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What does /lit think about to Kill a Mockingbird?
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>>13362774
I think it sucks. I think the passage for its namesake is trite and untrue. Mockingbirds are mean and aggressive birds that chase away other avians and wild life. They should be shunned and kept in their place. Just as the negro in Lee's magnum copros should have kept his.
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>>13362817
Boo was the Mockingbird U RACIS
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>>13362774
putting yourself in other’s shoes is the cat’s pyjamas
it reaches its apotheosis in Dreams from My Father, where no one knows who Obama is, he has relatives that look like Margaret Thatcher and Bernie Mac, the mixed blood, the divided soul, the ghostly tragic mulatto trapped between two worlds.
Right after the book, Obama went to Harvard Law School and finished No. 1, because of his unparalleled ability to put himself in others’ shoes.
Harper’s daddy was a lawyer, her sister too, and Harper dropped out of Alabama Law School.
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>>13362774
Not bad, but ridiculously overrated. My opinion might be colored by having known quite a few people in high school that idolized it, though.

Heh nothing personal kid
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>>13357220
>>13357271
>>13357307
>>13357313

My reading comprehension would be greatly enhanced if I knew what the hell was so great about the now-deleted post? A simple prose description would be appreciated.
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>>13363491
Me too. If anything, it feels like my comprehension is just better. I look up more words and look at maps and other references a lot more when I'm high. Now, whether I can actually access all that later, I don't know. I'm not in school and I don't write for peer review, so I don't give a shit.
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>>13363506
>I have noticed slight memory impairment but nothing about decreased reading comprehension or intellect in general.
But that’s what’s so bad about it, it doesn’t make you less intelligent so if you’re smart you see less reason to quit while the destruction to your working memory is turning you into a different kind of retard. Also the average stoner is completely insufferable.
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>>13357126
I do and I admire your will if you're not bullshitting.
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>>13357694
I do this as well. I try and stay off it before/during exams for obvious reasons.

>>13363578
That's a fair enough assessment actually. But I take breaks regularly, and like I say above, before and during exams.

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>The stone sucking scene in Molloy
What did Beckett mean by this?
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>>13362539
does he merely know about it, i.e. about its existence, or does he also know particulars and has even read it maybe? the former, in any case, isn't mexico-specific, saying that you're "waiting for godot" is kind of a winged word for waiting in vain
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>>13362685
He actually owns the book and has read it. All his buddies from uni have read it too and one of them rec'd him the play, and also apparently there's a weird theatrical community that is obsessed about the book and Beckett. Why's my country so fucking bizarre? lmao it's good that people still care for literature, though.
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>>13362519
The inability to synchronise or integrate with a perfect system, hence there is always an imperfect or imprecise remainder that refuses to be incorporated into the symbolic order. You cannot run a strict programme if the elements are interrupted or randomness (human error) is introduced into the equation. There is always the chance you are sucking the same stone twice.
>>
an expression of his autism
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Hard to say...

I read it as Beckett deconstructing structure. Any system (whether it be self-referential or not) he devised resulted in some sort of failure. Eventually you get back to sucking the same stone or you toss out the bin. In either case, you’re not really much further than before

It kind of gets at Molloy’s structure in general. In the end, you aren’t much further in figuring out who/what Moran/Molloy are/is (depending on your interpretation of the ending) One thing is clear, though, regardless of which theory you believe, you’re at the same point (someone is in a room unknown to them writing nonsense).

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What are some quotes by philosophers who lambasts people who read?
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>>13363332
>let's just shoot ourselves on the foot xDDD
kys
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>>13363341
>Ignoring insights from some of the greatest minds in history because you don't agree with it
no u kys
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>>13363332
28. And he would wonder that the grammarians should investigate the ills of Odysseus, while they were ignorant of their own.
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>>13363351
incredible pic
photog was right there
wonder what that fucker’s story was
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>>13363419
who cares

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>I contain multitudes
yeah--of dicks lol
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>>13362142
More like shitman hehehehe
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>>13362142
KILL YOURSELF
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>>13362142
good post and good thread desu
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>a child asked me what is the grass
DUDE WEED
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>>13362142
You don’t insult Whitman on my board and come away unscathed, bitch.

Is it worth the time? I read the first book when I was a teen and honestly I liked it a lot. But i've lots of stuffs to read as a grow man now and it came to me if is it worth the time yet. I'm 32, protofascist, and a avid reader of italian classics like Bocaccio, Ariosto, Dante, et al. Should I re-read the first one?
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>>13362651

I hear Budding Grove is actually the worst.
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>>13362667

Really? I loved all the stuff with Francois and Gilberte's relationship.
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Proust loves Italian shit so yeah. In fact it's best read from middle age, and who knows, maybe the act of reading it again will involuntarily conjure up memories of your earlier years and lead you on a very Proustian odyssey yourself, heh heh heh
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>>13362681
Francois and Gilberte's relationship? I just finished the series a couple weeks ago but either my comprehension is awful or that part is very slim. Did they even interact??
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Only read Swann's Way.

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bruh you haven't even done the infinite resignation yet that's so cringe bro
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this board is full of filthy aesthetes
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>>13363434
Finished this book a couple weeks ago, didn't like it that much

Just seemed redundant. Like a more complex way of saying "It takes courage to believe in the irrational", which I appreciate, but then he just spirals into all of these autistic metaphors about the dancing knights and all this nonsense.
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>>13363554
I'm one ^^

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>>13360744
I did not like Stoner, the book was an entertaining enough read and I do not feel as though that I wasted time that could have been spent on another book.
The man Stoner, I understand that the book sets out to make him an everyday hero. A tough, humble, ever enduring man. I did not feel that those qualities were enough to qualify his life as anything important.
The book, to me, showed me a hero who slowly lost any of the things that I respected out of him. His greatest, and pretty much only feat worth talking about was his changing majors. It marked an escape from the mind-numbing life that his parents, and I am sure his ancestors all lived until his existence.
This is equivalent to the first step on the moon in terms of his background. It meant a release from the old and a rebirth of him and his lineage.
Stoner squandered it. He lived a life that was barely a step above from the bland and tough life that his ancestors lived. In my opinion this made him choosing to go into a different major the worst mistake of his life. He had potential, he had made his shit hand, a mediocre or even good hand.
To me it felt like Stoner's life was barely worth living, and it might have been better if he had not lived at all. A failure through and through.
Stoner, while being a good book, did not fit me, I am glad that I read it but am very disappointed in just how pathetic Stoner turned out to be. I guess you could even call it a great book because it elicited very strong emotion in me, even though I am unsure if that is what Williams was going for.
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And what about the other novels by the same author, such as Augustus or Butcher's Crossing.
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>>13361713
>fun
Brainlet
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It is the best book I've read. I thought that would always be 100 Years of Solitude, but here we are
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>>13362373
El stoner salu2

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Books like " how to read a book by Mortimer" but for writing. also other books on learning that's mentioned on the truvism chart.
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>>13363323

t. /lit/ pleb who can only recognize paintings by covers of books they haven't read
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>>13363283
>From Where You Dream (for the process of writing, only one I've found that actually works)
>Writing Fiction (for the craft of writing. 2nd edition is on libgen, but read chapters in the order given in the 10th edition) by Janet Burroway
>Techniques of the Selling Writer (annoying antiquated writing style, but reinforces all the ideas in the first two books and helps you realize that all writing books cover exactly the same topics and you don't need to read any more of them)

After that start putting each element into practice until it becomes unconscious.
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>>13363432
That's quite the assumption. All the paintings I like I know by name and artist.
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>>13363460
Thank you !

What do you think about On writing well by zinsser ?
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>>13363312
Thank you very much anon, I didn't know that and I never bothered looking at the painting until you told me all about it.

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Read Ted
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I have. My 2 cents are that he is right in his prognosis of society, but his solution to the problems is wrong.
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>>13362571
lol
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>>13362571
I read his manifesto already, now what?
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>>13362578
This. You cannot play this in lethal.
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>>13363705
plant an ameteur bomb up your ass and scream "behold, a man"

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Why is it so long, what's his problem?
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>>13363827
he originally wanted to call it "war, what is it good for?"
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In his time, authors would be paid based on page number. So of course he made it super long so he would get paid more roubles

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Suppose you could only read and re-read 3 books for the rest of your life, what would you pick? What books are of such quality that they warrant being re-read countless times?
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the Bible
the iliad/odyssey (im counting them as one large work, if i had to choose the odyssey)
ulysses
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>>13363761
Nothing. I'd be too depressed at such repression.
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>>13363761

hey, joe.
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>>13363761
Bible
Collected works of Shakespeare
And
The tattoo on your mamas tits oo gotem
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>>13363761
The Waves by Virginia Woolf
Finnegans Wake by James Joyce
Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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Any 150 - 250 page contemporary novels about lonely guys craving for affection and stability?
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>>13358495
Platform by Houellebecq
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>>13358495
Crime and punishment
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The tunnel by ernesto sabato
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>>13359040
>>13359046
both garbage
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>>13358495
I understand that this question is meaningful to you, but as I see it, it doesn't make sense to me, that someone would crave for "affection and stability". In my experience, one usually craves for affection and stability in relation to another person and not so much in relation to an abstract entity that you don't know about. But what do you think? How do you see things differently?

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Any more like this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-EwIbfx6FY&feature=youtu.be
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>>13363255
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiaWsgtJrNI
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>>13363527
I don't like that one as much.
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>>13363740
Do you know more?
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awful
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>>13363746
Was hoping for something other than the Landman.

Do people like Stavrogin from Demons actually exist? It seems like such a bizarre psychology, yet it's plausible.
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Yes.
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He's like Rakhmetov except based on a real person instead of a stereotypical person. Read Chernyshevsky and Nechayev, they prefigure Lenin and the the Bolshevists to a much higher degree than Marx.
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>>13363480
Stavrogin is the most boring character in Demons, just a less-fleshed out Ivan Karamazov
>hurr he's like so deep and mysterious, everyone is interested in him but he has a bad side ;)
Shatov and Kirillov are the ones you should pay attention to. Both Verkhovensky's too.
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>>13363480
he's like my roommate in college


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