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/bqg/ - Bike Questions General

Last thread: >>1273372

Resources:
https://sheldonbrown.com/
https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help

If you want help picking out a bike to purchase, don't post here. Ask in >>>/n/bbg
>>
Imagine using slow two-wheeled death machines to commute. This message brought to you by no rolling resistance gang.
>>
>>1278928
>no rolling resistance
So you walk? Even slower, faggot.
>>
>>1278928
>This message brought to you by no rolling resistance gang.
Not everybody can afford to have only air resistance..
>>
>>1278917
No. E-bikes are officially bicycle, since you don't need license and insurance. And you can ride on bike lanes dabbing on cagers. And on convencional cyclists (actually no, real cyclist can go faster than 25 km/h).
>>
>>1278935
>officially
According to who?
>>1278935
>since you don't need license and insurance
No one gives a fuck what you government says you homosexual statist bootlicking cuntfuck.
>>
So, people always talk about how steel bikes are easy to repair. How hard is it to learn how to weld right, and how hard is it to buy the right metal tubes?
>>
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>>1278988
The jigs are expensive unless you have the autism to construct them yourself. I think the tube sets and lugs are $150 minimum for nothing special
>>
>>1278988
Depends on type of steel.
Some are pain in the ass to weld, so brazing is a good alternative.
>>
>>1279009
It looks like lugged + brazed is the easy way of doing it. But it appears that brazing is less strong than welding.

Why do steel bicycle enthusiasts tout both durability and repairability when they can only do one or the other?
>>
>>1279017
>It looks like lugged + brazed is the easy way of doing it.
Welding is much faster and easier because it doesn't require labor-intensive preparation of rough cast lugs.

>But it appears that brazing is less strong than welding.
If correctly done, the tube will fail before the brazed joint does. However many production bikes have overheated the steel when brazing, weakening that area. Welding doesn't suffer this problem because the steel is hot for a much shorter time.


>Why do steel bicycle enthusiasts tout both durability and repairability when they can only do one or the other?
Both welded and brazed frames can be repaired by a competent frame builder. All you need to do is grind off the welds and install a new tube or other part by your preferred method.
>>
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>>1278988
you can get a tubeset from nova cycles for $100. but you should practice on thin .040 to .060 mild steel tubing because it's cheaper. download the paterek manual for free from his website.
you can notch your tubes with a set of half round files and some tube clamping blocks. make lots of practice welds like in pic related.
if a tig welding setup is too expensive, look into fillet brazing or lugged brazing with oxy/acetylene. a good gas brazing setup will get you pretty far. don't mig weld bicycles, it doesn't work right and it looks like shit.
if you have $3000 to spare, take a frame building class at UBI ashland. it's fucking amazing.
>>
My mountain bike is a 29er XC hardtail, and my rear wheel is busted. It has a severe wobble and the LBS mechanic says the opposite spokes can't be tightened any more. It has a 135 mm QR hub and a 19 mm rim. This is an old bike. I plan to upgrade when I can afford it, but for now I just want to get it trailworthy again as cheaply as possible. I don't have a truing stand or any wheel building experience. I can't seem to find any cheap rear wheels for sale with the same hub type and rim dimensions, which is surprising to me because I think this was a very common wheel style for a number of years. I feel like I'm probably missing something, like maybe I'm supposed to buy a different type of wheel and use a hub adapter of some kind, or something.

What do I do?
>>
>>1279093
The easiest, cheapest option will be to buy a replacement rim of the same model as the original then transplant the old hub and spokes into it: Tape the new and old rims together in parallel then transfer the spokes from one into the other one at a time - this way you keep the lacing pattern intact and don't need to replace or source any spokes. If you're not comfortable attempting the complete wheelbuilding process, you can do the simple gruntwork of moving all the spokes over, then take the wheel to a mechanic with experience for final truing and tensioning.
>>
So, if you aren't a racer, what's the type of bike that's "the one"?
>>
>>1279104
unicycle
>>
>>1279104
90s rigid MTB with marathon SUPREMES
>>
>>1279116
Second
>>
>>1279104
OTS
>>
>>1279104
Well, what you want to do with the bike still matters even if you aren't a "racer".
>>
How do you lads clean your drivelines to get them minty fresh and clean?
Also, what oil do you use to re-lube?
>>
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>replacing cables on old bike
>New style housing end caps don't fit (brake)

Ok to put bare cable housing into cable stop in brake/frame? It's a snug fit anyway.
>>
>>1279144
My technique is this:
brush/wipe obvious gunk off the drivetrain, then remove the chain and drop it in a glass jar full of kerosene, and use a toothbrush dipped in kerosene to loosen crud on the chainrings and cassette so it can be wiped away easily. After letting the chain soak for a few minutes, remove it, wipe dry, allow a few minutes for the solvent of your choice to evaporate, then relube with whatever you like (I use the finish line wet/dry lubes personally, but really there's plenty of options that work fine).

Kerosene is my degreaser of choice because it's highly effective, evaporates quickly and cleanly, doesn't harm anything else on a bike, and is inexpensive - but you should only use it if you're willing to take some basic precautions: wear gloves, don't use it around open flames, and use it in a well-ventilated location so you don't breathe in any fumes.
>>
>>1279165
If you're talking about the cable stop on the frame you can get away without the ferrule in many cases, but at the brake lever there are some old ones where, if you don't have the appropriate reducing ferrule, the brake housing can get pulled into the lever body over time where it gets jammed and adds friction to the cable.
>>
>>1279168
>remove the chain
Wew lad. I hope you know that quick links and chain pins are for single use.
Why kerosene and not diesel? It leaves a bit of residue, but isn't flammable.
>>
>>1279144
Car oil and stolen jet fuel (kerosene) to clean.
>>
>>1279179
Diesel is greasy.
Not him, but I had good luck with white spirit and gasoline (cleaning one).
IPA will work, but shit is expensive.
WD-40 will remove grease, but shit is very expensive.
>>
>>1279179
>for single use
There are quicklinks from SRAM, KMC, and Wippermann (my fav) that can be reused and make it a very simple matter to remove a chain when desired.
>>
Hi guys,

I have an old CX bike that I want to put new bar tape on. I want something reasonably cheap maybe in the 10 to 20$ range. What would you guys suggest?

Thanks!
>>
>>1279188
Lizardskin is generally considered the best but it is more expensive than your price range. If you want something cheaper, they're all pretty much the same, just go to LBS and get whatever one looks good.
>>
>>1279188
Here you go:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dq3z_DybpI
>>
>>1279168
Do not submerge a chain in solvent/kerosene/etc. Doing so will eat away the factory grease that is deeply embedded in the links. Normal lubing of a chain will not penetrate that deeply.
>>1279179
>>1279186
Removing the chain can make it easier to clean the chain and other drivetrain components. Masterlinks should be fine to re-use a few times. Manufacturers will sometimes say not to re-use them, especially with narrower (i.e. 11sp) chains, but it's generally okay to re-use a masterlink 2-5 times. You can buy new masterlinks, but you shouldn't have to remove a chain that many times over the course of its lifespan, since it will only last a few thousand km anyway before needing replacement due to stretch.
Masterlink pliers make removing SRAM and KMC chains very easy.
Shimano chains don't have masterlinks but Shimano is garbage anyway.
>>
>>1279165
Shift housing comes in 4mm and 5mm. Brake housing is 5mm. Shift cables are also smaller than brake cables so the ferrule hole is smaller. You probably just have ferrules for the wrong type of housing (4mm vs 5mm or shift vs brake). You could probably get away without a ferrule if it fits really snugly, but it would be ideal to get the right type of ferrule.
>>
>>1279144
If my chain isn't that dirty, I won't clean it before lubing, I'll just lube and wipe down. Wiping off the lube will take dirt/grime with it, so the lube kind of acts as a cleaner.

If it is pretty dirty, rag with solvent to clean, then lube. I use wet lube. Holds up better than dry lube. People claim it gets the chain dirty but that's just because they don't wipe it down thoroughly enough. After lubing the chain, let it sit 10 minutes to let carrier solvent evaporate, then wipe it down with a clean dry rag very thoroughly (keep wiping it til no more lube is coming off). (you don't need lube on the outside of the chain, just the internals)
Dumonde lube is nice.
>>
>>1279188
I like Fizik superlight classic.
It stands up to a lot of abuse, you can rewrap it, it's easy to clean, it's got a really nice faux-leather feel.

it's just not very padded but I personally like that.
>>
Would a 29er fork fuck up the geometry on a 27.5 frame?

More specific, a 29er Suntour Epixon on a 27.5 specialized pitch expert 2018 frame with 27.5 wheels.
>>
>>1279181
>car oil
Based anon.

>>1279196
>If my chain isn't that dirty, I won't clean it before lubing, I'll just lube and wipe down
The tiny particles of metal inside the workings of the chain are what mixes with oil/wax etc and form a "grinding paste" that wears your chain faster than just about anything.

Clean your entire chain each time you do it anon, just doing the outside isn't enough.

>>1279200
You can make any bar tape softer by wrapping another layer of soft bartape under it first.
Double wrap is pretty comfy, you can have one layer for softness, and nice grippy tape over it for the best of both worlds.
>>
>>1279204
>Clean your entire chain each time you do it anon, just doing the outside isn't enough.
If you mean soak it, no, that will eat away all the factory grease
>>
>>1279211
Your beloved factory grease is full of metal shavings.
>>
>>1279211
Not this anon:
>>1279214
But he's right. The factory oil gets fouled up with road grit, dust, and metal shavings sooner rather than later.
Loosen it with a brush loaded with solvent that'll penetrate enough to soften it, then you can blast it out with a simple garden hose gun.
Replace it with a thick oil that's been thinned with a carrier solvent.
75-90W synthetic gear oil thinned with 2 parts petrol will allow it to get into the bushings just like the factory oil (which is actually a pretty similar oil)
Once the petrol fumes off, you're good to ride again, which doesn't take long especially if you leave the bike in the sun for a bit.

It's super cheap and as effective as any lube I've used, including teflon and hi tech waxes.
>>
>>1279193
>>Shimano chains don't have masterlinks but Shimano is garbage anyway.
they do now
>>
>>1279216
Chains come from the factory with metal shavings already on them, so it’s more than sooner, it’s immediate. When I started stripping them of all factory applied lubricant to wax my chains I was amazed at how many silver flakes would come off of a new chain in mineral spirits.
>>
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hi anons, i'm that BSO dude who posts on PYBT
recently i was commuting back home from work and i hit a crater i forget appeared on the middle of the road (about 20cm deep) and it bent my fork's steerer tube, pinch flated the tube and wheel and also bent the rim a little
i'm worried about the damage the impact might had on the frame, considering that it is unusual for the steerer tube itself to bent this much (after impact the inside bearings were visible from the front and sides.
is it safe to put a new fork (or possibly straigthen the current one) and keep riding like that? or is the frame lost? uni is starting soon and i'm broke so it would be unfortunate to have more stuff to spend money on and also loose my main transportation
>>
>>1279288
Assuming the bearing races are ok and the head tube isn't bent too, you could fit another fork if you can find one.
>>
>>1279288
That is a tragedy.
I am super cautious and got rid of my bike when the fork was bent beyond repair in an accident, but many people do not. I would check every weld and under the tape for hairline cracks... must be clean to really check
>>
I want to get a 10 speed crank for a bike that currently uses an 8 speed cassette, which I plan to upgrade to 10 speed eventually. Do I get a 8 speed chain or a 10 speed chain, and will this cause any issue other then slower shifting?
>>
>>1279368

10 speed chain will work just fine. You probably won't notice a difference
>>
>>1279368
If you put a new chain on an old cassette it'll "stretch" to work with the old cog teeth, then when you put it on a new cassette it'll be too worn and start skipping. Get an 8 speed chain for now (they're dirt cheap anyway) and a 10 speed one for when you get the 10 speed cassette for it.
>>
>>1279368
The levers are indexed for 8 speed mate, so unless you replace the entire groupset, it isn't going to work.
Also, the freehub is 3mm too narrow to fit the 10 speed cassette and you would need new wheels with the appropriate hub just to fit it.

If you want more low gears, get a semi compact chainring set (assuming you have a double ring with 130BCD) or switch the cranks for a full compact chainset.

First port of call, if you're strapped for cash, would be to find some smaller front chainrings, and buy the biggest cassette your rear derailleur can handle (probably a 28t).
>>
>>1279290
where would you even find a replacement fork?
>>
>>1279530
You can find generic forks online, look at a bike parts wholesale online for example.
If you have a bike co op or a local crazy bike guy that hoards and restores bikes, you could find something there too.
>>
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I fell from my bike the other day at a low speed. I managed to brake quickly before a car on my left made a turn without signaling
Anyway, no injuries on me or on my bike, but when I got up the handlebars had a ~40° misallignment in relation to the fork
I put the wheels between my legs, turned the handlebars until it was alligned and procceeded in my commute
Is there any chance the insides of the stem got fucked? Should I check it in a bike shop? I got around a couple of times after that but I'm worried
>pic related for reference
>>
>>1279534
You can loosen the stem with that bolt on the top instead of trying to taco your wheel next time.
>>
>>1279535
what do you mean by taco?
Anyway, I was getting to work, didn't have the tools to loosen it, of course
Just fixed it quickly so I could get there and back home after
But could it have harmed the stem or something?
>>
>>1279534
It just sounds like your stem was loose enough to move during the impact, probably no big deal.
Loosen the stem bolt enough so that you can pull it out and inspect it and the inside of the head tube for damage.

3 things, if you don't already know them:

1. When you put the stem back in, be sure to grease it up good to prevent it seizing and rusting.

2. The stem will have a minimum insert line on it, make sure this is inside the head tube and not sticking out or your stem is dangerously high. 50mm is standard minimum depth for most stems if it doesn't have this marking line.

3.tighten the stem up real good, 20-25nm is fine for the vast majority of stems.
>>
>>1279539
Thanks a lot!
I'll check it as soon as I get home (didn't come to work on my bike today because I was worried I could worsen it if anything had happened)
Do I need to loosen that 32mm ring (or 36, I don't remember correctly) or can I get it done by removing just that hex bolt on top of the stem?
Thanks for the infos
>>
>>1279540
Leave the ring, that's for taking the fork off.
>>
>>1279532
i went to my local bike crazy guy and he had it
thanks anons
>>
>>1279558
Gotta love those mentally askew bike hoarder guys, they have some cool/obscure parts and love talking shop.
Good times.
>>
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I cut my rear brake housing too short. Instead of buying a new one, is it possible/effective to put cable stops in the front/rear cable guides on the top tube? I assume this design of guide isn't meant to be used as one, as there's no lip to actually stop the cable, but can I jam a cable end into it? Will the pressure cause the join to fail?
>>
>>1279203
Okay, so I did a little bit of research and it seems like it would slack the geometry and raise the bottom bracket just like if I were to put a 120mm travel fork, or something along those lines. That would make a little bit better for descending yet worse for climbing, and I do a lot of climbing.

Now I was thinking if actually reducing the travel to 80mm would make the geometry very similar to how it is right now, but I wonder if 80mm of travel it's enough... I am a little on the lightweight side at 130 pounds.
>>
>>1279574
No, the cable stop will eventually go through the guide. Go buy some cable housing and get 10 meters of it right away, you'll always need it
>>
>>1279520
<Also, the freehub is 3mm too narrow to fit the 10 speed cassette and you would need new wheels with the appropriate hub just to fit it.

He said 10 speed not 11, retard.
>>
Not sure if it belongs in this thread but alright
What do you guys recommend for keeping my shoes dry when riding in the rain?
I improvised with plastic bags a couple of times but it obviously sucks
What is a good, light, impermeable option? Something reusable, that doesn't slip on the pedals
I use footstraps, so it would help if it would fit without getting stuck either
Is it worth buying some of those waterproof foot protections? They all look slippery af, and I don't know how well they work if you're not wearing full body protection (would it keep my feet dry if I used it with shorts? Does it grip to my skin in a way that doesn't let water soak from my thighs to my feet?)
Lots of questions, sorry
>>
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Before asking my question know that I know of the option to just buy a new bike.
So I have a total kid's bike. What I mean by total is that I don't think it's a kid's mountain or kid's bmx. It's just a kid's bike.
To get movement on this thing I have to constantly pedal. If I stop it stops. It kills my knees.

What can I do to get it going a long distance after a couple of pedals and just sitting there enjoying the cruise? Or is it just impossible with kid's size wheels?
>>
>>1279598
kys, or walk
>>
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>>1279607
seriously though
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>>1279598
You need one of pic related anon
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>>1279694
thank you. What size? Or where do I go about finding what the right size is for me? also is this all i'd need? the same size wheels will be good with these?
>>
>>1279590
fenders is the first thing, because road spray is a bigger problem than rain
then you can either go waterproof shoes, or covers

Goretex boots/shoes are excellent but the soles are generally too thick for cycling and you probably don't want to wear them casually, although the more expensive leather ones can be quite stylish
It is possible to get casual leather shoes that are somewhat water proof/ resistant too. They're expensive, and won't stay dry for ever in torrential rain like good goretex boots will, but if they're high quality, you treat them, and look after them, they'll keep you somewhat dry.

People use gaiters to stop water running down your socks.

Otherwise, you're gonna be experimenting with waterproof covers. Cycling specific ones will be designed for clipless, so maybe look at other options.
>>
>>1279598
>fixed gear kids bike
hmmm what? really?
maybe it's just a coaster brake that's broken. I've never heard of a literal kids bike that you can't coast on.
>>
>>1279703
Maybe you're still right but in case I worded wrong- I don't dead stop but I slow down significantly and don't go far coasting.
>I've never heard of a literal kids bike that you can't coast on.
Sparks hope because I didn't know this
>>
>>1279711
lots of kids bikes have coaster brakes, so if you backpedal, it brakes. But you should still be able to not pedal and just coast.
Maybe it's that, but it's not working.
It's not a fixed gear, so anon suggesting a freewheel is not going to help you. Although your freewheel might be gunked up/ broken and that's where the resistance is coming from.

It could also be resistance from a rim brake, or your wheel hubs. If you flip the bike upside down, do both the wheels spin freely with no resistance?
>>
>>1279697
Count how many teeth are on the one you have, and go from there.
Go for a couple of teeth more if you want an easier gear, a couple less if you want a harder one.
>>
>>1279720
dude he clearly already has a freewheel
>>
>>1279722
>has a working freewheel
>can't coast
Yeah nah mate, pick one and only one.
>>
>>1279728
I didn't say it was necessarily working. I just said he definitely has one and replacing it isn't necessarily going to fix his problem.

1. Fixed gear kids bikes don't exist
2.
>I don't dead stop but I slow down significantly and don't go far coasting.
>>
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>>1279730

/n/ I need you help.

Can you identify the model, maybe even year?
>>
Wouldn't it be a better idea to lube the chain when it's extended over a level surface? Then the oil has more time to penetrate down the thing. And when it's on a drivetrain, some of it will get on sprockets or end up underneath the chain.
>>
>>1279749
who cares? I don't care, it's going to get dirty anyway, I just oil it without cleaning and add more oil whenever it looks/feels dirty/grimy/gritty/dry
>>
>>1279749
Capillary action can pull a thin enough lubricant into the bushing/roller interface m8, does not matter if the chain is on the bike or not.

Taking the chain off to clean and relube is nothing short of autistic.
>>
>>1279742
Looks like some supermarket POS someone slapped a Specialized sticker on
>>
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>>1279742

2009 Specialized P1 All Mountain
>>
>>1279702
>>fenders is the first thing, because road spray is a bigger problem than rain

don't forget a mudflap of some construction that goes down close to the ground
>>
>>1279712
The front wheel seems fine but the back wheel gives me the vibe like there is some resistance. Sorry I have to say vibe because I'm not sure what it's supposed to look like so I don't know if it was resistance or it's supposed to go slower than the front wheel which has no connections to the pedals.
And doesn't fixed gear mean only having one chain? Because that's my bike. I only have one chain

>>1279720
I had too many teeth to count so I didn't. Sorry anon my bike is in a cold location. But maybe it's between 20-30+
>>
>>1279756

Exactly why I was trying to find a name model.

>>1279758

Good find, thank you.
Is it a good deal for $300 USD?
>>
>>1279794
All bicycles have one chain bru
>>
>>1279826
Where are you from?

Its an old bike, very similar to the hardrock.
You can do better than that.
>>
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What causes a chain to snap like this, it happened while I was changing gears
>>
>>1279837

Mexico

Also one of my friends told me exactly the same.

Thanks.
>>
>>1279842
I am from Mexico too.

If you search hard enough, you can get a Giant Talon 3 for around the same or a little bit more.
>>
>>1279841
Mad watts bro.

It's probably faulty or poorly seated link pin from a chain that's been taken off and put back on.
>>
Realistically, i'm not going to spend a lot of my commute riding 50kph. No matter how much i ride. Maybe 40 on a good stretch.
How much trouble would i need to go through to Frankenstein my roadie 12-32T x 34-50T group into something like 12-50T x 40T?
>>
>>1279829
said it wrong then. I thought fixed gear meant it only had one gear
>>
>>1279854
New narrow-wide chainring, new big cassette, new long cage derailleur. Not sure why you'd want to do that though.
>>
>>1279871
Do different derailleurs all work properly with the same shifters or are there difference in how much the cables need to be moved per gear?
>>
>>1279829
>t. forever alone virgin solobiker
>>
>>1279168
what do you do with the dirty kerosene?
>>
>>1279886
put it out in the driveway in a metal tin and set it on fire
as long as it is kerosene and not gas, it will safely burn off
>>
>>1279873
If they are the same speed (designed for the same number of cassette cogs), the same brand, and both road or both mountain, then they will have the same shift ratio.
If you change any of those variables, they may or may not have the same shift ratio.
Refer to this article if you want more in-depth information: https://www.artscyclery.com/science-behind-the-magic/science-behind-the-magic-drivetrain-compatibility/
>>
>>1279888
good lad.
as long as you're not pouring it down the gutter or into the ground, we're good.
>>
>>1279873
>>1279912
To be clear, this reply is specifically regarding rear derailleurs.

With front derailleurs, it's generally best to keep 2x derailleurs for 2x cranksets and 3x derailleurs for 3x cranksets, but other than that, you can get often get away with using the wrong front derailleur. Front derailleurs do have several different mount interfaces though.
>>
>winter
>residential streets & backroads clean up after 1-2 days without snow
>only sane way of bike transport without playing chicken with the 4-lane highway is a gravel nature trail (& T-intersection backroad spaghetti)
>no studded tires
How fucked would I be if I just brought muh 700c road bike with slicks onto the trail? I'm not riding a goddamn highway when I'm still an evergreen cyclist & only have a learner's permit.
>>
Whats the most cost effective way to track your ride. I dont need turn by turn navigation or speed/cadence in real time. I just want to track my ride. Also would need it to last 10+ hours, ideally 24 hours.
>>
>>1279918
If your phone can last 10 hours, just use strata or a related bike app.
GPS uses more power, so you might need a powerbank to keep it going.
A single 18650 power bank should do the trick, assuming your phone is on full charge to start with.
>>
>>1279926
Yeah Thats what I think I'll end up doing. Im aiming for a 24 hour, so ill just have to keep a power bank or two with me. Are their any computers that last 24 hours?
>>
>>1279861
no
>>
>>1279928
I think they may have fixed this issue, but some of the garmin computers would reset and kill your data when a battery bank was plugged in and a simple "dummy cable" fixed the issue.

24 hours of GPS time might be a bit to ask of most computers, so the most trouble free way would be phone and battery bank for now I'd say.

You can run a computer and a bank, but you'll need a stem bag to carry the bank in so it's safe while recharging.

If you can find a computer with 24 hours of battery life, then get one. Bryton would be a good bang for buck option to start looking at.
>>
>>1279928
Seems like you need it now but there are cheap Dyno options... Like $150 for sanyo hub rim brake front wheel.. gonna slow you down like 3% but can easily keep the phone charged
>>
>>1279935
It's really bad for phone batteries though. Much better to charge a powerbank and charge your phone off that and then he's back in the same situation. Also you can't charge and run your lights at the same time and if you're prepared to deal with dynamo drag then the lights should get priority, even in the daytime they're useful. I have a sinewave charger for my son hub and i very rarely use it.
>>
>>1279928
Are you actually going to be riding for 24h nonstop? I think your phone would be the best bet. Or, even better, get a cheapo android with a big battery, turn on airplane mode, then switch GPS back on. There's some phones with like 6000mAh batteries and a pretty underpowered processor so they last forever.
>>
>>1279945
Yeah, ittl be nonstop. Thats actually not a bad idea with the cheap android, I may go that route.
>>
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I'm I crazy for wanting a shaft drive bike with an internal gear hub?
>>
>>1279993
not crazy enough, I want the same but carbon shaft and delrin gears for igh
>>
>>1279993
>shaft
yeah
>igh
nah

what's wrong with a belt?
>>
>>1279918
>Whats the most cost effective way to track your ride. I dont need turn by turn navigation or speed/cadence in real time. I just want to track my ride. Also would need it to last 10+ hours, ideally 24 hours.

Net 10 prepaid 4glte phone (59.00). buy prepaid card. install strava. buy a couple cheap powerbanks.
>>
>>1280062
There's no need for data if you use MapMyRide or openstreetmap. You can then export the ride data to strava if you really want.
>>
>>1280195
Strava works without a data plan, you don't get map view though
>>
>>1280195
>>1280232

Even my taters quality smartphone cam takes pictures well enough to post up. It's nice not having an 800 dollar phone on the ride. I've dropped this beater multiple times and it's still ticking fine.
>>
So i have this 26 hardtail mtb in my garage that i haven't used in quite a while, it's a 3x8 and has a suspension fork and disc brakes. I also have a 700c wheelset that i planned to use for a bike project, that won't see the light of day.

I'm thinking about using the mtb's hubs with disc brakes and put them together with the 700c rims, and install them on the hardtail. There is enough clearance on the back, but i'm not so sure on the front, also the fork is a bit worn so i'll probably replace it in the future, My question is, can i install a 29r suspension fork on 26" frame? I want to use this project as a Touring/MTB/XC bike?
>>
>>1280347
Hell no to all of that. You will fuck up the handling beyond redemption in most cases, or at least the bottom bracket height. The fact that you're asking this is proof you aren't ready to perform even if it wasn't a terrible idea
>>
>>1280347
don't do that. if it works, grease it up and ride it. if you don't want it then just sell it and buy a new hardtail 29er. You can get one for less than a grand now.

I'd keep the bike
>>
>>1279104
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRhV054fzSk
>>
>>1279873
Shimano is 2x cable pull imo
>>
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>>1279749
I put lube on my fingers and then run the chain thru them
I will clean the chain with a rag and water first
degreaser if it's really messed up due to a previous owner neglecting it

big peppers are hotspots I like to hit because the chain is deflected and u can make the lubes while it is in flexion welly.
>>
after a chain is completely degreased I apply White Lightning grease as a base layer then progress to lighter lubricants as appropriate
heavier grease in excess will be a magnet for grime.
>>
>>1279749
That would be ideal yes, but re-using a masterlink multiple times can be bad. If you just re-use it a few times that's fine.
You could also just lube part of the chain (with the chain on the bike, just lubing the part that's sitting straight on bottom, not rotating the cranks), let it dry, wipe it down, rotate the cranks a bit, lube the next stretch, etc, repeat 3-4 times til you've done the whole chain.
>>
>>1279749
I use engine oil and brush to oil the chain and shit.
Never had problems, besides it leaving oil spots in train
>>
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>>1278915
I bought a new tyre. Fitted it on, inflated to ~100psi (25mm) and put it on the bike. Fast-forward a few minutes, and...
TSSSS- B A N G

After my ears stopped ringing and my head stopped feeling light, I checked and saw part of the tyre was now unmounted and there was a massive rip in the tube. Thing got BTFO. So I put another tube on and (with earplugs) inflated to 100 and stuck it in another room. So far, no blow out. Was I just unlucky with where I put the tyre bead? I always inflate to 30 or 40 and then give the wheel a spin to make sure nothing is too uneven and it looked okay. Can a defective tyre make blowouts more likely? It looked fine to me but don't want this to happen when I'm on the bike.
>>
>>1280765
my suspicion is that the tube got stuck under the bead or something like that

just a simple mounting mistake, shouldn't indicate anything wrong with the tyre
>>
>>1280765
Tube got stuck under the bead. When you mount the tire, put the wheel on the bike while it's on a stand or whatever, put a little bit of air in, then spin the wheel and check both sides for a bulge or any irregularity. This is a good video on it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCEjqI96meU

Where it gets kinda hard is with latex tubes, because they're so fucking thin that you might miss the signs.
>>
>>1280765

It's usually a good idea to inflate the tire a little bit, then let out all the air, un-seat the bead and check on both sides of the tire that the tube actually sits inside the outer tire and won't be pinched between the tire bead and rim when you inflate it properly.

But yeah, that does happen occasionally even if you're very careful, but it will usually blow out very soon if not during initial inflation so if it's fine for a few minutes then it will hold up just fine.
>>
>>1280765
You probably got the tube stuck under the bead, but you could also have twisted the tube.
Inflate the tire a very little bit, like 10psi, then go all the way around. Don't just look to check for tube that is visible sticking out, but also push inward on the sidewalls of the tire all the way around on both sides to make sure the tube isn't stuck under the bead at any point. It is especially likely to get stuck by the valve stem, so push up on the valve stem to make sure the tube is all the way up in the tire and not stuck under the bead.
>>
>>1280765
It's rider's first blowout. Adorable like hearing people tell stories about how they awkwardly lost their virginity.

My favorite part is how he goes into multiple sentence detail about how he was harmed by the bang noise.
>>
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>>1280767
>>1280772
>>1280781
>>1280785
Okay, I'll deflate most of the way and feel around for a trapped tube. It's been fine overnight but better safe than sorry.

If it blows when I'm out riding and I become an potato, you'll be hearing from my lawyer.
>>
>>1280799
Losing your hearing is no laughing matter my melanin brethren
>>
Good recommendation for a front light? I moved to an area without much street light and need a front light good enough to help me see.

No real budget but I have seen some almost exorbitant prices for high end lights.
>>
>>1280835
Busch & Muller
their optics are amazing
>>
if a have a 29 inch wheel bike with 33T front 15T rear sprocket,
what would the equivalent be on a bike with 26 inch wheels?
>>
>>1280854
http://www.bikecalc.com/gear_inches
>>
So with cars, you have car insurance. So what the hell happens if you hit someone or someone hits you while on a bike?
>>
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>>1281046
I got $1000 from the guys insurance last time for bending this frame which was generous resale value, pre-crash, quoted from a shop. I got to keep it too. They quoted repair value for a new ritchey logic frameset which was even higher. If you're lucky, it might be replacement value which is a new bike. I'd still rather not have been hit though, because it fucking sucks. The guy straight away called his insurance and admitted fault which made it easy.

First time, bent fork, i just let the woman drive off because you don't think straight after a crash and i thought it was ok. I learnt my lesson that time. Be calm. Tell them you don't know if it's damaged, and you'll have to get a shop to assess it. Get their number, all their details, and tell them you'll call them tomorrow. Ask them to call their insurance company and admit fault. Then deal with the insurance company. Take it to a bike shop, one that sells used bikes if you need a resale value quote, and then the bike shop and the insurance can deal with each other. Get the shop some beers.
>>
Why the fuck are powermeters so expensive?
>>
>>1281046
You collect your settlement check
>>
>>1281075
developing them requires lots of R&D and they sell in low numbers to a small market that can't be grown by reducing entry costs
>>
>>1281046
you can get bike insurance too which does cover third party damage and such
>>
>>1281075
>Get powertap c1 for $350 direct on their website
>Most places still list them 600-700
>Fits basic 110bcd 5 bolt cranks

>Mine is sitting in a closet unused since my 110bcd 5 bolt is just barely incompatible (clearance issue with the spider arms)
Looks like old generation Shimano and some FSA/srams fit, they have a compatibility chart. My cranks are chinktech "prowheel" so not listed anywhere really. I bet a lot of older 110bcd square taper cranks fit too, I had one but the cheap POS was basically an undrilled/tapped triple. Actually I have another but it's a hidden bolt design, which is also incompatible.

The watteam powerbeat is too sketchy imo lots of misgluing reported, also says it's only compatible with hollow crankarms

I guess you could wait for the iq2

Both seem much more of a gamble than the c1, and c1 is already dual sided.
>>
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Can someone help me identify the model of this bike
>>
I ride a bicycle daily in Finland and today the cable for the rear derailleur just snapped.
I've never replaced one and I pretty much have to have this bike running tomorrow, it's how I get around.
Any help?
I can't even get the bit out of the shifter. It's a Shimano Acera 9 speed shifter. I took out the plastic plug and I can see the tip of the cable but I can't poke it out.

>if you ride a bike 365 days a year to survive you should learn to fix them
I know bro.
>>
>>1281241

You can set the derailleur to a specific gear by adjusting the high/low limit screws so you'll be able to ride single-speed before you get the cable replaced.

Click the shifter to the highest gear (smallest sprocket/least tension) and you should be able to get the cable out of the shifter. If you unbolt the shifter from the handlebar you should be able to get some slack also on the outer cable which should make it easier for you to get the cable out. Of course you'll need to re-set the tension when you install the new cable.
>>
>>1281241
Pull the housing away from the shifter and you should be able to push the cable from the other end. It probably won't come out, but it will make it easier to pick out with a needle or tweezers or something.
>>
>>1281243
>>1281244

Thanks guys. I got the broken off bit out of the shifter.
I still got no idea how the cable could snap like this, it was barely 3 years old. It has clearly been grinding against something inside the shifter.
>>
Why would anyone ever ride a single speed roadbike? I can't think of anything to put in the "pro" category (except maybe that no-one will steal your ratchet ass dike)
>>
>>1281252
>shitposting this badly
>>
>>1281245
I replace all my cables annually to avoid situations like this. They're cheap.
>>
>>1281252

Wanting to be different, that’s pretty much all there is to it. Well maybe price too, you can get a great single-speed for much cheaper since you don’t need to put expensive shifty bits on it and the rear hub is more simple too.
>>
>it's cold
>i crashed and fell because of ice
>friends offer to give me a ride or teach me how to drive
>suffer for months in the cold
How do I not give in and be a traitor and become a fucking cager? I'm sick of having to deal with riding in the winter.
>>
>>1281269

I ride daily even when it's -25 celsius or they haven't plowed the roads and there's 10 inches of snow.
Get spiked tires and don't give up. I haven't fallen after getting good winter tires.
But I must admit I'm an insufferable elitist, I spend most of my time boasting to my driver friends how I'm tougher than them.
>>
>>1281124
I'm going to grind my $30 Chinese cranks to accommodate the c1 wish me luck /n/

Of course I'll relegate this crankset only to the trainer now and get a better one for the road in a month or two

Just grinding the webbing in between the leading spider arm and the second, Sheldon says it's the gap between the crankarm and the leading spider arm that usually goes first, with a hairline crack and not usually catastrophic anyway so I'm not too worried

4chan is not letting me upload pics
>>
Are there any decent 700c x 20 c or 700x23c skinwall clincher tires that aren't terribly expensive. I'm building up a classic road bike and I want skinwalls to complete the look.
>>
>>1281441
Veloflex Master
Vittoria Corsa G+

try get a good deal, it's the one thing most worth paying for. Corsas are better but Veloflex is cheaper and looks more classic
>>
What SPD pedals should I get? Is it worth paying for XT or XTR?
The bearings in my Ritchey ones are fucked.
>>
>>1281441
Pasela PTs are still available in 23 if you look really hard but I would go with Veloflex Masters or Vittoria Corsas because they will take a grand ol' poo on the Paselas with respect to look and performance.
>>
>>1281441
gravelking 23s also exist and they look pretty cool
>>
>>1281447
the main advantage to the higher end pedals is weight savings, so if you're not counting grams just go for M520's - they work great, aren't exactly heavy, and all the Shimano pedals have great bearings.
>>
>>1281457
thanks lad
>>
>>1278915
I just moved to Korea and am kind of broke, so am looking at buying a cheap bike to get around easier.

should i buy a 20" folding bike for inter-modal transit? should i buy a road bike to train for the cross korea rides? get some kind of hybrid?

what should i look for in a commuter bike?
>>
>>1281512
Are you in seoul? fenders and a ventilation mask maybe
>>
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>>1281441
think about these conti's. they only come in 25c tho
>>
>>1281515
they're basically midrange contis with a different skin
nice for aesthetics sure but I don't see why you'd get them over the gp4/5k
>>
>>1281514
im 40 minutes away by bullet train
>>
>>1281516
bc anon is building a vintage roadie that they'll barely ride.
>>
>want a cheap bike for commuting
>guy offers to help me
>shows me new bikes starting at $1000
i could literally buy a motorbike for less than that
>>
>>1281521
And I assume this "guy" is a bike shop salesman?
>>
>>1281521
you'd be getting a good bike though
and a shitty motorbike
probably needs a lot of work

people always say this
"oh your bike cost so much you could get a car for that"
bitch that car sucks
>>
>fixies
literally why?
>>
so what's better for a bike for cities, a road bike or a folding bike?
>>
>>1281543
It depends
>>
>>1281521
Find proper frame size for you then buy off craigslist
Even performance bike has stuff for $700, you nearly got jewed hard
>>
>>1281546
Performance Bike is literally going out of business, Einstein. Quit pulling shit from your ass
>>
>>1281557
The point is that even entry level new bikes aren't $1000, substitute for whatever new bike shop that doesn't trigger you.
>>
>>1281525
>>fixies
>literally why?

They're more fun and better exercise. Turn boring rides into real workouts that are mentally stimulating
>>
>>1281574
You need faster friends
>>
>>1281252
I feel better on single speeds and also prefer to master a specific ratio on any terrain or condition
Also i dont feel like learning how to do maintenance on gears and every shop around here charges triple digits for a basic check
>>
>>1281596
>i dont feel like learning how to do maintenance on gears
do you skip wiping your ass because that seems like a lot of work too?
>>
So im getting some weird 'stick' in my rear disc brake. Normally it works fine, like when i move it by hand, the calipers work smooth, no grinding. The lever is fine and snappy too, but under load (like when im riding and hit the brake) it has a tendency to lock up and nothing seems to make it come unstuck except forcing the calipers back. but then when im not out riding and try to replicate it at home, it never happens

my front brake doesnt do this, what could it be? I've done bike mechanic work for about 5 years now but this is puzzling me
>>
Can you use shimano road front (front derailleur, crankset) with an mtb rear (rear derailleur, cassette that is larger than what is supported than if it were a shimano road rear derailleur)?
>>
>>1281914
Yes, as long as your rear derailer has a cage long enough to wrap the increased amount of chain needed for the larger chainrings you can run whatever you like up front.
>>
Is the seatpost gradually sinking over a year a thing? I don't feel my legs extending as much. Almost a inch less than expected. Or is it my imagination, or did I get more flexible?
>>
>>1281990
your seatpost is slipping.
>>
>>1281599
no
i just dont care about gears and dont feel like im missing them
my ass is clean anon
>>
>>1282061
>he doesn't care about gears
>>
>>1281739
Sounds like the piston is getting stuck. Have you tried bleeding the line and making sure that the pistons are clean?
>>
>>1281914
If it's a road bike that you're converting to wider gearing in the back, there are some possible issues.
9 speed and earlier is all fine
10 speed road and mtb don't have the same pull ratio. Supposedly you can still use a 9 spd mtb derailer with 10 spd road shifters but i've ran into problems doing that recently.
also some newer higher end mtb derailers won't have barrell adjusters, so if you don't have one on a cablestop, that's an issue.
>>
>>1282104
mechanical disc, my bad i should have mentioned that

ill take a look at the piston but it's just weird that it happens so infrequently
>>
Shifter cable guy here again.

So I managed to replace the cable for the rear derailleur, but I can't fine tune it.
The range of motion is always too small, and when I tighten or loosen the wire I either get to the small gears or the big ones, never both. Shifting also feels sticky like there's resistance.
I played around with the two screws that apparently do nothing, and one single screw that moves the derailleur up and down.
>>
>>1282320
Make sure your limit screws aren't too tight, make sure your derailleur hanger isn't bent, make sure your derailleur isn't bent, make sure your derailleur is compatible with your other components (meaning the same brand as your shifter, designed for the proper number of cassette cogs, and the same type [road/mountain] as your shifter).
https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/rear-derailleur-adjustment
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkZxPIZ1ngY
>>
>>1281739
Could be that the piston is old/worn/dirty.

Less likely possibility, could be that the housing is coming out of a housing stop when you apply the brake. I've seen that happen before and it could have that effect. But given that you have to force the calliper apart, it's unlikely.

>>1281914
If you have a road front shifter and mtb rear shifter, yes. A stock chain may be too short so you may need to buy a second chain and add a few links (or use a too-short chain and just be careful to avoid the big-big combinations and risk locking up your drivetrain and breaking stuff and crashing if you accidentally shift into big-big).
>>
does biking cause prostate cancer?
>>
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>>1282320
The two screws are your limit screws that set the maximum range of motion of the derailleur. H limit determines how far outward, L inward. The other screw is your B-tension, which affects how close your upper pulley wheel gets to your cassette gears.
Did your housing seem grody at all? Might be good to replace it. Also maybe get some spray lube inside the shifter itself. Sometimes they have open spaces where you can get one of those straws in to really flush it out. Since you said you had a little plastic screw thing to get the cable out, you probably have one with two little screws holding the top cover on. Take that off then lube the internals.
>>
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is a higer number harder or easier to peddel?
>>
>>1282696
harder
>>
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>>1282697
i want to get the same gearing as my friends 29er, on my 26 inch, which one would be better?
i have a 38 front sprocket and just thinking bout changing the rear cog

29 inch top
26 bottom
>>
>>1282368

living causes prostate cancer.
>>
can i turn a mtb with freewheel into a single speed?
i wont be able to space the rear cog out to make the chain run stright with the front sprocket
>>
>>1282735
that shit wont even come off the wheel, i tried a impact gun on it...
im about to go steal a bike just to get a cassette wheel
>>
>>1279093
if you have rim brakes. get this https://www.thebikesmiths.com/products/72774657025
if you have disc brakes get this
https://www.ebay.com/p/Wheel-Master-Wheel-Rear-700-Wei-Zac19-SL-36-Alloy-8s-Cassette-6/1303893244
>>
>>1282744
the ebay disc wheel is a better all around choice and will last longer than the cheap one. it's also rim brake compatible.
>>
>>1279102
this is fucking retarded advice.
first, the spokes are fatigued and should not be reused.
second, tensioning the wheel properly requires special technique and measurement with tensiometer otherwise it will not be true or have even tension.
>>
>>1279116
third. this is my commuter, touring rig, club/event rider, and gravel bike. it's absolutely The One.
>>
>>1279223
and 75% of the time the shitmano masterlinks are defective garbage out of the box, and I have to use a stupid pin anyway.
I don't know why the entire world hasn't just switched to kmc chains already.
>>
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>>1279532
>local crazy bike guy that hoards and restores bikes
>>
>>1279728
>>1279694
absolute shit advice, DO NOT buy a freewheel, it will not even fit on your bike.
you need your coaster brake hub adjusted or even overhauled. it is adjusted too tight and it is dragging.
>>
if they're 23-25c tires don't do it. you will fuck up your rims. if you have 32-40c tires, lower the pressure a bit (to 50-70 or so) and have fun.
>>
>>1279917
>>1282758
this post is in reply to that post
>>
>>1280835
cygolite has god tier customer service. even their lowest tier expilion is bright enough for night time mtb riding
>>
>>1281925
>>1282111
>>1282337
Interesting. I'm wondering what people will end up doing in the future when road triples vanish from eBay.
>>
Anyone know anything about bamboo bikes? Should I build one instead of buying a cheap chinesium carbon or alu frame? Intended use is gravel and touring, lightweight is very important for my autism
>>
>>1282858
build a steel bike tard
>>
>>1282858
Making bamboo bikes was a fad 10 years ago that died because there's no real advantage to bamboo other than that it looks cool.

>>1282830
Triples aren't likely to go away any time soon, there's a health supply of used ones and there will always be a small market for people who want them for loaded touring and aging roadies who need them.

>>1279532
>local crazy bike guy that hoards and restores
You got me

>>1282747
>spoke fatigue
Explain how exactly you think this works, please, do the spokes just get tired or something? Have you ever seen an old wheel that was kept true spontaneously fail because the spokes somehow "wore out"? Also note that I did indeed mention that anon should take the wheel in for final truing and tensioning...
>>
>>1282903
>Explain how exactly you think this works, please, do the spokes just get tired or something? Have you ever seen an old wheel that was kept true spontaneously fail because the spokes somehow "wore out"? Also note that I did indeed mention that anon should take the wheel in for final truing and tensioning...
Because spokes tension, then detension as the wheel rolls.

Yes, it's called a broken spoke.
>>
>>1282906
Yes, they do, but unless subjected to excessive force a spoke will tolerate a practically infinite number of tension cycles with normal loads without breaking or permanently bending out of shape. Spoke breakage is not a result of old "worn out" spokes, it happens when an out-of-true wheel suffers an impact and one single spoke takes an excessive amount of load because the wheel as a whole wasn't properly tensioned.

When you replace spokes on a rim that has sustained damaged then yes, you'll be more likely to suffer future spoke breakages, but that's because the imperfections in the rim make it difficult or impossible to achieve equal tension across the rim, not because there's anything wrong with the remaining spokes themselves.
>>
>>1282912
>Yes, they do, but unless subjected to excessive force a spoke will tolerate a practically infinite number of tension cycles with normal loads without breaking or permanently bending out of shape.
No they don't take infinite numbers of normal loads. In fact, it's going between no tension and some tension that generates the worst fatigue, not high tension and normal tension. Stop making shit up out of your ass. Spoke breakage isn't a result of excessive load, spoke pullthrough is. An unfatigued spoke will pull a nipple through a rim or break a hub flange before breaking.

You are so incredibly full of bullshit.
>>
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>>1282830
>Interesting. I'm wondering what people will end up doing in the future when road triples vanish from eBay.
Ultegra rds now do 11-34t cassettes, stock
that's pretty great
46/30t rings are becoming common. You can just put those chainrings on a stock ultegra compact crank
it's not quite low enough to be perfect for touring, but it's good enough, certainly good enough for your aging roadie or anyone who just likes comfy climbing

People want STI shifting, so that means triples are out.
>>
>>1282920
>46/30t rings are becoming common. You can just put those chainrings on a stock ultegra compact crank
No you can't.
>>
>>1282929
https://absoluteblack.cc/oval-road-chainrings-30-46-and-32-48-for-110-4bcd/

yes
>>
>>1282931
>chain line needs to be moved out 2.5mm for discs
>move chainline in 2.5mm instead
Ok you are right
>>
>>1282934
Sorry i'm not quite following you
>>
>>1282934
oh right no, i understand. Does it matter though? Chainline isn't really much of an issue these days. It's still going to be better than running 1x which is itself perfectly fine. It might even be good having your rings more inboard, and so using the 46 as like your main ring and the 30 as a bailout.

The issue is that they're oval and despite seeing skellington zoom up mountains to tdf wins with oval chainrings iunno if i'm sold on the meme yet. I'm guessing that it would not be possible to make round 46/30 rings for this gen std road cranks, for some reason? Iunno. I don't understand why those don't seem to be available.

It just seems like an absolute no brainer for all of these gravel bikes with 50/34 compact cranks and even for a lot of roadies. 46x11 is still taller than 50x12
>>
I guess we're still stuck thinking that your big chainring represents the size of your dick and if you don't push 53x11 on the flat for an hour then you're a leglet
>>
Need some help finishing my bike build, and want to make sure everything is compatible. I'm using some old shimano 105 sti shifters, they're 2x8 and I'm wanting to replace the crankset (it's a triple) and the cassette/rear derailleur. I'm going to get a 46/30 double crankset, and a 11-32 tooth cassette. I'm also looking at the shimano claris rear derailleur, and if I'm understanding correctly it will just barely work, as the spec sheet says 32 max tooth in the rear, and 16 max difference up front. (https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/claris-2400/RD-2400-SS.html)

Have I understood this all correctly? Want to make sure before I pull the trigger and buy everything.
>>
>>1282947
yep, you're good, the published figures for max chain wrap are always conservative anyways
>>
road triples used to be 30/28 in the lowest gear and now we get 34/34 on the 105 compact double. with 11 speeds the spacing is comparable too. so no need for road triples anymore, in my professional opinion.
>>
>>1282968
yeah, triples for road riding are totally redundant.
There's still a place for them on touring bikes though, with 26t, 24t or even 22t grannies

I've got a 26/34 low gear on my touring bike and if anything, i'd like lower.
>>
>>1282969
agreed on the need for granny gears. I used to rock a 28/34 but now I like my 24/32 even better.
but road triples are 130bcd for the middle and big ring, which doesn't play well with touring gearing. mountain triples have 110bcd for these rings which seems more appropriate for touring.
>>
>>1282971
my triple is campy road with 135bcd lol - 53/39/26. it's kinda stupid but i like it. It shifts good. The bbs are expensive but they last for ages.
I've got a spare deore 48/36/26 to replace it with eventually, which should work with a 24t or 22t granny.

Or I've been thinking of making a custom cassette, something like 13-14-15-17-20-23-26-30-34 and staying with the campy crank

Iunno. Lower gearing would be nice but I miss having straight gears at the top end too.
>>
>>1282971
>I used to rock a 28/34 but now I like my 24/32 even better.
btw did you make that small change just cos or was it like shit wore out and needed to be changed? I feel bad replacing anything unless i have to.
>>
>>1282952
Ordered the rest of the parts I need and will hopefully be riding this thing in about a weeks time. Thanks for the quick reply!
>>
>>1282975
>>1282973
I replaced it because I needed a lower gear. The way I see it, there's no point wearing out your knees just to get your moneys worth from a few bits of aluminum. You can always buy more bike parts, but if you damage your body, you can never get that back.

>>1282976
Hell yeah brother. Post pics when it's done
>>
>>1282973
>26-39-53
This is almost begging for a custom 14-15-16-18-20-22-25-28-34 so you have close together gears for cruising plus a nice low bail out gear.
>>
hitting a freewheel with an impact gun for 10 secounds and it not coming off?
what do?
>>
>>1283201
clamping the freewheel removal tool in a big heavy vise, then turning the whole wheel (sometimes with two people) usually works. If you really can't get it off by normal means google 'destructive freewheel removal'
>>
>>1283223
ok i will try that later today,
also another question, my rear axle broke and i need a new one.
i measured the dropouts at 150mm can i use a 140mm axle then? because the stores only have 140..
>>
>>1282830
Alpine 11 + Patterson or Rohloff or
>>1282920
>>
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>>1278915
I'm trying to decide between 2 models of gravel bike. The major difference seems to be one has Shimano 105 and the other has Tiagra, both the new flat mount. Is the 105 worth the extra $200?
>>
>>1283374
Is it a 1x or 2x?

I'd say the rear cassette becomes more important when there is only a 1x up front.
>>
>>1283381
Both are doubles (checkem). 105 is the 11 speed HG800 and the Tiagra is the HG500 10, I think. I don't really mind 10 vs 11, however.
>>
>>1283385
Tiagra is very good. You're not losing much. 105 gives you a shadow mech which is the modern design, and lower profile and less likely to get bashed, also handles wider gearing better if you want to upgrade that. And you can break stuff and upgrade to DA or ultegra while tiagra is all you can use for tiagra basically.

But yeah there's not a lot in it.
>>
Alright I need advice.

I’ve been riding a trek marlin 6 about 40 miles a week on the road. Don’t have too much traffic to worry about. I’ve decided that I’d like a road/gravel bike but I don’t really know anything about geometry/components/build quality between different brands.

It would be nice to be able to bail off the side of the road if I need to and not worry about damaging tires/wheels.

What bikes should I be looking at with a budget of 1500 bucks?
>>
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>>1283403
>shadow mech
Damn, I didn't even know that was a thing. I haven't had a new bike since one I built in 2008; so I'm way out of the loop on the current state of hardware. Neat, thanks.
>>
>>1283435
my advice is to get a road bike if you want to ride road. and put 28mm tires if your roads are a bit shitty.

Gravel bikes are fun but they are slow and your marlin 6 with a triple would be faster than a gravel grinder with a small 1x rig.

What I'm saying is you should get an Aluminum framed, carbon fork, 700cc bike with 105 shimano and a wide cassette in the back like 11-32.

If you want to stick with Trek that's the Elmonda ALR.

Also every major bike maker makes one that is claris for 750 or so. The 105 model is usually 1200 or so.

If you are willing to not buy a bike from a major bike maker that sponsors a race team you can get a carbon bike for that much. The Fuji SL and the Raleigh Clubman Carbon are both about 12-1300 usd.
>>
>>1283443
I was about to say basically exactly the same thing. The emonda is a very good looking bike, that's what I would get now too, for a pure road. Put aside money for clipless pedals + shoes.

>>1283435
you can for sure ride a pure road bike with 25/28mm tires on reasonable gravel, it's just not ideal. If you really want more of an allrounder, look at endurance road bikes, which will fit 32mm tires, and have a more upright position and probably have mounts for fenders/ a rack. Like the domane. And if you want a full blown compromisemobile then look at gravel bikes like the checkpoint which will fit 35mm+ tires

but honestly if you like to go fast then get a pure road bike.

105 is where diminishing returns really kick in, but if you want to spend less money, even the budget models with claris / sora / tiagra are going to be decent. I would just recommend making sure you're getting
>a carbon fork
>a shimano hollowtech crank (not a cheap square taper one)
>a double crank, not a triple
>shimano brake calipers
>>
>>1283449
Does the emonda alr4 meet these specs? I know it has a carbon fork but I’m not familiar with the terminology of bottom brackets, cranksets and such.
>>
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>>1283459
Ya, it's full Tiagra, so it'll be fine, but it's quite overpriced compared to something like the Specialized Allez Elite, which offers 105 at a lower price point than the Emonda ALR4. The Emonda ALR5 has 105 and is a bit lighter, but it's nearly as expensive as an Allez Sprint, which is a fucking beast as soon as you swap the burly but heavy DT R460 wheels out.

Only thing is, the Emonda and Allez are aluminum race bikes that can only take 25mm tires max, so they're going to be fucking harsh on anything but smooth roads.

Personally I'd go for a nicely built-up Surly Crosscheck, an All City Mr. Pink Classic, or maybe a Space Horse. All of them are going to be much smoother rides, and can take wider tires. The Mr. Pink is more of a classic steel racer, while the Crosscheck and Space Horse are all-rounders.

>tfw I'm now thinking of getting the Mr. Pink 10th anniversary as bike #7
stahhhhhp
>>
>>1282979
Lol I actually have a new 12-36 spare and there's a 14-25 on wiggle, i might do this

It'll be 14-15-16-18-21-24-28-32-36

>>1282978
>there's no point wearing out your knees just to get your moneys worth from a few bits of aluminum
yeah for sure, you're right
>>
>>1283435
please listen to this because I mean it heartfully. go test ride a kona rove ST. it's the best riding gravel bike I've ever been on. if it changes your life like it did mine, you'll know right away that it's worth it.
>>
Need some new tyres for my road bike.

Should I get some good affordable Maxxis Refuse?

Or should I spend a bit more to get some coloured stripes on the wheels to make the bike kino?

Or is all black everything the current meme
>>
>>1284031
What does your bike look like? I personally feel that colored sidewalls look best on classic road bikes with shallow wheels or at least single-color wheels. Second best would be on an aero road bike with minimalist paint job and deep section wheels. If your bike is more or less murdered out, I think matching an accent color to your tyres would be a decent look.

I think getting an effective tyre would be more important than one that looks good though.
>>
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>>1284031
its worth spending money $ on tires
if you want coloured, try get ones that have fully coloured sidewalls, like the pro4 service course on the left of this pic, and not just a coloured stripe in the middle of the tire, like the open paves on the right. That generally looks better. Tanwalls like corsa g+ can look pretty cool too.
>>
anyone ridden these yet?
>>
>>1284056
I want to know as well. Bicyclerollingresistance tested these tires to have very low ruling resistance without compromising much puncture protection.
>>
>>1284056
meme tires
>>
>>1284056
Normie tire. I prefer supple casing 26 x 2.00 compass tires which have been proven to roll faster on pavement microbumps on lightweight steel construceuer frames that are actually faster and lighter than carbon road bikes
>>
>>1283435
>What bikes should I be looking at with a budget of 1500 bucks?

rigid 90s trek multitrack 750 from craigslist
>>
Is there a general recommendation on here for an action cam? Got close to being hit once, I think a camera would alleviate some of my anxiety
>>
>>1284053
>if you want coloured, try get ones that have fully coloured sidewalls, like the pro4 service course on the left of this pic
Yeah I was considering that but i'm thinking of getting a 'training' tyre just because the paths I plan to cycle on have some tree cover and there'll always be some dirt/rock/stick/nuts and a fully smooth race tyre is gonna be pretty susceptible to puncture
>>
>>1284101
I don't see how a camera is going to protect you from being hit.
>>
New to road biking

I always get chain grease on my leg from riding

Is there something to prevent or do I need to put up with it/wear long socks
>>
>>1284112
fair enough. I've had a few sets and pro4 service course are definately more dainty than gp4000
I'd just get some of those, they're reasonably tough. Excellent allrounders.
>>
>>1284080
but one of the good memes
>>1284083
well yeah obviously that goes without saying, i mean just as a curiosity
>>
>>1284151
How are the Michelin Endurance tyres?

Look like they're made to be tougher but also have got coloured options?
>>
>>1284157
iunno man, can't say, i've never had those. but it looks like they're just a strip, not a coloured sidewall. I don't think they look good.
>>
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here's what you really want man. the king of pimp tires. Rivendell Speedblend. Changes colour depending on how fast you're going. You can buy them only if you've been initiated.
>>
>>1284031
the only acceptable tyre colours are tan sidewalls or all black desu
>>
>>1284158
What's the difference ?
>>
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>>1284164
One has colored sidewalls, one just has a strip of colour. I don't think tires with the strip of colour look good.
>>
>>1284167
Oh right.

My local bike shop had a different pic which looks like it's the sidewall that's coloured, not just a stripe.
>>
>>1284168
hey those look alright
probably a diff tire
>>
Absolute noob here and I’m looking at getting a nice road bike for <$200. I’m in a college town so there are a lot of bikes on Craigslist and I’ve come across this one.

It’s old. A Peugeot steel body from the 70s. It’s pretty cool looking and only $150. What do you guys think?
>>
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>>1284172
you could do a lot better. That's a pretty low end bike, with some archiac standards on it and cheap steel. Shitty Peugeots look deceptively cool.

Pic related is some general stuff to look for.
Or if you want some recs, post your craigslist & height and i'll have a look for you
>>
>>1284172
>>
>>1284175
I’m 6’1 and in Athens Ga. I really appreciate the help man
>>
>>1284177
lol wtf kind of college town is this?
there's only 70 bike listings
basically nothing good available

https://athensga.craigslist.org/bik/d/athens-nishiki-prestige/6813745676.html
this is a decent bike but it needs lots of work and is way overpriced and probably too small for you

https://athensga.craigslist.org/bik/d/athens-gary-fisher-mtb/6805553244.html
this would be decent with some slick road tires, if you could haggle it down, but man, what the fuck?
>>
>>1284179
Lel. There always seems to be a ton of people on bikes so I assumed there’d be a lot on Craigslist too. The south is pretty inaccessible with cycling and the big cities aren’t super safe so I guess that’s the reasoning.

I want to move to lower Washington/Upper Oregon in the next couple of years and was hoping to come away with a good deal here before leaving.

I’ll just use those pic you posted for reference and keep posting here periodically if I find something. Thanks for the help though man
>>
What tires would you advice for a 28" hybrid for riding in the city?
>>
>>1284182
do you have a performancebike in atlanta or athens? They are going out of business and are selling 1000 bikes for 500.

It's also that you are tall. At 6'1 you are at the xl/xxl on bikes and those are always harder to find. I'm 6'4 and I've got exactly one on CL.

>>1284172
assuming that you're just looking to get around class, ride some paths, and drunkbike from bars to bars here's a few:

SHOGUN (1980s japanese import during second bike boom),
https://atlanta.craigslist.org/nat/bik/d/cumming-shogun-road-bike-japan/6806611509.html

This is a 1500 dollar Giant from the 00s. It's a nice bike. may be too big for you or perfect depending on how your legs are. I don't know. its 250

https://athensga.craigslist.org/bik/d/athens-giant-defy-large-frame/6805415429.html

Trek 1000c from the mid 00s, also 250. This is your size or 1/2 size small depending on how long your legs are.

https://athensga.craigslist.org/bik/d/watkinsville-bike-trek/6816133709.html


If you bought the Trek or Giant you could keep on on group rides with middle aged freds. The Shogun is too heavy to do that. The Trek and Giant will also have better hand position and INTEGRATED SHIFTERS aka STI. Which IMO is the biggest leap forward in road bikes in the last 20 years.
>>
>>1284172
oh and if any bike has a shitty or uncomfortable seat you can get a 'pull off' seat from your local bike shop for $10-20. They are usually nice seats.

You can also guy a new seat on amazon for $20. The ones at the LBS are name brand if that matters to you. (the shogun has a torn seat, don't not buy the bike because of that).

I'd say to ride the shogun/peugot and the trek or giant and see what the differences are to you. If you consider the extra comfort important you'll buy the newer bike.

However from a fashion perspective an 80s road bike is considered cool. Those other bikes are cool too just considered cool among bikers.

A 70s Peugot will be 32lbs or so in your size. An 80s Shogun probably 29lbs.

00s Trek and 00s Giant will be 19-24lbs. It makes a gigantic difference. The 00s bikes will also have more speeds and wider gearing to crush hills.
>>
>>1284208
Performance bicycle?
>>
>>1284224
its a store.
mostly online but big cities have big box type outlets.
I believe there is one in ATL (?)
>>
>>1284182
>>>/n/bbg
>>
>>1284225
Performance bikes is bankrupt but has 60 or so zombie stores still running for a few months. Their website and Nashbar will continue to run
>>
why isnt there an gear thread like /out/ has so you can recommend some shoes, jackets or tools, whatever, seems weird
>>
>>1284242
we do every once in a while but the board is too slow to stay alive. At the same time everyone's gear needs are highly specialized so what works for one won't work for another in regards to cycling.
>>
>>1284242
Just post in the not so daily ride thread, here or make a new thread
>>
>>1284208
Is that shogun bike in relatively good shape? Would I need to replace anything
>>
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what are these called in english?
they are the bolts for the front sprocket
i need to find some longer ones on ebay
>>
>>1284352
chainring bolts

if you need the longer ones, they'll probably be listed as "double" for mounting two chainrings rather than just a single.
>>
>>1284300

Doesn't look like it's been ridden very much, sprockets and tires seem to be in very good condition. Tires might be rotten from age though and with an old bike like that they might be tubulars which are a pain in the ass to replace.
>>
>>1284182
You'll get a better deal in the PNW. We have lots of bikes here. The market for old steelies is cooling off for whatever reason, too.
>>
>>1284194
28-35
>>
>>1282758
>>1282759
thanks anon, the bike only came with a 28c set, so I guess it'd be better to buy another set
>>
How often do you oil your bike?
>>
>>1284412
Depends, during winter I keep my drivetrain drenched with oil since the salt would turn it into rust if I don`t.
I also grease up every part that might rust during winter to prevent it from rusting.
On my roadbike I check the chain before starting a longer ride, plus all my bike get a total overhaul at least once a year.
>>
>>1284352
>what are these called in english?
>they are the bolts for the front sprocket
>i need to find some longer ones on ebay

They are indeed chainring bolts but the word you are looking for is "TORX bolts" Torx is a trademark name they are also called star bolts.

You can go to your local hardware store and get Torx bolts. Just bring your old bolts. A bike shop should also have them.

I wouldn't bother with Ebay you'll need to look at the bolts close up. Unless you are in North Alaska or something and there are no stores close.
>>
>>1284412
Every 50 miles.
>>
>>1284404
when you say trail do you mean crushed limestone or crushed flat dirt or do you actually mean something off-roady?

Because if it's just a crushed limestone flat trail and you have 28mm tires you should be fine. Especially if you go slow.
>>
Looking around at my LBS and everything seems nice and affordable.. except for bar tape.

WTF why is it so expensive compared to everything else?
>>
>>1284491
tires, bartape, etc, buy that shit online anon
>>
>>1284492
Are there any good international places online that are cheap?

Everything for Australia is dominated by LBS online sites which are basically store price expensive shit.
>>
>>1284493
wiggle & chain reaction cycles both ship free if you order over $100. They're the same company. Very good prices and range.
>>
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>>1284493
I like Fizik Superlight Classic btw, unless you want something with a lot of padding. It's got a nice feel and it's very durable, you can rewrap it.
>>
how much do cycling bibs normally cost?

found a new pair at a good Samaritan OP shop for next to nothing, they fit really well
>>
>>1284491
>Looking around at my LBS and everything seems nice and affordable.. except for bar tape.

Because at least at my LBS they'll wrap the bars for free if you buy the tape.
>>
>>1284493
>Are there any good international places online that are cheap?

https://www.biketiresdirect.com/shipping
>>
>>1284508
Think of the gallons of straight ball and asshole contact and asshole and ball sweat that's soaked into them lol it's worse than buying used underwear
but if you're cool with that, go for it
>>
>>1284509
I like wrapping bartape
It's one of the most relaxing jobs on a bicycle
>>
>>1284511
Nah they're brand new, probably only been tried on at the worst.

Everywhere i'm looking says a average pair costs over 100 bux?
>>
>>1284513
the budget house brand bibs on wiggle are $30. If they're new and basically free and you like them and they fit you what is even your question lol why did you not buy them?

But yeah, midrange ones avg around $100

it is also good to be able to try them on
>>
>>1284512
could never get it as tight as the LBS and I usually buy it as a 'treat yourself' add on before getting something fixed.
>>
>>1284513
>Everywhere i'm looking says a average pair costs over 100 bux?

I wear Aero Tech Designs bibs because they are tall but they also make regular sizes. They range from 79.99 to 159.99.

https://www.aerotechdesigns.com/bib-shorts.html
>>
Your opinion on road tubeless? I have compatible rims and thinking about trying them on my road bike. 28mm fits perfectly. My budget would extend to GP5000 TL if needed to.
Try going tubeless or should I stick with tubed? Reasons?
>>
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I have an old bike that I want to turn into a single speed beater. The rear dropouts are pic related, unfortunately, so I guess I'll necessarily have to get a chain tensioner (no spare derailleur to create a makeshift one, either). What are some good options for this?
>>
>>1284481
I've never heard of any crank using torx bolts to secure chainrings.
>>
so I recently went from a 52/42t 144bcd crank to a 53/36t 130bcd crank. it's way better, but I have some bretty big hills around me and my middle-aged knees are still hurting from my commutes.

I already have the lowest rear gear my hub will take, a 34t.
So, it's time to get either a compact or sub-compact double. I have several questions:
1) a standard compact is 50/34t, which would give me a 1:1 low gear. Does anyone bother with lower than that? should I even consider sub-compact?
2) compact cranks are all 110bcd, is that standard for sub-compact as well? the ones that listed the bcd in my searches said 110 but that they also had ovalized rings, like it was a cheat.
3) I'm really tall (frame is 63cm) and I've always rode 175 arm length. one of the cranks I'm looking at is 170. I've heard that shorter arms make for easier spinning, which might help my knees? I don't really want to fuck with my fit or my cadence, but if I'm already buying to go low, maybe I should get something spin-ier. but I'm so tall and used to 175. I dunno how to call it. anyone have experience they can share?

anyway, I'm looking at cheap shit since my bike is old and cheap.
these are the 2 I found just now, the shimano is only 170 arm length. Any input welcome. Americlap for shipping costs.

https://www.amazon.com/d/Bicycle-Cranksets/Vuelta-815003370-Corsa-Comp-Crankset/B0081UV2NU/ref=mp_s_a_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1550000156&sr=8-14&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=compact%2Bcrank&th=1&psc=1#immersive-view_1550003667945

https://www.bikewagon.com/shimano-crankset-fc-a070-red-170x50-34t-w-ocg?CAWELAID=400006350000064710&CAGPSPN=pla&CAAGID=20967086916&CATCI=pla-132683525076&catargetid=400006350000433338&cadevice=m&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIlrGeqIK34AIVmoqzCh1WCgruEAkYBiABEgKHQvD_BwE
>>
>>1284753
Some bikes use 48/32 for "gravel", it depends on how much you really need and whether you actually take advantage of going downhill a lot.
Longer is easier to spin, actually.
>>
>>1284834
>Longer is easier to spin, actually.

Biomechanically or in terms of the drivetrain? It's been my understanding that a longer arm means an effectively harder gear ratio. But you shouldn't try to tune your drivetrain by changing cranks, you should get the ones that fit your legs. If he's riding a 63cm frame he probably wants 175s anyway.
>>
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>>1284753
You could get a 46/30 FSA crank
Tempo for 9spd or Omega for 10/11

46x11 is still a taller gear than 53x13

It seems like a no brainer really. Those FSA cranks come in 172.5 and 175 too.
>>
>>1284591
I don't know if it's paranoia but at that width I'd be a liiitle worried about rim blowoff with the pressure (unless you're very light).

Have you used tubeless for mtb/gravel/etc before?
>>
>>1284591
They're just a bitch to fix if you're 20km from home

though if you don't carry puncture repair kit anyways it doesn't matter
>>
I want to buy new or aftermarket lever hoods but seeing as my bike is about 10-15 years old, they've not been in production for a while.

I need them for a Shimano 105 STI ST-5500 set, but I can't find them anywhere.

Can I just get something new from a current gen model or something aftermarket even if it is a bit loose or tight, or are these completely shaped different and i'm shit out of luck?
>>
>>1284182
I swear to god if you move to Oregon I'll tear your fucking head off and shit down your throat
Motherfuckers need to stop moving here, you faggots are taking over my state and now you're trying to take my guns away
>>
>>1279165
try stepped-end ferrules, friend
>>
>>1284682
surly singleator



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