation that as your body develops cycling form, you can work it up incrementally
>>
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>>1355600
>>1355602
complete noob here. Sorry for awful paint but angle is something like this at the moment, maybe not even that much, but it's not completely straight.
I guess that means I could make it a bit higher.
>>
>>1355594
>Does it matter?
Fit is the most important thing to a bike after geometry IMO.
>Should I try increasing the height again?
Do >>1355600 to figure out proper saddle height. I follow the same method but raise a cm or so for full leg extension. Don't worry about how the pro peloton rides, most of them have freak body proportions and flexibility allowing them to have absurd bike fit to maximize aerodynamics without sacrificing power output. It takes time to build that flexibility and since you haven't rode in 13 years, adjusting your fit is going to take some back and forth testing as you find what works and what doesn't as well as building the muscle and flexibility as you progress. If something hurts or feels uncomfortable, something is wrong.

Every single one of us have different proportions, don't skimp out on fitting your bike. Ever wore a tailored suit vs a factory sized one? Adjusting your bike is the same.
>>
>>1355608
You should be able to extend your leg entirely with your HEEL on the pedal, not your forefoot.
>>
>>1355608
You don't want it to be fully extended either. You want just enough for full power extraction without over extension (which could lead to a permanent chronic injury the same way as too low saddle height) Watch a youtube video on the topic
>>
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>>1355610
>but raise a cm or so for full leg extension
By "full leg extension" I also meant there's a slight angle in my knee too.
>>
>>1355608
to find your saddle height, you can fully extend your leg with heel on pedal, but when you actually cycle, you want to switch to the balls of your feet over the pedal spindle, which will then not fully extend your leg. or you can work it out without the heel trick.
there's probably billions of things online about this.
>>
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>>1355608
do it like this
>>
>>1355594
>>1355608
Usually you want it so that you can reach the pedal with your heel but your leg is fully extended at that point and of course not suitable for pedalling in that way (since you pedal with the ball of your foot, not your heel).

But that's a good way of measuring saddle height. If you can reach the pedals with your heels (with legs fully extended) then that should be right. Then try pedalling and it should be comfortable.

Watch some videos if you want, they'll be more informative than me. Park Tools may have one and GCN too, they both do good bike videos. And Sheldon Brown's website is invaluable for all things to do with bikes.

Naturally beginners to road bikes don't like the high saddle position, it feels unnatural to them because they're used to a more upright sitting position instead of being hunched forward over the handlebars. But the road bike position is of course more aerodynamic and therefore faster. And the pedal height is meant to allow maximum power transfer to the pedals.
>>
>>1355594
>>1355608
>>1355675
Wait sorry I mean if you can reach the pedal AT THE VERY BOTTOM POSITION with your heel while on the saddle, extending your leg fully, then that should be right. Then try pedalling with the balls of your feet like normal and it should feel pretty good.
>>
>>1354266
is this guy right? >>1354382
>>
>>1355681
Yes, just ignore the image he posted and focus on the text. It takes an IQ >90 to do this, not everyone on this board is so capable it seems from reading that thread.
>>
>>1355683
follow up question, why isn't there sumo drag racing then?
>>
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>>1355688
That's called Keirin.
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>>1355705
but that's a velodrome where the specific power actually matters what with all the turning hence they are all typical cycling twinks
>>
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>>1355706
hmm
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>>1355688
just being big doesn’t make you strong lmao what are you fucking on
>>
>>1355706
>he doesn't know track cycling is peak power output and road cycling is average power output
Board tourist need to leave
>>
>>1355711
well actually, if you weigh a lot and can stand up and walk around you probably have more strength in absolute terms than the average person
>>1355714
>he doesn't know basic physics
>>
>>1355715
but is your power/weight ratio still good? there’s a point where there’s too much weight and not enough power, that’s what’s being discussed, don’t stray from the main point else be labeled a retard.
>>
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>mfw banned from the /n/ discord

you know who you are, fred
>>
>>1355717
the topic is top speed going straight and flat
the theoretical fatass monster would win this
>>
>>1355594
post an actual picture of your bike
maybe what you want is to raise your bars?
>>
>>1355731
good riddance cuckster.
>>
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>>1355594
>>1355602 <--------- what this anon said

>>1355608
the heel trick is a good estimate of where you want the saddle. I tell people they want their leg at 97% extension on the downstroke.
>>
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Has anyone ever done this? I don't really see a point in a 24 inch front wheel but seems like it could be interesting for front bias cargo. What are some problems with a setup like this?
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>>1355782
what are you going to do for braking lol
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>>1355782
>>
>>1355782
It effectively increases trail and bb drop, steepens headtube and seat tube angles. Not really something you want to do to improve handling under front load.
>>
>>1354837
send me a belt-drive bike and if it's good I'll help you push it as a meme
>>
>>1354949
go where the cars are
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>>1355783
get a 24" fork
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>>1355731
that place is a hugbox for retrodouches i wouldn’t be too upset if i were you
>>
>>1355752
the heel trick is good, but you have to measure for like 4:30 position, not 6 position. the hill test is also a good one - ride up a hill on a harder gear than you would normally choose, and see if you get any lift off the saddle. if you are lifting a bit, raise the saddle a touch. if your hips start to rock, its too high. if you start getting numb in the dick/balls, likely also too high.
>>
>>1355814
everyone on there has modern bikes tho. there's two race bros, a tt guy, etc.
>>
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What are some supps that make me genuinely faster besides energy drinks (sugar + caffeine) and amphetamine.
Some magic powder I can put into my bottle or pre ride pills or something like that?
>>
>>1355888
Sugar water with added electrolytes will work wonders when taken alongside an effective and consistent training plan.
>>
>>1355888
you need a bottle of mj's secret stuff
>>
>>1355888

amphetamin, no joke
>>
>>1355888
If you ain't dope'n, there ain't no hope'n
>>
>>1355888
adderall or riterlin (amphetamins)
>>
I turned my tire inside out and it did this. What do I do to fix this.
>>
>>1355931
Seriously, the bead on my bike tire curled and can't get it to uncurl. Wat do.
>>
>>1355434
your bike just needs a tune up
>>
>>1355960
turn it inside out and then right side in but the other way around (left hand roll instead of right hand roll)

imagine the rolled up part staying put and the rest of the tire unrolling around it
>>
A LBS installed a new headset and new tires on my bike (free since i bought them there so i thought it was a good idea) and I noticed a few problems.
1- The front tire is set in the wrong direction. The only reason that bothers me is because it's a Vittoria Corsa Graphene Control so it has sort of a direction to the tread. Does this matter in any way?
2- What bothers me most is that there's a tiny bit of space between the fork and the bottom of the head tube and that allows the fork to wiggle a bit. For example if i lift the bike, when i put it back down i can sometimes feel the fork moving a bit forward (and the top of the steerer a bit backwards). Do I need to reinstall the headset bearings or just push down on the frame and tighten everything up by installing the stem a millimeter or two lower?
>>
>>1355975
I did that and other side curled up. Am I fucked.
>>
>>1355976
>1.
Not realy that big of an issue, you can usualy just remove the wheel and turn it around, at least with rim brakes.
Otherwise the tread on roadbike tires is mostly a meme.
>2.
You probably just need to tighten it.
>loosen bolts on steerer tube side of stem
>tighten screw in steerer tube cap untill it isn`t loose anymore but not too tight either
>tighten bolts on steerer tube side of stem to proper torque spec (overtightening them can damage the threads in the aluminium)

Since they fucked up that basic stuff, I recommend to not go there anymore.
>>
>>1355989
This, pathetic performance by the lbs. I had similar experiences at three shops and just started doing everything myself.

>>1355888
Depends on your health and ride but there are some. This would be a good place to start: https://examine.com/topics/aerobic-exercise/
>>
>>1355995
And more...
https://examine.com/stacks/preworkout-muscular-endurance/
>>
>>1355989
>>1355995
Thanks. It sucks a little that I still need to work on things I thought I wouldn't have to touch again for a while. That's also one of the more respected LBS here. Guess I'll look for another place but I'm a bit fucked. I want to do everything myself but I'm still a noob so I need help.
>you can usualy just remove the wheel and turn it around, at least with rim brakes.
I was considering this until I noticed that it would make an asymmetrical logo on the hub face a different direction to the one on the rear wheel. I know it's irrelevant, but it would bother me more than the tire rolling in the opposite direction it's supposed to since it's more visible (unless there are safety or performance issues with the tire sitting that way). The logo is a sticker though, so maybe I'll go for it. If the treads on my tires and bike tires in general really are just a meme I won't bother.
>>
>>1355888
albuterol/clenbuterol inhalers, hydration fizzy electrolyte pills for the water bottles, black coffee, marijuana instead of pain pills, b12. some oldsters swear by coQ10 for the joints but it gives me horrible gas.

bad stuff that helps performance: cortisone injections, EPO, Testosterone Patches, hgh,
>>
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I'm trying to make my mountain bike that I've had since I was a teenager street-legal for the city, so I need to add (large) reflectors to the front and and back.

I understand how to attach the back one: https://www.bikesomewhere.com/sunlite-reflector-sunlt-rear-only-3in-rf202rdh (around the back stem, easy enough)

But what is the front one supposed to be attached to?: https://www.bikesomewhere.com/sunlite-reflector-sunlt-front-only-3in-rf001wth

The description says "Front uses a brake bolt mount", but I don't understand what that means.
>>
>>1356060
The brake bolt mount is the little hole in the middle of the front of your fork. It's where you mount a rim brake. A lot of disc brake forks don't have it.
>>
>>1356061
Ah, okay. My bike has rim brakes, and the fork does have a hole like that, but I thought it was for a fender (another thing I need to buy and install). Also, above that hole, there's another hole that's facing up instead of forward. Any idea what it is? Is the brake cable supposed to go through it?

Thanks a bunch!
>>
>>1356070
A picture would help
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>>1356060
I have never heard of anyone getting in trouble with the law anywhere for not having reflectors.

All they do is look ugly and rattle. They do fuck all for visibility. They're not even seen from profile.

You should get some of pic related instead which a:looks much better b:won't rattle and c:can wrap all teh way around a tube and be visible from every angle.

But really if you want visibility, it's lights, not reflectors, which will make you seen. Even run flashing in the day if you want.
>>
>>1356113
Tbh on a dark road a reflector does a lot for a cyclist with no lights. But you should have lights.

In a well lit urban setting they seem pretty useless to me though I do like to have them on my pedals because it looks cool from a car
>>
>>1356079
Maybe tomorrow.

>>1356113
>But really if you want visibility, it's lights, not reflectors, which will make you seen. Even run flashing in the day if you want.
Yes, I need lights too. What kind should I get? Are ones that connect to the gears and run off the power generated by my pedalling good enough? or do I need battery-powered ones?
>>
>>1356121
Modern light systems that run off the power generated by pedaling are the absolute best kind.
And very safe as you can always have them on and never worry about batteries.

https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/shimano-custom-made-vr-26-nexus-dh-c3000-3n-with-dt-swiss-535-701344

You would need a front wheel with a dynamo hub to power the lights. Importing one from germany is likely the cheapest and best option. Assuming you need a 26" rim brake wheel, above would be great.

https://www.bike-discount.de/en/shop/dynamo-operated-303/l-24
Then buy some dynamo lights. The german ones again have very well made optics and beam patterns as it's regulated there. It's like having a car headlight on your bike.

All up a bit pricey and a bit of effort to install, but not that hard, and easily the best upgrade you can possibly do for a commuter bike.
>>
>>1356025
>I was considering this until I noticed that it would make an asymmetrical logo on the hub face a different direction to the one on the rear wheel. I know it's irrelevant, but it would bother me more than the tire rolling in the opposite direction it's supposed to since it's more visible (unless there are safety or performance issues with the tire sitting that way). The logo is a sticker though, so maybe I'll go for it. If the treads on my tires and bike tires in general really are just a meme I won't bother.

just go back to the shop and make them redo it. barring that, deflate the tire, unmount it and flip it around then remount it and reinflate.
>>
>>1356121
get the $20-40 ones that run off of a rechargeable battery and have an LED light. dynamo hubs are old tech, expensive and sap watts.
>>
>>1356139
Modern frictionless dynamo hubs with led lights are not old tech. They're nothing like the old dynamo systems. Infact they're the most significant technological advancement for cycling in the last couple decades, outside mtb.

They sap ~5 watts only when they're on. It's insignificant.
>>
>>1356139
and you won't find a single person who has installed a modern dynamo system and doesn't love it.
>>
>>1355527
why not put new bearings there?
>>
>>1355731
anything that associates itself with 4chan and is outside 4chan is is very gay. they will ban you for the smallest things and the people on them arent users of these boards. makes no sense to go from a anonymous board like this to a forced non anonymous namefag site like that. why even come here if thats what you are looking for..
>>
>>1355971
i will beat the front derailer with a hammer soon. im sure that it wont be too close to the chain then. any kind of adjustment seems to only be a temporary fix and it will eventually start touching the chain again. the brakes could maybe be fixed by putting some oil on the disks. they say that you should not do it but that way it would brake smoothly as long as the brake lever is pressed hard enough to apply enough force.
>>
>>1356143
they still require a complete wheel rebuild with the whole thing costing about $250 while my option is $40 and involves plugging it into your laptop every week or so.
>>
>>1356143
The lamp and the mount probably sap more with drag
>>
My headset creaks when I turn the handlebars, with it worse further from the middle. Do I need to take it out and regrease etc? There's no play, topnut is secure etc

Webm here: >>>/wsg/2936582
>>
Faggots. All of you
>>
>>1356263
Sounds like it's too tight. Does the front wheel/cockpit/fork rotate by itself when you lift the bike by the frame, or does it just stay there?
>>
>>1356278
If I lift it straight the cockpit stays straight, obviously once I tilt it it turns, or if I rotate the frame back or forward it turns as well.

Is it just a case of loosen it off and re-torque it?
>>
>>1354266
Is 16 kilos normal weight for a 26-inch MTB?
>>
>>1356402
Any suspension? If full-rigid, 16 kg is an absolute boat anchor
>>
>>1356403
Front fork, rigid tail. I weighed it with lock and small toolbox, I think without accessories it should weigh about 15.
>>
>>1356121
dynos are cool but most people just get battery operated ones
>>
>>1356146
The only people that install modern dynamo systems are people that are already going to love it. Most people just buy rechargeable lights.
>>
>>1356290
Inspect the bearings. You don't have to completely remove the fork, just enough to get a look at both sets of bearings. Sometimes the split ring gets stuck if the headset is overtightened too much and you have to reset it by moving the fork down (which moves the split ring up). Are they cartridge? Might want to just buy another set. If they're retainer/loose: when was the last time the headset was overhauled? That is, bearings removed, cleaned bearings/cup/race, greased, reinstalled.
>>
>>1356176
Yeah I could do, they're not expensive, but then I've got to take it all apart and clean it all off again and reinstall the whole fucking thing. Just a bit of an effort, and I'm not sure if doing so would actually eliminate the wobble in the chainrings (at the moment the bottom bracket is very tight, I don't feel any play in the crank arms at all, and yet the chainrings still wobble, so I think maybe the chainrings are just bent? Especially since I rode with a loose wobbly bottom bracket for so long, maybe doing that caused the chainrings to warp due to the forces being put through them).

Eh I don't fucking know. The bike is basically rideable now though. The next thing I should possibly tackle is replacing the cassette because there are two sprockets where the chain just skips over them. They're roughly in the middle of the cassette, adjacent to each other. And new cassettes aren't that expensive - pic related is a Claris model according to Shimano's website and it's not too expensive (£14.49 is $18.25 USD, €16.27 EUR, $24.47 CAD, $26.54 AUD): https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/New-Shimano-CS-HG50-8-Speed-Mountain-Road-Bike-Cassette-11-28T-11-30T-11-32T/272220497520?hash=item3f619b2670:m:mBN_gwbRrjwSIWpKF_ttXqg

Also 11-32 would be great for getting up this big fucking ball ache of a hill near me. It's like a fucking mile long. In fact Shimano's website says they do this cassette in 11-34 too so I might be able to track that down.
>>
How do I know if a saddle is prostate-friendly? Currently riding this one from a stock Allez Sport.
>>
>>1356538
Does it have a gaping hole where your taint would normally rest? Do you feel pressure on your undercock veins?
>>
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>>1356543
Is this what you're talking about? I never tuck my balls down there, but rather laying then to the front of the saddle with my cock (I don't wear lycra). I have never experienced any pressure or pain in that area as well.
>>
>>1356546
Is it wide enough to support your sitbones?
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>>1356548
Yes.
>>
>>1356546
Assuming your taint does not have saddle pressure on it you're good
The cutout is to prevent the veins there from getting closed and the few nerves there from getting pinched, also probably weight reduction somehow
>>
How are bike gears called? For example if I am in 1 front and 7 rear, what gear am I currently in? Then say I shift into 2 front and 1 rear, what would that gear be called? 8th gear? 21st gear? I've wondered this for a long time..
>>
>>1356557
road cyclists usually refer the gear they are in by the number of teeth on the sprocket as the gaps between gears can vary wildly depending on what cassette you have.

In your first example if you had a standard modern road bike you'd be in 50-11. Then you shift to 34-11.
>>
>>1356538
>How do I know if a saddle is prostate-friendly? Currently riding this one from a stock Allez Sport.

looks like a pretty good one. you'll know if it isn't friendly to you down there.
>>
>>1356534
i actually recently moved to a tighter 8 speed cassette, 11-28. I was happy with the original 11-32 I had but I just never used the 32 and the last shift is from 28 to 32. Riding a road bike not a MTB though. The cassette is exactly the same. HG-51 is the current model.
>>
>>1356578
>I just never used the 32
I'm guessing you don't have many big hills in your area then?
>>
>>1356573
That's.. strange but kinda makes sense the more I think about it. I've always wondered if there is a standard way to describe to someone what gear I'm in.
>>
>>1356737
>I'm guessing you don't have many big hills in your area then?

lots of rolling hills, yes. mountains, no.
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>>1356861
Fair enough. Maybe I'm too weak but I want a nice big sprocket because my current area is just too fucking hilly. The hill to my house when I'm coming back from the gym is a bit annoying, but the real annoying one is this nearly mile-long hill on the way back from the local city. It's only 5.1% according to my calculations (average for the whole climb) but it's 0.8 miles long, nearly 0.9 miles long. And there is a tiny bit of climbing before it too. It's just annoying which is why I want a nice big sprocket on the back.

Looks like I can get the 11-34 Claris cassette for £17.99 with free shipping which isn't that bad.
>>
What kind of terrain at minimum would warrant a suspension fork?
>>
Can anyone recommend me a 26 inch tire thats good for light trail use/road? Some kind of nice inbetween, willing to spend probably 25 bucks per tire.
>>
My torque wrench doesn't measure past 25Nm. Can I simply tighten the bolt in my ultra torque crankset as much as I can or is the 50Nm spec particularly important?
>>
>>1356964
Getting it more or less in the ballpark is probably fine for a torque that high. It's a bit more than the usual 40Nm for cassettes which I assume you're already familiar with.
>>
>>1356971
I don't really have a feel for torque higher than about 5Nm. A skinny guy from GCN or some other big cycling channel on youtube said that 50Nm took all the strength he had on a video they made about installing ultra torque cranksets and that's pretty much the only point of reference I have.
So I either go ham with a quad wrench or buy a new torque wrench, which would be expensive and would make my current one useless.
>>
>>1356919
Minimum would probably be regular unavoidable potholes, though that could potentially be solved with a suspension seat instead.
>>
>>1356998
>would make my current one useless.
Nah
That small one will give you precision for small bolts, the automotive one you're going to use for the bigger torque adjustments will probably be adjustable by 5Nm increments
and a longer lever = less strength
>>
>>1357004
Fair enough, thanks.
>>
>>1356919
>>1357003
Suspension is for traction, not comfort. If you're on a fast downhill section of an XC trail that has rocks and roots in it, suspension will improve your ability to steer and brake slightly. Anything less than that, and you are adding a lot of weight, cost, and potential problems to your bike for no reason.
>>
>>1357003
Retarded post. This anon doesn't know shit
>>
Is it stupid to buy a pair of NOS Look Arc pedals for my vintage bike. There 90 bucks on eBay.
>>
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>>1357030
ehhh they don't even look that cool they're just chunky
i rode some mid 90s ones for years that came with my moser
work fine though, modern 3 bolt system, more or less like spd-sl

you'd probably get more retrodouche points for some faux-vintage clipless shoes like giro republics or the expensive leather ones
>>
>>1357052 My bikes from 1987 so I'm not losing any retrodouche points going clipless. That Moser is fucking gorgeous BTW.
>>
I want to get a high-visibility water-proof jacket for when I ride to work or go outside in general. What's a good brand?
>>
>>1357094
don't ride in a rain shell unless it's raining
any that are actually waterproof will trap moisture and make you sweaty
so you really want one that's -just- the waterproof bit, and not insulated at all
so you can remove it and layer

plus fit is so important imo you should buy from a shop you can try it on so basically recommending anything is pointless.
>>
There are so many different types of grease on the market. I'm lost and confused. Help.
>>
>>1357112
i just use a big ass tube of wheel bearing grease from the autoparts store
i think they're all much the same
use phil wood grease if you like spending money
>>
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>>1357115
They all should be good enough, but I'm tempted to try molybdenum disulfide
>>
>>1357147
>superlubrication
that doesn't work on bicycles
you need regular normal lubrication
>>
>>1357112
Generic 'blue' marine grease for everything.
>>
>>1354266
So are special cycling sunglasses worth it ? Currently I usually just ride wearing my cheap knockoff Wayfarer sunglasses but I am thinking about getting the 100% s2 or maybe Oakley Jawbreaker ones. Supposedly the Oakley ones have a special lense to see better ? Does that really work ?
>>
>>1357171
The temples tend to be designed to accommodate helmet straps. Sometimes (not always) they have better field of view. Otherwise it's mostly just fashion.
>>
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>>1357171
Air can stream around regular sunnies on cold mountain descents and make you tear up
If that isn't an issue for you, don't bother. If you wanted better optics/lenses you could get that with regular sunglasses.
>>
>>1357182
I had that problem on descents before, just dont know how much of an issue that is since it only happens when I go faster than 50kph (30mph) and although that does happen quite a bit on descents I dont ride that many hills for it to be a huge issue.
>>
>>1357184
It also happens on headwinds
In any case, $2 hardware store safety glasses work just as good as overpriced Sagan-endorsed shit.
>>
>>1357017
This is the type of answer I was looking for.
>>
>>1357204
You can get overpriced Sagan endorsed bullshit for $15 on aliexpress and no one knows the difference except you
>>
>>1357282
>except you
That's the only one that matters.
>>
>>1357204
>$2 hardware store safety glasses work just as good as overpriced Sagan-endorsed shit.
no they fucking don't, the lenses are dogshit to look though and they scratch when you breathe on them.

glass does not = plastic
>>
>>1356179
>beating bike with a hammer
>intentionally contaminating disk brakes with oil

I take it back, I think you're the reason your bike doesn't work right. You should probably ride a cruiser with a coaster brake. Whatever you do, don't attempt to work on it or make any adjustments yourself. You sound like you are dangerous with bikes.
>>
>>1356920
giant 26x1.95 blackbelt (aka kenda komfort)
or if you want something more moungain oriented, kenda smoke
>>
>>1356920
panaracer
a
s
e
l
a
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>>1357303
beating things with a hammer is often a valid strategy desu
>>
>>1357094
unironically showers pass is god tier
you want the 3 layer e vent "elite" jacket, not anything 2 layer. if you don't mind ugly colors you can get good deals at campmor and amazon.
>>
>>1357307
*flats*
>>
>>1357311
i've had 2 sets of regular paselas
I didn't get a single flat on either, riding in a city, loaded touring, on gravel, before the tread wore thin and they needed replacing anyway

flat tyres only happen to cowards
ride supple and comfy
>>
>>1357094
https://www.westernbikeworks.com/product/showers-pass-mens-hi-vis-elite-jacket
I'll shill for these guys because they're a reputable LBS even though they compete with my shop. And $145 is a killer deal for this jacket.
>>
>>1357147
red hi temp "disk brake wheel grease" from an auto parts store is satisfactory
>>
>>1357303
whats this contamination thing that i keep hearing about? they should work just fine as long as the bits that go on the disk move. might make the thing slightly weaker but its better than a stuttering brake. looks and feels retarded when going downhill with a brake that randomly brakes really well (so well that it can lock up the wheel if you arent careful) and suddenly switches to sliding without any kind of braking power and then suddenly starts braking again.
>>
>>1357307
>>1357311
>>1357313
Regular Paselas go flat all the fucking time. Pasela PTs hardly ever go flat.
>>
>>1356179
>but that way it would brake smoothly as long as the brake lever is pressed hard enough to apply enough force.
The lever, cable, and calliper would break before applying anywhere near enough force to stop a bike with pads that are contaminated with oil.
>>1357319
Stop shitposting or a newfag who takes you seriously is going to get himself killed.
>>
>>1357094
The only hi-vis hooded jackets that I know of are Gore Element Paclite and one of O2 Rainwear's jackets. The latter is made out of a cheap material that tears and fades, leaving the Gore Element Paclite as the only reasonable option.
If you don't care about having a hood, then there are plenty to choose from, just get something made of Gore Tex and it will be good quality.
>>
>>1357112
PHIL WOOD
H
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O
O
D
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>>1357171
No. I like my cheap $20 sport sunglasses more than the high end glasses I've had.
>>
I want to do a tour (180km in one direction, with some climbing involved) on several years old mountain bike. Not much of short-term endurance or experience, but apparently I don't get sore in the legs like friends I went mountain hiking with. Might be able to get there in one day if I get up really early.
I legit want to get out somewhere and my region is quite industrialized, so no larger parks besides the one(60km away) where I was already once, but via car.

the 180km destination is in the mountain and the place where I was once as a kid, the 60 km got something like tall hills.

Thinking now, the 60km is a wiser idea, but the 180km one seems pretty epic.

How fucked I'm going to be? If doable, should I remember about something? In terms of bike stuff I'm thinking of getting spare tubes, hand pump and tools I would need to change them, that's at minimum.
>>
>>1357293
I’ve got bootleg 100%s and POCs and they both work great, and I like knowing I paid $15 for them when I drop them.
>>
>>1357338
fuck yeah dude, do it
>>
>>1357338
Dont tour on an anal bike
>>
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So Siroko has a sale on their K3 Sunglasses where I can get them for like 70% off as cheap as 25 bucks. Seems like a good deal, what do you guys think ?

https://www.siroko.com/collections/cycling
>>
>>1357346
>anal bike
???
No, seriously, I don't what it means. Isn't it just a normal bike seat?
>>
>>1357353
hes just unfunnily trolling you
>>
>>1357355
Oh, ok.
>>1357340
Hopefully I will find enough gut to do so. I want to do at least the 60km one. Depends on how many free days I get from work.
>>
>>1357112
>There are so many different types of grease on the market. I'm lost and confused. Help.
Motorex Grease 2000
Originally for motorcycles or some shit but got so popular with cyclists they're repackaging it in a squeeze tube
>>
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>>1356920
I would spend the $45 on 26x2.0 schwalbe Marathon GT 365 or the cheaper $35 GT Tour

https://www.biketiresdirect.com/product/schwalbe-marathon-gt-tour-26-tire

here is some drop shipper selling the Tour for $22

https://www.bikeinn.com/bike/schwalbe-marathon-gt-tour-hs485-d/136846981/
>>
today I was searching for a some frame for my new bike build and first time ever I saw brakes under the bike I was like what the fuck is this real and apparently it's called direct mount pic rel
why would you have something like this instead of a regular pair of brakes are there any benefits besides possible less aero drag?
>>
>>1357365
I think it;s only for Aero gains. On really old MTBs they would also do this for some reason... I forget the logic behind that one
>>
>>1357369
I guess it makes it even harder to smash your brakes, even though it's pretty close to impossible with the regular ones
>>
>>1357365
>direct mount
This also refers to brakes mounted in the traditional place, but using one bolt to secure each arm instead of a single bolt in the center. They're stiffer than single-bolt brakes and can clear a wider tire.
>>
>>1357052
das a hot bike
>>
>>1357112
another vote for generic auto parts store grease.
has never done me wrong.
>>
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>>1357112
Park Tool
P O L Y L U B E 1 0 0 0
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>Error: Our system thinks your post is spam. Please reformat and try again.
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>>1357461
Too thin
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>>1357369
I never understood that either. aero at least makes sense, but on MTB, they just get packed with mud immediately.
>>
>>1357464
That's what she said
>>
>>1357112

>>1357115
>>1357155
>>1357454
these are correct

>>1357331
>>1357357
>>1357461
these are consumerist suckers
>>
>>1357478
haven't tried the motorex.

phil grease is better than park polyurea lube. phil is better than auto store grease. park is similar. better grease will absorb impacts, resist entry of water, and make bearings last longer. for some applications, such as old or cheap bikes, top quality grease is not worth the extra money.

name brand red or green wheel bearing grease from valvoline, lucas, or timken is the best auto store grease. avoid yellow or brown grease, this is made for sliding plates and not ball bearings.

some bike oems use bright blue or green grease. this is the same stuff as the red valvoline lithium-moly grease but dyed differently.
>>
I just bought a 1000-dollar road bike. I usually run/swim. I have not biked in years. Biking is amazing. I went out for a 3 hour ride today. I have drop down handlebars. I have disk brakes. I am new to road biking.

When I fully depress the rear brake handle there is no braking. When I fully press they front brake pedal (at speed) braking is mediocre; I do not go over the bars. The people at the bike store did a "safety check." I assue this has something to do with the tension in the brake cable. How do I fix this problem? What alan key do I use? Or just a screw driver?

-------

I have Shimano Claris. When changing the tiny gears at the back, with a tap, they change instantly. When chanining the large gears at the front when I tap the gear changing thing it moves but does not change the gear. For me to change the front gear, I have to hold it down for a few secconds. It is more true when going from small to big, then big to small. Is this normal.

t. doctor of engineering
>>
>>1357478
Motorex is literally better than your fringie dirt grease but if saving 10¢ is that important to you okay
>>
>>1357523
>hen chanining the large gears at the front when I tap the gear changing thing it moves but does not change the gear. For me to change the front gear, I have to hold it down for a few secconds. It is more true when going from small to big, then big to small. Is this normal.

The lever tightens the cable to shift up from big to small. The lever has a set, indexed amount of cable it tightens with each throw, which is meant to be the right amount to move the derailer over and shift up. What is likely happening, is that the cable has stretched a bit and is a little too slack and the first part of the lever throw is merely taking up the slack in the cable, before it starts to move the derailer. So tighten the cable.

Front shifters most also have 3 positions though. There is a middle 'trim' position reached with a soft small movement of the lever. This is not meant to shift the front chainrings, but merely to slightly change the position of the front derailer, so that the chain running at extreme angles due to the rear cogs does not rub on it. When you move the front shifter all the way over, that is when it will skip the trim position and shift cogs. So maybe you are not shifting hard enough. Holding it means the cable is too loose though, shifts should still be immediate.

tl:dr tighten the cable
>>
>>1357523
>braking
You have mechanical disc brakes. Many of these have one pad fixed and one pad that moves. You want both pads as close as possible to the rotor. There is an adjustment allen screw behind the fixed pad, usually in 5 mm. By behind, I mean that it will be on the outside of the brake caliper. The moveable pad is adjusted by altering the tension on the cable. Some mechanical brakes have two pads that move, in which case there should be an adjustment screw behind both pads. If you want truly good flip over the bars performance from mechanical discs, you'll probably have to swap the pads and rotors. Preferably a metallic type pad and a more durable rotor which can handle the extra wear from the grabbier pads.
>shifting
The cable may need more tension as the other anon mentioned. The front derailer may also need the high limit screw let out a small amount.
>>
>>1357339
Good for you.
>>
>>1357523
your brakes arent bed in yet. they'll get better after a few more miles of riding. if they're out of adjustment, you could try adjusting them yourself, but there's a 50% chance you'll make it worse.
>>
>>1357338
Do longer and longer short rides, building up to your target distance.
>>
>>1357607
>a few more miles
>literally zero braking
The problem is a road bike with discs that retails for $1000 retail. I guarantee they're some promax garbage that barely work. This is why no one should buy road bike discs less than R7020
>but it sort of works for me with my frankenstein system that I spent $300 extra for and hours fiddling with to upgrade to
Good for you
>>
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>>1357626
I have shitty hayes MX5s with cheap as fuck tektro levers and they brake decently after retouching the pads so they're close, a good cheap upgrade is getting a brace and a 20 mm more of rotor upfront.
>>
>>1357523
disc brakes can break from things like storing the bike outside. those memes will never be better than rim brakes.
>>
>>1357605
It is good for me
>>
>>1357365
I had these on my road bike and they were absolutely garbage.
>>
>>1357717
I have the R8010 chainstay brake caliper on my bike and it’s fine. I’ve used cheap Tektro ones and those suck.
>>
What's a good cycling computer with speed, distance, cadence, power, heart rate data, but no navigation? Don't wanna pay for a feature I won't uae
>>
>>1357754
>no navigation
No navigation or no GPS tracking?
Because even the edge 520 I use doesn't have navigation per-se, I have to create a route then tell the computer to guide me through the route, I can't put an address and follow the path.
Yo could also check if your phone is compatible with ANT+ and save some money in the cyclocomputer and just get the sensors, just check that they're ANT+
>>
>>1357522
Wait. Grease is colour coded?
>>
>>1357779
Everything is, even fuel
>>
>>1357758
Ah maybe I misunderstood, then. Was looking at that Garmin and the Wahoo Element Bolt and saw they offer navigation, but I figured it was a Google Maps sort of thing. Thanks for the info
>>
>>1357754
Stages makes a pretty basic computer with all those, plus a few extras.
>>
>>1357522
>haven't tried the motorex
Motorex is neon green
>>
New to cycling. I can't figure out if I'm EXTREMELY out of shape or just am stupid and cannot figure how to pedal properly.

Lets say there's 1KM straight road. Most people I see continuously pedal the whole way but here's what I do - pedal for 200 meters, stop peddling for 100 meters, pedal for 200 meters, stop peddling for 100 meters, and so on.
I try switching gears, easier or harder gears, I just cannot find the one that feels comfortable. Easier ones make me pedal too fast, harder ones makes my legs hurt.
>>
>>1357607
I went biking for 35km.
>>
>>1357522
>>1357524
>no arguments
case in point
>>
>>1357830
>Easier ones make me pedal too fast, harder ones makes my legs hurt.
Then pick the ones in the middle, stupid
>>
>>1357830
>pedal for 200 meters, stop peddling for 100 meters, pedal for 200 meters, stop peddling for 100 meters,
Yep. You're out of shape.
>>
>>1354741
I had the same problem with mine (except I have a Claris groupset) and I count figure out how to change to the bigger ring on the front. Turns out I want pushing the lever far enough. Idk if you used enough force but for mine it took quite a bit of effort to shift up, but shifting down is normal. If you push the lever all the way with force and it still remains then go to your bike shop where you got it from and tell them about your issue
>>
>>1357830
>, harder ones makes my legs hurt.
What part of your legs?
Post your bike it sounds like something is wrong.. Is your seat too low?
>>
>>1357860
Don't confuse the guy, there's nothing wrong with his bike. He just can't into gears and cadence yet.
>>
>>1357523
you spent $1000 on a bike and it came with Claris?
this is why I stay retrogrouchy.
>>
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Bottom bracket question:

My current cup-and-cone BB has a 124.5mm spindle length.

Shimano don't do this length on their cartridge BBs. Two largest sizes are 127mm and 122mm.

What do?
>>
>>1357868
The longer one. You'll have to adjust your front mech just a bit, turn the low limit in and the high limit out, a touch more cable tension. Not a big deal.
>>
>>1357859
>Turns out I want pushing the lever far enough. Idk if you used enough force but for mine it took quite a bit of effort to shift up, but shifting down is normal

FYI that is because claris hoods are meant to be used with both double chainrings and triple chainring setups. When set up with a double it has a 'trim' where you can move the deraileur a bit to prevent chain rub. you can trim up and down as well when it is in 2x setup.
>>
>>1357864
so what? Today's claris is better than Ultegra from 10 years ago. And with an 11-32 cassette, and 34t small ring any leglet can be a polka dot jersey star.

I recently replaced a claris crank. It was $67 USD. You can't argue with that. Just looked it up and the 105 crank is $167.

We all ride thousands of miles a year and being able to swap out an entire gruppo for $200 is great.
>>
Is there any significant benefit to buying a carbon stem? I am curious to how much better it is than a standard one on vibration dampening. Also any info you guys have on the structural rigidity of the thing and the catastrophic failure rate would be appreciated.
>>
>>1357917
>I recently replaced a claris crank. It was $67 USD.
right, it's a cheap groupset. so what's it doing on a $1000 bike?
>>
there's no difference between MTB and road shift cable kits, right? Looking at two shimano ones the only difference seems to be that the MTB one has a lot longer cable cover
>>
>>1357921
>right, it's a cheap groupset. so what's it doing on a $1000 bike?

The big 4 makers strategy is to put beginners on an entry level gruppo but on a good cutting edge frame.

If you want to do the opposite you can get a Claris Vitus Razor for 479 USD.

If you want a cutting edge frame, good gruppo and the most bang for the buck the direct-to-consumer brands still do this. ex: The $1000 Vitus is a Tiagra specced road bike with disc brakes and a full carbon frame.

I buy all my bikes direct-to-consumer. But people like brand names.
>>
>>1358025
correct
>>
Does anyone know where I could find an Autoshift rear derailleur. I wanna build a dank meme bike an this would be the cherry on top.
>>
Very general question: what are /n/ approved sources for all things cycling? I am particularly looking for forums where people show off their builds.
>>
>>1357724
The original bike came with ultegra 6800, then the frame was replaced under warranty and came with FSA aero something or other. I don't remember them ever being good.

I did replace with the same ones you have before selling it so I hope they work better for the new owner.

Dunno if it was a cable issue or what, just felt like you couldn't get any clamping force on the wheel.
>>
>>1357868
>>1357870
I figured it out in the end - 127mm from Shimano is indeed what I want. The reason being that my current one (old style cup and cone) has an asymmetrical spindle. The left-hand (non-drive side) taper is slightly shorter than the drive-side, which sort of makes sense because the drive-side has chainrings on it. But the new Shimano cartridge ones are symmetrical. And when I take the measurement I took of the right-hand (drive-side) taper and apply it to the left as well, it's exactly 127mm. So the only difference will be that my left-hand (non-drive side) crank sticks out by 2.5mm more. The chainline on the drive-side should be exactly the same.
>>
Hi guys. I need something to cut gear cable outers (housings, sheaths). They're way tougher than I thought, with strands of very strong metal running through.

The Park Tool CN-10 is of course the best tool for the job but it's £25, plus shipping.

Do you reckon pic related will work? It's some Chinese thing. It has five reviews that say it works but they could just be fake reviews, given some of the lengths that Chinese companies will resort to.

Or any other ideas for cutting? People online say use a Dremel but they're more expensive than a cutter tool.

Thanks for any help if anyone can offer some.
>>
Another post from me here: >>1358503

I'm thinking I should just go with the chink tool, and if it's faulty / doesn't work, Amazon says I have a legal warranty to return it. Then I can just buy something else instead. But at £13 (and delivered tomorrow for free) it seems worth a crack, surely. The product itself has 5 positive reviews and the seller has 100% positive reviews, and some of them could be fake, but some of the seller reviews do look legit.
>>
>>1358515
it probably doesn't hold up to shop use but for the few times a year when you are cutting cables and housing, cheap is probably satisfactory.
see if you can get lifu/icetoolz, this is at least a well known bicycle brand and not "china special so sharp cut anything easy wow"
>>
Do you guys consider mips a gimmick or a necessity? I mean, it's the noggin bucket, so everything that makes it safe is an improvement, but gimmicks are just that.
>>
I am done with my smartphone and shitty free navigation software to track my rides.
The altitude gains are not reliable and jump, and even the momentary speed is not reliable.

I want something that tracks my speed decently, gives out altitude changes correctly and it would be the best if it could also display the gradient.
I won't buy a power meter, but at least give me correct information about the terrain. Of course the new device should be able to display a rudimentary map for navigation.

Do Garmin / Polar /Suunto watches fullfill my demands?



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