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Are there any underwater train stations? If not, why?
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>>1294122
Tappi-Kaitei Station is technically underwater. It is a station in the middle of the Seikan Tunnel, a sea tunnel which connects Honshu and Hokkaido together by Shinkansen.
The train station is underground, and used to serve the local town before its upgrade to Standard Gauge. There is a tunnel museum in it now, and it is also used during emergency evacuations to the surface. Not all of the station is underwater though.

Cité on the Paris Métro M4 is built under an island on the Seine. As a result, some of the platforms are underwater, but the entrance is not.
Museuminsel on the Berlin U-Bahn U5 (currently under construction) will be located under the Spree, however, the entrances will lead to both sides of the river and also the Museuminsel itself.

Underwater train stations are mostly always train stations which serve islands, usually river islands. The platforms will be underground and underwater, but the entrances will always be on land. Tunneling under rivers or the sea usually isn't so hard as to prevent the construction of stations under the river or the sea, but the problem will be, what will the station serve? Ultimately, if the train station doesn't serve anything, then it's pointless. But if it serves something important, like an island, then that makes sense. No station will 100% be underwater.
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>>1294127
Thank you for the extremely informative post! In this hypothetical I'm referring to a station that runs parallel to the coast (only about 50 ft or so) so the station and staircases would have to be underwater, but they would be on land at the surface.
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>>1294610
This is rarely done, but I think there might be some examples of underground rail lines which do go under the sea bed, but never parallel, because there's no point. tunneling under rivers and some parts of a bay is common enough, but these kinds of stations will only ever exist to serve very specific situations.
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>>1294122
Canary Wharf Station was built underwater in an old dock slip, but the headhouse is so large I don't think there's any water directly over the platforms.

The planned Boston South Station under expansion will be built partly under the Adjacent Fort Port Channel.
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>>1295074
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>>1295089
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>>1294122
Earthquakes
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>>1295074
That's the Crossrail station, the original Tube station was planned to be put under a lake after it was completed but this was not done. That's why it has such a high ceiling compared to every other station on the jubilee.
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>>1294122
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koivusaari_metro_station?wprov=sfla1
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>>1294122
>underwater
Define the depth to qualify.

>>1295111
Tokyo and Sendai have one or two.

>>1294127
>Underwater train stations are mostly always train stations which serve islands, usually river islands. The platforms will be underground and underwater, but the entrances will always be on land. Tunneling under rivers or the sea usually isn't so hard as to prevent the construction of stations under the river or the sea, but the problem will be, what will the station serve? Ultimately, if the train station doesn't serve anything, then it's pointless. But if it serves something important, like an island, then that makes sense. No station will 100% be underwater.
Basically, the width and depth of the river constrains catchment area and alignment (which may further inconvenient service and accessbility in adjoining stations). Elevated stations over low clearance rivers are more common.



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