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What is your favorite and why?

I am a beginner, I have learned the basics of Python, Java, C, C++ and I do not know which of them to devote myself in depth, C ++ maybe?
Help me /g/
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>>68821446
Me second from top left.
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>>68821446
Coq, Lisp, and Haskell :}
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>>68821446
>not mentioned: assembly
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>>68821446
>I am a beginner, I have learned the basics of Python, Java, C, C++ and I do not know which of them to devote myself in depth, C ++ maybe?
>Help me /g/
Focus on tasks and theory, not the programming language
Most of your programming skills will transfer from language to language, with the exception of different paradigms
Think up a cool project, figure out what language would make the most sense for the task, and practice with it.
eventually maybe try a functional language for more brain gainz
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>>68821605
god i love coq
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>>68821859
lmao :}
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>>68821446
Make. Regardless of what you write in, learn how to build your shit by hand. You'd be surprised how many `professionals' suck at it.
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>>68821446
I am working on XAML and C# from scratch for Xamarin.

How fucked am I, and when can I into employment?
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>>68821446
I'm a beginner too. I took a class on c++ in hs and I did the full course on python for that sololearn app so I'm at about the same level for both of those. I think it's probably best to learn a little bit about different kinds of programming languages and use whatever is most appropriate for the situation. For example, if I'm gonna write a keylogger, I'm using C because you can get really low level. If I'm gonna do some web scraping, I'll use python. I'm learning a functional programming language next but I'm not sure what those languages are good for exactly, I just think Haskell looks really /comfy/ lel. Just do whatever is most fun imo unless you're looking for jobs because performance doesn't matter too much imo
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>>68821446
C because it is a simple, minimal and fast language. It doesn't assume anything, everything is left for the developer to implement and has no artificial restrictions. It has no abstractions and the dev has the full control.

Case in point: Say Java. Java has an automatic garbage collector. It keeps track of what objects the user uses and what they don't. Once there is dangling object that the user doesn't use, Java clears the memory and gives it back to the OS. This is great but it also allows users to be sloppy. In C, every bit of memory you ask from the OS, you have to manually give it back. You are in control. This garbage collector has it's overhead that the user had no control and cannot accurately predict.
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>>68821446
Ruby is by far my favorite, but I also know the rest on the list except R and ActionScript.

Ruby is great for prototyping, and for pretty much any non complex data processing tasks. It makes things like distributed processing very simple to implement on your own.

Ofc, I’m not a total fan boy, if it’s heavy processing I’ll first make a jump to JRuby/Java or go to C++.
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>>68822280
>a simple, minimal and fast language
>It doesn't assume anything, everything is left for the developer to implement and has no artificial restrictions.
>It has no abstractions and the dev has the full control.
Thanks, you're describing Forth
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>>68822642
JRuby is a fucking nightmare to maintain. Had to install jbundle and it constantly broke. Glad we threw that shit out of my work.
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>>68822280
c has abstractions, even assembly is an abstraction
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Any other self-learners experience constant choice paralysis, or at least crippling self-doubt? Up until recently I thought I wanted to learn mobile dev. Learned Java by reading a crappy textbook and doing a bunch of Codewars exercises, too intimidated by the actual docs/Android Studio. But now I'm thinking it might be better to go for a less niche specialization, like C# or Python (backend?)
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>>68822665
I’ve not had any issues, but maybe I’m not the best for that as ruby is my favorite language I’m perhaps too familiar with it. What issues did you have?

>>68823257
Yeah, that used to be a thing for me too. Eventually I realized it doesn’t matter what language you use, they’re all tools and for the most part very similar in syntax. So learning one really well, regardless of which one it is, will translate knowledge to any other one. So just pick one, and implement projects you care about.
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>>68823884
Vague Psych runtime errors that ended up being caused by mismatched Ruby and JRuby Versions. It was such a disaster. Then we ported the Ruby framework to Spark Java.



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