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Will they be able to permanently transform the passenger transportation landscape in America? Any updates about these projects?
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>>1229004
>Will they be able to permanently transform the passenger transportation landscape in America?
No.
>Any updates about these projects?
https://www.railwayage.com/passenger/chsra-appoints-lipkin-n-california-regional-director/

https://www.railwayage.com/passenger/union-pacific-slowing-ca-high-speed-rail-report/?RAchannel=home
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>>1229004
1 3 4 2
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>>1229011
So you think all three projects won't success? Or do you think they won't make an impact?
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>>1229004
No, but from what I recall Flixbus is leaking into the US. They recently started offering trains in Germany, very likely that they will attempt to do that in the US as well once they catch a foothold.
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>>1229004
4 4 4 4
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>>1229485
They already launched im the US, but what's special about them?
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>>1229004
4132
>>1229488
but really this
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>>1229004
If Brightline keeps up its performance and momentum, maybe?
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>>1230191
The key part would be the Orlando expansion
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>>1229493
Cheap tickets but good busses.
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>>1230203
I don't think prize and vehicle qualities are the two greatest obstacles to bus development in the US...?
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>>1229004
i read that the opponents of the texas hsr will be able to kill it when it the legislature convenes again next year
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>>1230193
And then to connect Tampa and Jacksonville?
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>>1230650
That would also be something dependent on the performance of the Orlando extension, no?
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>>1230668
But it'll likely do well
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>>1229485
>>1230203
>>1230253
Flixbus will either crash and burn violently, or mess up everything for everyone forever within the next few years.
Their business model is basically nothing but externalizing cost to smaller coach transport enterprises and individual drivers. They set the prices and schedules, and the drivers have to do work overtime without breaks for shitty pay.
The funny thing is that they haven't even been making a profit for years now. All they're doing is offering low prices and buying up the competition so that they'll soon have a monopoly over coach transit in central Europe and can set the prices as high as they want.
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>>1230938
You can say the same for uber and many other companies of this type too
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>>1230943
That's true. Hermes and a bunch of companies that make food delivery websites are guilty of the same thing. Looks like this meme really caught on in the last two decades
>>
California High Speed Rail is a failure. Building HSR only from Bakersfield to Merced is useless.
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>>1229004
>Will they be able to permanently transform the passenger transportation landscape in America?
If Texas Central and Brightline are successful, yes I do believe so. This could signal other investors into making lines in other parts of the states to dig into the market. Especially with Amtrak enforcing full PTC.

>Any updates about these projects?
Texas Central is still slowly buying land, but all they're officially doing is attending big meetings to get publicity.
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>>1231824

You're misinformed so I'm going to revive a dead thread to correct it.

CAHSR is not building HSR from Bakersfield to Merced; the bare minimum HSR plan is for 4th&King-Bakersfield per the Initial Operating Segment, the IOS. This is what was sold/bid to DB who would operate full 220mph HSR trains on that route until the full build out from the new Transbay Terminal to Anahiem.

Until that is built, what will operate on the currently constructed tracks are the existing San Joaquins. CHSRA first made this announcement in their most recent business plan, and it's a practical move that will see 110-125mph services which is at least legally not High Speed Rail (only High-er Speed Rail, or HrSR). This will continue until the Pacheco Tunnels are built _and_ Caltrain sufficiently upgraded with passing tracks to allow for HSR trains.

So either HSR only happens between 4th&King-Bakersfield, or it doesn't happen at all. Either way the statement "Building HSR only from Bakersfield to Merced is useless." is incorrect.
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>Future of American Passenger Railways
Pic related
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>>1233220
>Either way the statement "Building HSR only from Bakersfield to Merced is useless." is incorrect.
Well, it is correct, it just has no connection to reality. Either way, the 99 corridor is a bitch to drive and several million people live on it. This whole "no one lives in the Central Valley" meme needs to stop. Even if the project only placed HSR along 99 (which it's not), it'd still be serving millions of people and upgrading a popular rail route, whose popularity is in spite of a 79 MPH max speed and mixing with freight traffic.
>>
JR Central established a new branch company at Texas to work together with its existing branch there
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>>1233319
I thought they did that a while ago. They're the ones serving as technical advisors to Texas Central Partners, right?

I heard the reason they stationed some employees in the US was because Texas Central could almost never talk to JR Central due to time zone differences, and vice-versa.
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>>1233324
The document said they established a consulting corporation back in 2016 mainly for providing technical support to TCP, while this new integration corporate will be mainly to help them made different agreements with Japanese companies alliance that will be formed in future for orders and such. And if the Japanese alliance is ultimately selected to build TCR it will also be responsible for subsystem integration, testing and staffs training
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I've been wondering on how TCR will manage to move the N700S's from Japan to Dallas/Houston. Since they run on standard gauge the easy option would to run them on a freight line between Cali and Texas. Although it'd be silly to see Japanese Trains running on American freight lines.
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>>1233329
>formed in future for orders and such. And if the Japanese alliance is ultimately selected to build TCR
Hah! Like there's any doubt they're gonna be the tech providers. The DEIS specifically states the project will be using the N700, and both JR Central and the Japan Bank for International Cooperation are almost certainly going to financially back this thing if the EIS goes through.
The fact that the Japanese companies got all-but locked out of CAHSR is a big reason they're so interested in the Texas project. They want to show up the Euros by getting their project done first.
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>>1233355
They're not gonna run them directly on the rail. Even if they fit the loading gauge (they don't, they're too wide), no company wants to risk damaging the unfamiliar equipment they're hauling by tugging it. If they go by rail, they'll load the train cars on to some flatbed cars and ship them that way. If they go by sea the whole way, they could just sail into Houston.

Houston is a big port - one of the largest in the US. I know, I was surprised too. No-one thinks of Houston as a port city, but the numbers don't lie. They could definitely get the trains in by water if they wanted.
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>>1233371
Eh, thought it'd be funny to see an n700s running on American rails, but I had forgotten loading gauge entirely.

Yeah now that you mention it, I'd imagine it'd be easier to ship it directly into Houston's port and you don't have the risk of people tagging the sets.
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>>1233370
>The fact that the Japanese companies got all-but locked out of CAHSR
Yeah, why was that? With California's earthquake problem Japan's technology seems perfect.
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>>1233371
>Thinks they won't fit the HUGE N. American loading gauge.
You're a dummy.
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>>1233488
CAHSRA got smooth-talked by the Euros into using "international" (read: European) UIC standards that aren't compatible with unmodified Shinkansen tech.

The Japanese companies knew that would drive up their costs and put them at a disadvantage to the European bidders, so they lost interest.

>>1233491
American loading gauge is huge.

But it's not 11 feet wide.
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>>1233488

Because nobody really knows what CAHSR is going to look like until it's done. Blending with Caltrain and having diesel San Joaquins use the finished track were not in the original ballot measure, but both essentially make Shinkhansen tech unusable unless it is custom modified at great cost. Also Shinkhansens require bigger tunnels, a cost which CHSRA is trying to mitigate as much as plausible.

>>1233509

>CAHSRA got smooth-talked by the Euros into using "international" (read: European) UIC standards that aren't compatible with unmodified Shinkansen tech.

CHSRA doesn't use UIC, they are still using AAR plates. This decision was made in 2013 when the decision was made for blended service with Caltrain, whose tracks are used by freight from 12-5am. This is why CHSRA always planned on folding threshold gap plates to fold down, as platforms have to be set back a few inches for freight cars to clear them. Likewise, CHSRA's wires are a few inches higher than UIC for AAR Plate H (double stack container) clearance. One of the reasons why SF keeps dragging their feet on the downtown extension is because the train tunnel under 280 needs to be dug out a few feet deeper for wires, which means affecting existing Caltrain service.

Not that I disagree with your points.
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>>1233491

The issue is platforms, stock Shinkhansen trains have platforms flush with the doors but this isn't doable on the Peninsula or LA where freight trains would clip it.

By the way, see that concrete strip? That's a standard Caltrain platform. Notice the huge freight trains adjacent.
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>>1233641

Another shot. Platform heights in general are a big problem which is also why TGV Duplexes are preferred since their doors are about the same height as the existing cars.
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>>1233643

Another image to demonstrate the problem, this is also why Caltrain is dumping all of their galley cars. Notice how the "standard" car, Amtrak's Superliners, are the lowest at 18". As this is the platform height the San Joaquins use, it more or less means CHSRA has adopted a platform height no greater than 18". This is a problem when they've already agreed on adopting a platform height of about 50" with Caltrain.

The "solution" is that CHSRA will abuse their station dimensions: normal CAHSR stations are speced to be 1400' long (for 2x trainsets) but because SF is dragging their feet on the downtown extension it was revised down to 700'. CHSRA will likely build 700' of 18" platforms for the San Joaquins and later the other 700' for 50" HSR trainsets as they move to actually start service.

Point being is that all of this is done to deal with American rail standards, not UIC.
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>>1233509
>But it's not 11 feet wide.
10 ft. 8 in. is the standard. You bet that out west where there are few narrow curving tunnels that they can accommodate a dimensional load like that.

If BNSF can move retarded long loads like windmill blades you bet some 11 ft. wide niptrain will work.
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>>1233650
Right, they could probably do an out of gauge load. It's not super uncommon - they just have to be careful with the routing.

It's still technically out of the loading gauge though.
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>>1233509
What? 11 feet is still only roughly 3352 mm
>>1233650
And 10 feet 8 inch is only about 3251 mm

I guess Japan can actually get some of those Mini Shinkansen trains in?
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>>1233661
That 10 ft. 8 in. just means unrestricted in interchange. That's not to say that a carrier cannot easily accommodate larger loads. I just had a 19 ft. 8 in. tall load that was 120 ft. long, weighed 260 tons, and was like 12 ft. wide come into my yard. There was no issue routing it unless it was going to meet something else that exceeded the standard plate.
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>>1233672
Right. An 11 feet wide load is technically out of loading gauge. That doesn't mean they can't haul it. They just need to make sure there aren't any narrow tunnels/bridges, and that there aren't any other out-of-gauge loads that could collide with it.

My main point was that an American railroad probably would just put the shinkansen pieces on cars and haul the trainset that way rather than run them directly on rail.

To get back on topic, Brightline's offered a stop to the Treasure Coast and the meltdown is glorious.

On one hand, you've got the NIMBYs that are so used to getting their way advocating a hard-line NO because they still think they can block this.

On the other hand you've got the pragmatists who see the writing on the wall and are trying to convince the NIMBYs to see logic and take the offer.

The NIMBYs, in typical NIMBY fashion, yelled and screamed at the second group and called them traitors, which only further proved they're completely divorced to the reality of the situation.
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>>1233682
Why are people losing their shit about the Treasure Coast station? You'd think more stops the better, or am I missing something bigger?
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>>1233848
The NIMBYs are fighting the station because they see it as admitting defeat.

Truth is, they lost a long time ago. They're just in denial about it.
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>>1233682
>Out of gauge load.
Call it a dimensional or high and wide, poindexter.
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>>1233672
The other problem is that American rail is dogshit and Texas Central probably doesn't want their brand new Shinkansens getting destroyed by being pulled halfway across a continent on "Eh, it works" quality track. US Class I's *plan* on derailments.
>>
But yeah what I mean is, can CAHSR use mini shinkansen trainset that is compatible with narrower dynamic loading gauge?
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>>1233355
>Tokyo-houston via ship
>Port to depot via pic related
????
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>>1233220
>even american high speed trains are bulky and shit looking
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>>1234163
That's not a high speed train.
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>>1234175
What is it then?
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>>1234179
A normal train? That particular train never breaches 80 MPH.
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>>1234163
There's no such thing as "American high speed trains"
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>>1234184
>A normal passenger train
>never breaches 80 MPH
christ what a godforsaken shithole america is.

>>1234211
true
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>>1234226
Well, the train itself can do 125, which is typical for diesel trains, but the track it runs on is privately owned and not maintained well enough for faster operation.
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>>1234163

why are european trains so tiny?
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>>1234244
>and not maintained well enough for faster operation.
The FEC is one of the best-maintained railroads in the US. The 79mph limit in place between Miami and West Palm Beach owes to the huge amount of grade crossings in that area, not to any track deficiency. The portion of the FEC mainline past West Palm Beach will allow 110mph running once double tracking and crossing upgrades are complete.
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>>1234343
I don't know what you're talking about, that particular train is the San Joaquins, and runs on track only maintained to a standard such that only 79 MPH operation is allowed
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>>1234343
>Being this dumb
79 mph is the max speed if there are no cab signals.
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>>1234353
>they only run 79mph because no cab signals.
Oh, really? Well then someone should tell the FEC, because their ENTIRE MAINLINE has had cab signals since the 80s!
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>>1234345
misread your post, thought you were talking about the FEC, not the railroad in your picture.
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>>1229252
2 4 3 1 wtf is wrong with you
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>>1234334
small loading gauge
it comes with the territory of being the first nation in the world to have proper railways
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Texas Central Rail just got 300 million from Japanese investors.
https://www.dallasnews.com/news/transportation/2018/09/13/texas-central-lands-300-million-loanfor-dallas-houston-bullet-train-project
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>>1237586
nice
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>>1237586
>Thank you for being a patron of the Dallas Morning News. Unfortunately, our site is unavailable to European Union visitors while we work with our partners to ensure your data is protected.

JUST BRUSSELS MY SHIT UP
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>>1237857
tl;dr/eurocuck: TCR got a $300 million loan from Japan and plans on repaying it. The loan apparently is the last financial resource needed and now they're waiting on the FRA to finish the environmental report and other regulation permits to start construction.
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>>1230938
US already has cheap buses in the form of Greyhound and Megabus. If you are looking to get from New York to Chicago you can do it extremely cheap.
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>>1237897
thanks

also we're leaving the EU in a few months
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>>1237917
Only to rejoin within the next decade.
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>>1237949
please no
it'll be dead/stagnant by then
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>>1237957
Too late. It's an inevitability.
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>>1237586
NICE.

You do not know how long I've been waiting to hear something like this!
>>
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180918005202/en/Statement-SNCF-America-Texas-Central-Partners-LLC

SNCF continues to bitch and complain and not do anything
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Brightline just bought out XpressWest. They plan to build and operate the line themselves.

I would've never guessed this in a million years.
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>>1238626
https://press.gobrightline.com/showPressRelease/100055086
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>>1238628
>>1238626

Holy shit, I guess this really proves that people want to ride trains in the US.
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>>1238626
Guarantee they fucking botch it.
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>>1238626
Would it be compatible with CAHSR to enable through service?
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>>1238626
>“Brightline currently operates passenger rail service in Florida between Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach, and is expanding to Orlando, with plans to further expand into Tampa

So they aren't extending to Jacksonville now?
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>>1229004
hate shitskins, take the flight.
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>>1239937
>So they aren't extending to Jacksonville now?
I never heard once that they would build it to Jacksonville. Only the plan to go to Orlando.
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>>1238594
>TCR are shitlords for taking "public" money
>how dare they attempt to build a railroad without gubmint assistance
What the fuck is wrong with SNCF?
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>>1239934
Unless they want to secure their own ROW/trackage rights from LA to the Antelope Valley, they'll have to to provide meaningful service. The only alternatives would be partnering with CAHSR to sell tickets and have a seat change in Palmdale, or count on people to drive to the part where the drive gets easy, pay to park, get on a train, and then rent a car in Vegas, neither of which are winning solutions.
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>>1240619
Isn't brightline buying up a few acres of land next to the strip so that when you arrive, you're on the spot and don't have to worry about driving?
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>>1240815
I have no idea what the latest from the LA-LV HSR people is. The project has been a perpetual clusterfuck for most of my adult life. I am, however, from the Central Valley in California and my dad lived in Vegas while I was growing up, and I've followed CAHSR pretty consistently, so I'm pretty familiar with the region. Anyways, Las Vegas is likely the worst big city in America public-transportation wise. They have a shitty, bottom of the barrel bus system used exclusively by nogs and poor people, and that's it. Oh! and a monorail between two casinos. So to go anywhere you either need a car, a complimentary shuttle, or a taxi. The latter has become more popular with the advent of uber, but if you're going to Vegas for anything over than gambling (which many people do contrary to popular belief), exclusively using taxis is going to be expensive. All of that is to say that without a massive change in the transportation picture of Las Vegas, the only way to sell LA-LV HSR to non-gamblers is to make it cheap enough that the time savings/convenience compared to a car offsets the cost of renting a car/taxiing. Not to mention offer a better service/price than flying. Speaking of which, flying from California to Las Vegas is cheap as fuck. One time visiting my dad my airfare was, I shit you not, $15 before tax. That was to Fresno, so I honestly don't know what the market is like for other cities, but I do know that with the Sierra Nevadas, there's no world in which HSR between California (outside of SoCal) and Las Vegas is competitive with flying. So basically, for LA-LV HSR to succeed, they need to have enough weekend gamblers, and convince enough conference/convention goers, from practically exclusively the LA area. *Maybe* they can get customers from San Diego too. Until then it will likely remain a neat idea. When the economics get worked out, figuring out compatibility with CAHSR and where to put the station will be easy.
TL;DR: I'm not holding my breath.
>>
Second quarter report from April 1 to June 30 for Brightline is out

Ridership:
106,090 passengers for Q2, up from 74,780 in Q1 (around a 42% increase)
Revenue:
$1.54 million from ticket for Q2, up from $663,667 in Q1 (around 132% increase)
Revenue lost:
$28.3 million lost in Q2, up from $28.2 million lost in Q2 (around a 0.35% increase)
Gross profit:
$1.3 million in gross profit for Q1, up from, $590,000 in Q1 (around a 120% increase)

if anyone wants to dig up the online document from the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board we can get more detail on the numbers
>>
>>1242198
How is gross profit positive if the revenue lost is much higher?
>>
>>1242217
the revenue lost refers to net income and the profit referrers to gross income. I'm sure someone else can better explain it but I think it goes something like this.
Gross Income: Revenue minus the cost of goods sold (not sure what CoGS is in this case but I think its the ave. price for one person to ride the train)
Net Income: Gross Income minus operating expenses and all other expenses such as taxes and interest paid on debt
>>
>>1242198
>>1242217
I believe he means

>Gross Profit => Gross Revenue
>Revenue Lost -=> Loss

So that means that there's a $28.3 million loss in Q2, compared to a $28.2 million loss in Q1.

So their loss has remained relatively consistent even as ridership's basically doubled and revenue's tripled.

Not a good trend so far, but I still think it's too early to tell whether it's doomed to failure or not.
>>
>>1238626
diesel or electric?
>>
>>1242450
Almost certainly diesel. I don't see Brightline going with anything but the Siemens Chargers and coaches they use in Florida.
>>
>>1242449
one reasons I can see to why the loss stayed about the same despite the increase in revenue is that the opening of the Miami station probably added more operating costs in the form of additional employees, maintenance, etc.
Also does anyone know if brightline is starting to pay back the bond they took for phase 1 (I believe it was either 600 mil or 1.1 bil). This might be a little conjecture but brightline might be counting the money they pay back for the bond under total expenses.

We'd probably know for sure if one of these sites talking about it would link the document, all we have on this is from a TCpalm article listing $13 million spend as "general, administrative and other." and $5.8 million on salaries and benefits leaving around $10.8 million in other expenses left unsaid.
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>>1242198
>~1166 passengers per day
>11 trains per day on both directions in a normal day during Q2
>On average 53 passengers on board of each trains
Yeah this is really bad.

>Revenue: 1.54M
>Not sure about operational cost, but assume it's roughly sane as lost plus revenue then it would be about 30M
>That translate to an operational lost ratio of 2000
That is on the same level as lines going to be closed by JR Hokkaido in Japan
>>
>>1243274
>operation lost ratio
I mean operational-cost-to-revenue ratio
>>
Alright managed to find the MSRB document with more specific numbers
https://emma.msrb.org/ER1153459-ER902235-ER1302737.pdf

Ridership:
106,090 passengers for Q2, up from 74,780 in Q1
(No additional info)

Revenue
ticket sales:
$1,143,000 from ticket sales in Q2, up from $664,000 in Q1 (not wasting time with percents again)
other:
$392,000 from other revenue in Q2, up $104,00 in Q1
Total:
$1,535,000 total revenue for Q2, up from $768,000 in Q1 (most news sites must of only used ticked revenue when the Q1 report came out)
Cost of sales:
$207,000 in Q2, up from $178,000 in Q1
Gross profit:
$1,328,000 in gross profit for Q1, up from, $590,000 in Q1

Operating Expenses
Salaries and benefits:
$5,811,000 for Q2, down from $8,951,000 in Q1
Professional fees:
$2,167,000 for Q2, down from $2,368 in Q1
General, administrative and other:
$13,048,000 for Q2, down from $13,488,000 in Q1
Depreciation and amortization:
$6,521,000 for Q2, up from $4,013,000 in Q1
Total operating expenses:
$27,546,000 for Q2, down from $28,820,000 in Q1
Operating loss
$26,219,000 for Q2, down from $28,230,000 in Q1

Other expenses (income)
Interest expense:
$2,224,000 in Q2, none recorded for Q1
Miscellaneous income:
$100,000 in Q2, up from $46,000 in Q1

Net loss:
$28,342,000 lost in Q2, up from $28,184,000 lost in Q2

Think the paints a clearer picture, the biggest kick in the balls for Brightline seems to be interest at $2.2 million (of what I'm not sure), They did manage to decrease there overall operating cost by $1.3 million minus that however so they seem to be on the right track, but as >>1243274 put it still not great for passenger numbers
>>
>>1243837
small error under professional fees, should be $2,368,000 for Q1
>>
>>1243274
>That is on the same level as lines going to be closed by JR Hokkaido in Japan
Yeah but their ridership isn't growing. Brightline's is.

This is only worth panicking about if their ridership starts to plateau and they're still deep in the red.
>>
>>1243862
Exactly. I don't expect much until next year. People need time to adopt rail as a real option for travel again.
>>
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>>1234334
European, which means what?
Bongistan has a really tiny loading gauge, but Krauts and their protectorate have quite a wide one and probably could fit a burger sized trains - maybe except those super high autoracks and boxcars.

Obviously catenary mostly forbids double stacks.

Ex USSR has an even wider loading gauge and most of their rolling stock would dwarf US stuff.
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>>1244925
>and probably could fit a burger sized trains
Yeah, no. You underestimate the size difference. Not even AAR Plate C, which is basically the smallest loading gauge the US still uses, would fit in the largest UIC loading gauge.
>>
>>1244925
I was in Russia a few days ago and was I M P R E S S E D by their loading gauge
>commuter trains have 3+3 seating
>bilevel sleeper cars with two levels of berths on each level (ie total of 4 berth levels)
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>>1244925
>European, which means what?
GC obivously
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>>1245214
>commuter trains have 3+3 seating
More like 2.5+2.5. It was designed for prehistorical thin soviet untermeches. Every time I seat near the passage, half of mine ass hangs of the seat.
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>>1245782
It's designed for normal people, you're just a lardass.
>>
So apparently the Texas HSR is going to be designed by the Italians (Salini Impregilo).

https://www.railwaygazette.com/news/infrastructure/single-view/view/texas-central-names-contractor-and-starts-engineering-design.html
>>
>>1245798
Also Renfe was picked as the operator.

https://www.progressiverailroading.com/high_speed_rail/news/Texas-Central-picks-Spanish-firm-Renfe-as-bullet-train-operator--55860
>>
>>1245798
>>1245799
did Texas Central abandon JR or something or where they only intending to use the Shinkansen rolling stock
>>
>>1245803
No way in hell they abandoned JR. Not after they just gave them 300 mill.

I guess the deal was just for the technology? Because let's be frank here, there WAS a deal of some kind. You don't just give somebody $300 million dollars for nothing.
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>>1245803
My guess is they don't want the project to look like it is some Japanese attempt to invade Texas so they get other international companies onboard. Also to counter SNCF's complains?
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>>1234244
>not maintained well enough for faster operation
No, they don't have speed limits higher than 80 miles an hour (130kph for the non-burgers) because the FRA has restrictions on operations faster than that, namely in-cab signaling that Class 1 freight companies are too cheap to install.
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>>1244925
>Ex USSR has an even wider loading gauge
Because their lines are mostly broad gauge lines, and the wider your wheelbase is, the wider your cars can be
>>
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>>1246914
>No, they don't have speed limits higher than 80 miles an hour (130kph for the non-burgers) because the FRA has restrictions on operations faster than that, namely in-cab signaling that Class 1 freight companies are too cheap to install.
The FEC has cab signals, which will soon be upgraded to PTC signals. Course it's not a Class I, so your point still stands.

I believe they run at 79mph on the current segment out of liability concerns. There are WAY too many crossings on that part of the railroad.

On the existing FEC track from West Palm Beach to Cocoa, the speed limit will be raised to 110mph, the max allowed with crossings. For the new Cocoa-to-Orlando segment, it'll be 125mph, because that's basically the most the diesels can put out.

Fun fact, the FEC will legally be able to run intermodal freight at 90mph (that's 145kph for you eurofags) between Cocoa and West Palm Beach once the track upgrades are complete.

I mean, they probably won't, but they COULD. There'd be no law stopping them from running 90mph freight trains on that portion. Just imagine seeing one of those monsters barreling down the tracks at above-highway-speeds.
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>>1247101
Imagine being so used to slow trains that one of them running at "above-highway-speeds" blows your mind.
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>>1247109
Brightline already runs at above highway speeds, dingus. I'm talking about a 200-car long intermodal freight train thundering along at 90mph. Europe sure as hell doesn't have that.
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>>1229004

I don't know why the US doesn't have more high & higher-speed rail already.

Updates:
Brightline: https://eu.tcpalm.com/story/news/local/shaping-our-future/all-aboard-florida/2018/10/19/stuart-ready-move-forward-brightline-station-proposal/1700073002/

Texas Central:
https://www.railwaygazette.com/news/infrastructure/single-view/view/texas-central-names-contractor-and-starts-engineering-design.html
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>>1229004
One day lads...
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>>1248553
>I don't know why the US doesn't have more high & higher-speed rail already.
You clearly have no idea about the retarded passive people that are the US population. Those fucks believe any and every piece of bullshit you chuck at them.
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>>1248579
Nope. So much of it doesn't make sense.
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>>1248579
Assuming we do get something resembling a high speed network, would they really have lines that go through Chicago since iirc there was something in the cities history about several railroads agreeing to have it be a universal terminal which is somewhat still true today
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>>1248626
>>1248579
Why have a leg go to Quincy Illinois all on its own? Why not have a stop in Madison, Wisconsin?
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>Elon Musk: Rapid-transit test tunnel under LA opens to public Dec. 10
It would be the more American-styled high speed transportation, right?
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>>1249465
What do you think is going to happen to the one Elon planned for Chicago? Mayor Rahm Emmanuel approved of it but he isnt seeking reelection so im not sure.
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>>1248627
None of that would matter, since airline travel is so much faster… even for East Coast–Chicago distances.

American HSR will inevitably be regional in nature.
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>>1248579
That would be the ideal dream but lets step back and be a bit more realistic.
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>>1249547
huh? I thought Musk have already get his approval there and all that's left are for him to actually start digging?
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>>1249569
He does, but something you have to understand about Chicago's infrastructure politics is that a project isnt 100% confirmed until there are boots and machines on the jobsite. Rahm approved construction but he isnt running for reelection and i have a sinking feeling that the next guy will cancel it before the digging begins.
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>>1249574
But when will they start doing works in Chicago? A few months ago they said the they can start digging in Chicago in a few months
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>>1249575
Chicago is a city full of delayed and cancelled projects, so don't be surprised if our next mayor cancels the plans. There's so much political resistance to developing anything here it's stupid. From zoning laws to over budget issues to permit problems to NIMBYs and rival politicians. It's actually quite astonishing when a new building or project is completed, even more so when on time and under budget.
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>>1249548
I was mainly referring to things like having a line say from St. Louis to Milwaukee without having to transfer at Chicago.
But since you mentioned a Chicago to east coast route, I kinda think it only needs to be fast enough to get there overnight so you can leave one point in the mid to late evening and arrive at the other in the early to mid morning.
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>>1249561
Why not connect those eastern corridors while you're at it. That's when it becomes really interesting.
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>>1249599
So something like this?
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>>1249626
>No Houston-Dallas corridor
Get that shit outta here.
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>>1249626
>not connecting Houston-Dallas
>not connecting Cleveland-Pittsburg
>not connecting Jacksonville-Orlando
Literally why? I get not connecting Texan rail to Cali rail to PNW rail because of the distance but all the shit i just named are right next to each other.
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>>1249626
Fixed your map, your welcome
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High speed rail is gay. Go back east eurofags. Airplanes are the future bois
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>>1249650

>implying it can't be both

pilotfags, boatfags, bikefags and trainfags all have a shared cause against the Cager.
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>>1249650
Enjoy your airplanes once transport methods are held fully accountable for their emissions.
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>>1249650
>relying on a finite resource
LUL
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>>1249634
Much better.

See, this is how you get a national HSR network. It comes about through the confluence of a bunch of regional networks merging together. Yeah, just about no-one's going to ride a train to Miami from Boston, but that's okay because the real ridership drivers (the links between closely spaced cities) are still there. To put it simply:

The national arises from the regional, not the other way around.
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>>1249634
Is there any reason to have a HSR line to Minneapolis/St. Paul? I mean the metro area isn't that big and its kinda isolated in terms of other big cities near by since Iowa and the Dakotas effectively have nothing of note to that's close by and while Rochester might be considered big enough, its on a different route then the preferred one.
I suppose you could have it extend north and connect to Winnipeg and maybe a stop at Fargo or extend south to Kansas City (or maybe even Tulsa) and a possible stop at Des Monies, but both ideas seem like a bit of a stretch.
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>>1249634
>Linking Vancouver
>Linking Montreal
>Not linking Toronto
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>>1250983
Minneapolis MSA still have like 3.6 Million population. Comparatively Winnipeg only have less than a million and about 2 million for Kansas City
When considering a high speed rail line connection to Minneapolis, it should be 80%+ focused on the demand to travel between it and Chicago.
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>>1250298
THE NIGHT TRAIN SHALL RISE AGAIN
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>>1250990
Most days i try to pretend Toronto doesnt exist.
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>>1250998
What about maintenance window. HSR need fixed maintenance time slot unlike regular trains.
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>>1229391
you are talking about a country that constantly favours freight over passangers giving them the middle finger always..

the only way for redneck shinkansen to work is to bring ACTUAL japanese to work on it from top to bottom
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>>1249626
Montreal would be connected to Toronto and New York before Boston. there isn’t even a train to Boston currently.
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>>1253229
Night train use regular lines, not HSR. That's why they generate fewer emissions, they don't travel at such high speeds.
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>>1253472
But why not night bus then. Depends on condition of regular lines night trains might even be slower than buses. And what about time consumption
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>>1253476
Night trains have berths and beds so you can actually sleep without half the muscles in your body hurting the next morning. Night trains are usually not slower than buses, in any case time is not of the essence in an overnight journey.
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>>1253330
>the only way for redneck shinkansen to work is to bring ACTUAL japanese to work on it from top to bottom
>Japanese bullet train operator opening office in Dallas to assist Texas high-speed rail
https://www.dallasnews.com/news/transportation/2016/05/18/japanese-bullet-train-operator-opening-office-in-dallas-to-assist-texas-high-speed-rail
Wish granted, anon.

The Texas project is going to be a game-changer if they can raise the money to build it. It won't be politically watered-down expensive bullshit like CAHSR, and it won't be stuck using old Pennsylvania Railroad infrastructure like Amtrak in the NEC. It'll be actual, real, HSR.
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>>1253478
>Night trains have berths and beds so you can actually sleep without half the muscles in your body hurting the next morning.
Only if they're at least as comfortable than hotel beds which aren't really that comfortable to ensure actual restful sleep can be performed
>Night trains are usually not slower than buses, in any case time is not of the essence in an overnight journey.
It depends, like when it take 24 hours or even more for the night train between New York and Chicago then it's obviously too slow even when you considered sleeping and rest in it.
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>>1253480
eh thats just their u.s company front its not like they are actually bringing japanese people to live there and work there..
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>>1253536
So the corporate shell JR Central set up in Texas is called High-Speed-Railway Technology Consulting Corporation, or HTeC (the fact they missed the opportunity to call it HiTeC makes me sad).

One of the people I found online that works there is named Hiroto Sunahara. This guy worked for JR Central for 7 years, and did high-level civil engineering stuff, i.e. project management. Another guy, Yuta Hagiwara. Once again, similair background. Worked for JR Cemtral for 5 years, primarily dealt with engineering Shinkansen infrastructure, except this guy seems to specialize in electric catenary and power distribution instead of project management.

Unfortunately, none of the other 18 guys there seem to have bothered with LinkedIn, so that's the only one I can pin for sure. Still, while these people might not be JR Central's a-game, they're definitely some of their b-team. They're serious about this project.
>>
Update from Miami. The brightline trains run nearly empty even at rush hour. Now the introductory fairs are over and it costs $20 to go 30 miles. It runs slow as fuck from running over blacks all the time.

F
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>>1253483
nigga u dumb
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>>1253623
>It runs slow as fuck
Slow is relative.

Brightline's got a better average speed than just about any other passenger train in the US. Only isolated sections of the Acela (and maybe that one train in Michigan) beat it.

The speed will be even better on the new sections. 125 mph is basically the maximum diesel-electric locomotives can do. Anything higher, and you need to look into gas turbines (the Bombardier JetTrain approach) or electrics (the everyone else approach).
>>
Bechtel will serve as project manager for the Texas HSR.
https://abc13.com/high-speed-bullet-train-project-takes-another-step-forward/4594874/
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>>1253623
Bus rides to Brightline also take forever, too, since neither Broward nor Palm Beach have metro systems.
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>>1253623
I wouldn't say it's a doomed project, but it most definitely wasn't set up for success. They didn't advertise it aggressively enough, and the only way to keep HSR, well, pseudo-HSR in this case, afloat is to have lots of people in it, like, damn lots. The way they advertised it made it sound like it's just another train for dumb millennials or old people, which is not enough to gather up all the swamp hicks and make them ditch the cage. Also consider this : most HSR systems are set up between big business hubs or highly industrialized areas. Florida is neither of those, it's a tourist attraction full of rich foreigners who are only there to see Mickey Mouse or whatever the fuck.
That last point is why I think that the Texas project will work though, here's hoping.
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>>1256664
Without Orlando extension, brightline phase 1 as it is now is just a commuter rail line
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Virgin Group bought Brightline and is going to be renamed Virgin Trains USA

https://www.railwayage.com/passenger/high-performance/branson-bankrolling-brightline/
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>>1257417
Brightline is saved.
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>>1258320
Hardly any significant impact
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>>1258320
if the rest of the public transport that connects to brightline isnt fixed
and by fixed i mean do a fucking low level format and start from scratch
no matter what you do it will still be a fucking sinkhole
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>>1258520
Whats wrong with it? Is it that bad? Apologies, i've been out of the /n/ loop for a while.
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>>1259364
Short answer, anons are discussing whether a rail line is a success or a boondoggle based on less then a year of service.
If you really want to stay up to date I'd advise checking this site once in a while
https://emma.msrb.org//IssueView/Details/ER383438
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>>1259401
Yeah, whichever anon is talking like the project's already failed is jumping the gun massively.

Brightline had 48% ridership growth Q1-Q2, and 50% Q2-Q3. That's a good sign, because it means they haven't reached saturation. The market's still adjusting to it's presence, and people are trying it out to see if it works for them. This'll continue until the market settles and their ridership growth plateaus. When that happens, THEN we'll be able to see whether or not it worked out. Until then, everything's just conjecture.
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>>1259436
Speaking of ridership there's a new document from the site for the October ridership.

They carried 60,013 passengers for the month and generated around 1 mil in total revenue
So that's around 1,936 passengers a day and if their still running 24 trains per day that's an average of 80-81 passengers per train
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>>1259453
That's roughly a 34% load factor. According to an analysis someone smarter than me did on another site, that's up from the ~13% they had during the first few months, but short of the ~60% they need to break even.

So as long as they keep having strong ridership growth, they're on track to meet it. But that's the billion-dollar question, isn't it?
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Short distance commuter rail line running at hourly frequency doesn't make sense anyway. Let's talk about its success only after the opening of its Orlando extension
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>>1259466
is the 60% estimate still accurate? they seem to be generated more revenue with less passengers, comparing the results from october to the Q2 and Q1 here >> 1243837

Q1 had 74,780 passengers and a total revenue of $768,000: Averages out to around $10.27 made per passenger served
Q2 had 106,090 passenger and a total revenue of $1,535,000: Averages out to around $14.46 made per passenger served
October had 60,013 passengers and a total revenue of $1,000,000: Averages out to around $16.66 made per passenger served

Granted this is mainly due to the increase in fares and other revenue like the advertisements/stores at the stations and the special event trains they've been hosting but if this trend is consistent (and depending on how much they need to make to break even) it might be possible to calculate how many passengers they need to serve.
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WFAA (channel 8 Dallas) released a really good article giving an overview of the Shinkansen system and the Texas project. Worth a read.

https://www.wfaa.com/article/news/the-texas-bullet-train-now-looks-likely-heres-what-to-expect/287-617806536
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>>1259612
>bullet train is literally a giant rail gun that shoots the train off the tracks
thanks texas
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>>1259540
... They extended the service to the north and it's natural that people making longer ride would pay more
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>>1259624
And then they started charging for parking and raised the fares.
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>>1259540
November numbers are in:
80,660 passengers with $1.5 million revenue
Average of $18.60 per passenger
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>>1259614
You gave me the best laugh I've had in quite a while.
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>>1229004
these are halfarsed intercity trains
so, no
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>>1246915
Russian gauge is only ~3.5 inches wider.
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>>1249626
This is a meme map and every time it's posted it reminds me why public investment is death for public transit.
>>
https://www.wptv.com/news/region-c-palm-beach-county/lake-worth/pickup-truck-struck-by-brightline-train-in-lake-worth

Why are people so fucking retarded?
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>>1261818
>florida
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>>1229252
>>1229488
>>1229544
>>1234525
4 4 1 4 4
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>>1248579
That is not where Tulsa is. I'm surprised they even got Oklahoma City's location correct.
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>>1233371
>I know, I was surprised too. No-one thinks of Houston as a port city
Was this sarcasm?
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>>1248623
>You clearly have no idea about the retarded passive people that are the US population.
What are you talking about? Americans are the most aggressive NIMBY fucks in the world. If Americans were passive, like the Japanese and europoors, then they would already have high speed rail, like the Japanese and euros do. Just see >>1249582 as one of many examples. Americans are the kind of people who conduct armed insurrections because the government decided to build a dirt road on some guy's ranch (true story).
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>>1262180
Maybe I'm just an idiot, Anon, but I only realized the port of Houston was a thing after living there for four years.

I mean, the Ocean's an hour drive away. Unless you live south of the inner loop it's not really obvious we have such a long connection to it.
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>>1262203
You're right, passive was the wrong word to use. I meant a state of anti-rail NIMBY.



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