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Is it possible for an American to get an EU train driver liscense ?
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>>1284243
Yes, there are train driving schools in Europe, like flight schools or driving schools.

Your main limiting factor is having a visa for permanent residence in whatever EU country.
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Germany basically wants to employ hundreds of 3rd world refugees with no technical knowledge as train drivers because they have big shortage of domestic train drivers.
So yes, it is possible and in some countries you don't really need to have any education. It is enough if you are interested and you get all knowledge you need.

However you will definitely need to know the language, at least on a intermediate level. But I guess you know that, right?
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>>1284243
Btw

>EU train driver license

I just read that part.
Wtf do you mean? Nobody hasa license to drive a train in the whole EU. There are not even such jobs to ride through whole EU. You always stick to 1, maximum 2 countries.
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>>1284322
>Wtf do you mean? Nobody hasa license to drive a train in the whole EU. There are not even such jobs to ride through whole EU.
Not OP, but I have researched this.
Much like EU drivers licences for motor vehices, there are EU train drivers licences. Basically, they work just like the motor vehicle licences, but they have to be respected and recognised in all the EU member states. Unlike EU motor vehicle drivers licences which have recognition in the EEA states and Switzerland, the EEA states and Switzerland can choose not to accept the licences (though this usually results in that EEA state not having its train drivers licences recognised in the EU, which is no big deal for a country like Iceland, which has no trains).

There are categories, like for motor vehicles, which cover both train weight and other bits and pieces. The train drivers licences can also record endorsements, like speeding, breaches of safety protocols, failing alcohol and drugs tests, etc. This means that if you get a train drivers licence in an EU member state, you can legally drive trains in another EU state. The most common category is "Category B", which mostly covers lighter electric locomotives and multiple units.

The result is that if you got your EU train drivers licence in, for example, Ireland, if you went for a train driving job in Sweden, you already are legally allowed to drive trains. You will need the training for the local signalling systems and the trains, but much like a motor vehicle drivers licence, if you got your drivers licence in Spain, you can drive in Finland, even if signs and rules/laws are different.
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>>1284328
You can operate the vehicle yes, but if you want to hit the railroadin a particular country you need to know all the signalling systems and basically everywhere that means also understanding the instructions which you get in a form of paper documents or verbally, that means understanding the language.
That is also the reason why all the train drivers exchange at the border stations
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>>1284345
>You can operate the vehicle yes, but if you want to hit the railroadin a particular country you need to know all the signalling systems and basically everywhere that means also understanding the instructions which you get in a form of paper documents or verbally, that means understanding the language.
This is, for the most part, also changing.

The European Rail Traffic Management System, or ERTMS, is a standardised system for signalling, rules and instructions for all trains and railways in Europe. After a decision made by the European Commission, no European Regional Development money for any railways in the EU will be provided if the upgrade or new railway does not confrom to ERTMS.
Parts of this involve the creation of the European Train Control System, or ETCS. ETCS is already implemented along many rail corridors to different levels, but under ERTMS ETCS, all communication must be carried out in English, and many aspects of telecommunications within the ERTMS framework are basically copying aviation.

While it is very obvious that not knowing the language of where you are going to will make things harder, the switch to English will eliminate certain aspects, while establishing a common technical language with common technical terms. The fact that now DB drivers of ICE trains driving along the new Erfurt-Nuremberg high speed line must know English to handle the English language interfact of ETCS as well as the English language signalling terms for contacting a signalbox. The switch over the German again is when the train leaves the ETCS zone. Over time, as more and more railways switch to ERTMS ETCS, a "railway English" will become necessary just as there is an "aviation English".

By the way, you do realise that Austria and Germany both speak German? Or that France, Belgium and Luxembourg all have French speaking regions, and that Dutch is also spoken in Belgium as is German? Or that Luxembourg also has German speakers?
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>>1284353
Nice encyclopedia knowledge and for the reality.
ETCS is loooong way from being euro-wide implemented. The equipment of both tracks and vehicles is way too expensive.
Plus each nation implements its kinda different standard of ETCS, because every rail operator found out, that the ETCS as such does not really meet the standards they need. E.g. Switzerland has whole network ETCS covered but they have their own ETCS level 1 which means you still have to be Swiss to understand it.
ETCS might work on some tramsborder lines like France-Germany or Czechia-Austria, but that is still just 2 consequent countries, not a whole continent
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>>1284320
Why aren't more people moving to Germany to drive trains if it's so easy?
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>>1284320
What’s the pay like?
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>>1284524
No idea

>>1284507
Apparently there are not hundreds of people willing to leave their countries and families to move to Germany to do some blue-collar job over there.
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>>1284768
*cracks Monster*
Back in my day blue collar work was respectable and people actually aspired to do it. Selfish millennials these days.
* sips *
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>>1286606
>Back in my day blue collar work was respectable and people actually aspired to do it. Selfish millennials these days.
Germany's blue collar work issues are a bit more..... weirder than just people not wanting to work in those fields.

A number of years ago, Germany abolished the Militärpflicht, which was a mandatory military service, but if you were a conscientious objector, you would still have to do mandatory community service or Zivildienst.
Since the German Bundeswehr only allows professional soldiers and the fittest volunteer conscripts in fighting roles, the Bundeswehr would put most of the people in mandatory military service into fields such as field hospitals, maintainance, logistics and so forth. If someone didn't have the qualifications for the position, the Bundeswehr would train and teach people in those fields.

This resulted in the weird situation, where lorry/truck drivers got their drivers licences for large, heavy vehicles in the military, mechanics learned how to fix engines and vehicles in the military, (male) nurses learned how to be nurses in the military, etc. etc.

Now, if you want to be a mechanic, you have to go through several years of school and then do an apprenticeship. If you want to be a lorry/truck driver, you have to pay €10,000 for the driving school to teach you, if you want to be a nurse, you're going to have to go through the grammar school system and then get into college. A lot of other skilled, but "blue collar" professions started dying out in Germany, simply because the people who were teaching German young men to do these jobs was the Bundeswehr.
Now, many of these positions have been filled in by Eastern European migrants, especially from Poland, because the pay in Germany is so much better, and they are filling in a gap in the German labour market.

There are discussions about whether Germany should re-introduce mandatory military service, but the main issue now is whether or not women are included too.



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