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/bqg/ - Bike Questions General

Last OP was a massive faggot who didn't use the template or link the previous thread edition

Last thread: >>1338798

/n/ Discord: https://discord.gg/z5pdNh2

Resources:
https://sheldonbrown.com/
https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help
https://booksdescr.com/item/detail/id/1444747

If you want help picking out a bike to purchase, ask in >>>/n/bbg
>>
>>1344371
You mean derailleur hanger? https://wheelsmfg.com/derailleur-hangers.html
>do you make one
I haven't heard of anyone doing that but I suppose you could
>universal
That would be nice. There's no technical reason they couldn't, manufacturers are just dumb.
>>1344515
I like Giro helmets. I prefer mountain helmets over road helmets (even for road cycling) because they come a bit lower in the back and as such provide more protection. Not sure if the visor (most mtb helmets have visors) would make it a bit less aero though, so possibly not ideal for racing.
MIPS is nice. If you want the safest option, you can get something with MIPS and Koroyd which is supposedly safer than traditional EPS, such as the Smith Forefront 2 MIPS koroyd helmet. Or a Bontrager WaveCel helmet such as Blaze WaveCel which is supposedly even safer than Koroyd, and negates the need for MIPS because it provides the same functionality as MIPS without incorporating MIPS.
But Koroyd and WaveCel are both very new technologies, and the claims of them being way safer than traditional foam helmets are of course claims by their manufacturers.
Are MIPS, Koroyd, and WaveCel good technologies that increase safety? Probably. By how much? I think it's too soon to say.
tl;dr if you want the safest possible helmet, get either Smith Forefront 2 MIPS koroyd, or Bontrager Blaze WaveCel. Those are pretty much the two safest helmets on the market unless you go with a fullface.
>>
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Can someone explain what in the fuck these little silver bits are in my sram crank and why they're positioned close enough to rub the chain? I know they're not holding the crank on by checking the other side
>>
>>1344545
RAMPS and PINS
>>
>>1344530
Thank you. I had never heard of Koroyd. I've heard about Wavecel, but I feel like it's still a little too new for me to trust it, since most of the information that's out there is Trek marketing material. Apparently Virginia Tech has tested some helmets though, and the Specter Wavecel scored pretty high.

Bonus question: Do you know any good locks? Everything I've found that gets praised by reviewers (such as the Kryptonite evolution mini 7) seems to get shit on by actual users. The lock I mentioned for example reportedly gets stuck while trying to open it and rattles.
>>
is it possible to over lube a chain? i just tried degreasing my chain for the first time... it was pretty messy so im probably gonna uby one of those tools next time
>>
>>1344555
yes
excessive lube just attracts grime and makes your chain dirty and preform worse

you should apply minimal lube, like 1 drop per roller if you want to be autistic, then after a few mines, run it through a rag to wipe off the excess.

also i think a legit strategy is not really cleaning it, just running it through a rag a bit before you lube it, then replacing it fairly regularly.
>>
>>1344564
i put one drop on each "node". Maybe not every single one...are they called rollers? I thought it might be too much and I didn't think to look it up first.
>>
>>1344568
That's probably still too much unless your chain is completely bone dry. I just run the tip of the lube thing over the chain fairly quickly. Wipe before applying and after applying. Of course, I lube my chain fairly often, maybe every 150 miles or so.
>>
>>1344575
>I lube my chain fairly often, maybe every 150 miles or so.
wildly excessive imo
>>
>>1344568
nah that's right just run it through a rag to get off the excess
>>
>>1344545
They grab the chain when you shift to make shifting smoother and faster
>>1344552
If you want a lock that's really secure and don't mind some weight, the Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit ("forget about it") is strong but heavy. If going with a u-lock, you want something that's thick (obviously) and small (so the thief has less room for leverage). Then use Sheldon's locking method: https://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html
For extra theft deterrence, you can use a cable lock in addition to the u-lcok. This can be used to lock the front wheel and frame to whatever post/rack/etc you're locking to. This way the thief has two locks to deal with (even though cable locks are easy to cut, a second lock makes it more hassle) and protects your front wheel from theft.

If you always lock in the same area, you can get a heavy chain and padlock and leave it at the place you lock to. But for portable locks, u-locks are more secure than chain locks of an equal weight.

If you want the versatility of being able to lock to larger objects than a u-lock will fit to such as a tree, then your options are folding lock or chain lock. I really like Abus folding locks. I'm not sure if they're as secure as a u-lock (but they do have the bonus of being uncommon so thieves aren't used to knowing how to break them). My Abus folding lock is what I normally use, I like being able to lock to trees. From what I can tell it's sturdy and secure. But as far as I know there's not much study comparing folding locks to chains or u-locks.
>>
>>1344568
That's not too much, you are doing it right. If you did less lube, then you'd end up missing some links and not getting any lube into them. Just make sure to wipe the chain down thoroughly afterward.
>>1344555
The downside of applying too much lube is you'll have more dripping onto your cassette, chainrings, and chainstays during the lubing process. But overlubing resulting in too much lube the chain itself? Not really aside from being wasteful, cause you should be wiping the lube off anyway. You should lube the full length of chain, then let it sit 10 minutes to let the carrier solvent evaporate. Then wipe down the chain. This is where most people go wrong, they just wipe down the full length of the chain with a rag once or twice. However, this is not enough. You should be spending about 2-3 minutes wiping your chain (grip the chain with a rag in one hand, pedal in the other hand, and rotate the cranks). Keep wiping until no more lube is coming off onto the chain. The point of lube is to get into the internals of the chain links. You do not want any lube on the outside of the chain (nor on the other components like the cassette) because it doesn't accomplish anything and just attracts dirt, which causes your chain to wear out faster.
>>1344585
Depends on the lube, riding conditions, etc. You should be basing it on when you start noticing the chain being dry (i.e. making a little bit of noise). If you just go by distance ridden, it will vary a lot.
>>
>>1344812
thank you for the advice
>>
>>1344530
I have the XXX wavecel and it's turned into my favorite helmet ever. It looks the biz and is good on hot days. Not as good as the Synthe it replaced, but I grew to hate the Synthe for other reasons. The fit of the XXX reminds me of the top part of a good motorcycle or auto racing helmet. Kinda makes me wonder what would happen if Arai made a cycling helmet, aside from me immediately dumping all of my current helmets for theirs.

For MTB I have a Giro Chronicle and while it fits well, the ventilation is godawful. When it's even a little warm and I'm climbing I can tilt my head forward and a fucking stream of sweat will pour out the top. I'd be safer without it because then my head won't get cooked and start making me woozy. It's going to get replaced by a Specialized Ambush and relegated to wet weather commuting duty. I seriously don't know what the fuck Giro was thinking, and I dunno what the fuck I was thinking trying to save money with this shitty helmet.
>>
>>1344811
Thank you again anon
>>
So I have 2 problems with my downhill bike.
Sometimes when I go faster then ~20 km/h the breaking disks ring sometimes. I tried to adjust the position of the breaks but this didnt help. They have been quite well adjusted allready.

Second one, I guess a little more serious.
When I apply force on the peddals, they start cracking. And when I was cleaning the bike, I found some blue lubricant stuff coming out of the bearing region of the peddals, its not flowing, just 1 or 2 gramms. Is this the bearing? How do I fix the cracking? It doesnt crack when I just lift the bike and rotate the peddals.
>>
>>1344938
1. Its normal. Large rotors might ring a bit when being ridden hard on a DH bike.
2. Most likely a dying BB. Depending on how persistent you are - either repack the bearings ( might help ) or just replace the BB.
>>
>>1344938
>When I apply force on the peddals, they start cracking
this can be either the bb or the pedal bearings themselves
may as well replace whatever the issue is
>>
How do i ride with damaged ears?

hyperacusis and tinnitus make the wind literally feel like a knife stabbing my ears.

earplugs dont work cause it makes every bump amplified, and i cant hear the cages attempting to take my life
>>
>>1345117
looks like you're going to have to make a headband with some half-cups fixed in front of the ears.
the dorkiest solution is the only solution
>>
>>1345117
>>
how the FUCK am i supposed to store my bike inside
>>
>>1345208
Lean it against a wall
>>
>>1345141
real cyclists develop natural cat ears while also maintaining exquisite sideburns
>>
>>1345141
I might try this myself
>>
>>1344938
>When I apply force on the peddals, they start cracking
This can be the pedals or bb. Sometimes it's just the pedal/crank interface such that removing the pedals, cleaning and greasing the threads then tightening them down is enough. If it's the bb, you may need to overhaul/clean/regrease it and maybe replace the bearings. It could be the pedal bearings, that's less common, as far as I know people generally just replace the pedals when that's the issue but I suppose you could try overhauling them. Some companies might offer pedal rebuild kits, not sure.
>>
>>1345117
would a hat with ear covers like this help? obviously one with plain nylon flaps would be better for the summer and ones with fleece or "sherpa" flaps would be better for winter
>>
Alright, anons: babby's first with the exception of the heaviest steel bike ever that i bought for $40 a year ago. i'm 6'4" and all the beautiful vintage stuff i've seen online is too small for me. so i'm thinking of goin' with the giant escape now because i've gotten tired of looking through listings. is that bike OK considering the price? i don't want to go above $500 really. it'll be used probably 90% of the time on a tow path that's right by me. it's a flat and easy ride just becomes a little muddy on occasion. so the bike should be a hybrid, right? i looked at some mountain bikes but i can't imagine how i would need wide tires or a suspension fork when there are just a few bumps here and there. thanks for any responses
>>
>>1345477
sure but get the escape 2 not the escape 3
>>
>>1345472
pretty sure the air would just collect in there.
it's open in front and closed in back.
you need the opposite for a bike, cutting forward into the wind, but still open to your eyes somehow.
>>
My uncle lent me his fixie for a couple months, and I’ve found there’s some play in the cranks (pic related). The arms can spin for 1 or 2 degrees but the carbon part and chainring don’t move. Any idea what could be causing this?
>>
>>1345631
Crankarms mite be loose or bottom bracket is fuxked. Tho since it's
>ISIS
the shittiest BB design ever, it was fucked from the start
>>
>>1345725
that doesn't make sense given the problem that he described.
>>1345631
If the arms move a bit independently of the spider, they may have separated. Take a peek at the backside of the crank if you can.
>>
>>1345631
Could be that the crankarms are extremely loose. If they're loose enough to cause the problem you're describing, I would be worried about them falling off mid ride.
>>
Are discbrakes worth getting if they are mechanical instead of hydraulic? I believe in disc brakes and often ride in rain
>>
>>1346074
I would never buy a bike with mechanical disc brakes. That is my opinion though other people might think they are fine, you might as well. Hydraulic or bust for me.
>>
>>1346074
I'm not even sure what you're asking
>>
>>1346074
mech disc brakes are "ok", hydro are a lot nicer.
If you keep up to date on keeping them nice and trim the performance is reasonable. I quite like spyres.
>>
Recommend a saddle for fat asses. Regardless of when I'm fit or overweight my mass is mostly stored in my legs, so I'll always have a fat ass.
No city bike, I'm talking about a hybrid, like this
>>
>>1346117
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/contact-comfortplus-giant

This is the comfiest saddle in the world if you're big enough for it and don't care that it weighs 450g.
>>
Is it pointless to buy 120 tpi tires if I'm gonna put flat prevention strips in them?
>>
>>1346117
I think everyone owes it to themselves to try a b17 at one point in their lives
lots of people don't like them but it you like them they are magical

don't be daunted by the break in or the care either. mine was comfy out of the box and i didn't do anything to it at all in the first year

and the resale is decent
you can get half your money back easily
>>
>>1346120
what tyres?
depends on your goal really
if you want a good ride and flat protection tubeless does that well
tpi is a bit of a meme for rating tyres thought unless you're looking at two choices of the exact same brand and model
>>
>>1346122
Is it even suited for aggressive riding?
>>1346119
Looks nice, now I have to find a place with international shipping.
>>
>>1346133
>Is it even suited for aggressive riding?
yes
not exactly sure what you mean but yes
it's just not suited to an aggressive fit, so if your bars are well below your saddle height, then no.
If you just mean riding hard, yes.

they mould to your ass
the leather whicks sweat much better than other saddles, so your ass stays cooler
they have a nice amount of suspension
they're comfy over long rides
>>
>>1346150
>>it's just not suited to an aggressive fit, so if your bars are well below your saddle height, then no.
that's exactly what anon meant, I suspect.
>>
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>>1346151
>fat
>rides a hybrid
>instinct is to buy this

somehow i doubt it
>>
>>1346151
Anon is also on a hybrid, the large stack of those frames is not ideal for an aggressive fit.
>>
>>1346153
>>1346154
holy fuck I'm retarded
goodnight /n/
>>
>>1346155
night anon

>>1346133
you ever broken in a pair of leather shoes man?
>>
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>>1346150
>>1346151
See the pic? My saddle is barely a couple inches higher.
>>1346155
>>1346154
>>1346153
I actually tried all sorts of saddles (except brooks), and bigger ones scorch my ass. When I was at my thinnest (160lb) my ass was still huge, now I'm a bit heavier (170) so.
>>1346158
Aside from the fact I haven't worn leather shoes in years because bunion (almost old enough for surgery though), the ass is slightly more delicate than the feet.
I read people claim the b17 is suited more for touring (basically my riding position) and the team pro for race bikes. Is this true?
>>
>>1346161
try a b17 man. the 'racey' ones are redundant compared to modern road saddles

again you may not like it
many people don't

but they're a game changer if you do
it's one of the rare expensive cycling memes which is not slightly different or marginally better, a sprung leather saddle is fundamentally different
>>
>>1346024
When I move the crank arms the small ridged black part moves with them. Do I just tighten this thing?
>>
>>1346174
There is three parts that could be moving/flexing:
1. Crankset
2. Bottom Bracket
3. Frame (when pushing too hard)
Always go for the bottom bracket first: remove the crankset, play with the axle, if it moves then overhaul if old school and replace if cartridge. Don't ever address other options until you've checked the bottom bracket.
>>
>>1346180
I did some research and apparently it’s a common issue with these cranks:

https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/843548-fsa-vigorelli-cranks-carbon-disc-slippage-issues-solution-help-dissembling.html

Guess I’ll just deal with it until he asks for it back
>>
i just installed a TiN chain on my bike and something just occurred to me...

aren't i going to cause dissimilar metal corrosion? the gears are all steel and the chain is titanium.
>>
>>1346191
Probably not, Titanium isn't that electronegative. There will eventually be a dark patina on the Titanium chain but it won't flake off due to it's similar crystalline structure to the parent alloy.
>>
>>1346202
Actually no, I was thinking of Tungsten. The chain will be covered by Titanium Oxide but it still won't flake off, Not sure about the color.
>>
>>1346211
if i use a thick grease will that help mitigate the problem?
>>
>>1346213
>thick grease
>on chain
>>
>>1346214
>yes
>>
>>1346215
please read up on the purpose of chain lubricant and how it works. thick grease will just sit on the outside of the chain and turn into grit paste. also clean your nasty shit.
>>
>>1346221
chain lube is what i meant. i usually use teflon but maybe the sticky rain lube will protect the chain a bit more?
>>
>>1346161
The B17 can be nice once you get it broken in, but I think that their materials and build quality are slipping. Plus, the rivets on the back can become irritating. Berthoud saddles are much better but they also command a large premium over Brooks, way too much for me to rec unless you don't mind blowing $200+ on a saddle.

I like the Terry Fly and Liberator, the latter being wider and more touring oriented.
>>
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Looking for a MTB saddle that's lower profile/stack height than the Giant Contact SL Neutral (pic related) that came with my bike. I've acquired a dropper post, which is like 5-10mm too long with my current saddle. Any suggestions?

Kinda sucks that manufacturers don't list other dimensions than width and length on their websites.
>>
>>1346245
Probably the best thing you can do is a shorter crank.
>>
>>1346174
On this crankset, the arm and the spider (the carbon part) are two separate pieces. In the picture that you provided, the black ring is a lockring to secure them together.

>>1346180
stop making suggestions when you don't know what you're talking about.
>>
is this "too much"?

https://www.amazon.com/Bright-Spokes-Premium-Wheel-Lights/dp/B07BBQ3MXQ/ref=sr_1_5?fst=as%3Aoff&qid=1560371711&rnid=2367799011&s=sporting-goods&sr=1-5

i have a $40 gift card and i want some aesthetic lighting
>>
>>1346117
Measure your fat ass and buy one the correct width and shape. You want a saddle that supports the bones without squashing the soft tissues. No gel. No thick padding. Springs only if you're sitting very upright.

>>1346161
>I read people claim the b17 is suited more for touring (basically my riding position) and the team pro for race bikes. Is this true?

Decades out of date, but based on reality.
>>
>>1346290
Does the cyclist in posture 1 have the saddle up his ass
>>
>>1346291
What happens in the tt stays in the tt.
>>
>>1346283
I'd avoid wheel lighting but something similar on the frame might be neat
imo the most aesthetic lighting is the lighting that comes from your environment, which can be accentuated by things like retroreflective tape

>>1346291
no, he just crushes his nuts
>>
Can the Vittoria Corsa G2.0 Control TLR be normally used with inner tubes? Would you recommend thin butyl or latex for safety/durability/reliability?
Can the Zonda C17 be safely used tubeless if the product page doesn't say so?
>>
>>1346296
>Can the Vittoria Corsa G2.0 Control TLR be normally used with inner tubes? Would you recommend thin butyl or latex for safety/durability/reliability?
Yes. Latex tubes are more expensive, not as durable, and tend to lose air more quickly as they're more porous. However, they're lighter and are more supple.

>Can the Zonda C17 be safely used tubeless if the product page doesn't say so?
It's tougher on road rims than on a wider rim to set them up tubeless if they're not specifically meant to be because of the higher pressure.
>>
>>1346294
It shapes his nuts for maximum aero advantage.
>>
>>1346299
Thanks.
Do you think thin butyl tubes like the Michelin AirComp Ultralight or Continental Supersonic would be too fragile for everyday use?
>>
>>1346299
Latex also improves your rolling resistance significantly, gaining you around 5W per tire. It's roughly equivalent to tubeless in that regard. Latex is a pain in the dick to install though.
>>1346296
Zondas aren't 2 way fit, so tubeless won't work. That's one nice thing that you get when jumping from Zonda to Eurus in their lineup.
>>
>>1346311
>Latex also improves your rolling resistance significantly, gaining you around 5W per tire. It's roughly equivalent to tubeless in that regard. Latex is a pain in the dick to install though.
I just want something that won't randomly explode while going fast or commuting but that also won't add too much weight. I won't compete.
>That's one nice thing that you get when jumping from Zonda to Eurus in their lineup.
The bad thing about Eurus is that it doesn't come in c17.
>>
>>1346324
>doesn't come in c17.
I honestly don't know what c17 means.
>>
>>1346342
OK, so I looked it up and it's just a name they have for their rim shape that's a little wider?
I'd just look into something different if you want to do tubeless.
>>
>>1346342
Internal rim width of 17mm. Eurus is 15mm.
>>
I'm doing my first XC mountain bike race in 2hr. Anything I should be prepared for.
>>
>>1346347
go faster than the other people
>>
>>1346305
Continental products are meme-tier garbage.
Regarding lightweight tubes in general, they are definitely more prone to getting flats so it depends if you prioritize MUH GRAMS or practicality/durability. Same goes for tires, a lot of people don't use race tires for training because they are more prone to flats, it just depends on if you're willing to deal with the occasional flat for the sake of saving some grams.
>>
>>1346344
>I'd just look into something different if you want to do tubeless.
Unfortunately, my autism is limiting me to the likes of Campy, Vittoria, Miche etc. I think I'll just go clincher, but I still have to find good inner tubes.
>>1346352
I'm mostly just scared of tubes/tires actually blowing out. Things that are very sudden and can make you lose control at high speeds. Flats that come more gradually are obviously a pain in the ass, but not as dangerous. I already bought those Vittoria Corsa tires so I'm kinda stuck with them, but when it comes to tubes, even though I'd like not sacrificing a lot of performance or weight, my clear priority is durability and therefore safety.
>>
>>1346371
Seriously man, I wouldn't worry about it so much. I wouldn't say that one tube over another is going to be more prone to a catastrophic blowout like that. The tube is always being held in by the tire, so if something it sticking/cutting through the tire enough to give you an immediate flat, it really doesn't matter what tube is in there - your fucked either way.
>>
>>1346373
I've used tubes my whole life and never worried about such things. Going through countless reviews and forum posts about specific tubes, even popular, well rated ones, is what has made me a bit paranoid. People talking about sudden blow-outs for no apparent reasons. If you could name a decent tube or two I'll just buy them and use them. Thanks for your time anon(s)
>>
>>1346324
Which is why you have to pay more € to get the Shamal.
>>1346377
With butyl almost every tube is made by Kenda or CSG, and quality varies greatly from batch to batch. The brand name on the box doesn't matter. I think that Schwalbe still makes their own and while they look higher quality I've never noticed a difference. If you ever go for latex, Challenge and Vittoria are good.
>>
>>1346377
Bruh, I literally buy my tubes from walmart. They've always seemed to last longer than namebrand ones and are $5 cheaper. Might be 10g more or something but who cares. Tubes are one of the few things you can cheap out on without hurting yourself. If you're paranoid about flats get those tire liner strips and put them in your tire. You'll literally never get flats unless you really fuck your shit up somehow.

As far as tires blowing out, just make sure you put the tire on correctly and check it out regularly for signs that it's failing (bulges, cuts, whatever). Tires don't generally just spontaneously explode without warning.
>>
>>1346396
post your bike
>>
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>>1346397
>>
>>1346347
Do what anon >>1346351 says.

Also, keep in mind, if you crash and end up leaking hydraulic fluid from your sphincter, you aren't going fast.

Froom will not be fast at the Criterium du Dauphine this year.

>>1346377
Proper inflation, rim inspection, tire inspection, and riding technique will take care of pretty much all of that.

Most blowouts will have SOME sort of warning, if you pay proper attention. If you're plowing curbs and garbage, paying no attention to your line, ect, you're far more likely to be surprised by blowout. And get some good handling skills so you can control things even if you do blow out.

Vid somewhat related.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnf7VdofZF0
>>
>>1346396
>Bruh, I literally buy my tubes from walmart. They've always seemed to last longer than namebrand ones

WMT sells Bell tubes those aren't exactly no name. Also the cheapest place to get that waxy White Lightning that people love here.
>>
>>1345480
Alright thanks i'll do that. also: is the cannondale quick "Si" acceptable?
>>
>>1346436
towpath?
>>
Best bar tape for wet weather? Also are gloves a necessity for rain riding?
>>
>>1346578
Just buy some bar tape and wear gloves, or don't wear gloves. See which you prefer.

Are you bored or something? Go for a ride...
>>
>>1346579
Idk I rode my bike in rain for the first time and my hands kept slipping off and the tape was peeling off at the end so I want something where that won’t happen

I think I will go for a ride though
>>
>>1346583
That's cause it looks like you went with fabric tape. Get cork or rubberized tape and that won't be a problem except they last about one season before tearing apart. Usually only $10 so they can be replaced regularly.
>>
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ok guys this is my carbon fork on my trek 7.4
will i die if i keep riding it ?
>>
>>1346588
yes if you're the original owner take it to a dealer and cry that you're too young to die, they should give you a new one
>>
>>1346590
holy shit it actually say i have a 5 year guarantee if im the orginal owner
fucking hell
>>
>>1346578
lizardskins should be fine in the wet, yours looks like it needs replacing though.
>>
>>1346578
lizardskins is my second favorite behind fabric knurl tape btw
>>
>>1346590
so what are the odds they wont comply with the waranty ?
i literally had a full service 3 months ago and the crack wasnt there
>>
>>1345477
Good enough. You want shit that's more or less like the old steel mountain bikes.

>>1345480
You would go with an aluminum fork? I'd actually go with the 3, even with the crappier drivetrain.


>>1346436
I'm not sure with one is the Si, But the quick 6 7 and 8 are all solid choices.. I'd actually take the quick 7 over the giant 2. and the quick 8 over the giant 3.
>>
>>1346595
well nvm called the dude, he said bring it np i did the service saw no dmg then and you get a new fork
dodged a bullet there, warranty goes out in 8 months
>>
>>1346588
I wouldn't ride it.

>>1346595
Worst case scenario is that they offer you a discount on a replacement and make you eat the installation cost. Call it in.
>>
How do I know if I need new disc brake pads?
>>
>>1346618
if there's a metallic squealing when you brake, and there wasn't before
>>
>>1346607
The bike industry is gearing up to be hit with a shitload of lawsuits for failed carbon, particularly forks, so I suspect that has some bearing on them being nice about replacing it.
>>
>>1346635
>The bike industry is gearing up to be hit with a shitload of lawsuits for failed carbon, particularly forks
This is the first I've heard of this rumor. Do you have any evidence that it's true?
>>
>>1346635
Doubt it. I still see a massive amount of 2000s and even 90s carbon bikes still kicking around on the streets and for sale.
>>
>>1346635
I halfway, no, maybe one-eighthway believe this. While sitting around drinks after a ride one of the guys who owns a bike shop told us about Trek giving a guy with one of those old bonded carbon/aluminum frames a free replacement when he brought it in because one of the lugs had begun separating. I think bike manufacturers are wising up that they need to stay on top of stuff like that else be skewered by pitchforks of the "carbon will explode if you look at it wrong" crowd on the internet. ALL frames have a finite lifespan if you ride them enough, but to me it seems like only carbon fiber gets an undeserved bad rap for this simple fact.
>>
>>1346635
thing is he thinks its a basic aluminium fork, and im like no its carbon, and hes nah, then i check online and its actually carbon
>>
>>1346649
Your mechanic saw that blue fork posted in the pic and thought it was aluminum? Find a new mechanic.
>>
>>1346650
yeah its an official shop for the bike so if i dont go there rip warranty
also he didnt see the pic yet, just said no dude its not carbon i know that bike inside out
>>
>>1346657
Ohhh ah okay, I thought you meant he saw that crack and said it was aluminum. Just bring the bike in and show him. From that pic it looks exactly like how carbon fiber cracks.
>>
>>1346639
https://www.outsideonline.com/2311816/carbon-fiber-bike-accidents-lawsuits

The article mentions how the industry tends to fight it, by layering companies and making it hard for a lawsuit to stick to any of them. Now that this one stuck, I imagine that they're going to be working on a defense for the inevitable class action.
>>1346645
If I were selling someone used carbon I'd make them sign a liability waiver.
>>1346648
The problem with carbon is that problems can be impossible to detect and the failure mode is often catastrophic.
>>
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Looking to buy a Canyon Ultimate. Their sizing guide tells me 166-172 is an XS, 172-178 is an S.
I am 172cm. I don't know which frame size to get. Advice would be great
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>>1346683
Maybe you should go to a LBS and try one out, champ.
>>
>>1346675
>The problem with carbon is that problems can be impossible to detect and the failure mode is often catastrophic.
My carbon seatpost cracked once. It just creaked and groaned for a really long fucking time until I pulled my saddle off and checked it. Anon's fork didn't explode. Stop spewing bullshit you read on Grant's blahg
>>
>>1346685
Amazing anecdote. Incredibly convincing. My understanding of the failure mode of carbon has been changed forever.
>>
>>1346690
Thanks for providing evidence Anon.
>>
What are the signs of a shit local bike shop? I want to check mine out and support them when I get my first decent bike. I know they carry a bunch of Specialized but that's about it.
>>
>>1346694
Here's some introductory reading for you
http://publications.aston.ac.uk/23791/1/Failure_in_composite_materials.pdf
https://www.southampton.ac.uk/engineering/research/projects/3d_imaging_of_tensile_failure_mechanisms_of_carbon_fibre_components.page

Carbon fibre's failure mode is well understood, and materials scientists are working on ways to make the failure mode less catastrophic, strengthen layups against perpendicular impacts, make failures more predictable, etc. Note that catastrophic failure doesn't mean explosive. A catastrophic failure is a sudden and total failure that is unrecoverable. Whether that failure causes a crash or an injury is a different matter.
>>
What's the best AliExpress shop to custom order a cycling Jersey from? I really want an Love live cycling jersey but they cost like 130$ dollars.
>>
>>1346700
Thanks for providing real-world evidence, again, most carbon fiber failures on bike parts do not mean exploding parts and horrific parts. I know you’re scared anon, we all are.
>>
>>1346738
If you want failure statistics, you'll need to contact Trek or Giant. I'm sure they'll be willing to share that confidential information with you, as well as how they're preparing for future lawsuits.

I have multiple carbon bikes. I have little concern about riding them because I have a reasonable understanding of the technology and how it fails. It sounds like you're unwilling to learn, or are unable to. Maybe you need to work on your understanding of English first. Quick review: what does "catastrophic failure" mean? Hint: the answer is in the post you replied to.
>>
>>1346747
So it’s still just a rumor with zero supporting evidence. Thanks anon.
>>
>>1346753
What's a rumor? That bike companies are getting sued? That was covered in the Outside article that you didn't read.
>>
>>1346757
An article that only cites one instance? I’m convinced.
>>
>>1346700
>Carbon fibre's failure mode is well understood, and materials scientists are working on ways to make the failure mode less catastrophic, strengthen layups against perpendicular impacts, make failures more predictable, etc.
except for Chinese stuff
they just add more material to the shit design instead of adjusting the weave direction
>>
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>>1346684
>go to the LBS to testride a canyon
>>
>>1346764
t. posts "winnie the pooh" pasta he got from /pol/ while smugly imagining himself to be on a crabon bike made by whites
>>
>>1346782
nah I just use a lot of chinese CF in quadcopters. they clone, and they clone cheaply and relatively well for the price, but they pay little if any attention to what direction the carbon is facing before they cut it, and that makes for weird flex directions and weird brittle directions
>>
>>1346796
Yeah, but drones are for dirtbags. The companies making bike frames in China actually cater to people who care if their frame crashes and will complain about it online.
>>
>>1346797
t. dronelet
>>
recommend me the most bulletproof BB ever created, that can take more torque than a typical steel or alu mtb frame before creaking
is there anyone really pushing this field?
>>
>>1346820
what style?
>>
>>1346827
>>1346820
But also, define "bulletproof". You mentioned creaking, but that depends on the frame as well, it's not all the BB's fault.
>>
>>1346827
the least creaky style IDK
probably not press fit
>>1346828
it could be the frame but I doubt it
Something that doesn't have a lot of play before engaging, can take a fair bit of irresponsible gear management, is sealed well, and won't be affected by weather or city grime
>>
>>1346830
>Something that doesn't have a lot of play before engaging
I don't understand what you mean here. But I've had far fewer creaking issues with any threaded style than I have with press-fit styles. As far as durability and resistance to weather, square taper has given me the best results. That being said, there aren't as many higher end square taper cranks as there used to be.
>>
>>1346832
>I don't understand what you mean here
I'm not sure of the exact terminology, but the distance or travel or play when pushing down on the crank until it actually begins to move the chainring. I assume that the clicking noise is because of something like a ratchet but a lot lower friction, so a ratchet with a lot of teeth?
are companies just going to press fit exclusively?
>>
>>1346820
it's definitely the SKF square taper
they are $150
>>
>>1346841
thanks, I was looking at sram and shimano, had never heard of skf but this looks like what I've been looking for
>>
>>1346842
10 years or 100,000 km warranty on them
but you do have to use an old style square taper crank

it's heavier and will flex more
but, bombproof
>>
>>1346595
I had a small crack in my bike where the seatpost clamp went in, they replaced the whole frame with basically no questions asked.
>>
Why do so many bikes come with Ultegra or Dura Ace but garbo tier wheels? And you can't swap out you have to buy the whole thing and THEN buy real wheels. Nobody sells a good bike with good wheels and cost-conscious groupset, they always put all the money on the groupset and ignore the rest.

It seems like there's a huge gap between the 105 entry level stuff and a full custom build that's filled with nonsense that doesn't even make any sense.
>>
>>1346836
That mechanism isn't in the BB, but in the rear hub.
>>
>>1346841
>>1346842
>>1346844
And yeah, this anon is right. SKF is probably the best sealed BB out there. I don't know where you're located, but if my memory serves, Rene Herse Cycles is the only distributor in the USA.
>>
>>1346820
You should probably understand your own question before wondering why all these dummies can’t innovate
>>
>>1346683
have you tried using the detailed fit selector they have on their fuckin website m8
>>
>>1346904
consumers generally either own good wheels already, have autism preferences for them, or don't care about them, and speccing decent wheels is shooting yourself in the foot for each of those.
>>
>>1347019
no substitute for riding that shit tho cuz it can't control for personal preference. I like my bikes one size small with narrow handlebars and a hard seat and big drop so when I'm riding it feels like I'm holding some bitch down and fucking her and when I hit some bumps the seat pummels my nuts and ass like she bucking
>>
>>1347108
...then don't buy from canyon.
>>
are fixies for fags? the answer may surprise you
>>
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>>1346657
a quick update
whent to the shop, guys took convincing it was carbon fork even when they saw it and took pictures
they also say its just paint crack and nothing serious, they did send the pics to the main werehouse for a checkup tho, so hopefully they arent as retarded
>>
>>1347108
Then use the fit tool and go one size down?
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>>1347019
I think they got rid of that or something. They only let me input my height and inseam
>>
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Looking at buying a bike to commute in a city, specifically the Breezer Downtown 8+ caught my eye, 800€ at a local bike shop.
I'm a bit confused as when it comes to parts and how much is necessary to pay for something that will last me a while.

They hadn't taken it out of the box and assembled it yet, so I tried a 500€ Bianchi Spillo Onice, which rides quite nice imo.
The guy in the shop told me there wasn't a big difference between internal gear hubs and external gears for longevity and maintenance.
Also it has a suspended fork, which is apparently a big no-no according to bike snob forums here in Germany that decry any bike below 500€ a piece of junk.
Going there instead of lurking around online made me question how much I really need to pay to get something nice.

I could also get the Breezer 200€ cheaper if I order it online and do the final assembly myself, is that worth considering for a newbie?
>>
11-25, 12-25 or 12-27 for a 52/36 crankset? There are some hills here but not too steep. Will any of those allow me to go uphill relatively easily, be fast on flats and descents, and still have smooth shifts?
>>
i just found out the axel on my rear wheel is sheared. i have no idea how long its been like that, my guess is it happened a year ago when i had a crash and fucked the wheel up. should i keep riding it?
>>
What do you guys do when you injure yourselves and can't ride?Fractured my fibula and I wanna say fuck it and ride around anyway.
>>
>>1347213
Nothing. We die like a real men.
>>
>>1347186
no

>>1347174
suspension for road riding is retarded, dynamo hubs are good because you don't have to remember to recharge and niggers aren't going to steal your lights (or are less likely to at least). does your bike shop add in any kind of servicing, like a free tuneup in six months or something? because rims/hubs/headset all commonly require tuning out of the box with tools you are not likely to have. if you want to learn wrenching, it would be worth buying the tools and doing it yourself. if you just want to commute, then let them do it.

> there wasn't a big difference between internal gear hubs and external gears for longevity and maintenance
this is generally true. the biggest problem is that people know when their derailleur bike isn't working right and can see an issue, whereas the IGH hides everything away.

you could also try posting in the /bbg/ if there might be something used online nearby
>>
>>1347185
only you can know what ratio is right for you, anon. look inside your heart for the answer.
>>
>>1347043
>consumers already have wheels before buying a bike
Yeah no. You're living in bizarro land dude. Try talking to people outside of the weightweenies forum
>but what I meant was
Yeah no. I know what you meant. You're wrong.
>>
>>1346698
Volunteers/earn a bike/registered charity. They set retards on your bike for free labor

>>1346820
Update on this: turns out I just had the chain improperly tensioned and after fucking that+spraying off grime with a high pressure hose attachment my crank is quiet enough. It was my handlebar creaking all along.
Still probably going to nab a skf for fun later though
>>
>>1347230
Fixing that, not fucking that
>>
How do people keep track of what gear they're in if their shifters don't have the little needle in them to indicate it?
>>
>>1347219
My heart says 11-25. Thanks for helping me become a better person, anon.
>>
>>1344526
my brakes are hard to pull and they don't close tight to the rim, what do I need to adjust? late 80s road bike horseshoe shaped brakes. I've replaced the brake shoes and pads already.
>>
>>1347235
just, like, remember what gear you're in. also there's usually a big enough difference between steps that you can figure it out just by feel. it doesn't really matter what gear you're in though as long as the ratio is good for you and you aren't crosschaining

>>1347266
probably change your cable and housing
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>>1347266
Hard to pull as in they stick or as in you can't pull them far enough to brake because the levers hit the handlebar before they grab?
>>
>>1347165
shit you're right anon, sorry about that.
Love it when website redesigns remove features.
>>
>>1347213
See Baconrider to know what is possible. But don't you dare ride your current fucking bike. Get a handbike or some shit like that.
>>
>>1347235
Go by feel not number
>>1347266
Lube the levers and replace the cable
Maybe also check the pads if you haven't already
>>
How do i know when I need new cables and cable housings?
>>
>>1347362
If the wires have snapped or if they don't move smoothly and it's affecting your shifting or braking, you do.

Otherwise you don't.
>>
>>1347362
you could unclamp them and then hold the end and feel their action to see if it's smooth or not

but then you're gonna have to re-adjust

could also drop some chain lube down them then
>>
>>1347266
What do you mean by hard to pull? Could be a bend in the cable or housing, or rusted cable, or dirty cable/housing. Oiling the cable can help (remove the housing from the stops and slide the housing to expose parts of the cable that are normally inside the housing to help you be able to lube as much as possible of the full length of the cable).
You can also lube the pivots of the brake levers and brake callipers, being careful to not let any oil get on the brake pads or rims.
If they're still hard to pull after all that, you may need new cable/housing or new brake callipers.
All of the above is assuming that by 'hard to pull' you mean it feels like there's resistance or roughness when trying to pull the lever. If by 'hard to pull' you mean that the lever bottoms out by hitting the bar then you're a fucking moron and need to learn how to word things clearly.
As for the pads not going all the way to the rim, you may need to add cable tension if the problem is that the lever bottoms out. If something else is causing the pads to not reach the rim then you need to be more clear about what is going on.
>>
>>1346904
its probably like pedals. bikes always come with none or some shit tier plastic pedals. you then replace them with whatever you like.
>>
>>1347185
I run 53/39 with an 11-speed 11-28. I have used that out west riding multi-mile-long very steep climbs, and I also use it on super flat terrain in the mdiwest, and I am happy with it on both settings. On occasion on the steepest parts of the climbs when I'm really tired I'll feel like I'd maybe like a ratio slightly lower than 39:28 (which would be roughly equivilent to 36:26) but never to such an extent that it was much of a problem. I never felt limited by having too wide of jumps between cogs, so I wouldn't see any advantage in going to a narrower range cassette (i.e. 11-25), and I definitely wouldn't want to lower the size of my biggest cog when riding out west. I can't really advise you other than telling you what works for me.
>>1347213
Depends how severe the injury is. When I got doored and got a fractured rib I rode home (was probably like 7 miles) then laid in bed for a week or two. When I got an injured (maybe fractured) foot skiing I skied on one foot for an hour or two then went home and rested it for a week or so. Another time I got an injured (maybe fractured) foot skiing I rested it for a few days then went back out skiing and just limited myself to only one big cliff huck per day for a few weeks til it was completely healed. Point being I'll still bike and ski when I'm injured if I can, just taking it a bit easier. I'll stay home and rest only if I absolutely have to.
>>1347235
It really doesn't matter what number you're in, it matters if it feels right. If it feels too high or too low then shift. If you want to know that fucking much, look down at the sprockets.
>>
>>1347362
If they feel rough or look dirty, lube them. You can use chain lube or, better yet if you have it, Dri-Slide Bike Aid. Remove the housing from the housing stops and slide the housing back and forth to expose the stretches of the cable that are normally inside the housing so as to allow you to reach as great as percentage as possible of the full length of the cable, and apply oil to it all. Then slide the housing back and forth a bit to help get the oil along the bit of cable that you're not able to expose. Then put the housing back in the stops and try riding.
Replace the cables if the above does not work, or if you see bent spots in them.
When oiling cables, it is generally not advisable to remove the cable from the pinch bolt even though it might be tempting since then you can remove the housing entirely to access the full length of cable; this is not advisable because the end of the cable will generally be slightly frayed and as such, you may not be able to get it back into the housing. It's not worth removing the cable from the pinch bolt to oil the cable, but it is good to remove the housing from the housing stops to access/expose more of the cable.
I ride a lot and go years without replacing cables/housing. Only replace them if they're not working well and oiling does not resolve the problem.
>>
>>1347186
What do you mean by sheared? Be more specific or post pics. Like it's broke in half or the threading is stripped off or what?
>>
>>1347174
Do not get suspension. Suspension on a cheap bike is going to be garbage (you can definitely get a decent bike in your price range as long as you get one without suspension), and suspension should never be on commuter bikes. It adds weight and causes bob which further saps power and reduces efficiency, and gains literally nothing. Suspension is great on mountain bikes when you're riding over big rocks and roots and going off jumps and cliffs, but it does not belong on commuter bikes.

As for assembly, it depends on what needs to be done. It might just be a matter of installing the front wheel and the seatpost (the latter of which may be quick release or may require an allen wrench) and maybe the handlebar (which will require just an allen wrench). If it's just those things, you could potentially do it yourself. However, even if the brakes and derailleurs are installed, I would tend to doubt that they'll be properly adjusted on a bike that is not fully asssembled, so you'd have to either learn how to do that or go to a bike shop.
If you do choose to assemble yourself, there's good articles on adjustment on Sheldon Brown and Park Tool websites, both linked in OP. You'll need metric-sized allen wrenches (potentially sizes 3, 4, 5, and 6; possibly 1.5 and 2 but probably not for assembly), a phillips screwdriver for derailleur adjustments, and probably a pedal wrench to install the pedals (a standard 15mm wrench). Possibly other tools depending on the specific bike and how much assembly is required. And of course a pump for the tires, but you'll need that anyway cause you should be checking your tire pressure every few days or before every ride (tires lose air over time from sitting).
Anyway, could you assemble it yourself? Yeah. Will it be a bit of a headache for someone who doesn't know what they're doing? Likely, yes. It's good stuff to learn though, so it's worth doing if you feel up to it and want to get the tools.
>>
>>1347174
The Breezer Downtown is alright for commuting. I'd prefer something with geometry that's a bit less relaxed. The Downtown is on the verge of having cruiser-like geometry which handles like garbage. I'm not familiar with what brands are available in Europe, but these are the bikes I tend to recommend; you should be able to find a similar type of bike from pretty much any company even if these brands are not available there:
Kona Dew Plus
Marin Fairfax
GT Tachyon
Trek FX
Specialized Sirrus (Vita if femanon)
Giant Escape
Cannondale Quick
Cannondale Bad Boy
>>
I removed the front wheel of my mtb for transport but after reinstalling it,it feels sluggish and slow and if I spin it,it stops after 2-3 seconds. I don't think it's on too tight because I have been told that it has to be some resistance on the quick release. What do I do?
>>
>>1347426
Is it a disc brake bike? Is the wheel lined up properly, or is the disc rubbing?
>>
>>1347433
It is a disc brake bike and it looks normal,the disc fits perfectly in the slot.
>>
>>1347436
Cartridge wheel hub? Quick release? If not, you didn't use a flat wrench to keep the hub locknut in place while you locked the wheel so you tightened the nut and the bearing cone shut.
>>
>>1347426
take it out and see if it has resistance. if it does, then you probably have this >>1347440 issue
if it's fine then just put it back in and maybe adjust your brake.
>>
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Dumb retard here, who never rode a road bike before.
Is this a good bike for a beginner ? Got the recommendation at my local bike shop.
>Cube Attain GTC Pro - 2019
>>
>>1347452
Looks like a pretty nice bike. If the dosh is no barrier I'd say go for it but if you not sure how much you'll get into it you could maybe go for something lower specced.
>>
>>1347454
That's why I am asking here. I am into PC hardware and I know that shops just want to sell you their stuff. The price is definately in the range I am willing to pay and I don't wanna save money now and buy a new bike in a few years because I wanted more from it. I also rode some bikes which were cheaper but they didn't feel as good.
>>
>>1347452
Another quick question concerning buying this bike. The Cube Attain 2019 seems to be pretty similar but it's not even half the price of the GTC Pro. Is there something I don't get ?
>>
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https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/folding-bikes/apollo-tuck-folding-bike
for 1/2 of price its worth ?
>>
My tire leaks and it's adhered to the wheel, so I think I need a whole new wheel. It was 700x25c. What do I buy? What price range am I looking at?
>>
>>1347556
8 speed claris vs 11 speed 105
Aksium vs some generic no-name wheels
Aluminum vs crabon
1.2 kg weight difference

On paper, they are drastically different bikes.
>>
>>1347589
>it's adhered to the wheel
You bought pre-glued tubulars? I don't understand.
>>
>>1347591
Do you think the price difference is justifiable for a beginner ? I don't mind spending money but I don't wanna waste expensive components on a beginner. Every sport I have done so far I always started with very low quality equipment.
>>
>>1347597
>Do you think the price difference is justifiable for a beginner ?
If you are even thinking of racing, absolutely. A few mins of riding should show the difference.

You might consider splitting the difference with the cube attain race. Aluminum frame, 10x tiagra drivetrain.
>>
>>1347597
I don't know. I don't think the 105 is "expensive", I do think it's nice, but it's all relative. Like, what's "beginner", you say first road bike but have you had any bike? How much did you ride before? Are you well off? Do you have other obligations? The carbon is certainly going to be lighter and smoother riding, the aksiums will probably also damp out the buzz a bit more than generic wheels and give you a more responsive ride quality. You'll have shorter jumps between gears on the 11 speed so you can maintain a comfortable cadence for any circumstances.

On the other hand if you expect to ride a lot you can also expect to be buying more stuff. So if the more expensive one is a stretch, go with the cheaper one so you have the dough to polish it up and keep it maintained. Most bikes are not, in my opinion, sold ready to go. If you're doing a lot of long rides you'll surely want bib shorts and a jersey, a nice comfy helmet, a cap, glasses, and gloves. Likely shoes. Bottle cage, a bottle, and either a canister or a saddlebag for the spare tubes and cartridges. Generally some sort of computer, even if it's a cheap generic $20 wired thing with a wheel sensor. Good pedals for sure. Whatever pedals the cheaper one comes with will be shit, guaranteed. Probably some kind of blinkies (most roadies are not active at night so just a strobe is fine for keeping you visible on the highway)

The more expensive one will probably come with terrible platforms meant to be thrown away. I think a carbon 105 r7000 road bike with aksiums would be a waste without some kind of clipless pedals and bike shoes, m520s at a minimum although "road pedals" would be the fashionable choice. Are you willing to learn how to use clipless? It's not hard but you do need to commit to learning.

To me the difference would be like "wow this is fun" vs "ok this is fine". You absolutely would notice the difference if you rode them side by side. Why not ride them both and decide for yourself?
>>
>>1347607
I think I know what you mean. I rode a few different road bikes and some were definitely nicer than others. I guess bikes are different in that regard when it comes to price and quality.
I wanna invest in something comfortable. I am mainly picking up cycling due to health issues preventing me from doing my normal routine. So extra stuff isn't really the issue because I wanna make it my main hobby from now on.
About the clipless I am not really sure. At some point I probably will use them but to get the basic hang of it I might start without. My sense of balance isn't that good and I am afraid I will fall over a few times.
>>
Rim or disc brakes on a hybrid bike like the Trek FX 2?
>>
>>1347612
Are you planning on boomer rides on 2 sunny saturdays a season, or are you going to use it as an all weather urban beater?
>>
>>1347613
A bit of a mix desu, although I do want to ride in the rain sometimes
>>
>>1347614
If it's in traffic, get the discs. If it's just the occasional damp ride on a MUP then it probably doesn't matter, but the price difference for hydros on a flat bar bike is pretty slim these days
>>
>>1347597
Claris is a groupset for casuals. 105 is the cheapest of the 'proper' groupsets, i.e. what a serious cyclist would use if they're poor or if they're putting it on a bike that they ride casually.
I didn't look up the bikes but other anon said that one is carbon and the other is aluminum. That's pretty significant.
There is definitely a big difference between the two bikes. The carbon one with 105 is going to be a pretty nice bike, whereas the aluminum one with Claris is going to just be an average bike, decent for normies but sub-par for people who take cycling seriously.
>>1347612
Disc brakes are better than rim brakes in just about every conceivable situation, so the only reason not to get them is that they're more expensive. Discs are nicer but not absolutely necessary so it depends if you want to spend a little extra money for a little more stopping power.
The FX is a great choice for commuting and cruising around the city btw, good decision if that's your intended purpose.
>>
>>1347612
Oh, I should add, if the discs are hydraulic, there is one downside: They're harder to service yourself. Adjusting cable-actuated brakes is easier than bleeding hydraulic brakes.
>>
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https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/folding-bikes/apollo-tuck-folding-bike
for 1/2 of price its worth ?
>>
Awhile back someone posted a really helpful website for me for bike fit/geometry and I can’t remember the damn name of the site. It wasn’t competitive cyclist, the sites layout was a bit more basic, required a login. Maybe had the words “wrench”, or “gear” in it but honestly can’t remember. If anyone can help I’d appreciate it.
>>
>>1347387
Fixed it, I had to add tension by closing the brakes down halfway and then pulling the cable tight. The cables are still a bit stiff, but the brakes work well enough now that I trust them on the road.

Tired as hell after only riding an hour in a hilly area, have a long way to go. Looking for ride tracking app suggestions pls
>>
>>1347607
>The more expensive one will probably come with terrible platforms meant to be thrown away.

I'd be completely unsurprised if it didn't come with pedals at all.
>>
>>1347668
>Looking for ride tracking app suggestions pls
strava is the big one

you'll want to get a dedicated bike gps eventually though.
>>
>>1347597
The difference between an entry level bike and a decently sorted mid-range one is night and day, and having a nicer bike can be a big motivator for riding more. I've seen people make the jump after a couple of years of riding an entry level bike and their big regret was always that they didn't do it much sooner or even right off the bat.
>>
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>>1347556
I disagree with the other anons.

Those two bikes have exactly the same geometry.
The claris one hasn't cheaped out on no-name brakes or crank like they often do.
I think it's a very good bike for a beginner.
Claris is very good.
Modern allum/carbon fork is very good.
Better, wider, tyres off the bat would make a big difference. 28 or 32mm gpk5. And if you wanted to upgrade it more later, you could get some nice wheels.

The carbon frame one would have a slightly smoother ride, yes, but what tyres you run will make much more of a difference. Yes it's nicer to be lighter, but it's not a huge deal. The gearing probably won't matter much to you nor will the stiffness. You won't really be getting parts which are more durable, or fundamentally more modern.

It's worth buying the more expensive one if you want something really nice but is it twice as good? Is it really worth twice as much? No. It's like 15% better.
>>
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>>1347699
>I've seen people make the jump after a couple of years of riding an entry level bike and their big regret was always that they didn't do it much sooner or even right off the bat.

for every one of these, there are ten who decided they didn't like cycling that much and never really got into it.
You're talking about people doing serious group riding training and racing right?
>>
>>1347452
>>1347610
Consider the Attain GTC pro as the most raciest thing that would be a good idea for you. I'm not a fan of claris, but it's not an unreasonable choice for a new rider. The wheelset is also a big part of the price and performance difference.

Keep in mind you generally can't upgrade individual parts easily you can with a computer. You can't upgrade the base attain to the GTC's drivetrain viably for example. It's cheaper to buy a whole new bike.

>Health
CF frames are generally better at absorbing vibration than aluminum, which may or may not matter in your case. I'd also try out the Cube Nuroad series. The wider tires cost you in acceleration, but allow for a more plush ride.

>>1347612
Disc gets you better hard stops, and modulation, at the cost of complexity, maintenance, heat dissipation, ect.
But those wheels will lock up quickly with rim brakes alone.

Rim unless you actually need stronger wet weather braking power, or hard downhill stopping. Those tektro dracos are about the cheapest hydraulics you should consider.

>>1347614
An occasional slow ride in the rain, rim. Fast, or in traffic, or commuting, disc. Tie should go to disc.
>>
>>1347730
>I'm not a fan of claris
why ?

>Keep in mind you generally can't upgrade individual parts easily
As a general point, sure.
>You can't upgrade the base attain to the GTC's drivetrain viably for example
Sure. But specifically for him that's unhelpful advice as he can upgrade the wheels easily, easily the most significant upgrade one might make on that bike.
>>
>>1347715
>>Better, wider, tyres off the bat would make a big difference. 28 or 32mm gpk5
those rim brakes only clear 28mm unfortunately
>>
>>1347746
28mm gp5k are very comfy
>>
>>1347735
Ergonomics. Shift feel and precision. Braking. Expected lifespan. I'll grant you that R2000 claris is one of the better years for it, and a hell of a lot better than the earlier versions, but claris shouldn't be an automatic choice, especially when tiagra is not that much more.


>But specifically for him that's unhelpful advice
What's unhelpful or wrong about it? Shimano's planned obsolescence is a thing. The hard breakpoint between speeds that require an entire wheel replacement at certain points is a thing. This makes the strategy of "start with a basic model and upgrade as you go" that anon may be considering a lot less viable, and that's an important thing to know.

>wheels
That's actually a good point. Check say, Evans. One wheel available, with another that takes screw ons, but neither are upgrades at all. Or CRC. One, and also not an upgrade. Jenson DOES have an 8 speed wheel upgrade, but it's disc specific. Of course they're not the only retailers out there, but as far as many of the big retailers are concerned, 8 speed is on it's way out, and that means less options at the LBS. Less choice in cassettes, ect ect. So, while you CAN just upgrade the wheel without upgrading everything else, it's still not as simple.
>>
>>1347748
>Ergonomics
nonsense, the ergonomics are near identical, a little smaller, but still very nice.
>Shift feel and precision.
again, nonsense, claris shifts very well
>Braking
again, claris calipers not chinkshit on that bike, again, very good with some better pads, and if he wanted to ride mountain descents in the wet and get even better calipers, that IS a straight swap upgrade
>Expected lifespan
again, for a total beginner, not an issue, and durability is not a problem

>What's unhelpful or wrong about it?
Because the actually worthwhile upgrades are not the drivetrain. So the bike IS upgradeable. Having closer spacing between gears is nice, but it's not really something an inexperienced rider will even benefit from.

>an 8 speed wheel upgrade
lol do you not realise that 8 speed cassettes fit on 11 speed hubs and that the hub spacing is the same? Any rim brake road wheelset is compatible. So there are lots of options from those sites you mention.
>>
>>1347749
So...is there anything wrong with Tiagra? Or do you just have a mad boner for the cheap shit?
>>
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>>1347752
Tiagra is fine but it's 2 years older than Claris, so all the tech has trickled down, aside from having 2 more gears and being a bit lighter, it's not better, and it isn't even specced on entry level road bikes by most companies now.
Most just have a claris, sora, and 105 model.

And because it has its own specific pull ratio, yeah, it's less compatible. But sure, it's fine.

It's not that I have a mad boner for the cheap shit, it's just no longer the case that it's significantly worse. Freds are still getting dabbed on in their head by thumb button shifters old ergonomics and archiac bb standards but thats just not the reality any longer.
>>
>>1347715
>>1347730
Thanks for the input. I wanna buy either of these on Monday. I'll just ask the clerk to ride both again. At least I know now that I am not getting cheated with the price. That was my main concern.
>>
>>1347765
Test ride the nuroad. Notice that wide tires is something that the bike nazi and anon both agree on.
>>
>>1347768
I looked that one up but the store doesn't have it in my size. Should I go for the slightly smaller frame to test it ?
>>
>>1347769
Maybe just a little. Just feel the difference the wider tire makes.
>>
>>1347770
Thanks, I will try it out!
>>
Anyone can recommend some makeshift ingredients to wax the chain? I read that paraffin liquid firestarter in 1:1 ratio with wax from a candle should produce good consistency
>>
I have a set of pre 2015 Chorus brakes, front one is dual pivot and the rear one mono pivot. I haven't tried Record and Super Record brakes. Would it be worth t upgrading to those, especially in 2x dual pivot configuration? re the newer, non-skeleton versions noticeably better?
>>
What's the best way to make a slightly too large fit? My boss has a bike for sale at a great price, but it's a 60cm and I probably need a 56 or a 58.
>>
>>1347998
Bike too big = bad
Bike too small = maybe ok
>>
>>1347998
I agree with >>1348034
A frame that's too big is not worth investing any money into.

But to answer your question, only things that really can be done is lower saddle, shorter stem and maybe shorter cranks.
And possibly playing around with handle bar geometry. Swept back handlebars, upturned drop bars or butterfly bars, that sort of thing. But it's not recomended.
>>
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>>1344526
Thinking of bulding a cross/gravel/whatever bike, but cross wheels are expensive for some reason.
Can you use MTB wheels on a 32-35mm tyres? Will they be okay or do MTB wheels have a minimum safe width?
>>
>>1347721
Nah, just avg. rec riders who immediately saw an improvement in the overall feel of riding a better bike, as well as a nice jump in their performance and distance that they could comfortably ride. The groupset upgrade was only a part of the equation there, really the smallest. And yeah, there are definitely a lot of people who go out, get a good bike, and then let it rot in a garage due to not really liking it or time constraints or whatever.
>>1347889
Modern Campy rim brakes all offer similar performance and haven't made any great jump in stopping capability since whenever dual pivot fronts came out. Their Potenza/nongroup brakes apparently have a bit more more tire clearance than others. 2x dual pivot won't get you better stopping power or modulation than your current setup.
>>
>>1348044
depends heavily on the mtb wheel, a lot these days are going 30-40+mm wide which wouldn't work too well for you.
On the other hand XC wheels/rims are often narrower and probably pretty workable.

I had a set of gravel wheels made on the dt swiss xr 331 (xc) rim, Inner width 20 mm Outer width 23.5 mm, perfect for gravel/cross width tyres.

The other issue you might come into if you buy a whole wheel is hub standards, it's pretty common for mtb to have wider hubs and fatter thru-axle in the front compared to road/gravel stuff.
>>
>>1348044
this is quite conservative and you can exceed it a bit. You can probably put 35mm tyres on 30mm rims. But they won't handle the best. I wouldn't do anything larger than that.
road wheels will also work, they just won't be as tough.
>>
Alrighty /n/ this is my first time posting here and I am not even sure if I'm asking this properly with the right words, but I'll try my best.
I first learned to ride a bike on a bike sized for a 5'3"/160cm girl. I am 6'/184cm tall, and found it to be very comfortable and easy to use, even when going up hills.
A friend wanted to teach me more things about biking, and let me borrow a bike sized for me.
I found it much more difficult to pedal and go anywhere especially up hills. My muscles would feel the burn within minutes, while with the other bike it would take just over an hour.
I am wondering - my friend says the larger bike sized for me is better, but I am not sure why the smaller one feels better. Am I not maximizing my potential in some way by not using a properly-sized bike?
>>
>>1348053
>Modern Campy rim brakes all offer similar performance and haven't made any great jump in stopping capability since whenever dual pivot fronts came out.
Good to know. I'm upgrading my shifters from pre 2015 Chorus to pre 2015 Super Record, front and rear mech from Athena to Super Record. Apparently 2015 SR is a considerable step up, but I only paid 300 for those SR parts (and a Chorus crankset) so fuck it. Don't really wanna spend more on upgrading the rest.
>>
>>1348065
did the gear ratio you were in feel the same?
>>
>>1347721
>serious group riding training and racing
Ugh, I wish you would stop polluting these threads with your bizarre opinions. Just because YOU got into cycling because of your race hobby doesn't mean everyone who doesn't race wants to be riding around on a clunky 8 speed or will eventually quit cycling because they never liked it to begin with. You probably ride one of those indoor trainers in the winter, you can't ever have a valid opinion on cycling if that's your relationship with bicycles.
>>
>>1348065
You were in the wrong gear, and your saddle position was wrong.
>>
>>1348073
sounds like someone's still salty after getting cat6ed by an overweight lycradad on the bike path lmao
>>
>>1348073
I don't know why you're under the impression that nuclaris is clunky or lacks finesse. Go meme a salesman into letting you demo a bike like that.

It's really very smooth and functions well. The difference in finesse is quite marginal.

It's weight, and more gears for closer steps.

If you're a casual, you can just lose that weight and you're not matching cadence and benefiting much from close spacing.

And a modern allum frame + fork from a big boy brand is fucking decent too, you can race on it, that one has the exact same geo as the pricey model.

I'm not saying he should get some exage chromoly whip off craigslist anon.
>>
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I'm putting gatorskins on my cx bike to cycle around the city and commute in the summer, and I'm not sure I'm fucking up or maybe I can't use gatorskins on this wheel or what, but when I put the tyre on the wheel there is this gap that allows you to see the rim tape, and when I inflate the wheel I think the bead stays there instead of going to the sides.
any advice for this? is it OK to ride the wheel like that? this wheel is supposed to be "tubeless ready" or something, and I've read that shit like this might happen but I'm still a bit worried about this, it's really weird and never happened with any other wheel before
>>
>>1348085
Internal rim width
Tire width (looks like 32mm? but fucking c'mon dude)
what are they
>>
>>1348081
That isn't even a contextually relevant insult
>>1348084
It's clunky dude. It's a bike aimed at casuals which for some reason is set up with 11x34 and 50x34, your "everyone with a good bike has to be in a race" mentality is why you think this is even acceptable. Nobody buying that bike is going to EVER be topping out that gearing, not even on a descent. It's just a weird nonsensical setup meant to approximate the look of a "real" (whatever that means) road bike.
>>
>>1348087
the tyre is indeed 32mm and I'm not sure about the rim, I just measured it and the internal width is either 19mm or 20mm, so according to charts like >>1348058 and the fact that the bike came with 33mm Clement Crusade PDX, I think it should be fine, right?
What's freaking me out is that the bead seems to stay on the rim tape instead of expanding to the rim sides
>>
>>1348073
what’s wrong with using a trainer for training in the winter? sometimes I even use mine in the summer for some workouts
>>
>>1348089
>It's a bike aimed at casuals
He IS a casual. He's on the fence about even using clipless pedals.

>which for some reason is set up with 11x34 and 50x34
The 105 bike which was his other option has 11x32 and 50x34. It's nearly identical gearing, just with closer steps. I don't understand what your point is at all.

> "everyone with a good bike has to be in a race"
I don't think that at all. I've only done 2 races in my life and i'd very happily ride that claris bike myself, if i could upgrade it a bit over time. It's a very good bike. I even said he should go ahead and buy the full carbon 105 bike if he wanted to splash out and get something great. I don't begrudge new roadies with nice bikes at all. Infact they prop up the industry.
>>
>>1348102
>He IS a casual. He's on the fence about even using clipless pedals.
And you think someone who is afraid of clipless is going to spin out on a 50t chainring and an 11t cog, apparently.
>I don't understand what your point is at all.
Obviously, hence my concerns about you posting your weird ass "everyone is into racing or they don't ride" opinions
>with nice bikes
It's not a nice bike. It's a tin can dressed up to look like a nice bike.
>>
>>1348104
what do you even recommend him getting? I’m really curious.
>>
>>1348089
>It's clunky dude
Have you ever ridden nuclaris or nusora? The most recent ones? Without chinkshit brakes and crank?

It's not clunky at all. I don't think you have.

And the idea a new road cyclist needs a full carbon frame is absurd. Many many very experienced cyclists race on nice allum frames.

Close gaps between gears are really nice but that IS something which actually is largely imperceptible to a new rider.
>>
>>1348105
I was the second person who replied to him. You don't need to be curious.
>>
>>1348107
Thanks that makes it clear since everyone here is posting as anon. What did you recommend him to get, and it better not have a top gear higher than 50x11
>>
>>1348106
>Have you ever ridden nuclaris or nusora
I've been riding since 5 speed was state of the art technology. Newer IS better, take off your rose tinted glasses
>And the idea a new road cyclist needs a full carbon frame is absurd.
I never said anything of the sort
>largely imperceptible to a new rider
Just because someone can't articulate a feeling in the common lexicon doesn't mean something is "imperceptible"
>>
>>1348104
Anon i am not into racing and I do ride. You are being triggered by a fantasy.

You're not going to find ANY road bike for sale with a lower top end than that, and it's very easy to get an 8spd cassette with a 12t or 13t top end or a semicompact crank if he wants to change it. I don't even understand what you're arguing now.

>it's not a nice bike
what do you ride?
>>
>>1348108
I asked him how much he was comfortable spending, he was vague. The reason 50x11 is a problem on the lower end bike is not that high speeds are bad. It's that it's trying to accomplish the same thing with less resources when the use case is clearly weaker, less experienced, more timid riders. It would make much more sense to give a usable and closer spaced gear range and give up that top 10mph or so which, I guarantee, is never actually going to be used.
>>
>>1348109
I think you're confused. We're discussing which of these bikes in the pics on these posts:

>>1347721
>>1347715

that anon, who is a new road cyclist, should buy. They are both new.

I am merely saying that they are both good bikes and that he does not have to spend twice as much to get the full carbon 11spd one, unless he feels like splashing out.
>>
>>1348112
What bike did you recommend with a lower top end than 50x11?
>>
>>1348112
The use case and the rider and the gearing range is identical in the situation.

You've got a good point, and swapping to a 12-32 cassette or something is not a bad idea. But it doesn't really matter. And it's a complete tangent.
>>
>>1348110
I ride a "not nice" 5700 steel road bike with 12-28 and 48-34. Obviously I swapped out parts because "not nice" bikes are usually shipped with incredibly stupid setups.
>>1348113
He was asking between two bikes that are wildly different despite having a similar thumbnail picture. I explained to him the difference.
>>1348114
As I have mentioned already, 50x11 is not the inherent problem, the problem is the spacing.
>>
>>1348116
They're not wildly different at all.
They have literally identical geometry, near-identical gear range, and near identical ergonomics.

And the claris one, which you're shitting on so hard, is definitely better than your bike. But for some reason you think it's not good enough for a complete beginner?

And it IS often the case that cheap bikes come with some cheap parts, but this specific bike actually HAS an inseries crank, and brake calipers.
>>
>>1348118
>They're not wildly different at all.
Yes they are.
>They have literally identical geometry
Yes, that's what makes them look similar, einstein.
>is definitely better than your bike.
"Higher MSRP compared to the used resale value of an ancient, beat up commuter" != "Better"
>But for some reason you think it's not good enough for a complete beginner?
The issue is with the people who configured the bike, not the beginner. Stop getting offended on behalf of someone who hasn't even made a purchase yet.
>some cheap parts
I'd rather have cheap parts set up right than gold plated Super Record set up by a fool. People make too big a deal out of the specific brand of crank, it's not important, no one cares.
>>
>>1348120
Let me get this straight
Geometry, doesn't matter
A 2019 allum frame/carbon fork from a reputable brand is inferior to old steel
chinkshit square taper cranks and brakes are fine

but anon who is a complete beginner has to buy an 11speed full carbon bike, so that he has close steps between gears?
>>
>>1348120
oh yeah and
Newer IS better
except your old steel beater is better than a modern entry level roadie
>>
>>1348127
Anon is just one of those weirdos who is mad about bikes. No one normal thinks having an 11t cog will ruin someone’s riding experience. fwiw I started out on an old 6 speed downtuber with 52/42 x 14-28, I would have been stoked to be riding new Claris instead.
>>
>>1348129
lol i just hope our autism hasn't scared that guy off from buying a bike
>>
I just tried a Trek Zektor 2 in a store, I liked it quite a bit, but I could get a FX 3 Disc for the same price, 500€, in a different store.
Main difference seem to be more roadie geometry on the Zektor, and a carbon fork on the FX.
Which one would you prefer?
>>
>>1348127
If they’re the same geometry then it doesn’t matter. Why are you so angry?

And no, he doesn’t NEED carbon to have sane gearing. He can just get 10 or 11 speed, or get a different cassette and chainring if he keeps the 8x
>>1348128
Better than this particular one, yes. 5700 is 10 speed and I have a much more usable range of gears because I’m not trying to pretend my bike isn’t what it is
>>1348129
Why are you putting words in my mouth? Why do you keep using mangled logic?
>>
>>1348151
Ok weirdo, you’re still clearly very mad about bikes. Just give it a rest.
>>
>>1348156
No u
>>
still waiting on an answer to >>1348099 from
>Ugh
anon
>>
what group/charity rides are people doing this summer? Lots of them on the calendar.
>>
>>1348039
Yeah but it's a road bike. Could I just slam the stem to get aero enough.
>>
do these black brake surfaces change color after being used? pic rel vision team comp 35
also are these wheels good for riding like 90% on road and occasionally 10% gravel?
>>
>>1348216
The reach might be too long if you really do belong on a 54. If your stem is shorter than 100mm on a road bike you are a fuck.
>>
>>1348223
>If your stem is shorter than 100mm on a road bike you are a fuck.
What do you mean?
>>
>>1348239
Your frame is too big
>>
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>>1348240
That was the inital premise.
>>
>>1348243
Yeah and it’ll handle like shit and your saddle will be too far forward, pass on it you idiot.
>>
The other day an anon was complaining that bicycles always come with shit wheels. I know practically nothing about wheels. How do I know what wheel is good?
>>
>>1344526
Hey do any of you a/n/ons know about a bike called the Randor Trailblazer All Terrain Bike. I got it for free recently and have found almost nothing in it. I think its from the 80s. Thanks to anyone who has an answer.
>>
>>1348261
Worth $30-$50, 5 years ago
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage-bicycles-whats-worth-appraisals/946912-value-randor-trailblazer-atb.html
>>
>>1348268
Thanks, ill probably stick some parts i have laying around on it, like different wheels, better handle bars, stuff to make it work. Maybe ill repaint it if I get the cash.
>>
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helmet recommendations?
>>
>>1348292
Giro Hex if you aren't a road racer.
>>
>>1347394
its broken in half. i just tightened the cones a ton and have been riding it but im going to put a new one in tomorrow.
>>
>>1348256
Good road wheels generally weigh around 1500g for the set, have good lateral rim and spoke stiffness so that brake rub doesn't happen (this happens with both rim and disc brakes with soft wheels), and have deliciously smooth hubs. They'll also be built well enough to take a few hard shots without going out of true or tacoing. Aero only really needed for serious racing.

This is an interesting dive into wheel stiffness: https://www.slowtwitch.com/Tech/Debunking_Wheel_Stiffness_3449.html
>>
bicycle and helmet mounted light recommendations?
>>
>>1348326
So, it's impossible to tell online if a wheel is good or not? Weight is the only thing they can objectively account for.
>>
>>1348338
READ
the
FUCKING
reviews
ABOUT IT
by
REAL PEOPLE
>>
>>1348338
>Weight is the only thing they can objectively account for.
Not really though, they always publish the weight to something impossibly precise like 1503.4g per set whereas the reality of manufacturing is that the wheelset may be plus or minus 100g

Also by the time you get into "good" wheelsets with that kind of weight class, you're in the realm of custom handbuilt wheels that you can't read a review for, only the individual components, and then it becomes religion
>>
>>1348292
I've got a Giro Bronte
>>
I can't adjust the height on these kind of pins, right?
>>
>>1348425
unscrew, put nut under bolt on bolt side, screw nut on pin side. Boom, lower pins
>>
>>1348427
alternatively, tiny washers on the underside work too, probably get finer adjustment that way
>>
>>1348427
>>1348429
The nut has to be on that side since the pedal body itself isn't threaded. I'll try it like it is before I decide if I care enough to spend $10 on washers and two hours unscrewing and rescrewing all of them.

ty
>>
Other than being too poor to buy a car or motorcycle, why in the literal fuck would anyone ever buy an eBike?
>>
>>1348223
But I belong on more of a 56 or 58 not a 54
>>
>>1348446
I think it's some sort of cargo culting. I looks like cycling so people think they will get the exercise of cycling without the effort of cycling.
Yes, even otherwise smart intelligent people seem to think this. It's stupid.
>>
I want to learn to build a wheel as a hobby project. Is this a terrible idea?
>>
>>1348446
They don't like climbing. Also useful for commuting/utility.
>>1348524
If you're really really bored...
>>
>>1348446
my boomer parents have cars and they bought pedal assist e-bikes and commute to work.
it's hilly and they're in their 60s and couldn't really do it otherwise.
they still exert themselves.

They find it really fun.
>>
>>1348145
The Zektor 2 is a really cool bike (sadly out of production now). I think not having a carbon fork is even a plus in this price segment and for its intended purpose (I assume casual riding and possibly commuting?).
That being said, the components on the FX3 are somewhat better, so if you're looking at 500 € each, it's a tough choice. The FX3 also provides lower gearing, so if there are many steep hills around where you're living, that might be a plus.
The Zektor looks much nicer, though. That sloping top tube on the FX3 really kills my boner.
>>
>>1348222
Yes and yes.
>>
>>1348425
find longer shoes instead
>>
>>1348292
a hat turned backwards
>>
>>1348277
>Thanks, ill probably stick some parts i have laying around on it, like different wheels, better handle bars, stuff to make it work. Maybe ill repaint it if I get the cash.

don't drop any money on parts for a trash heap bike. you put extra parts and coop parts on a bike that cheap.

There really isn't any way to make the bike better so just fix whatever is broken on it.

Just curious, what do mean by "better handlebars? " It's got upright-ish handlebars on a quill stem, what is there to upgrade and why? Really the only practical thing is to put a pair of 50/pair tires on the thing and throw a new chain on it.



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