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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkveQrTBFtU
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they took the GI bill, went to school, fugged fine SJW slooots on campus, shitposted on 4cocks, the usual stuff
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>>5943035

Lamented about how they couldn't save pregnant Anne Frank.
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>>5943035
A large number moved to California and Chicago.
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Became train robbers.
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>>5943035
They formed the KKK.
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My ancestors became clergymen.
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>>5943035
Continue to pay the spite taxes that caused the war.
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Most went back to the farm to pick up the pieces and rebuild, not having any real interest in fighting anymore. Some went on to continue fighting the government through being outlaws in the west or becoming members of the KKK, Red Shirts, White League, etc. Some hated the idea of even living in a south controlled by the union and moved out west or some even went to Mexico and Brazil. Not every Confederate was really upset about the war ending the way it did though. There's plenty of stories out there of soldiers who were just relieved to finally be able to go home and didn't really care that the Confederacy lost. Some like Lee and Longstreet I think deep down were glad they did lose since they didn't really want to leave in the first place.
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>>5944297
>taxes caused the war

2/10
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>>5944560
Did soldiers write home about fighting for or against niggers? Did they even mention slavery?
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>>5946003
>soldiers' reason for fighting=nation's reason for fighting
fucking brainlet
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My great great great grandfather went back to his farm and became an alcoholic, going to CSA veterans reunions once a year to get shit faced with a bunch of other aging white men
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i'm curious, do we have any biographies about it?
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Lynched niggers, cooked meth, collected welfare, the usual
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>>5943035
Jefferson Davis ran an insurance company and hired a lot of ex-Confederate officers and members of his old cabinet. He was offered some positions at military academies, but he refused them.
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>>5946960
If we're discussing individual Confederate leaders I think James Longstreet is one of the more interesting ones considering he was friends with Grant before the war, possibly was even one of Grant's groomsmen at his wedding, and seconds after the end of the war rekindled their friendship and became close political partners for the rest of Grant's career which cost Longstreet his reputation in the south. He even led black troops against the White League in New Orleans.
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>>5944282
:DDDD
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>>5944282
That was an actual side effect of the war. A lot of soldiers on both sides went on to become influential clergy in their churches.
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>>5943035
I think a few officers went into politics. Forrest went into the railroad game and lost while Beauregard won. Lee became President of Washington University until his death. Loring went to Egypt.
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>>5947598
Longstreet went on to serve a variety of political jobs for Grant, Roosevelt, and Hayes. Mahone ran as a third party candidate for several jobs with his party being a coalition of Republicans, more liberal Democrats, and free blacks. Alcorn became a moderate Republican senator and governor. Mosby became an active supporter of Grant's and Grant's campaign chair in Virginia which irked a lot of hardliners. Fairly these guys weren't the majority but rather the exception.
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took care of their wives newly born black sons
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>>5946003
Although, >>5946017 is correct for insulting you. I can tell you’ve never actually read any of the various books that contain letters from soldiers because slavery actually does come up quite a bit.
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>>5943035
AYOOOOOOOO
*smacks lips*
BOY SO YA'LL THER BE SAYIN"...
*spits dipping tobacco into a bottle of spit he's carrying around*
"THAT WE'S HERE..."
*fucks his sister*
"WUZ ONCE DON GON WERE..."
*collects welfare check*
"GENRALZ N SHEIT???
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>>5948231
> you're right but you're an asshole
Are you a woman?
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>>5949850
What?

He isn’t correct at all. The notion that dixiefags were fighting for some noble cause other than slavery is largely a meme.
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>>5943035
>What did CSA soldiers do?

Their sisters, mostly. Or their cousins if they were an only child.
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>>5950015
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>>5950011
>The notion that dixiefags were fighting for some noble cause other than slavery is largely a meme.

Wrong

>>5950015

Rude
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>>5950060

this meme should be dead by now
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>>5950064

Well it's not going to, Yankee.
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>>5950025
>Inbred hillbillies spend centuries autisticly screeching about "M'uh racial purity!!!"
>Get surprised when black people take their word for it and strive for "m'uh (black) racial purity."
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>>5950082
Did you not see the pic? It was the daughter of your hero Obama with her white boyfriend
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>>5950101
Why would I give a fuck about Obama, you stupid cuck?
Stay mad.
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>>5947103
>He even led black troops against the White League in New Orleans

Really? I didn’t know there were any other openly “repentant” CSA leaders besides Nathan Bedford Forrest (of all people lol), was this a common thing?
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>>5946620

There are plenty of diaries and memoirs of Confederate soldiers that have been published over the years.
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>>5950277
>repenting for being right
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>>5944432
In his testimony before Congress in February 1866, Lee said that in his opinion, the civilian population of the South held more bitterness toward the North than the soldiers did.
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>>5946960
Davis was far more loved and lionized in his later years than he'd been during the war itself.
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>Lee had not been in Washington since April 1861 when he arrived in the capital on February 17, 1866 to testify before the Congressional Joint Committee on Reconstruction. The city had grown considerably as a result of the war and much of it was unrecognizable to him. He was not necessary looking forward to this as he was not fond of public speaking, or being cross-examined by a panel of Radical Republicans.

>Among the questions asked:
>Q: What would you say is the general attitude towards ex-leaders of the Confederate government towards the government of the United States?
>A: I have been living very much in retirement and have no contact with politicians. On that I cannot give any opinion on their attitudes or beliefs.
>Q: You have heard no hostile opinions towards the government of the United States expressed by any citizen of Virginia?
>A: None that I am aware of.
>Q: What is your stance on granting colored men the vote?
>A: I do not believe they are ready for it at this time. To give them the vote now would simply lead to rabble and demagoguery.
>Q: What is your stance on educating colored men?
>A: I believe some form of education for them would be of considerable benefit to both the colored and white populations. I am not qualified to judge the colored men's capability for learning, although I do not think it is equal with the white man's. I rather think it would be preferable for the colored population to be removed from Virginia altogether--I always have. They will work briefly to earn their sustenance, but they aren't inclined to prolonged hard work. They like their ease and comfort.
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>Q: Are you aware of any atrocities committed against Union prisoners?
>A: I do not know of any.
>Q: Do you believe President Davis would be convicted of treason against the United States if put on trial?
>A: I think it is very probable that they would not consider that he had committed treason. The state and not the people of Virginia made the decision to secede, and therefore all its citizens were bound by the laws of the state.

Many of Lee's replies, particularly his denial that he had heard anyone in Virginia express hostility to Northerners less than a year after the end of the war, come off as slightly perplexing at best, borderline evasive at worst. However, he navigated the testimony with considerable skill and avoided giving Radical Republicans any ammunition. The committee, having resigned themselves to getting nothing interesting or incriminating out of Lee, ended the questioning after only one day of testimony.
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>>5950015
Fuck off you smug elitist
>haha stupid poor people fuck their sisters
This is just as offensive as saying blacks look like monkeys
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>>5947725
>>5950082
blackbois are so pathetic
Your ancestors spent hundreds of years getting whipped and castrated making the Bigdick White Master his cotton money while Master breeds your wives and daughters :) Even today, black men delude themselves by giving themselves concussions and hernias on the football field making the White Man billions of dollars while their black goddesses are in the locker room being bred by Superior White Southern Semen.
Being a cuck is in your DNA, blackboi.
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>>5943508
based
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>>5950325
like?
>not american so dont know how to find it
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>>5950565
BASED
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>>5950541
>I do not believe [blacks] are ready for it at this time. To give them the vote now would simply lead to rabble and demagoguery.
> I am not qualified to judge the colored men's capability for learning, although I do not think it is equal with the white man's
> They will work briefly to earn their sustenance, but they aren't inclined to prolonged hard work. They like their ease and comfort.
Where is the lie? How could anyone doubt this?
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>>5950840
>>>/pol/
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>>5950864
> Louisiana School Made Headlines for Sending Black Kids to Elite Colleges
It's still not a lie.
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>>5944432
>Much of the South lay in ruins--cities destroyed, factories, businesses, and banks closed down, railroads out of commission. Farms were abandoned and fields choked with weeds. Seed and livestock were in short supply and labor as well; slaves were now free and tens of thousands of young, fit white men had been killed or maimed. There are pathetic stories of farmers pulling a plow across a field all by themselves with no human or animal assistance. Not until 1870 did cotton production return to prewar levels and mostly because of new tracts of land being put to use in Texas.

>One Radical Republican proposal involved redistributing the former land of plantation owners to freed slaves. It went nowhere due to lack of support and because traditional American attitudes regarding property rights remained too strong.
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>Grant was notably critical of Lee in his memoirs, arguing that he had been too old to be an effective field commander and that he was also unimpressed with his devotion to the state of Virginia, arguing that fellow Virginians George Thomas and Winfield Scott had remained loyal to the Union. It may have been that Grant felt the need to deflate the growing Lee cult in the South, which was becoming a thing by the 1880s, when he wrote his memoirs.
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>>5950559
>being THIS much assmassacred
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>>5943431

fpbp
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>>5950565
BLACKIES BTFO
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>>5950565
NEGRO FINNA START BOILING
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>>5950277
I wouldn't say common but it wasn't entirely rare. John Mosby became friends with Grant after the war and was Grant's campaign chair in Virginia. James Alcorn became a Republican governor and Senator for Mississippi. William Mahone led a third party that included Republicans, more liberal Democrats, and blacks. Even Robert E. Lee himself while he never got directly involved with politics did make it clear to a colleague at the university he worked at that he would not tolerate any disrespect to Grant while he was there. As for Longstreet himself he served a variety of positions for Grant, Roosevelt, and Hayes. Fairly many of these men were unionist sympathizers despite ultimately fighting for the Confederacy so I don't think it bothered them too much the south returned to the union. The Confederate military leadership from what I can tell weren't often as rabidly secessionist as the Confederate political leadership.
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>>5950584
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_R._Watkins
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>>5950981
To give Lee credit Lee would've agreed with him that the Lee cult was stupid and was going against what he asked southerners to do.
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Jubal Early was mostly responsible for the Lost Cause myth and creating the Lee cult. He was one of that portion of diehard Southerners who never accepted defeat.
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>>5953951
>The Confederate military leadership from what I can tell weren't often as rabidly secessionist as the Confederate political leadership.

As far as specific Confederate generals who were, I think D.H. Hill was one of the worst. He had an almost borderline lunatic hatred of all things Northern.
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>>5950015
Yank detected
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>>5943508
Objectively a good thing because the Carpetbagger yankee government would have been corrupt beyond repair
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>>5955167
>he doesn't want a Southern jihad against Northerners

KKK Militants flying airliners into the World Trade Center instead of Al Qaeda would've been best timeline desu
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>>5955167
Hill was a capable general not used much because he was a dick and argued with practically everyone. Dude ran his mouth way too often and in any profession, that's usually a bad idea.

>>5955163
Early however was fairly high up on the incompetence scale, the Frederick fiasco being one of the worst (wasting valuable time to collect ransom money from a town).
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>>5943035
A lot of them went back home glad it was all over. The fact is the war was so horrific for both sides that by the end everyone just wanted it to end.
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>>5950565

t.
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>>5943035

Impregnated the local Jewish qt
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>>5950025
>dad is half-white
>be surprised that his daughter doesn't have a problem dating a white guy
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Went out west, became mercenaries elsewhere, moved to slave-holding South American states.

>>5950464
Wouldn't surprise me, excluding those who experienced the war firsthand it's easy for chickenshits to be chickenshits. It's why I get livid when I see people today peddling the "TEEHEE BURN EM SHERMAN. KILL EM ALL. MARCH AGAIN KILL ALL EM REDNECKS WHO ARENT IN REBELLION KILL EM FOR DISAGREEING WITH ME" When Sherman explicitly cursed those who bring about division and eternal war of secession, that if you obey the union you are his charge and he and his army will protect you from all threats, and in general was a man who hated secessionists, not Southerners. It just so happened Southerners were secessionists so he hated them for secession but once they accepted the rule of the union they were his countrymen again.
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>>5943035
They were used in the first Vaudevillian mandingo shows to play the cucks whose daughters and wives got blacked.
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>>5950464
That's been the case for almost every war ever. One of the only major exceptions I can think of is Germany after WW1, because since the country surrendered while the Germans will still entrenched in France, a lot of veterans felt they were cheated out of their victory and it started the idea of "Germany never lost on the battlefield".
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Lost Cause mythology tends to mostly glorify the ANV and the Virginia front, you hear less mention of the West where the Confederates lost almost every major battle.
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>>5955195
The best timeline is the one where brother never fights brother.
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>>5955254
>Lost Cause mythology tends to mostly glorify the ANV and the Virginia front
Well yeah, there's a reason today the symbol of the Confederacy is the Virginia Battle Flag and not the CSA's political flag.
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>>5955263
>Well yeah, there's a reason today the symbol of the Confederacy is the Virginia Battle Flag and not the CSA's political flag.

The national flag was widely hated for his resemblance to the US flag and its future iterations incorporated the battle flag?
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>>5955263

Also, the most popular variant of the Confederate battle flag (the one you see in Dukes of Hazard and the like) is the Army of Tennessee's 1864 Battle Flag. The Virginia Battle flag is a square and it's mainly used by the SCV and reenacting groups.
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Confederate battlefield performance in the West was mostly just nonstop failures. Not that the rank and file soldiers were any worse, but the ANV had the best generals and equipment while the West had such luminaries as Braxton Bragg and Leonidas Polk.

The Union armies in the West were tougher overall; the enlisted men came from a more rural part of the country with harsher winters and could handle the rigors of campaigning and marching better than many of the soft city boys from the Northeast (cavalry in the East took half the war to get good while they were always first rate in the West from day one). The overall distances in the West were enormous while the vast majority of the Eastern front took place in the 100 miles between Washington and Richmond. The West was also far from the nation's capital and generals had a free hand and little political interference due to the sensitivity around leaving DC exposed.
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>>5955293
After his initial stint as a brigade commander at First Bull Run, Sherman was eager to be transferred west where he argued the real war would be fought. If anything, the bloody stalemate in Virginia for three years was necessary while the Western armies did the real work.
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>>5955226
>>5955312
Where Sherman and Grant succeeded and their predecessors failed was to an extent political. They managed to reconcile themselves with the Lincoln administration's program for abolition of slavery while many generals and also tried to play politics themselves. It must be understood that the large majority of regular army officers were Democrats or apolitical (Grant had voted but once in his life, for James Buchanan in 1856) and few had much use for abolitionists. Many officers rather admired the culture of the South and had many Southern friends in the army that they were not happy about having to fight against.

When you consider generals like McClellan or Buell, it was obvious that they didn't accept Lincoln's program at all and to the bitter end wanted to wage a "nice" war where Southern civilians and property would be left alone and the goal of the war was merely to suppress the rebellion; when it was over, slavery would be left intact with maybe a few compromises or adjustments regarding states' rights.
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>>5955335
It wasn’t really that political at all. McClellan and Buell were both hilariously incompetent.

McClellan could have ended the war at Antietam if he was even mildly competent and Buell’s refusal to commit more soldiers to the battle at Perryville made him hated by his own men.
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>>5955335
I remember reading a wikipedia article on reconstruction mentioning two seperate Union generals emancipating all slaves in the territories they administrated to the chagrin of Lincoln.
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>>5943445

this
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>>5950060

Based
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>>5943035
iirc some ran off to Nicaragua or Central America to own slaves
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>>5955335
>Sherman
>political success
If it wasn't for Grant's personal intervention, he'd have sit out the entire war after its opening stages with his shameful display early on.
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>>5950565
baste
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>>5950840
It only becomes truer as time goes on
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>>5950565

Intelligent Frogposter
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>>5954008

S A M M Y B O I



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