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Lets settle this once and for all /k/. Does leaving your magazines loaded damage the spring? Are revolvers the answer?
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Springs only wear out when they compress and decompress
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>>40876630
No it doesn't. I'm pretty sure it's not possible and even better for the spring than not being loaded.
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>>40876636
>>40876641
What about the spring creep?
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>>40876630
fudd logic 100%
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>>40876630
>are revolvers the answer
After the incoming semi ban, yes.
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>>40876630
No, it doesn't damage the spring.
Like any material you can damage it stressing it after the yeld point (which does not occour), or after N (10^6) cycles of compression and decompression (fatigue).

>>40876646
creep occurs only under high temperatures, this is not the case.
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>>40876708
>thinks they’ll stop at revolvers and bolt action
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>>40876630

>Are revolvers the answer?

answer to a problem that does not exist ?
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>>40876630
Yes, over a long period of time it does. Usually years. It also depends on the magazine make and what gun it's for.
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>>40876646
>https://www.yostsuperior.com/mechanical-spring-creep-does-it-matter/

>>40876823
isn't that always the case, no matter if the mags loaded or not? either way you should just always take care of your mags, i don't think unloading unused mags matters in any way
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material creep is a thing but it does not affect the magazines fast enough to matter
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The phenomenon known as creep, as mentioned above, only affects materials at or above ~0.4x their melting point, in absolute temperature (kelvin). This is unlikely to be an issue in regular service unless your springs are made of something absurd like lead, which actually creeps are room temperature. (I am assuming the temperature increases as a result of firing the weapon are small)

Stress-strain cycles, on the other hand, play a major role in spring wear. Ferrous material like iron and most steels exhibit an infinite lifetime under a particular amount of stress amplitude - not the absolute stress, which is generally far less - (the so-called "fatigue limit"). Less ductile materials like aluminum and titanium have a finite cycle life regardless of the stress amplitude; however, parts designed with these materials generally have lifetimes in the millions of cycles and fail by different modes long before the lifetime is reached.

So obviously, the life of the spring depends on proper design and materials choice. The spring steel that your gun would most likely use is a moderately-high carbon steel, with potentially nickel, silicon and manganese alloying agents in small quantities. Properly designed, it would last far longer than the other components of the gun that are regularly undergoing thermal stress, diffusion, and much larger fatigue cycles.

It's safe to say that storing your mag in a properly designed gun, will not wear out the spring prematurely. However, removing 1 or 2 rounds would increase the odds that you are maintaining the spring stress below the critical fatigue limit.

As a footnote, springs in regular circumstances follow Hooke's Law, which states that F=-kx (k being a materials, or "spring" constant and x being displacement). Thus, spring force is linear to displacement.
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For those worried about losing spring tension, remember that the spring on an unloaded magazine is under some tension.

If you want to play it completely safe, make sure to disassembly your magazine completely when not in use in order to relieve all the tension on the spring.
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>>40876895
or just do what you always do with your mags, keep them loaded or not, use them or not, and just clean them every once in a while, putting a bit of oil on the spring.
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Mags do get tired. Load handguns -1, 20 rds -2, 30 rds and up -3. Don't flog the pony. Lube your junk as necessary.
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>>40876934
Absolutely, I was just point out to the people who are paranoid about spring fatigue that even unloaded mags are under some level of tension.

Personally, I don't worry about the magazines I use in regular rotation, but disassembly stockpiled magazines.
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>>40876646
it take decades for creep to be a factor.
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>>40876630
Youre a fucking idiot. Its been settled forever. Leave your mags loaded. Worry about feed lips on shit polymer, springs will be fine retard. Theres an analogy about your car and its suspension im not gonna bother to get right for you. Fucking way to waste a thread retard.
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>>40876630
Revolvers still jam. Anyone who says they don't has clearly never owned or shot a revolver. They can lock up for a number of reasons. Best bet with mags that you've had loaded to long is to unload them after a period, break mag down, and stretch the spring back out a bit so it's not as compressed
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>>40876630
Yes 100%. Not really noticeable with rifle/shotgun mags but I definitely notice its a lot easier to load my handgun mags now Vs when they where brand new.
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>>40876630
>>40876636
I sign off this anon's post, I am a mechanical engineer
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>rifle mag was hard to load 3 years ago
>havent used it ever
>now its easy to load full capacity
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>>40876708
>incoming semi ban,

the only thing that happened after the las vegas shooting was a stupid bump stock ban. a lesser shooting in a different fucking country doesn't mean shit.
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>>40877536
My 686 cylinder stop got stuck in the frame and the cylinder was able to spin freely. Didnt happen last range trip. Probably just need to oil it more or something.
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>>40877873
whitepilled
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>>40876630
>Lets settle this once and for all /k/.
It's been settled a long fucking time ago but you fucking morons keep fucking asking.
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>>40877927
>Lets settle this once and for all
a new filter parameter thanks
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>>40876630
I guarantee nobody who spends this much time on the internet would ever notice any difference
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>>40877247
Git out with your fudd lore.
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>>40877536
>Revolvers still jam. Anyone who says they don't has clearly never owned or shot a revolver.
I worked at a range for 5 years and have heard many people that own revolvers say they don't jam. I have seen a few fuck ups with revolvers, but most of those times it ends up being to a point where they have to take it to a gunsmith, not something small that happened to get snagged on the cylinder.
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>>40876636
Another MechE here confirming

store them loaded, store them empty, wear happens during loading and unloading.
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>>40876630
>Does leaving your magazines loaded damage the spring?
Technically yes, creep is a thing. That said, it's completely negligible and a non-issue.

Also
>pic of a video that already answered this question once and for all
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVC-83QW5L4

>>40876721
>creep occurs only under high temperatures
Wrong, high temperature merely makes it more severe.
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>>40876630
No, springs work by cycles of compression/decompression. Leaving a mag loaded for 10 years and then shooting it has the same effect as loading a mag and shooting it on the spot.
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>>40877991
so what youre saying is springs are magic and a force acting on them causing them to move into a position where they wouldnt be resting naturally causes no wear. and your reasoning is because your an engineer. good job i bet you get a’s.
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>>40876636
This. Thisis basic engineering knowledge, so basic it should just be common knowledge to every one.
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>>40878073
>its true because my book says so but i cant give you a logical reasoning

bet you believe the earth is a globe too, srs.
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>>40878073
>Thisis basic engineering knowledge
And yet it was already debunked like 3 posts ago with an actual test.
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>>40876646
>The Spring Creep
I just imagine a tiny old man who lives under a bridge and steals magazine springs.
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>>40878066
There’s two types of mechanical deformation- plastic and elastic
Plastic is permanent deformation while elastic is not and compressing a spring is the latter
So if the spring is only in the elastic regime the only thing you need to worry about is fatigue
Creep takes too long to matter at lower temperatures

t materials engineer
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>>40878106
Must be a relative of the brass jew.
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>>40878138
>Creep takes too long to matter at lower temperatures
It might not affect performance, but it does visibly shorten the springs if left loaded for a few years. As was already proven in >>40877996
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>>40878084
Nah, its flat.
>>40878087
>one person does a test
>some how disproves the thousands of tests already done
Yeap, that one picture sure debunked it.
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>>40878200
>some how disproves the thousands of tests already done
Please, share those thousands of tests where both loaded and unloaded mags were left for years and their length remained the same. While you're at it, please explain why the springs in loaded mags became shorter in this particular test.
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Here's another point: think of all the striker fired surplus bolt rifles and other guns that have been sitting in crates with their striker springs compressed for decades and decades. If leaving springs compressed ruined them then wouldn't pretty much all the mosins and such have fucked strikers?
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>>40878253
You can't equate striker springs to magazine springs though.
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Keeping mags loaded does fuck up the spring. When your great grandkids get your gun, they will bitch and whine that the last round in the mag doesn't feed one fifth of the time.
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>>40878138
Confirmed.

Another actual materials engineer.
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>>40878283
Please explain to me why you can't exactly
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>>40876630
I wondered this myself for years, seriously. I even made threads here, but wasn't 100% convinced.
For the past 6 years, I kept a single stack 9mm gun loaded, and I plan on video taping results soon.

Is anyone interested in it? /k/ has been shit for a long while now.
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Not a spring issue, but I kept a Taurus 1911 magazine loaded for a good while, and the mag bulged and is now unable to drop free from the magwell. It's probably because Taurus is shit though.
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>>40879051
I would be. Are you just going to shoot it and see if it works or are you comparing it against another mag spring?
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>>40876630
who fucking cares? if you shoot your gun at least once a month then its fine because they are being loaded and unloaded. now shut the fuck up about this fucking wives tale shit
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>>40877921
Could be a weak spring in the little cylinder lock
>>40877961
They can lock up from a few common reasons
>Dirt/debris under ejector star
>Loose yolk screw
>Loose ejector rod cap
>Bent ejector rod
>Crud in the turning arm window
Any of these can happen during usage, obviously a few would be from bad maintenance, but yah especially ones like loose screw/ejector rod cap can happen in the middle of firing and lock the cylinder up. Anyone who claims they don't jam probably hasn't shotten many revolvers and is just repeating misconception
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>>40876884
>only affects materials at or above ~0.4x their melting point, in absolute temperature (kelvin)
That's just an arbitrary cutoff value of significance.
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>>40879049
Different size, different shape, most likely different alloy of steel and different treatment.
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>>40878950
Debunked.

Reality, see >>40877996
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>>40876636
>>40876641
>>40876823
>>40877493
>>40877927
If the spring is under high load like in a full magazine, then yes as temperature changes (even small changes like day and night), it will VERY slowly wear the spring out and make it weaker.
As a pilot part of the checklist for the type of aircraft I fly says to unlock the airbrakes when storing it in the hangar as to reduce the wear on the springs in the airbrake overcentre locks.
I've also got a buddy who's a maintenance engineer who can confirm that people who disregard the unlocking of airbrakes rule (usually people storing the aircraft outside, "to keep the inside of the brake boxes clean"), tend to lose entire years from their spring lifespan.
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>>40879276
That doesn't matter when discussing springs as a whole. The only way you're going to fuck it up is by stretching it significantly beyond its resting position, or as other anon have said, cyclically loading and unloading. The materials present will determine how far you have to stretch it before creep takes over, as well as the spring constant. It will not affect how the spring behaves to certain types of stresses.

t. Yet another materials engineer
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>>40876721
>creep occurs only under high temperatures
just because your simplified spreadsheet says it doesn't happen doesn't mean it does not happen.
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>>40879404
a spring not practically creeping by leaving it loaded is different than a spring not creeping at all. just because it doesnt creep enough to make noticeable difference doesnt mean springs are magic and will return to its identical original position.



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