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File: bqg10.png (1.49 MB, 1440x810)
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/bqg/ - Bike Questions General

Last thread: >>1278915

Resources:
https://sheldonbrown.com/
https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help

If you want help picking out a bike to purchase, don't post here. Ask in >>>/n/bbg
>>
Recommend some nice fenders, I'm looking at Velo-Orange fenders but the ones I want are out of stock.
>>
>>1284712
SKS Bluemels or SKS Raceblade, depending on your bike.
>>
>>1284716
The Bluemels look really good, and cheaper then what I was looking at. A lot of the reviews are complaining about mounting them on the bike, any idea what that's about? I'm probably going to pick them up regardless though.
>>
>>1284722
Yeah, mounting them is a bit of a hassle, a bit like building IKEA furniture. But you're only doing it once, the slightly more complicated construction leads to better stability, and I mean it's not like mounting a first gen Schwalbe Marathon Plus tire where you're sweating, cursing and braking tools all weekend long.
>>
>>1284712
If you want to look fancy, go Hanjo or Berthoud. Nicer than the VOs, more expensive, and just as much of a hassle to mount. Otherwise the SKSes that the other anon mentioned are Just Fine and not as much of a pain to mount. All of the others tend to require good drills wth step bits and shit.
>>
>>1284712
I avoid metal fenders. SKS Longboards are about as long as fenders come and the plastic/thin mean construction is easy to cut for weird fits. If you get a short front fender you're going to be spraying shit directly into your crankset and chain. If you do go metal, budget for some nice mud flaps

Not sure how low blumels or raceblades are, but seriously look into it. Half of the reason for fenders is keeping your chain clean
>>
>>1284722
can't speak for those models, but there's no such thing as an easily-mounted set of fenders.
they're pretty much all pains in the ass. but like the other guy said, overall it's well worth it.
>>
I mistakenly posted in the dead thread: >>1284753
repost:

So, I recently went from a 52/42t 144bcd crank to a 53/38t 130bcd crank. it's way better, but I have some bretty big hills around me and my middle-aged knees are still hurting from my commutes.

I already have the lowest rear gear my hub will take, a 34t. 38t is the smallest ring the 130bcd will take.
So, it's time to get either a compact or sub-compact double. I have several questions:
1) a standard compact is 50/34t, which would give me a 1:1 low gear. Does anyone bother with lower than that? should I even consider sub-compact?
2) compact cranks are all 110bcd, is that standard for sub-compact as well? the ones that listed the bcd in my searches said 110 but that they also had ovalized rings, like it was a cheat.
3) I'm really tall (frame is 63cm) and I've always rode 175 arm length. one of the cranks I'm looking at is 170. I've heard that shorter arms make for easier spinning, which might help my knees? I don't really want to fuck with my fit or my cadence, but if I'm already buying to go low, maybe I should get something spin-ier. but I'm so tall and used to 175. I dunno how to call it. anyone have experience they can share?

anyway, I'm looking at cheap shit since my bike is old and cheap.
these are the two I found just now, the shimano is only 170 arm length. Any input welcome. Americlap for shipping costs.

https://www.amazon.com/d/Bicycle-Cranksets/Vuelta-815003370-Corsa-Comp-Crankset/B0081UV2NU/ref=mp_s_a_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1550000156&sr=8-14&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=compact%2Bcrank&th=1&psc=1#immersive-view_1550003667945

https://www.bikewagon.com/shimano-crankset-fc-a070-red-170x50-34t-w-ocg?CAWELAID=400006350000064710&CAGPSPN=pla&CAAGID=20967086916&CATCI=pla-132683525076&catargetid=400006350000433338&cadevice=m&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIlrGeqIK34AIVmoqzCh1WCgruEAkYBiABEgKHQvD_BwE
>>
>>1284787
>>1284712
mudflaps are easy to make out of e.g. an old mtb tube.
V.O. fenders are plenty long. when i walk my bike down my staircase, the front fender catches on the first step if I don't lift the wheel slightly.
>>
I let my disc pads wear right down to bear metal. Now I'm trying to replace them but I can't push the pistons back in far enough for the new pads to fit. Do I need to do something with the hydraulic fluid to unfuck myself?
T. Fred and his first hydro disc road bike
>>
>>1284811
>1) a standard compact is 50/34t, which would give me a 1:1 low gear. Does anyone bother with lower than that?
No, lower than 1:1 doesn't make sense except for loaded touring, when pushing your bike is more strenuous than sitting on it and turning the wheels at 3 mph. I use 1:1 and I climb 150m on a steep hill every single day for my commute. I'm also middle aged. If you can't do a hill with 1:1 anymore, get an e-bike.
>>
>>1284811
1) Right now sub-compact is still a niche category so you won't find bargain basement stuff. Just stick with 50/34 and it'll be fine. For road, 1:1 easy gear is fine.
2) there is no real standard for subcompact yet because niche. Praxis are the only ones who make a genuine 110BCD 48/32 crankset. Other brands have mixed 110/74, direct mount, and other weird stuff.
3) Just stick with the 175mm, its comfy and there's plenty of options. Go with cheap shimano. I just got a shimano rs510 crankset for about $90 from Merlin.
>>
Weight weenie autist here. I have £500 britcoins to blow on a frame. I’m joining the gravel gang.
>is this chiner frame any good for gravel? I’m guessing the back wheel won’t fit
>does anyone know of a chiner frame under 1kg that’ll fit gravel sized tires?
There’s some decent looking cheap carbon “cyclocross” frames but they’re about 1.2kg, 400g is a big saving at my weight
Link: aliexpress dot com slash e slash ej3Nc8Y
>>
>>1284836
Forgot to add I could contact the seller and negotiate a price without the forks if they’re too narrow

I haven’t decided how thick tyres I need for touring, I’m retyreded lol. What’s a good all rounder thickness? I like trails too
>>
>>1284836
There’s also this
>>
>>1284836
And this,
>frame geometry is less compact so I assume I’d need a bigger frame
which would up the weight vs the other two. I have no idea how they’d respond since this thin monocoque t1000 carbon isn’t something I’ve ever ridden, has anyone been on similar frames? I’d use aluminium wheels, still looking for a budget pair and deciding size

Side question: can I drill alu rims?
>>
>>1284836
>>1284840
I've never heard of Airwolf or Sequel. When it comes to Chinese carbon it's usually a good idea to stick with the tried and true names.
>>
>>1284712
Planet Bike fenders are nice. I have them on two of my bikes. They are sturdy/stable, they stay in place, don't rub, etc.

I did have one of the quick release tabs break because I tightened it too much, but the quick release tabs are optional so just leave them out.
>>
>>1284827
Hopefully someone more qualified than me can answer but you should be able to separate them with brute force. You can stick a wedge in between them and wiggle it back and forth. There are even plastic wedges designed specifically for separating hydraulic disc pads. they are designed for when the pads are installed and you accidentally pull the lever when the wheel is off, but point is, there's nothing wrong with using force to push the pistons apart.

Perhaps you could fit a pad in on one side if not both and then stick a wedge in there to push them farther apart.
>>
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>>1284840
>Side question: can I drill alu rims?
>>
>>1284811
You could get a 46/30 FSA crank
Tempo for 8/9spd or Omega for 10/11

46x11 is still a taller gear than 53x13

It seems like a no brainer really. Those FSA cranks come in 172.5 and 175 too.

>>1284828
>lower than 1:1 doesn't make sense except for loaded touring
pro cyclists now ride 1:1 gears in tough mountain stages. There's absolutely no shame in going lower for mortals.
>>
Guys,
How can I make a 26" tire 90s rigid MTB into a sweet all season cruiser?
I was thinking fenders and mudflaps, some file tread or similar tyres for light gravel work, and the obvious mechanical overhauling.
What about grips and a frame/stem bag/basket, any suggestions?
>>
>>1284874
They ride 1:1.0625 gears.
>>
>>1284837
>I haven’t decided how thick tyres I need for touring, I’m retyreded lol. What’s a good all rounder thickness? I like trails too
35mm
>>
>>1285029
35 is nice, but if you're 90 kg and over and your frame can clear them, I'd go for 40-42 mm
>>
Are supple tyres a meme, or comfy and kino?
Can't say I'd be keen on dropping the asking price of compass or similar rubber if it doesn't have a noticeable benefit.
>>
>>1285076
what do you ride now?
>>
>>1285076
they are a meme and comfy and kino
>>
>>1285077
28 mm continental sport I think.
>>
>>1285084
It is 100% worth spending $100+ on grand prix 5000
28s or 32s
tires are by far the most important component on a bike
>>
I want to buy new or aftermarket lever hoods but seeing as my bike is about 10-15 years old, they've not been in production for a while.

I need them for a Shimano 105 STI ST-5500 set, but I can't find them anywhere.

Can I just get something new from a current gen model or something aftermarket even if it is a bit loose or tight, or are these completely shaped different and i'm shit out of luck?
>>
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>>1285114
Try checking out these 105 5600/Ultegra 6600 hoods.

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Shimano-Ultegra-ST-6600-ST-6603-105-ST-5600-Bracket-Cover-Set-STI-Lever-Hood-Set/321691813184
>>
>>1285114
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Shimano-105-ST-5500-CA-brake-lever-covers/264194616546?hash=item3d8339ece2:g:6IwAAOSwUnJcY-rV:rk:7:pf:0

You didn't look on ebay?

>>1285119
those won't fit, they're different
>>
>>1285121
I did and those didn't show up for me.

I can literally search the exact item name into the Ebay search and it still won't show me that item.

Thanks for finding that for me though.
>>
>>1285121
>>1285129
Anyhoo, that's an Auction item and the seller isn't selling internationally. That's why I can't see his items.
>>
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>>1284811
Unironically - Get a triple. I found the 16T gap on compacts to be cancerous AF. It works on the MTB - where you downshift to a granny before a climb, but on the road the sudden change of cadence is jarring. And then you need to compensate for it at the back.

Claris triple is 50/39/30, so you get just 11T difference on main gears, low granny and you can switch to a tightly spaced cassette.

I'm tall ( 6'5" ) and I find the minute differences in crank length to be, well, minor. But if anything - climbing on my 180mm set is easier then on 170.

If switching to a triple is not an option - consider, as other anons said, subcompact. You can adopt an MTB crank, if necessary. Although that requires some wrenching experience.

Lastly - depending of 'speedage' of your bike - you can get cassettes going as much as 52 these days. Even on 8 speed has a 11-40 option. Getting those monsters to work reliably is another issue, but they are there.
>>
>>1284828
>No, lower than 1:1 doesn't make sense except for loaded touring

You are a silly, silly Anon.
>>
>>1285023
>wonders if he should engage in this autism.

On the cosmic-ray actuated XX1 they get as low as 1:1. Besides, let them ponder the 12 speed for a while and they will go sub 1:1.

Spinning is winning.
>>
>>1285177
I'm a little surprised that Campy only went to 32. 13-34 and 14-36 with subcompact cranks seem like an obvious thing to do, although there are many frames that are too tight for anything more than 12t as the lowest gear. The SRAM 10-33 that's supposed to be paired with their 46/33 crank is weird, too.
>>
700c core

25-28: conti grand prix
30-38: schwalbe marathon supremes
42-47: some flavor of gravel meme
50mm+ : You either need a mountain bike for the job or you're a dumbass fuck off
>>
>>1285021
Not sure what you mean by 'file tread' but in general, you'll want to make sure all the components are in good working order. Old bikes often have worn out and damaged components that will need replacement regardless of what you use the bike for.
As for converting it from mtb to something better for pavement, gravel, commuting, etc, you'll want fenders, rear rack, lights, semislick tires. Panaracer Pasela PTs are nice tires (make sure to get the PT version, not the standard Paselas, because the standard non-PT Paselas get flats way too easily, which is a non-issue with the stronger PT version)
>grips
The grips it comes with should be fine, unless they're damaged.
>frame/stem bag/basket
Basket is a meme. Good options depending on your uses, preferences, and how much you'll be carrying are backpack, saddle bag, or panniers. Panniers are bike-specific bags that attach to a rack.
You'll also want a good lock if you're going to be leaving the bike unattended anywhere.
>>
>>1285196
>Basket is a meme.
for a reason
>Panniers are bike-specific bags that attach to a rack.
and then you get to lug and babysit _two_ bags, which are designed to be held by a bike rack and not human hands/body.. awesome.
>>
What helmet should I get for $100 or less?
>>
>>1285258
Giro Hex
>>
>>1285263
Danke Schoen anon kun
>>
How the hell does the Rivendell Quickbeam/SimpleOne work?
It’s a 3 speed fixie. What the fuck.
>>
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>>1285248
>he hasn't taken the basketpill yet
>>
>>1285258
Anything by Giro. Giro helmets best helmets. Go to a store that sells Giro helmets and try some on to pick out what one you find most comfortable, or else check here:
https://www.giro.com/us_en/products/men/helmets.html

Get something with MIPS, it's safer
>>
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>>1285301
t. someone that rides pic related BSO
>>
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>>1285311
baskets
>>
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>>1285311
4 lyfe
>>
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>>1285311
!
>>
>>1285308
>Get something with MIPS, it's safer
There's no proof of that, and MIPS themselves won't say if their claimed improvement in dissipating rotational energy is a significant factor in preventing concussions.
>>
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>>1285295
Double front with a flip-flop hub. I'd love to have a Quickbeam because the logo and headbadge are kino, and the later models have a fucking kickstand plate.
>>
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>>1285311
nuh uh

>>1285441
>>1285442
>>1285443
based & basketpilled
>>
>>1285443
based and PCB pilled
>>
>>1285443
is that your picture and where is it
>>
Got some V-O fenders today.
My bike has a (dick break) carbon fork with a nice long mounting hole near the crown, but there doesn't look like a long bolt in the hardware supplied.

I have a long bolt from another pair of fenders but that's not long enough either.

Gonna have to find a long bolt from somewhere, right?
>>
>>1285295

Sturmey-Archer makes a 3 speed fixed gear hub, the S3X. Apparently not a very good product.
>>
>>1285465
this is my picture. it's the gowanus canal in brooklyn, nyc
>>
>>1285508
you're going to have to dig through the bins at home depot or whatever. try to find one of those bolts that is only threaded halfway up
>>
i converted my old mtb to a single speed, but when i installed the chain tensioner, it made the chain feel like its binding?
is it tensioning too much?
>>
>>1285623
Yes. Cogs are, essentially, polygons, so radius between the virtual "circles" they represent varies dynamically. You need to take that into account and slacken the chain somewhat.

If you overdo the tension, it causes greatly accelerated chain wear.
>>
>>1285626
*radius of virtual circles
>>
>>1285626
oh right, so just add another link to the chain maybe?
>>
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>>1285629
That would lengthen the chain by 1 inch, so no bueno. What kind of tensioner is that? The type that pulls the wheel over the dropouts, or the extra pulley on a sprung arm like pic related?
>>
>>1285634
like pic related :)
>>
>>1285634
want to to get a pic of the slack i have in the chain now?
>>
>>1285640
Would be nice. I kind of assumed that you have the other type. But with those spring loaded things its difficult to break things. You are most likely OK.
>>
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>>1285642
this is the one i have
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>>1285642
>>
>>1285656
Its fine. Go ride it like you stole it.
>>
>>1285657
with the tensioner binding like it is?
like i cant spin the pedals and them keep going for a bit, they just stop.
also it sounds so wrong lol
>>
>>1285652
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJWw5oONQI8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxS6G-4VC_0
>>
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I've come to a bridge I cannot cross. Am I doomed to go external routing to achieve my dream?
>>
>>1285629
you also need to consider the thematic length of the chain
>>
>>1285758

Some of next year's SRAM groupsets are going fully cable-free. Expect more of that to follow.
>>
>>1285758
> Prefers internal routing
God damn it Alex
Stop
>>
>>1285508
Problemsolvers brand usually has weird bike specific nuts and bolts
https://www.maddogcycles.com/product/problem-solvers-brake-mounting-nut-182065-1.htm

I personally would not run VO fenders without safety release tabs on the front fender stays. There is a chance an object could jam between the tire and fender, lock up the wheel
>>
>>1285832
pussy
>>
>>1285804
>wireless brakes
I will never be ready for that
>>
>>1285549
Thought so, cheers anon.
>>1285832
>dick brake
anon there's nothing there to attach that to
>>
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I'm looking for an old rigid MTB to put some fat slicks on and cruise on, but there are heaps of BSO bikes to sit through and I'm not knowledgeable on MTB as such.
Should I be looking for certain things in a decent quality bike?
Canti brakes and lugged steel would certainly be nice, but I don't know much about older stems/bars/shifters/groupsets/wheels etc.
Can anyone tell me what makes a good rigid? Any help is good, I'm clueless really.
>>
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>>1285943
Here's some local bikes for discerning anons to choose from.
Anything passable in the bunch? It's pretty much going to just be fenders and fat slicks, maybe a basket or pannier later.
Not sure about sizing, as i normally ride a 58 cm road frame.
>>
>>1285958
I like the look of the bianchi the most out of those, but it doesn't look like it's a big bike 4u
>>
>>1285958
the first one is the only really obvious shitter there, from those pics. See how it has a claw adapter for the rear derailer to bolt onto the wheel skewer, instead of a threaded mount on the frame?

Big red flag.

Another important thing is that the bearings aren't all shot, and the drivetrain doesn't all need replacing. Which can be hard to tell from photos, but in person, you might pass on a bike over those things unless you want to put big money and time into it.

I'd look out for anything with deore or XT groups, or stickers saying it has higher end tange tubing or other chromoly tubing stickers, those are gonna be high end bikes.
Also try and get triggers shifters or thumbies and not gripshift.
>>
>>1285958
second and fourth are definitely the cream here, first is trash.
>>
>>1285971
This, and make sure it says Deore, XT, LX or SLX not only on one part. If the hubs are marked like that, it's definitely a higher end bike.
>>
>>1285958
The 'goose is the only bike I'd even consider here, but it's much too small for you.
>>
>>1285958
The fist one might fit, but is a pile of shit. The other four might be a tad small. Not sure what to recommend.
>>
>>1285943
>I'm looking for an old rigid MTB to put some fat slicks on and cruise on,

I'm gonna be a contrarian here and say that it doesn't particular matter what the level and quality of the shifting mech as long as everything is properly lubed and it drops into every gear cleanly. Thumbies are preferable to grip shifts only as far as it is more difficult to shred on a path because you can accidentally shift into another gear.

However there is nothing inherently wrong with grip shift. They are actually quite comfortable and I've retrofitted bikes to have them for people who have arthritis issues and can't hit the EZ Fire shifter with their thumb.

It is, however of the utmost importance that you get a bike that fits you. Everyone is shitting on bike 1 but only bike 1 will provide you with a comfortable ride all others are way too small.

As a 6'1 dude, you'll spend more time finding an XL size frame, they're probably only 1/10 of the frames on the used market.

(There is also nothing wrong with a derailleur claw adapter. They can prevent total frame failure on AL frames while with a claw you only have to replace the bent claw. They are also frequently used when taking an older bike and putting newer components on it.)

You are looking for a cruising/chill/relaxoid bike you don't need to get up in arms over high end vs mid range components just get one that fits great.

The only thing with your bikeu search is to get one with a rigid front fork. Not because how /n/ says front suspensions are worthless (they have value) but because like all springs they deteriorate over time and a new Suntour XCM/XCT level fork (what they put on a $600 mtb) is $60.

You want something you can ride away from the guy's garage with little to no required work. If you can't ride it away, don't buy it.
>>
>>1285943
tell us your Craigslist city we'll find something for you
>>
>>1286001
you're right that lower end drivetrains in good condition can function well, i just suggested looking for higher end parts because they're a tell that everything about the bike is higher quality, including the tubing used in the frame, the quality of the wheels, everything.

You're confusing bolt on claws from the steel era, with replaceable derailer hangers on allum frames, they're totally different.
Bolt on claws are almost exclusively only on gaspipe frames, with stamped steel dropouts, liable to crack, extremely heavy, and likely too stiff and horrible to ride.

You're also right about the fit thing, but he just shouldn't buy that bike. It's a piece of shit. A very old piece of shit is just so probably totally fucked condition too.
>>
lol, hey guys should I pay 1000 and 1200 each for two 1980s Stumpjumpers? They are classics!

my Craigslist is the worst CL of any city in america.

https://kansascity.craigslist.org/bik/d/shawnee-mission-stumpjumper-classics/6817989494.html
>>
>>1286007
lmao
>>
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>>1286008
hold on this fucker has dozens of LOL worthy bikes.

Snap City era Aluminum Cannondale only 425 USD

https://kansascity.craigslist.org/bik/d/shawnee-mission-mid-school-cannondale/6817701249.html

Only $290 for a mid 90s schwinn with downtube shifters and a threaded stem. oh yeah and it's aluminum. This guy must know something about vintage aluminum!

https://kansascity.craigslist.org/bik/d/shawnee-mission-schwinn-354-aluminum/6810535399.html

A modern Haro that has clearly been crashed only 425 usd

https://kansascity.craigslist.org/bik/d/shawnee-mission-haro-mary-xc-29er-disc/6801780645.html

Mid 90s Gary Fisher only 490!

https://kansascity.craigslist.org/bik/d/shawnee-mission-19-gary-fisher-mt-tam/6816279577.html

Too bad it wasn't the Hoo Koo E Koo Grateful Dead version...
>>
hold up I found something on my craigslist that isn't total shit, merely interestingly shaped shit with unique corn in it.

https://kansascity.craigslist.org/bik/d/shawnee-mission-univega-extra-tall-road/6812641947.html

1981 Univega Sport looks to be taken well care of and it's $119. I know a Univega isn't worth 119 but I bet I can talk myself into it being worth 100!
>>
Are mountain bikes unsuitable for street riding? Specifically for a plain 5.5 km distance.

I can't afford a regular bike, and I want to save for a BMX.
>>
>>1286154
If you only have an MTB and can't afford anything else, go ride it.

But if you some narrower, less profiled tires used for $10, you'll have it much easier already.
>>
Question to my American friends:

Bikes without (full) fenders seem to be a lot more common over there. So, how do you do it? Do you just not commute in the rain? Change clothes after every ride? Or walk around with a brown line up your bottom all day at school/work?

Legitimately interested, cause I love the look of fender-less bikes.
>>
Is there a tyre that is 27.5'' and is like 1.8 1.75 and it is not slick all the way. I want it to be slick in the middle but with some grip on the outside part? All i find is some that are 27.5" but 2.0 or 2.1. Halp?
>>
>>1286180
I don't pay too much attention to what other people do in that regard but it seems to me that there's a few categories here:

>Bikes used for recreational and serious cycling such as performance road bikes and mountain bikes which usually lack fenders and are used by serious cyclists and are not used to commute

>Bikes used to commute by fairly serious cyclists which usually do have fenders

>Bikes used to commute by casuals who probably don't ride in the rain, or ride so slow that they aren't kicking up much dirt, or are new to bike commuting and don't think about it

>Bikes used for recreation by casuals who just take them out for a half hour on a sunny weekend
>>
>>1286154
If it's rigid (no suspension) then it's fine especially if you put on semislick tires
If it has suspension it's definitely not as efficient but for only 5.5km it's fine. If you're doing a 5.5km commute on a regular basis I would recommend getting a cheap used bike on craigslist in which case post in >>>/n/bbg

>>1285943
Post in >>>/n/bbg
>>
>>1286180
My rack has a platform which functions pretty well as a fender to keep wet grime off my body. You could also get a racktop bag or just ziptie some plastic there. When it's really wet I pack an extra pair of socks, but I'm considering a front fender.
>>
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>>1286180
>>1286305

It's not really about keeping yourself dry, but keeping yourself semi-dry and keeping your drivetrain, bottom bracket, rim brakes, and headset clean.

It's fantastic for a commuter but i put SKS Longboards on all of my pavement bikes. Even a mup path will cover your chain in grit, and city commuting is much more disgusting. You have a bike that stays clean and needs way less maintenance
>>
>>1286180
Oh I totally read your post backwarda.
Here in America, the suburban cyclists I know are big into cleaning their bikes after every ride. They enjoy the ritual. Some remove the chain after every ride.

Others, especially city riders, abuse their bikes, never cleaning them at all. I was over if these people and then discovered the power of full fenders from bikesnobnyc

I think it is as simple as that. Most bikes here are for sport or bike path exercise, so they are either not ridden often by noobs, or have extremely meticulous owners focused heavily on performance
>>
>>1286210
27.5" is the same size as 650b, they're both 584mm
29" is the same size as 700c, both 622mm
One is just the mtb designation, and the other is the road
2.1 is around 50mm
Once tires get smaller, they often become road tires, given in mm

So what you're looking for, might be called a 38-50mm 650b gravel tire

I'd suggest a Panaracer Gravelking 27.5“ . You can get it in 42mm (1.75) or 47mm (1.9). There's an SK with some tread and a slick one, both in that size, both good allrounders.
>>
>>1286180
As the previous poster pointed out, many Americans who commute by bike do use fenders... but only a small percentage Americans who ride bikes actually use them for routine transportation, and there's less need for fenders if you only ride when the weather is nice. If you look at bikes used exclusively for sport/recreation in whatever part of the world you're from I would expect you'd find a similar lack of fenders.
>>
>>1286305
I have one of these too and they do absolutely nothing to stop water spraying forward off your rear wheel onto calves etc

really excited to be commuting on a bike with rack and fender mounts now desu
>>
>>1286366
How wide are your tires? I ride a road bike with 23s and have never had this issue.
>>
>>1286407
currently 30c but I'm usually in the mid 30s
>>
>>1286210
>Is there a tyre that is 27.5'' and is like 1.8 1.75 and it is not slick all the way. I want it to be slick in the middle but with some grip on the outside part? All i find is some that are 27.5" but 2.0 or 2.1. Halp?
Soma Cazadero come in 27.5x42mm. Roll fast on pavement but can do some pretty serious dirt and gravel. They weigh about 120 grams more than the gravelking, would not qualify as supple but probably better for flat protection
>>
>>1285969
>>1285971
>>1285977
>>1285978
>>1285983
>>1285987
>>1286001
>>1286006
Thanks for your help guys, you've all been really helpful and I appreciate it!
I've sent a message to the guy about the hill topper, and hopefully he will reply soon.
If it falls through, I might either look at the bianchi (unsure if it's rusty or just dirty so passed it over to begin with) or find some more suitable bikes and post them.

As to fitting, I can ride a 56 in a pinch so I hope I can fit on one of those bikes. I'm not afraid of a bit of drop, as the 56 road bike i have ends up at about 15cm drop; but I'm unsure if drop is even desirable on an MTB.
>>
>>1286307
That's a sweet ride anon, cool looking and really functional.
how plush are those WTB tyres? I've been thinking about pulling the trigger on some.
>>
I've been given a lovely old racing bike which originally had 23mm tyres on it. Bike shop fitted a cheap pair of 25mm. The rear tyre is catching at some point on the little rear cross link thingy near the bracket. Would a better made 25mm tyre not catch or just accept the frame can only take 23mm?
>>
>>1286549
Tire sizes aren't accurate at all. Another "25mm" tire might fit, even another manufacturer's "28mm" might fit. Wheel width also affects it. It has nothing to do with tire quality or price. If you go that close to what your frame can handle, the only way to find out is to mount the tire, pump it up to max pressure and see if it clears (there should be some room for debris that can get stuck in the threads as well)
>>
>>1286549
If you have horizontal dropouts, better yet, with setscrews, it may be possible to move the screws/wheel backwards and attain more tire clearance.
>>
>>1286319
>>1286468
Thanks mo/n/gols. After all i will maybe take Schwalbe Hurricane Tire, 27.5 x 2" it looks closer to what i want.
>>
>>1286585
hmmm man i'd really recommend spending more money on tires, they are the most important component. And the tread pattern you want is just nonsense for people who don't know better which exclusively appears on low end tires.
>>
https://corvallis.craigslist.org/bik/d/albany-trek-1000-road-bike/6819687080.html

Thoughts? Seems a little over priced, but the condition looks good and I'm a sucker for that color scheme. A little googling tells me this is a 1989 model. No idea why they put aero bars on this thing. Looking to replace my commuter for a ~6 mile ride, current one is a bit large for me (~56cm).
>>
>>1286759
I wouldn't trust 30-year-old aluminum.
At the very least, inspect the fork thoroughly for any deformation. And if it has any issues shifting, walk away. It could be a bent DR and that isn't fixable on an alu frame.
>>
https://www.bike-components.de/en/Panaracer/Pasela-ProTite-28-Drahtreifen-p69517/
https://www.bike-components.de/en/Schwalbe/Marathon-Plus-28-Wired-Tyre-p37545/

What tires are better for my 28" rigid to ride in the city?
>>
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>>1286557
>>1286569
If only they specified the vertical height of the tyre, but lile you say it probanly depends on too many parameters. Pumped up i could just about get a fag paper between it. I've ordered some conti 4000s 23mm for now but i'll go round a few shops and see what wider tyres might fit, because for one brief ride it did feel a bit more comfortable and the rest of the frame can take it. Maybe wider wheels or different inner tubes
>>
>>1286815
The Schwalbe won't ever have a flat. That's their selling point. I ran them as a courier for years and you can literally ride through broken glass, nails and thumbtacks.
But it takes a day to get them on your rims and you'll break 2 tire levers in the process. At 25mm width, they were slower than 50mm MTB tires and less comfortable than 23mm roadbike tires.
I don't know the Paselas but they weigh just a bit over half of the Schwalbe at the same size, so if you don't need insane flat protection, they'll probably be better in every way.
>>
>>1286821
*At 35mm width
>>
>>1286815
Depends on how you feel about puncture protection vs. ride quality. Marathon+ has excellent puncture protection but has a harsh ride as a result. They're also rather slow, and I'm not a fan of their handling. Pasela PT has a more comfortable ride and roll faster, but less puncture resistance, particularly along the sidewalls.

The Marathon Supreme is a good choice for city riding. They have a lot more puncture resistance than the Paselas, without sacrificing ride quality like the Marathon+ does.
>>
>>1286180
Compromise: mtb fenders don’t detract too much from the simple, clean look but will help a lot, and can literally be made from a coke bottle and zip ties if you want to try it first. Bikepacking, no need for a rear fender because you’re either wearing a backpack or it’s positioned in the place of the fender
>>
>>1286821
Is it their weight that influences so much the ride?
>>1286828
> Marathon Supreme
Doesn't it seem too sleek? Or does it have a decent grip?
>>
>>1287009
grip on what? you don't want tread (aside from super subtle stuff) for riding on asphalt
>>
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>>1286821

I work at a shop and let me tell you, Schwalbes are fucking notorious for being a nightmare to get on and off most rims. Especially Reynolds. You are going to want pic-related if you don't have one. Kool Stop tire bead jack. At the very least, the Park Took plastic tire levers hold up against those fuckers.
>>
>>1287012
The marathon supreme just looked a bit too smooth. How will it behave on wet roads?
>>
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>>1287023
Give this a read;
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/slicks.html
>machines that measure traction show that smooth tires corner better on both wet and dry pavement.
>>
>>1287023
>>1287025

This. Tread for cars us used to move water from underneath the tire. Cars need it because their tyres are flat. Bikes use baloon tyres and thus there is really little need for treading like cars or motorbikes do. Bike tyres are too baloon to gather sufficient water below them and bikes move too slow to aquaplan.

TL;DR - for riding hard surfaces use as slick tyres as you can get away with. Treading on them is the 'blue crystals' of tyre world.

Actual knobs and treads on bike tyres are for dirt riding, to dig into the loose surface.
>>
>>1287009
>Is it their weight that influences so much the ride?

That, and their thickness. There's a quarter inch of hardened material on the outside and reinforced sidewalls, which makes them about as supple as pic related.
>>
>>1287041
This, they ride awful. They also last as forever as a pneumatic tire can, resist sidewall cuts and don't get stuck in strain tracks.

But don't expect comfy just because it's wide.
>>
>>1286815
Pasela PTs are great tires. I have them on my OTS, wouldn't trade them for anything. Just be sure to get the PT version, cause the non-PT version is prone to flats. PT version never gets flats.
>>
>>1286007
>your CL
it's truly horrendous anon, i'm sorry.
>>
Is there any difference between a rigid mtb and a gravel bike besides having space for even wider tires and having a triangle that makes a dropper post worth it?
>>
>>1287204
Gravel bikes have drop bars, they're road bikes that can also go off road. Rigid MTBs have flat bars, they're off road bikes that can also decently ride on a road if you mount slicks.
>>
>>1287204
Are you talking about old (80s-90s) rigid mtbs or modern mtbs? Modern mtbs have geometry optimized for mountain biking. You can look at it as a spectrum: Road-Gravel-Cyclocross and hybrid-Cross country (mountain)-trail (mountain)-all mountain/enduro

Old 80s-90s mtbs have geometry more similar to gravel/cyclocross/hybrid/etc. They're usually 26" whereas modern gravel bikes are usually 700c.
>>
>>1287229
modern rigid mtbs don't exist, so he's talking about old ones.
>>
>>1287239
Yes they do
>>
>>1287229
So what you're saying is that what's old is new again? Did disc brakes exist back then?
>>
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Hey /n/, I'm from California and am moving to a place with more rain, so I'm preparing and want some advice. Little to no experience with riding in the rain.
I tried fenders and it doesn't seem like there's enough clearance on my ride. Should I get a different frame or are there some workarounds? I thought about getting smaller wheels for more clearance but I'm not sure if that will work.
I want different pedals as well, I'm not into clipless pedals but I'll consider it if you guys think it's worth it. Thinking maybe a pedal strap is enough for the slipperyness?
Any suggestions for this build? Also looking for general rain advice.
>>
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>>1287229
>Old 80s-90s mtbs have geometry more similar to gravel/cyclocross/hybrid/etc

false
>>
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>>1287268
very cool bike
fucked up handlebar position
it would look good with SKS raceblade LONG boys

https://www.amazon.com/SKS-Raceblade-Long-Bicycle-Fender/dp/B01CTGT5OY

fenders are a hassle to set up but are worth the effort

Personally imho in the rain I would go for fatter tires but that's just me ... if you're cautious it's pretty much NBD

But you will still get went with long raceblades. If you really while to keep the shit off you you need longboards or to add mud flaps to your shit because the front tire will spray shit right on your feet. imho

rain jackets are good move but you will get sweaty inside of them if they are truly water proof because well water can't get out either.

I would seriously mega big time recommend getting cheap pinned flat pedals. $25 will change your life. Shoes will never slip off with them

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07JKSB2ZG/

pedal wise just search "Flat pedal' I personally only have experience with alloy, loose-ball, pinned flat pedals.. never tried the nylon ones. Ive used tons of MKS classic style pedals, non compare to my $15 pinned flats. If they are crunchy out of the box and don't spin just install and ride, they will loosen up
>>
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>>1287280
>it would look good with SKS raceblade LONG boys

looking at these pictures I don't know how much use they will be. Better than nothing, butthe back doesn't connect

I def recommend full fenders by any means necessary. keep roadie the way it is and look for a beater on craigslist to put fenders on imho..
>>
>>1286180
those dudes just ride in fair weather for recreation, probably drive to a bucolic countryside trail with bikes on the roof rack of their Volkswagen Jetta, ride 10 miles away from the parking lot, turn around and ride back to their car.
>>
>>1287280
>>1287281
Thanks for the tips, will definitely pick up some flat pedals. Those fenders I'll think about since anon is right about maybe the brake calipers not getting any protection, but at least the chain is sort of protected. Shame when I bought this I never thought about fender clearance.
>>
>>1287022
eh, I've only bought one schwalbe tire but it went on my rim no problem.
putting a Kenda tire on my friend's rim was by far the most difficult tire I've ever mounted, busted a lever.
(my rims are Araya and his are Bontrager)
>>
>get power meter
>No head unit yet
>Using wahoo fitness on phone
>Attempt 1 minute power record
>Not obvious how to get best 1 minute power from power graph

Do I share into another app? Is there something I'm missing? Do they all charge to do a simple interval power average?
>>
>>1287263
No, but you usually had cantilever brakes which allowed you to clear big tires just the same.
>>
>>1287268
Definitely keep your bike indoors instead of locked outside with a shitty cable. Even better, keep it away from windows that someone walking/driving by can see it to further reduce risk of theft.
>>
>>1287312
Nvm I got it, if you hit the share button it actually just exports to different file formats

My 1 minute is worse than average untrained ;_;

Although I just went all out and faded, should I just pace? I was gone after 20 seconds pretty much, peaked at 1100
>>
>>1287263
>So what you're saying is that what's old is new again?
Not really, but you could draw some similarities between 80s-90s rigid mtbs and modern cyclocross/gravel/hybrid bikes. The geometry is somewhere between road and [modern] mountain.
>>
Are they going to stop making Conti gp4000 ii now that they are making new ones. Will they get any cheaper?
>>
Wanna get some new tyres that have blue sidewalls, want something 25mm and that'll be pretty durable, should I be looking at training tyres?

What do ya'll recommend?
>>
>>1287377
Yes and you'll be able to find them on deep discount for a few months so stock up, I guess. I think that they're vastly overrated but maybe you'll have better luck.
>>1287378
Trainer tires are terrible outside because their hard compound lacks grip. Michelin makes a bunch of tires with blue sidewalls, like the Lithion and Service Course
>>
>>1287169
> Just be sure to get the PT version
I sent the link to just the PT version.

What is an OTS?
>>
>>1287410
Old ten speed
>>
>>1287414
which means any old road bike, usually with steel frame and downtube shifters. They came with up to 14 speeds, but are still "old ten speeds" on /n/.
>>
I want to buy a pannier for commuting and grocery shopping. Currently I use a 25L rucksack for my lunch and clothes and then put a towel on my rack to stop it creasing my clothes.

Do any of you have tips/suggestions on what to buy? I like the simplicity of having one large pannier for everything but feel like it might be worth just having two smaller ones and dealing with that added effort.

I can rent a locker at work and leave towels there but I'm not sure they would really dry out. There isn't much ventilation in the basement.
>>
>>1287401
>I think that they're vastly overrated but maybe you'll have better luck.
elaborate please
>>
>>1287377
I doubt they'll ever be much cheaper. 4000s are no cheaper now, on wiggle, than they were in 2015.
GP 5000 are 1/2 again more expensive, likely worth it, and I think they'll stay that price until 4000s stocks are mostly gone, and then they'll come down to parity.

As soon as 32c GP5000 are in stock, i'm buying some. in 25c, it supposedly has 12-18% less rolling resistance compared to 4000s II, which is significant, and is also supposedly more supple. I seriously doubt continental would re-release this tire without significantly improving it and the idea of 'stocking up' on old tire tech to save a few shekels is absurd. Tires are the one thing most worth paying $$ for.
>>
>>1287456
Not him but: a lot of people make them out to be the absolute standard for road tires, which they are not. Nothing is. In my experience gp4ksiis are good all rounders for a good price, but are absolutely shat on by turbo cottons or corsas in terms of performance. I like them as training tires (not trainER tires) and if they ever get down to $25/tire I am sure I'll pick up more than a few.
>>
>>1287460
They're the best allrounders. No?
No one says they are unequivocally the best in all respects. That's absurd.
>>
>>1287463
They are good at a lot of things, yes. I like them. But I am not autistic enough to claim one tire is the best at anything and want to defend my position on the matter.
>>
>>1287464
So you would agree, that there is at least, not a better all-rounder road tire?
So they are, at least, the equal best?
>I am not autistic enough to [...]
that ship has long sailed friend
>>
>>1287465
Stop being autistic at me and trying to put words in my mouth. They are good tires in my opinion, use them if you like them. Don't use them if you don't like them.
>>
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>>1287466
not being autistic is the true autism
>>
>>1287467
Do you even own gp4ksiis
>>
>>1287468
rode em this afternoon
well, one, i've got a 4 seasons on the back atm
i've been through a fair few sets of them too

Though it does hurt me a little every time to go and ride german autist mainstream tires that aren't cool with no tan sidewalls, or rubber folded 1000 times in nippon, so i do see where you're coming from
>>
>>1287472
pasela pt master race
>>
>>
>>1287472
then why are you seeking validation for those tires? you know what they’re good for, you know where they are lacking.
>>1287474
keep yourself and your commuter tires out of this
>>
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>>1287477
how bout dis
>>
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>>1287477
>why are you having an inane autistic discussion about bicycles
anon where do you think you are lol
>>
>>1287483
I am asking why you are so fervent I’m getting me to say gp4ksiis are the best all round tires. I already use them. I think they are good. Focus your energy on someone who does not like them. I have seen people on this board suggest they’re weak and prone to sidewall blowouts. Assail them with your autism, not me.
>>
>>1287489
You're misattributing me with purpose and intentions
>>
>>1287483
lol thats the women's team that imploded because they all said the coach was a meanie and said they had to stay think and ride a lot.
>>
>>1287503
why do they even let incel misogynists coach womens cycling teams ??
>>
would anyone be interested in using a lightweight web app location tracker? i like strava but feel like building one since I have a few weeks until I start my new job

what features would you want aside from
>location tracking (obvious)
>speed, distance

I thought it might be cool to offer a livestream option during your rides
>>
>>1287521
>installing a location tracker made by the hacker named 4chan

No thanks
>>
>>1287401
>Trainer tires are terrible outside because their hard compound lacks grip.
I thought trainer tyres were more durable and good for all-weather situations and therefore would have more grip?
>>
>>1287547
Trainer tires are made for stationary trainers
>>
>>1287521
I'll make the logo
>>
>>1287548
I dunno if the term is different elsewhere, but training tyres here are for using out on the road, they're to train with without using your good rubber you'd use for racing.

They're heavier and slower of course, but far more durable.
>>
>>1287551
Those are training tires, not trainer tires. This is an English imageboard
>>
>>1287552
>uses "tires"
>thinks he's speaking English
>>
>>1287571
>not calling them caoutchouc circuits like a civilised personne
>>
hollowtech BBs need a special tool for installation?
is that what those notches are for around the circumferences?
is there a hack for getting around buying the proprietary tool?
>>
>>1287576
You need two tools, one for the cap and one for the cup. The Park Tool BBT-9 is both tools built into one.
>>is there a hack for getting around buying the proprietary tool?
Not that I'm aware of.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBO6OwQAwXg
>>
>>1287573
>not calling them round wheelie rubberies like a proper britbong
>>
>>1287601
>>1287576
If you have something like a SM-BBR-60, you'll also need an adapter to use the BBT-9 since the whole outside edge is scaled down. Fortunately, there should be one included with your BB if it needs it, but it's always good to check the box if you're buying in person.
>>
What are the best fenders for mountainbikes?
>>
I have a set of heavy CXP22 wheels that came with my old TCX 1 cylocross bike w/ canti brakes.

I am thinking about upgrading the wheels on it, however, I am not sure what to go with.

Are regular road riding wheels strong enough to handle some light single trail and gravel that a CX/Gravel bike will have to traverse?

Is there a such thing as a wheel just for cx/gravel? Or is that a meme?
>>
>>1287712

Ridinggravel.com have specific reviews for higher end stuff, but I think gravel specific is mostly a marketing tactic for wide road rims living between 700c and full on 29er
If you aren't picky i think your only consideration needs to be inner rim diameter and spoke count... People running cyclocross, touring, and mountain rims out there afaik
>>
>>1287479
>how bout dis
I would rather ride Marathon Plus concrete socks than those supple Rene Herse Wet Paper Bag panaracer skins being pedaled as "authenticity disintegrating LARP for childless 35 year old men with undiagnosed erectile dysfunction because they haven't had sex in five years and are thinking about getting a custom Fitz or an NFE or a coffee crust rawlvand
>>
>>1287712
Either upgrade to tubeless, or upgrade to a dynamo hub, or both.
>>
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>>1287734
>he doesn't like paying $200 for a set of pre-worn paselas that can be punctured by a wet fart
do you even radavist bro
>>
>>1287602
>he doesn't call them byrgnh yffrgryrll prthyffyn like a decent welshman
>>
>>1287552
he originally said training tires, and you read it as trainer tires
>>
How do you guys ship parts from eBay sales? The guys at FedEx and UPS are mean and really don't like shipping stuff :/ it's very uncomfortable
>>
>>1287747
We should have rounded up the fixie hipsters when we had a chance. Now they're infecting everything with their low trail rando bullshit
>>
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Sup /n/ just picked this up. What would you guys change/add to this build? Everything's stock as far as I can tell, barely used. Got 2 bike pumps, 2 helmets and a pretty good headlight and rear light with it too. All for $250, how'd I do?
https://www.evanscycles.com/norco-search-a-claris-2018-adventure-road-bike-EV306604
>>
>>1287783
pretty damn good
why don't you post a larger picture
>>
>>1287783
better pedals, clipless, or some nice pinned flats.
bottle cages
maybe a couple zip ties on that rear derailer cable down the seat stays
remove the plastic dork disc behind the cassette
If it's a commuter, a front and or rear rack

For safety, and looks, i'd get some coloured bartape, anything would look good, pink, yellow, red, green, blue, anything. All black on a low-ish level bike is not a good look imo and it is kinda dangerous too.
>>
>>1287734
you've clearly never touched, let alone ridden those tires if you think its the same as a pasela.
>>
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>>1287789
I'm glad!
>>1287791
Pedals seem like a nice choice for an upgrade, I'm not too picky though. I'll see how these fair in the rain.
Bottle cages definitely.
I dunno about the zip ties, maybe just one it seems kinda pinched if I do that.
Oh yeah totally missed the plastic.
I've got a decent rack I'm going to put on... Definitely a commuter but maybe some offroading occasionally. Gotta look for fenders first!
I've got some bright green handlebar tape I've been wanting to use! The black is a little much.
Thanks for the suggestions, going to do all of that.
>>
>>1287801
no worries
get your wear out of those pedals i guess
when the bearings go rough then think about it

cheap things are bad because they break so why not break them and if they don't break then they're not bad
>>
>>1287631
You'll need to tell us more anon.
>tire size (diameter and width)
>rigid, front suspension, or full suspension

If it's an old rigid mtb you can use regular fenders (Planet Bike makes good stuff). If it's a suspended mountain bike then you'll probably need those gay mud guards.
>>
>>1287571
People from the colonies should never try to lecture people on spelling.
It's "tyre" for everyone but burgers.
You guys might as well cal them "Imperial Rubber Roundlets".
>>
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>>1287809
it's a rigid MTB, 26x2.1 tires and no eyelets on the frame for fenders or racks.
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>>1287861
>no eyelets on the frame for fenders or racks.
Then you'll probably need clip-on fenders. Unfortunately they're gay and don't stay in place as well, but unless you want to get your frame modified/brazed, I'm not aware of any other/better option.
Perhaps another anon can recommend a specific model, otherwise just do a web search for the best clip-on fenders.

Alternatively, you could get some mountain bike style mudguards, the kind you'd typically see on a suspended mountain bike or a fat bike. They won't provide as much protection from mud/water as full coverage clip-on fenders, but they should stay in place better and not constantly come out of place and rub your tires.

This is all assumptions on my part, I've never used anything other than the standard fenders that attach via eyelets.
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>>1287479
I hate this name change so much.
Compass was short, snappy, memorable.
Yes, Mr Hearse is a legend but to most people he's a literally who and they can't pronounce his name anyway (I probably can't either desu). And Jan Heine ain't him!
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>>1287748
umm
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>>1287861
look into sks fenders. they're thin and light, and should be stable when attached to the frame with p-clamps. there are plenty of front racks that attach to your wheel skewer. some rear "bag supporting" racks that will attach with p-clamps.
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>>1287910
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>>1287875
apparently its renNAY AIRS. but yes, the compass name/brand referenced exploration, the outdoors, etc, without being too memey. now the brand is based on a single person that everyone that gives a shit already knows, but is actually obscure af, and doesn't immediately reference the direction/point of the brand. ugh.
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>>1287916
I love Jan's blog but Compass a much better name than Rene and I'm so worried about his brand now that I'm mad at him. Seems like he didn't consult people on this one, or has surrounded himself with Yes men
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I have a bike that was given to me for free. Im completely new to owning a bike and this one has rust on a lot of different parts. Is it worth disassembling and cleaning off tje parts or does it look like I should just buy a new bike?
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>>1287972
that's a very low end bike.
Buy a new chain. A 7 speed KMC chain will cost you $10 and a chain tool will cost you $10. That's all you need to change it.
Or just oil the chain and then ride it
The rust doesn't really matter
You could clean or replace the freewheel if you wanted. The teeth look reasonably good condition.
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>>1287972
Second pic
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>>1287975
Thats what I was thinking, dont want to put time and money into something that ill just replace in the long run with a better bike. Might do the chain eventually while I save up
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>>1287972
>>1287976
That rust in itself isn't much of a problem. You could just lube all the moving parts and see if it rides and shifts OK without much friction. If it runs like ass, next step would be replacing the chain and cassette (both $10 parts), but if the general condition of the bike is shit and you don't want to put money into it, then don't.

Sometimes after you've replaced the chain, it'll slip on the front chainring that then also needs replacing, and that's already a $20 part. Once you've renewed the drivetrain on your shitty bike, you've spent almost as much as a bike in OK condition costs.
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>>1287972
>>1287976
That's not even bad, no need to replace anything. Just oil the chain and ride it. More importantly make sure the brakes and gears work properly. If not, you probably just need to adjust them. There's lots of videos online and it's not that difficult. Throwing money into a bike like this won't be worth it unless they're upgrades you can transfer to a future bike.
>>
I've bought a used steel frame bike from my LBS which was pretty cheap cause the seatpost can't be moved.
Previous owner apparently tried to fit a 27.2mm seatpost into a 27mm seat tube and didn't take no for an answer.
The saddle height fits but I'd still want to get it out. So how do you remove it, when even the mechanics at my LBS failed? I figure I have more options since they couldn't invest more than $20 worth of their time and my time is worthless.

If it matters, the post is alu, the frame is steel. The post doesn't matter, but the frame needs to stay intact, obviously.
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>>1287802
>cheap things are bad because they break so why not break them and if they don't break then they're not bad
wisdom.
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>>1287801
>Pedals seem like a nice choice for an upgrade, I'm not too picky though. I'll see how these fair in the rain.

enjoy slipping off during an out-of-saddle climb and permanently damaging your prostate after it slams into your saddle nose
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>>1288021
Read this page, and don't miss suggestion #15 at the bottom:
>https://www.sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html
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>>1288021
I've never had to do this, but this is what I would do:
>remove the bottom bracket(you do have the tools to do that, right?)
>flip bike upside-down onto the seat and handlebars
>spray penetrating oil (liquid wrench, PB Blaster) down into the seat tube from inside the bottom bracket. douse it good.
>let it sit for, iunno, an hour? overnight?
>remove the saddle
>remove wheels would probably make it easier to work with
>with bike back upside-down, clamp the seat post into a stationary shop vise
>grab the headtube and a seatstay for max leverage and twist against the seatpost back and forth like a madman.
if that don't work, I doubt anything will.
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hi everyo/n/e
I'm upgrading my crank and the best deal for my needs is a Sora hollowtech compact with a hollowtech BB included. I currently have a square taper and have only ever used them.
Ok, so my BB shell is 68mm English thread.
the BB included with this crank is SM-BB4600, Tiagra Hollowtech II.
it is for 68mm English thread.
Cool.
Is this a guaranteed fit or is there the possibility of different circumference BB shells? The Shimano spec pdf doesn't even mention 68mm, and all it says for the cup/bearing things is
>1.37” B.C.x24T English thread
so those numbers reference the thread?
I got my callipers out but neither the diameter or circumference of my inner shell said that.
Please tell me it's all on the same standard so I can pull the trigger on this crankset.
Or call me a faggot or something.
oh yeah bike is '87 miyata 312
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>>1288060
Yes, your English BB shell will fit a BBR60 Hollowtech II bottom bracket. You’ll need a specialty socket to install the two bottom bracket halves and the plastic star nut driver thing to install the NDS crank arm plastic bolt thing.
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>>1288060
short answer, yes, 68mm English is what you want.

Longer answer is that by '87 there were only two road bike BB shell standards: English on pretty nearly everything, and Italian on a small number of high end European road bikes.
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>>1288063
>>1288062
fucking love this board
awesome, thanks!
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>>1288032
or as the Radical kids used to say in the 80s ride it till ya snap it
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>>1287979
do the chain now it's 15 dollars and if it is all stretched out then it will fuck out your back 7 speed freewheel.

I agree with the other anon that the freewheel looks in fine condition just a bit of surface rust.
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>>1284690

Just bought this bike today for my dad, as a present.
Its a Scott Speedster S10 from 2012 with Ultegra 10 speed, Compact gearing. In really good condition, having riden only around 2000km. It rides, brakes and shifts like new!
Got it for 400$ which is a good price around here.

The only thing that needs changing though, is the bartape which is broken. Anyone has a good idea what bartape goes well with this colour scheme? I like the black/white/yellow colour scheme, but it could use a little extra "wow" factor.
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>>1288100
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>>1288100
yellow or white for sure
both very classic bartape colours
If your dads anything like mine though (a pleb), he's not going to like anything other than black.
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>>1288100
Cinelli makes some cool designs they have a black and white zebra stripe inspired by Cipollini. They have a black and white ribbon stripe as well.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004X4P85Q/ref=twister_B07NS51B47?_encoding=UTF8&th=1

they also have special edition ones that have black and white aztec, black and white topo map of SD, black and white logo, black and white icons

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004X4P856/ref=twister_B07NR8TTKV?th=1

You could also get a perf tape that is white with black underneath or black with white underneath.
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>>1288100
fizik tape is good for white because it's easy to clean and I think the yellow is close to your accents
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>>1288100
I'm of the opinion that splashtape is gross.
if you're looking for wow factor then bright yellow it is. there's not some magic color that will go awesome with the bike other than what you already know, and in fact, deviating from blk, wht, or yellow would look bad.
black works but ya it's boring. I usually don't recommend white but with the white saddle it would actually look good. a/n/ons say one of the white fizik tapes cleans really easily.
what would really be wow is if you could get hood covers in yellow or white and then wrap the bars in the other color, IMO.
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When moving to a new derailleur/shifter combo. should you prioritize the shifter quality or derailleur quality?

I had a Shimano top-level rear with good shifters that failed, but I'm swapping them for top-level SRAM shifters with a good derailleur.
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>>1288205
Friction shifters+ altus rear+ cx70 front
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>>1288205
shifter is MUCH more important for shift quality.
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>>1288207
This is correct.
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>>1288100
Go for white tape, it matches the saddle, and if you get fizik microlight tape it's easy to keep clean with a 'magic eraser'. I would not try include any kind of yellow accent unless the accents were very subtle indeed (thinking of something like pic related).

>>1288205
It doesn't really matter - the main difference between group tiers is weight savings. In the past Shimano put fancier hoods on their Dura Ace shifters, and had crappy low-end shifters with ergonomically inferior thumb buttons, and there's still the difference between Ultra/Powershift at different levels of Campy, but shift quality doesn't fundamentally change between group tiers.

For derailers this cannot be overstated: there's essentially no real difference between models in the same family other than that the higher end ones save you a few grams. They work exactly the same.

If I had to pick one to upgrade first, it would be the shifters because they weigh more than derailers, so savings there are more significant.
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>>1288206
this is why rivendell is going out of business.
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>>1288212
>this is why rivendell is going out of business
Because they sell and promote products that last forever, instead of delicate plastic trinkets designed to be replaced at the end of a "product lifecycle"

Yeah sounds about right. Too pure for this sick world
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>>1288263
Nah, Grant is just a godawful businessman. Surly started by doing the same thing as Riv but at a less insane price point, introduced a brand for fancy bullshit after becoming entrenched, and now QBP is a quarter billion dollar company. They also don't reject new tech out of retrogrouchieness.

Grant needs to do what his favorite musician did. Go electric, full on. Piss off the fanbase. Stir shit up. It would be best to do before Surly announces theirs...
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>>1288205
>replacing Shimano with SRAM
Excellent decision.
>prioritize shifter or derailleur
I would prioritize shifters
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>>1284690
Im looking to buy a fixed gear bike but most seem to be cheap fashion accessories. Anyone know which brands generally make the best fixies? Are brands like retrospec or 6ku any good?
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>>1288311
No.

You want a 'chromoly' steel frame & fork. Or, for something a bit lighter and racier, an aluminium frame with a carbon fork. Like an aventon or a fuji track.

Retrospec & 6ku both seem to just offer high-tensile 'hiten' steel (extremely low quality, heavy and dull) and aluminium frames with aluminium forks (low quality, harsh). Or the steel isn't even specified, so I assume it's hiten.

On a bike you have to mash up hills you really want a good frame, and that makes it worthwhile upgrading over time too.

Otherwise yeah, if you're only prepared to spend $300 or less, you're gonna just end up with a cheap fasion accesory, not a good bike. Unless you hunt out a good deal on a high quality old road bike with horizontal dropouts and a fixed gear wheelset and convert it.
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>>1288263
no, because grant is too thick in his head to think a bike can be anything other than some 40 lb overbuilt boat anchor with chainstays that put the rear wheel in the next zip code. please don’t misunderstand that i think he makes bad bikes or that his philosophy of what makes a good bike is somehow wrong, there are infinite ways to make a good bike. that he thinks there’s only one way is why he fails.
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>>1287979
>>1287975
$5.something for a KMC 7 speed at walmart.com with free pickup, Amazon even with prime doesn't let you ship free and counts it as an "add-on item"
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>>1288263
Do you even own a Rivendell? I’ve built one up (one of their Taiwanese outsourcings) and the quality was disappointing for a $1,000 frameset. The driveside rear dropout had so much paint slopped on that I had to take a file to it to get any of the wheels I had laying around at the time to fit. The headbadge was falling off, the FD clamp was situated right between the seat tube’s bottle cage taps, requiring spacers to mount a cage, and there was a large buildup of clearcoat on the bottom of the BB shell. All of that just tells me the QC is piss poor, especially the rear dropout and bottle cage/FD situation. And it wasn’t a problem with using some weird sized 58t chainring, it was a 50t outer ring which caused the interference. Rivendell is highly overrated in my opinion, and Grant’s senile rants don’t help their cause.
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>>1288100
The general rules for modern bikes are
>match saddle and bartape to main logo color
or
>match bartape to saddle
or
>black black black
In that bike's case the >best is white. But white bartape gets fucking filthy much too quickly and he's probably going to switch to a black saddle anyway, so I'd just go with black.
Make sure to check the condition of the cables in the shifters while you're at it. 2000km is right around when the cable starts fraying inside of modern STIs with under-tape cable routing. It's a design flaw that they'll never fix, but in newer generations they've at least made the cable easier to replace.
>>1288205
Depends. For MTB and "gravel" getting a derailer with a low profile and/or clutch can be a good idea, and certain derailers (Zee) are just dogshit.
>>1288396
The MUSA and MIJ stuff is what they built their rep on. I have a Romulus, made by Toyo, and it's extremely well-made, like anything else Toyo makes. Toyo-ojiisan would violently murder anyone who lets a bad frame slip out of his shop. The frames built by Waterford, Nobilette, and Panasonic are also great. But I've never heard of quality problems with their MIT stuff. Did you complain to Grant about it?
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>>1288405
The bike wasn’t for me, I was reluctant to use one of their frames in the first place and after an abysmal delay in shipping and all the bullshit with the frame itself I just wanted to be done with Rivendell forever.
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Stubbed my toe and got a big hematoma, is it safe to still commute on bike before it heals? Hurts less than walking.
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>>1288407
So you handed off a bike with problems to a customer without trying to remediate with the manufacturer? And you're writing off a whole brand based solely on experience with just that one frame?
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>>1288422
sounds like he did exactly that
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>>1288422
>customer
lol no. The excess clearcoat in the dropout was filed down to fit a hub axle and I didn’t hit primer, I used spacers to fit the bottle cage on the seat tube, and I epoxied the headbadge on. The clearcoat on the bottom bracket had no effect on anything but aesthetics. Obviously I kept the guy informed about all of this, and he was okay with my proposed fixes. He likes the bike but I don’t see the point in spending that kind of money on a frame with that poor QC
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>>1288311
If you want cheap shit go aluminum and decently wide tires, don't listen to the "steel is real" plebs.
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>>1288434
Not to make an excuse for Riv (they sell so few frames that they should do 100% QC pn everything that goes out the door because it's not like they have anything else to do besides finally fucking die), but QC problems are a thing for frames at all price points, except for some of the more autistic framebuilders.
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>>1288405
>Toyo-ojiisan would violently murder anyone who lets a bad frame slip out of his shop
Shit.... My BQ is where do you get one today?
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>>1288461
Nevermind I found it and don't like anything
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>>1288461
toyoframe.com or abenova.com and hope you speak nihongo, brochacho

I suspect that they're one of Jitensha Studio's builders, along with Toei. Tho to get a Toei you probably have to go with a full custom for $4K+
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>>1288281
>introduced a brand for fancy bullshit after becoming entrenched,
Salsa? Didn't salsa exist long before surly? Wth you smoking pleb noob? Also surly sells inferior disc brake OS tube crap that doesn't even plane.
Also, Surly ebik? I can only imagine how fat those people will be.
Grant is about riding short distances, slowly, on an attractive velocipede without all the mumbo-jumbo. Stop trying to be a racer, but also definitely don't go electric because that's bad you need to pedal but not too hard or fast because nobody should jog and people should eat bacon

>>1288311
Wabi cycles pays a YouTube to say they are the best but I actually believe him.
However their fat tire model is pretty expensive. Personally I would get a kilo WT or even better, get a surly cross check and make it fixed gear, you can always change it over to geared

>>1288360
There is only one way.. He's right about 99% of everything
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>>1288465
>There is only one way
You are what I refer to as a bicycle bigot.
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>>1288465
All City, ya butt sniffin' dingus.
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>>1288464
>Jitensha Studio's builders, along with Toei. Tho to get a Toei you probably have to go with a full custom for $4K+

I don't speak moon rune. They will service me, in proper English. They will construct the bicycle with MUSA componentry. They will submit to me
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>>1288469
All Shitty? Those are just gimped Surlys with paint schemes designed by a rich 40 year old hipster girl

>>1288466
I am a bicycle fascist. Grant is my Hitler. He is innocent but SOME.. INDUSTRY.. PEOPLE.. want to besmirch his good name. He had given so much to his people!!! He is a good man;!!!
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>>1288474
Jitensha speaks English but good luck with sourcing MUSA components besides, uh, brake calipers, hubs, and headsets.
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>>1288104
>>1288143
>>1288144
>>1288145
>>1288148
>>1288211
>>1288405

Wow. thanks for all the replys guys! really appreciated. Im gonna stick with Black then, but with some nice yellow details. I found this, and it has decent reviews and the yellow is around the same tone, so i might order it.
I will post an updated picture of the Scott once im done servicing it!
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>>1288526
I'm the anon that posted the splash tape and I agree that this is pretty much perfect.
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>>1288526
I'm the anti-splashtape guy but something like that I can get behind.
hope your pop likes it.
>>
Which bike would go faster or be more "efficient"?

A\ an used 1980 vintage steel racing bike, or

B\ a moderately recent city bicycle ("utility bike")


trying to figure out if trying to dig out a cheap vintage bike is really worth it (=not gonna sink money into fixing a relic if the net average velocity gain is like 1,5%).
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>>1288595
Yes
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>>1288595
this question is unanswerable. Just one word of advice : lighter / better tires make much more difference than a newer bike.
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>>1288595
~25% difference if you’re comparing high end road to low end utility. Shrink the gap if you think a shitter road bike is magic. If you want to commute 3 miles at a leisurely pace don’t bother because you’re only saving a few minutes.

High performance bikes are for going long distance or going hard.
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i moved house, now surrounded by trails like this, what is the most suitable style of bike for riding it? not looking for competitive racing or anything, just riding by myself. I know nothing about the styles of mountain bike
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>>1288595
A high quality vintage road bike, in good condition, with modern road tires, and clipless pedals, is only marginally inferior to a modern road bike.

It won't have as wide gearing, it won't brake as well, and you won't be able to shift while sprinting or climbing out of the saddle, because you have to reach down to do it. But aside from that, it's only marginally inferior to a modern road bike. And basically just as fast.

A recent city 'utility bike' is not even in the ballpark.

Ideally look for a 90s road bike, not an 80s one though. 700c wheels not 27"
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>>1288654
You're going to be looking at front suspension only 'hardtails'.
A mountain bike for not-very technical terrain is called an XC (cross country) bike, but only more expensive bikes will start to be called that.
Your main choice is tire size, between 27.5, 27.5+ and 29er
The 29er will roll the fastest and roll over things, but it's the least agile, and if you're on the small size, be a bit out of proportion. 27.5 is kind of conventional. 27.5+ is like halfway to a fat bike, and can be fun, but tires are more expensive, and it won't roll very quickly. Some 27.5+ bikes come with no suspension, because the tires are so fat, and those are cool too.
Just get something cheap I guess though. The things worth paying for are hydraulic brakes, and 1x gearing. Very cheap mtbs will come with a triple crankset in the front, while all better ones will have 1 or rarely 2 chainrings. A triple is kind of annoying and old tech.

If you want to spend less than $500, post your craigslist and height and i'll make some recs, because older bikes are perfect for that kind of riding.

You could also look at a 'gravel bike' or a 'cyclocross bike' or an 'adventure bike', basically a drop bar road bike with wider tires.
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>>1288654
For flat non-technical terrain like that, you have a few options. You can get a regular cross country mountain bike. These come in hardtail (front suspension only) and full suspension versions. You don't need full suspension for that kind of terrain, and it adds extra weight and makes the bike cost more money, but full suspension can be a lot of fun, so it's worth considering. If you do go full suspension, get something with short travel, 120mm or so, or even less. They may be marketed as 'trail bikes', but make sure to go on the low end of travel (trail bikes can have up to 140 or even 150mm travel, which is a bit too much for your uses, you're better off in the 100-120 range).

You could also go with more of a bikepacking type bike, which are similar to cross country bikes, but a bit less playful and more oriented at longer rides on mellow terrain.

Another option which many people overlook but I think is very worth considering is an old 80s or 90s rigid mountain bike. They are often promoted on /n/ as good commuter bikes, which they are, but they're also a lot of fun on mellow dirt trails like what you pictured. They can't handle rough gnarly terrain like a modern mountain bike, but in my opinion they are extremely fun on terrain like what you pictured, and they're also cheap ($100-$300 on craigslist).

Your final option would be a cyclocross bike. Cyclocross bikes are kind of a cross between a road bike and a mountain bike. If you get into mud, sand, rocks, roots, etc they certainly won't be as good as a real mountain bike, but if you want something that does well on pavement as well as really smooth mellow dirt paths like what you pictured, a cyclocross bike is worth considering.
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>>1288654
>>1288676
cont.

It really comes down to preference. If possible, ride some different types of bikes and see what you like best. Some bike shops offer rentals so you can take the bike out to the trails and try it out. Even if they don't normally offer rentals, they may be able to work with you if they know you're interested in buying from them and want to try it out on the terrain you'll actually be using it on (as opposed to a test ride in their parking lo which is common practice at shops).

>>1288595
The old road bike will definitely be faster.

>>1288669
>Ideally look for a 90s road bike, not an 80s one though. 700c wheels not 27"
Nothing wrong with 27". I love my 80s bikes. I have an 80s road bike and an 80s mountain bike (as well as a modern road bike and a modern mountain bike). They're all great.
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>>1288465
>get a surly cross check and make it fixed gear

>make a light svelte minimalist bike and start with expensive overbuilt gaspipe so you have more utility
>>
>>1288654
One last thing: If you go the route of getting an old 80s-90s mountain bike, DO NOT get one with suspension. Suspension from that time period is absolute garbage. If you get a modern mountain bike, suspension is fine (though not necessary for your uses, but still a lot of fun). But if you go 80s-90s, rigid (no suspension) is by far the best.
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>>1288311
Surly lol
or All-City Nature Boy
But really just don't be a faggot and get a geared bike instead. Fixies are for fags
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>>1288526
that's...kinda balleur
>>1288595
>koga miyata gents racer
afaik this was the second-best Koga Miyata at the time, with Shimano 600. Which means that it's a fucking awesome bike that needs some TLC. You'll have to at least replace the tires (depends on your road but this sort of bike shines with 25c veloflex masters or equivalent), brake calipers (if you're going for period correct, superbe pros, but those are expensive, so I'd just replace with good TRP calipers and tell eroica nerds to suck it), bartape, hoods, cables. A wheel upgrade might be nice, too, especially if the hubs are gritty. At that point, whether or not you're fast is entirely up to the engine.
>>1288654
that trail looks ez pz, so I'd do a cx bike, gravel bike, or 90s MTB w/semi-knobbies. same difference for the most part. you won't need any kind of suspension unless that pic is not representative of what's around you.
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>>1288396
>the FD clamp was situated right between the seat tube’s bottle cage taps, requiring spacers to mount a cage
My Gunnar Crosshairs is like that too. It's not a design flaw, it's a feature. It's the most space efficient use of the inner triangle possible and the best for weight distribution. It lets you have a large bottle on the seat tube and as much room as possible above it, for a frame bag or shouldering the bike.

Needing a few washers isn't a problem lol
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>>1288677
>Nothing wrong with 27". I love my 80s bikes.
Sure, but 90s road bikes generally represent better value if you want to go fast and the tire selection matters.

They're both pennies on the dollar.
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>>1288654
>now surrounded by trails like this,
luckyyyyyyyy
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>>1288676
it is anything but flat, that is an uphill going along a path graded into the side of a hill, maybe the perspective is weird
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>>1288749
here is a different angle
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>>1288749
oh ok, that doesn't really change anything though. All mtbs now will have nice low gearing and decent braking and that's still not a technical trail.

that looks like an awesome place to ride btw and your dog is a qt
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>>1288752
ok thanks
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>>1288753
No worries dude. Post some specific options you've got if you want opinions.
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>>1288749
>>1288751
Like other anon said, that doesn't change a whole lot. The last picture you posted looks like the trail is littered with leaves or dead moss or something, in which case I'd probably stay away from cyclocross bikes since they don't have clearance for very wide tires. But all the other advise (cross country mountain bike, 80s-90s rigid mountain bike, etc) is all still equally valid.
The only real difference it will make if it's steep hills is that you'll want a wider gearing range, with nice low gears for climbing. But like other anon said, all new mountain bikes will have gearing that's plenty low. Even an old mountain bike will probably be fine, but worse case scenario is if you get an old mtb and the gearing doesn't give you the range you want, you swap out some parts. Old bikes often have freewheels instead of cassetts which is a bit limiting on what gearing you have available but you can always swap the rear wheel for a new one that accepts a cassette.
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>>1288763
cont.

Regarding my claim in my last post (and other anon's claim who said the same thing) that your trails being steep won't affect your bike choice: There is one but, but this but probably won't apply to your situation. For steep descents, people sometimes prefer longer travel bikes with slacker geometry ("longer travel" means more suspension), such as all-mountain/enduro bikes. These bikes are heaver, and are much more effort on the uphills, but they can be ridden more aggressively on steep and technical descents. It really comes down to preference here if someone wants to prioritize performance on the climbs and flats (in which case they'd go with a cross country or trail bike), or if they want to prioritize performance on the descents (in which case they'd go with an all mountain/enduro bike).
That said, this is more applicable to situations where the terrain is rough, technical, rocky, and where the person wants to ride fast and aggressively on the downhills.
It sounds like that doesn't really apply to your situation, so I don't really even need to incldue this whole last post, but I'm including it for the sake of completeness, just to be clear that sometimes, having steep trails does affect bike choice, even though in your specific situation it probably shouldn't.
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>>1288763
I'd say in his situation, narrowish, steep, probably shared paths, modern hydro disc brakes are probably worth paying the $$ for a new mtb.
Although if he wants to spend a couple hundred only and has a decent used market, yeah, a retro mtb would still be good.
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>>1288764
I think we should all make an effort to try and give less information to /n/ew posters
I'm guilty of this too and it's kind of ridiculous sometimes lol. I'm sure 90% of it just goes in one ear and out the other and makes it more likely theyll miss, ignore, or not understand the actually helpful info/advice.
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>>1288751
>>1288763
To be clear, when I said the dead leaves/moss/etc would make me stray away from a cyclocross bike, that's assuming what I circled in red is the trail. I can't really tell if that's the trail, or if it's beside the trail. Anyway, point is, a cyclocross bike would be alright in the first pic you posted, but in what I circled in red in this pic, I'd rather have wider tires than what you could fit on a cyclocross bike.
What it really comes down to is a cyclocross bike is nice if you want a bike to mostly ride on pavement and gravel, but can handle a bit of mellow dirt trails from time to time. Whereas a mountain bike is preferable if you are going to be mostly riding on dirt.

Then there's the in between, the Salsa Fargo. It's basically a mashup of a cyclocross bike and a mountain bike. Cool bike that's worth looking up.
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>>1288765
I'd be all for an old used bike in his situation, but I'm biased, because I love 80s bikes.
>>1288768
Yeah, you have a point. I try to be clear and say things like "this part probably won't apply to you", hopefully it's not too confusing.
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>>1288769
>Salsa Fargo
yeah and surly makes bikes like that too, and lets just assume anon who is new doesn't want to spend $2000
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>>1288764
ok, i definitely want slower on the downhill, not looking massive adrenaline rushes, just want to be outside and enjoy the scenery/get some exercise.

>>1288673
https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-bicycles/kangaroo-valley-south-coast-nsw/c18560l3004371r50

im 5'8
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>>1288777
https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/shoalhaven-heads/men-s-bicycles/mountain-bike-mongoose-men-s/1210565675

that's the only thing i'd even vaguely recommend, but it's not very good and it's probably not very good condition and it might be too big for you.

If you're looking new, because you're short, don't get a 29er. Buy a 27.5" tyre bike. And don't get a 7 speed bike. They're too cheap and low quality. Pay for atleast an 8 speed bike. 7 speed will often be 21 speed (7x3) and 8 speed will often be 24 speed (8x3). So it's going to cost atleast $500. There will be a lot of options that are more or less the same in that price range.
If you want to spend more than that, as i said, something that comes with hydraulic disc brakes, worth paying for.
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I broke my wrist so I can't ride but I still want to keep my fitness up.

Anyone have experience with those trainers you can get? I'd like to be able to set it up inside in front of the telly.
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>>1288777
Don't get the Mongoose the other guy linked, Mongooses are garbage.

I would suggest posting in >>>/n/bbg for more specific recommendations if you buy used

Anon said that you'd be looking at $500+ for a new bike. That's fairly accurate (at least in the US) for rigid bikes (bikes without suspension), but bikes with suspension are going to cost more.

Tell us your price range as well.

What I would do is post in /bbg/ with a pic of your trail like you showed us, along with your height, price range, and what kind of riding you intend to do (dirt trails, fairly casual, no intense downhills), that's a better thread than /bqg/ to ask in
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>>1288793
No personal experience but look into Zwift if you're planning to do it in front of the TV.
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>>1288797
Oh I don't mean I wanna go all in on an expensive trainer thing and have the bike sim mode or whatever. I just wanna still cycle effectively without risking my wrist, but being able to watch something on the TV while doing it
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>>1288796
you can get a 3x8 hardtail that doesn't have tourney and a freewheel so isn't absolute garbage with a shit suntour fork which isn't abysmally shit and that's your entry level and in straya it's $500

It doesn't matter how shit that mongoose is, it's $80 and there's nothing else on there. If it works it's worth it.
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>>1288796
and that $500 is true in the US as well
https://www.jensonusa.com/Giant-Talon-275-3-Bike-2019

look there's a perfectly adequate hardtail for $500
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>>1288806
I'd be hesitant to get anything with a suspension fork for $500
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>>1288807
why?
It's not gonna be great, but it's not a piece of shit that's just gonna break either.
That giant talon even has hydo brakes. Hell, it's better than -anything- from 20 years ago, for mtbing.

spend less and you get an archaic freewheel, plastic tourney, likely some no-name chinesium fork, and just all round something which is going to break.

But even altus is good. Those cheap suntour forks do work, they just aren't good.
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>>1288805
>you can get a 3x8 hardtail that doesn't have tourney and a freewheel so isn't absolute garbage with a shit suntour fork which isn't abysmally shit and that's your entry level and in straya it's $500
>>1288805

Hey kangaroo anon, if you want to look up a specific bike he's talking about check out the Fuji Nevada that's 3x8.

To check out a drop bike gravel bike like what people are talking about, check out the Fuji Jari.

A front Susp 3x8 mtb is really the only thing you can get new. Any gravel/cx bike is 700+ as it is the new fad.
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>>1288807
>>1288808

Those new generation Suntour spring forks that we all had nightmares about 10-15 years ago are actually good now provided you don't bomb down a mountain and break it.

>>1288808
>plastic tourney

I wouldn't wish a tourney MTB on people buying new since Sora is only a hundred bucks more but I put new tourney shit on a cruiser because I wanted economy, thumbies, and the largest range of gears possible. Works great. Of course she uses maybe 3 or 4 out of the 21 gears but c'est la vie.
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>>1288595
Depends on weight, but keep in mind a utility bike won't be aero
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>>1288808
>That giant talon even has hydo brakes. Hell, it's better than -anything- from 20 years ago, for mtbing.
A rigid 80s mtb is literally better than any mountain bike currently on the market.
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>>1288793
i ride Zwift on winters, and have done for the past 2 seasons. its awesome! but make sure to have some friends to ride with. That makes it even better.



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