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Has Rome ever contributed scientifically to anything?
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your mum
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>>7225559
how is that a contribution?
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Yes they contributed scientifically to keeping a modicum of purity of blood among the Western Aryans by preventing an invasion of German barbarians for centuries

No wonder real Western Aryans (Romans, Greeks) and real Eastern Aryans (Iranians, North Indians) look similar.

Then of course White Tyrone had to come and we WUZ that legacy. Looking at pretty much all of Western Europe and N America. Even Slavs had more to do with Aryanism than these LARPers
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>>7225572

Well we learned how fat a chick can get while still being able to get laid
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well when they finally got stomped out in 1453 the monks 'n shit fleeing brought with them many ancient texts and artifacts contributing to the renaissance
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>>7225577
again, how is that a contribution?
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>>7225579
>ancient texts
by that you mean ancient ''greek'' texts
That's not a contribution at all for the muslims did it even better in al andalus
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Were white people slaves in Rome? If so then where are my reparations?
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>>7225592
they got raped by white low class mass migration
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>>7225535
Stop it with the Greek vs Roman distinction. For once, they weren't that different ethnically because Italy was colonized by Greeks since forever. Also, the Roman empire helped to preserve the Greek culture by adopting it thus creating the Greco-Roman world, which was basically the more universal Hellenistic civilization that started with Alexander the Great. I doubt any of it would have survived the barbarian invasions later on if it wasn't under Roman protection.
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>>7225612
No and No.
Byzantine ain't Roman.
It is the Final Manifestation of Greek culture.
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>>7225644
byzantines were hellenic, not greek. Please learn the difference
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>>7225644
Byzantines didn't exist, it was the Roman empire. Not ERE, not Byzantium, those things never existed in history.
Just the Roman empire that had a Hellenic culture like it always did.
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>>7225661
nope, western roman empire was not and never was hellenic
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>>7225576
holy cringe
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>>7225669
Neither a western Roman empire as a different entity existed. Those are modern terms in historiography only. And yes, the western parts of the Roman empire were heavily Hellenized too, but the destruction of the barbarian invasions didn't let them develop any further as the eastern parts.
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>>7225692
nope you're wrong, the west was latinized as fuck while the east was speaking greek
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>>7225661
>Just the Roman empire that had a Hellenic culture like it always did.
no such thing as Hellenic culture, only Roman culture which was based on genociding other cultures and preserving what they thought was good for them and the Greek was one of the many of its victims
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>>7225777
this
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The aquaduct
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>>7225827
Sorry, greek invention, 2000 years earlier
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What I heard was that the founders of Rome themselves came from Greece and were Greeks...
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>>7226076
not really
That was a fairy tail in the last period of the roman empire where they tried to change the story of the origin from romulus and remus to the descendants of the troyans, because sounded more prestigious
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Roman cement? Haven't checked, just an off hand thought. Otherwise, their military tactics were pretty innovative for the time. The crane in a modrn and recognisable form could be attributed to them. The arch as well, I guess.
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>>7226085
*fairy tale

I see I get your point, thanks.
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>>7226093
Sorry too, concrete, even though was used by the romans, was already used for centuries before in the middle east and Greece.
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>>7226093
http://www.ce.memphis.edu/1101/interesting_stuff/pyramids_in_concrete.html
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>>7226115
Yeah, just looked that one up. Seems th Macedonians were on it a few hundred years before the Romans although one could quibble about hydraulic or non-hydraulic cement.
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>>7225700
Mainland Italy was speaking Greek too.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_the_Roman_Empire

Then you have the Roman religion which was also Greek
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_ancient_Rome
>>7225777
>Romans genocided the Greeks
I see, we can continue this discussion after you've finished school then.
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>>7226120
An interesting theory, if not widely accepted.
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>>7226124
sorry again, but hydraulic cement was already used by the greeks too
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>>7226127
of course aristocrats were speaking greek as a second language in italy, but it's nothing compared to the eastern roman empire where it was so widespread it became the official language. Latin was the language of the western part
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“Apart from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order, roads, the fresh water system, and public health … what have the Romans ever done for us?”
– Graham Chapman
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>>7226140
Hmmmm, seems that too leads to a dead end.
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>>7226151
you can argue they brought that to Gaul and Brittania, but certainly not in the middle east, greece or carthage
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>>7225535
Based Roman cat dabbing on Greek cunt kitty.
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The Hypocaust, a system of central heating for bath houses, was a uniquely Roman invention.
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>>7225612
>Stop it with the Greek vs Roman distinction.
Why should we?
>For once
For one*
>they weren't that different ethnically
Sure
>because Italy was colonized by the Greeks since forever
Except that isn't remotely the truth. The Greeks only colonized a small part of Southern Italy, the rest of the Italian peninsula and its islands (Sardina, Corsica, Sicily, etc...) were either populated by Italics or with the Carthaginians trying to establish colonies of its own, which it did. The vast majority of Italy was always Italic in character, language, and composition with the northern most reaches by Gaulic like the Senones, etc...were occupying the areas around the Alps. So the Greeks were never the major force population/demographically speaking in Italy.
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>>7226469
I'm sorry the greeks were already using the heating system for bath houses earlier

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_baths_of_Gela
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>>7226127
>Mainland Italy was speaking Greek too.
That's a bit like claiming England was speaking French during the time of the Norman occupation. It was only the case for the extremely small elite class in Rome; virtually everyone else in Italy was speaking Latin.
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>>7226127
>Then you have the Roman religion which was also Greek
The Greek religion was Egyptian in the first place.
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This thread taught me that the Romans were actually not great at all. All they did was steal from other cultures.
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Are Romaboos completely disingenuous to history?
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>>7226653
We know that the Bible was written in Greek in order to be spread in the lands of the Roman empire. We also have Paul's epistle to the Romans which is also in Greek. It doesn't seem like it was a language only for the elites considering that the first Christians were usually lower class.
>>7226656
They're not even compatible. Greek gods were anthropomorphic for a start. And even if that was true, Romans took their gods from the Greeks and not from the Egyptians.
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>>7226737
>We know that the Bible was written in Greek in order to be spread in the lands of the Roman empire. We also have Paul's epistle to the Romans which is also in Greek.
Because Rome at this time included Greek-speaking lands in the east, which is where the early Christians were spreading their ideas to at the time. In the Italian peninsula, regular people spoke Latin.
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>>7226737
Which Greek god was Janus?
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>>7226743
Also, even the elites in Rome also spoke Latin, it's just that they understood and could speak Greek as well.
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>>7225581
They contributed semen
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>>7226743
Still doesn't explain why Paul wrote to the church of Rome in Greek.
>>7226746
Congratulations, you found the only exclusive Roman deity
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_ancient_Rome
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>>7226781
>Still doesn't explain why Paul wrote to the church of Rome in Greek.
Because he didn't understand Latin and knew that there were people in Rome who understood Greek and could translate for him.
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Byzaboos legitimately have such an enormous complex over people telling them the Byzantines weren't Roman that they're soon going to insist that the Italic peoples and everyone throughout the entire Roman Empire were actually all Greek
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>>7225535
I want to ask the same thing about the pre wuslim Persians
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>>7226801
Nobody mentioned the Byzantine empire neither questioned if it was Roman or not. It only takes a google search with "Roman empire timeline" to see what history says about it anyway. Everything else is up to the psychiatrists.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_Roman_history
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>>7226810
Look at the Academy of Gondishapur for one.
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>>7225535
Romans in general were not interested in intellectual activities that did not support their militaristic plans. They were great engineers though.

>>7226781
Greek was the lingua France of the Ancient World

>>7226737
Romans did not take their religion from the Greeks. Their pantheon was a mixture of Italic religions and a small influence of Greek.

>>7226127
>after you’ve finished school
Lmao can you tell me what happened to Greece during the Macedonian wars, the Roman war against Epirus and Roman retaliation during the Mithridatic wars?
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WE
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>>7225535
>Asians discover
>Greeks make it good
>Italians commercialize it
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>>7225651
It's the other way around. The were Greek, but not Hellenic.
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Wes Rome the China of Europe?
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>>7225535
>Has Rome ever contributed scientifically to anything?

In this thread, a lot of people seem to argue that, like all contributions to science, art, technology, the Romans' contributions were based on earlier works and advancements, and that this somehow invalidates them.

That is nonsensical. Be ashamed.
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>>7225576
>real Western Aryans (Romans
Funny thing about that. Currently reading J.A. McCulloch's The religion of the ancient Celts from 1911, and he keeps talking about how the Aryan Celts looked down on the small and brown Romans.
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>>7229837
Actually i think he only says they looked down on them once, but repeatedly mentions the Aryan features of the Celts and how the Romans were relatively short and brown.
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>>7228187
>small influence
They barely even change the names of the gods they were copying lmao
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>>7225535
You do realize Greece in kind drew on the near east, right? It's not a zero sum game.
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>>7230507
do I what?
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>>7229608
This. It is a continuous improvement spanning thousands of years and civilizations.
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>>7226476
A small part of Southern Italy? Greeks were in Sicily numbering in the hundreds of thousands, Syracuse alone had like 200,000 people
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they weren't science people. slave societies have a certain inertia when it comes to novelty. in slave driven economies novelty is strongly discouraged in those with the freedom to pursue it and owner-class conformity is a powerful force.
ancient greece is the real outlier among slave economies with respect to innovation.
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>>7225535
Serious answer: Pliny the Elder wrote extensively on natural history
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>>7230779
This could count as a minor contribution indeed
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>>7229873
>Celtoids
>Aryan
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>>7225535
Not particularly. The Roman Empire while prosperous was actually technology quite stagnant.
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>>7232844
wrong, economically yes, slavery was a huge thorn on the Empire especially after expansion stoped, however even at the end of the empire you had things like the Barbegal aqueduct and mill and armored charriots with ballistas
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>>7232856
Greeks invented Aquaducts. The Roman Aquaducts gave everyone lead poisoning. But you're right the Romans invented some new battle tactics. All they were good at is killing and enslaving people.
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>France= Greece
>Uk=Rome


Think about it
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>>7230737
Sicily is arguably not even Italy tbqh
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>>7233071
Germany works better in place of France.
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>>7226781
>Congratulations, you found the only exclusive Roman deity

There's hundreds more in that page

>>7225535
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_technology#Technologies_developed_or_invented_by_the_Romans

The more notable ones here are screw presses, mills, harvesting contraptions, surgery tools, glass blowing, extensive use of water sluicing for mining, large scale sewer systems, large scale road networks, bridges, cranes, baths, fountains, and of course concrete.

But aside from technological developments, they invented the foundation of the modern adversarial system of justice, a very complex system of elections for public officials using a primitive principle of representation by tribe and by social echelon, they invented methods to obtain citizenship and a rough constitution, and militarily, they had the first fully professional army of paid volunteers pursuing a career and being trained to an institutional standard.
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>>7234230
>developed or invented
>It's all things they developed from copying other people
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>>7234253
After fire, the wheel and the knife, here is no invention that wasn't developed from something else.
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>>7225535
Roman numerals
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>>7234259
They had no original ideas aside from ways to kill or enslave people.
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>>7234298
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_law
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digest_(Roman_law)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corpus_Juris_Civilis

>invent the most advanced system of peaceful resolution of interpersonal conflict
>muh slavery and war

If you have a problem with indentured work you should despise the Greek.
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>>7234312
>Around 450 BC, the first decemviri (decemvirate, board of "Ten Men") were appointed to draw up the first ten tables. According to Livy, they sent an embassy to Greece to study the legislative system of Athens, known as the Solonian Constitution, but also to find out about the legislation of other Greek cities
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>>7234349
From
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve_Tables
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>>7234284
Man I sure do love using those Roman numerals in my math equations.
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>>7234349
>Roman jurists clearly separated the legal right to use a thing (ownership) from the factual ability to use and manipulate the thing (possession). They also established the distinction between contract and tort as sources of legal obligations.

>The standard types of contract (sale, contract for work, hire, contract for services) regulated in most continental codes and the characteristics of each of these contracts were developed by Roman jurisprudence.

>The classical jurist Gaius (around 160) invented a system of private law based on the division of all material into personae (persons), res (things) and actiones (legal actions). This system was used for many centuries. It can be recognized in legal treatises like William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England and enactments like the French Code civil or the German BGB.

Also
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_litigation
>Due to the faults of the legis actiones system, namely its excessive formality, archaic nature, and limited effectiveness, a new system was introduced. This was known as the formulary system. The formula was a written document by which in a civil trial authorization was given to a judge to condemn the defendant if certain factual or legal circumstances appeared proved, or to absolve him if this was not the case.[3]


>>7234372
The original Twelve Tables were lost during the first sacking, everything from that point onwards was developed by practice. Procedural law, as well as the Jurisprudence generated in the Digestas are a direct result of the experience Roman lawmakers had.
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>>7234378
>I don't personally use x so it doesn't count!
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>>7234392
Name the last 5 ways you've used Roman numerals where Arabic numbers wouldn't have been more efficient.

Hell if Roman numerals were so great we'd be using them on calculators, in code, for money, even basic player numbers for sports.

I know you love Roman m8 but don't be a retart.
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>>7234410
Name the last five times you've used your dick to have sex faggot
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>>7234415
A few nights ago I found a dead rat in my shed.
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>>7230737
You are overrating Greek colonization, the vast majority of the Italian peninsula was almost wholly Italic in character barring the Gaulic/Celtic tribes in and around the Alps. Magna Gracia was largely just in Southern Italy and even then there was a large number of Italian tribes there too.
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>>7225577
>>7226775
fkn based op btfo to reddit KEK
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>>7234454
Etruscan culture was almost as old as classic Greeks and also never colonized, wasn't it?
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>>7225576
>a modicum of purity of blood among the Western Aryans
fuck off /pol/
>>7225669
but the people in rome dressed like greeks (draped on clothes) while the people at the fringes of empire dressed as roman as fuck (wrapped on clothes). Always the case with empires, culture smorgasbord at home, fuck off i'm an imperial citizen at the fringe.

Greece was all stone and lintel, romans had the arch. /thread
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>>7234463
How many Etruscan towns and cities were there in Italy? I know that as a kid to young adult, one of Augustus' best friends was an ethnic though Latinized Estrucan along with Agrippa.
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>>7225535
>Romans copy some of the Pantheon
>Roman fighting style is different
>Roman Government is different
>Roman Culture is different
>Roman Clothing is Different
>Roman Economy is different
>Romans thought they were descended from the Trojans

The Romans Copied EVERYTHING from the Greeks!!!
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>>7233071
more like
>Greece = UK
>Rome = America
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>>7225644
It was both, really. It's undeniable that the Empire became more uniquely Greek as the it contracted geographically and culturally, but that's a bit of a chicken and egg problem. At the same time, the state was distinctly Roman (despite some largely superficial similarities with the Diadochi) and, while it adapted to hardships, a lot of its fundamental aspects (citizenship, legitimacy, the role of emperor, law) tried their best to maintain continuity with the time of Constantine. There was a general sense of 'Romanness' among the population. There was some private pontificating about being Hellenes, but it seems more poetic than anything. It should be kept in mind that by 600 AD, the Eastern Mediterranean had been part of the Roman Empire since well before the birth of Christ. The Roman Empire was really all people knew, apart from a few intellectuals, and even for them the age of Alexander or earlier was ancient, if not mythical history that they would be hard-pressed to relate to on a meaningful level. It would be like a Tudor era Englishman considering himself a Jute or Saxon.
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>>7234708
Sculpture, literature, painting are straight out copies. Architecture was heavily influenced
>culture
A copy. The first Roman writers were either Greeks such as Ennio or outright stated they were following the teachings of Greek writers such as Plauto, the same goes for Roman philosophers such as Seneca or Lucretius
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>>7235748
Weren't they essentially of the same family of people? Nordics or whatever to call it.
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>>7225535
The Julianic Calender.
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>>7235777
no



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