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/diy/ - Do It Yourself


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Thread hymn.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGNiXGX2nLU

Last thread: >>1664483

>Haas automation videos.
https://www.youtube.com/user/haasautomation/playlists
>Titans of CNC
https://www.youtube.com/user/titanamericanbuilt/playlists
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Anyone here working with lasers? We've always outsourced our laser jobs and are interested in starting out with a cheap laser to knock out at least our acrylic work in house. Is the step up to a metal cutting laser worth it if about 20% of our laser cut jobs are sheet metal?
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>>1676673
how crazy is it to consider buying a bad-ass saw setup so I can buy large billets of aluminum/steel and cut them into shape myself within hours of receiving an expensive order involving a large billet?

>faster turnaround than any competitor due to no material shipping delay
>less inventory costs because no oddball pieces laying around doing nothing
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>>1676752
that makes sense. *saved
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>>1676752
like a regular bandsaw and cutting up 0-1" x 6" x 6ft peices of aluminium? or something more elaborate?
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>>1676843
I was thinking more like 1.5 foot square blocks into the usual 10" x 6.5" pieces one big ass part requires that pays well. Holidays and weekends mean you can't get the material fast enough to take the job, if you have it on-hand it would be a game-changer.
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>>1676861
10.5" x 8" x 2.5" 6061
should have been able to take that job, damnit.
>>
Make sure to dip all your drill bits in liquid nitrogen, which will double their lifetime
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAxi5YXTjEk
>>
Rotary tables 101

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9uN8-jg0Gg
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I'm going to be buying some chink endmills for millins soft woods and soft metals, what would you recommend me?
seems like everyone online recommends titanium plated carbide endmills with 4 flutes for both materials.


I will be milling at slow speeds and feeds on my chinky desktop cnc
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>>1676973
alu = 3 flute
wood = 2 flute probably

https://www.onsrud.com/Products/52280.asp
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>>1676979
How hard is it to break $30 end mill vs $0.5 endmill? Because i'm fine which breaking a bunch of .5 endmills but would neck myself if i broke some golden endmill, since that is what they must be made out of with that price
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>>1676973
I'd advise against any coating because the chinks will use the opportunity to call HSS "carbide" when it's coated with anything. Just get normal carbide or even straight HSS. Also if your spindle is high speed low torque, which it usually is on chinkshit CNCs, you'll want to buy tiny endmills, like 3mm or less for alu. And blast the shit out of it with air when milling alu, else your chips will build up and fuck everything.
>>
>>1676973
I'm not entirely sure why carbide router bits are more expensive than carbide endmills but they are.

a nice 2 flute carbide endmill should probably last forever and be pretty damn cheap in the small diameters

>>1676980
heh you ain't seen nothin', looks like they have all sorts of extra geometry for roughing wood

https://www.vortextool.com/wood-tooling/upcut/series-1000-1100-two-flute-roughing-spirals.html
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>>1676982
The motor will be 500W 12k RPM, with er11 collet, so it is not the absolute trash they usually put in (which is 50W usually) but obviously nothing high end also, but it should be perfectly capable of slowly milling both wood an aluminium in my opinion. Even if i had the best motor on the market those nema17s that are moving that spindle around will tell me to go fuck myself and start skipping steps anyway if i go to fast

okay so 2 flute carbide for both alu and wood?
small diameters is all my machine can handle anyway

i will definitely buy the cheap ones since i will be learning and probably burn through them fast
the thought of using like $400 endmill that costs more than my entire chink machine is funny
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>>1676990
I paid $130 or so for an endmill the other day. And a $70 endmill, and a $100 endmill.

Long length = big bucks.
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEhXNzfnOQI

robodrill rapids
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>>1677000
>tfw 2,125 IPM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrMnH35vuvg
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNvZR8HYfvQ

new ball screws on the PM conversion
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has anyone here made one?
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>>1677237
No. Are there any open source plans?
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>>1677237
Sounds interesting, what it is?
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>>1677421
Generic 6 axis robot arm obviously
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>>1677497
pretty mediocre, hell even the woman is asian.
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Is it normal for large compression springs to deform under load? I ordered these 200x60mm, 10mm thick springs, and after loading them just for a couple minutes, not even to full compression, they turned into 175x60 springs. They're chinkshit that costs 4-5 times less than buying them locally.
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just bought a uline metal cart for $200 how did I do?
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woohoo high feed mill arrived

0.177" diameter is pretty damn small tho
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>>1676990
$70 small high feed endmill too much for it?

How fast are the rapids on it?
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>>1676752
Yeah, I mean you can but it would cost much more. Larger material sizes are more expensive.
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>>1677508
>I ordered these 200x60mm, 10mm thick springs, and after loading them just for a couple minutes, not even to full compression, they turned into 175x60 springs. They're chinkshit that costs 4-5 times less than buying them locally.
And what did we learn here anon?
>you ___ what you pay for
>>
>>1677673
wonder if it's worth having a few big billets of common material and the saws for that special occasion?
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>>1677674
I'm not surprised if they're just shit quality springs, but for all I know, the 50 euro springs could just as well exhibit the same behavior, which is why I'm asking.
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>>1677562
>tfw the $60 harbor freight one can only hold half as much weight and is half the length
>>
>>1677005
>>1677000
never seen anyone run half this fast without having to replace the spindle and servos after about 2 years.

slow and steady kids.
>>
I recently got a 3040T. Ive converted it over to a GRBL + CNC shield. Have the drivers set to 2amp etc. Ive noticed that if i set the feed rate low it sounds really grindy. Jogging around at higher speeds it doesnt do it. Is this normal? I have it set to full steps.
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>>1677696
the robodrill machines are specifically designed to operate at stupid speeds like that, they can even tap at like 5k RPM or something crazy
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>>1677746
huh, every other machine I've seen try to do those speeds has always needed spare parts rather quickly.

can they run 24/7 for years at those speeds? if so I am buying the fuck out of one.
>>
>>1677702
Steppers do indeed sound bad at low speeds. I bet there is some kind of motor tuning involved.
>>
>>1677747
Can't say for sure, but one guy on here says he has to rebuild those wheel type toolchangers constantly. He should know.
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>>1677750
So i went off and watched some videos. Apparently i can reduce the vibrations at low speed by using microstepping. https://youtu.be/bkqoKWP4Oy4
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>>1676673
How did we advance precision beyond surface plates? I get that flatness lets you affirm all sorts of things like angles, squareness, parallel surfaces, etc; but how do you go from something like a shit lathe to a less shit lathe?
Does the precision gain come in using that a machine to make less-shit indicators, which you then when making a new machine?
Does it come from just being more meticulous and careful?
Can someone explain to me how a lathe can produce a more precise leadscrew than the one already in it?
Did they just use pantographs or something?

Everything I can find on the history of machining jumps straight from A to Z.
>>
>>1677702
>>1677767
thats what i did, but mine are high speed vibrations, i didnt want to do microstepping because my leadscrews are 1mm lead, but it doesnt seem to loose to much torque. but i also cant get my machine to go faster than 600mm/s
https://youtu.be/2DUZSwsJ_Fg
>>
How do you connect your cnc machine to your controller? i am talking protocols and shit

The most populat controller software i found for CNC is LinuxCNC, but it has to communicate with the machine somehow.

Do you use like a serial port or something?
Most computers don't have that so you are forced to use usb and therefore need probably some translator piece of hardware to translate between usb speak and cnc machine motor drivers speak
>>
>>1677989
It depends on your CNC's controller more than on the software, software tend to support both I think. Arduino-based controllers go through the Arduino's USB port.
>>
>>1677997
Well mine uses grbl, so was wondering if there was some way for linuxcnc to connect the motors directly through usb, because the normal workflow with grbl is that you send it gcode commands, not direct dommands for the stepper motors, which means you are limited to only gcode commands supported by the grbl
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>>1678002
You always need an interpreter between the drivers and the PC, the only solutions I can think of is either editing the grbl code or buying a different controller, what gcode do you even want to use that grbl doesn't support?
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>>1677976
>600mm/s

what the fuck kind of measurements is that
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>>1677976
cut too heavy, the rumbling noise is the chatter probably.
>>
>>1677989
>Most computers don't have that so you are forced to use usb and therefore need probably some translator piece of hardware to translate between usb speak and cnc machine motor drivers speak

you can use those USB things or you can use a card like Tormach does

http://store.mesanet.com/index.php?route=product/product&filter_name=6i25&product_id=58

http://store.mesanet.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=55&search=5i25
>>
>>1678012
>>1677976
also, what endmill is that? almost looks like a 4 flute in plastic, a smaller 2 or 3 flute for that machine would probably be better right?
>>
>>1678004
Set state of output pwm pin with gcode. Easy with marlin for example but i dont see any support for it in grbl
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>>1677976
Need a way to get rid of those chips too,
>>
>>1677989

I use LinuxCNC.

Parallel port. Long obsolete, but supported long enough that you can still easily find SFF office PCs that have them for stupid cheap. If you can't, for some reason, parallel port PCI cards are also very inexpensive. There's no fuckery with configuration, as the wizard sets up the pins and a few key parameters (steps per unit, maximum travel, speed, etc.), and LinuxCNC sends control pulses directly to the drivers without any middleman.

Downside is that you're fairly limited on the number of connections it can support. After the step/dir, enable, and limit switches, you only have a couple pins left either for input or output. If you need more, either get a second parallel port or use something like a Mesa card.
>>
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I am assembling my chink desktop cnc which arrived yesterday
I really hope it won't turn out to be some useless shit than cant do a straight cut
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>>1678042
Everything going well so far
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>>1677910

Any number of various clever solutions to getting various dimensions of precision out of a flat surface, all added up over the years. Ran across this some time ago, pretty much what you're asking for:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNRnrn5DE58
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>>1678022
You can use marlin to run a CNC, as well as repetier and smoothieware.
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>>1678047
marlin wont fit in my control board and i read bad things on smoothie, i will check what the repetier is about
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>>1678049
If it's arduino uno with grbl-shield, you can just replace it with mega and a mega shield.
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>>1678050
Nope, the arduino chip is soldered directly onto the board itself
I could of course throw the board out a buy some 3d printer one for $20 but i don't want to needlessly toss out money and parts like that so i will try to make it work with grbl first
>>
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>>1678043
Spindle holder assembly is almost done, so far the only parts missing were only some m5x25 screws which made me pretty happy since those are easily bought locally in any hw store

It's really cool assembling the machine piece by piece from nothing and then run it knowing you personally tightened every single screw with your own two bear hands
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>>1678058
Aaaaand done.
It was just like lego, except it actually does stuff once you done building it. The spindle is only temporary, i will replace it for a 500w one once the ship from china docks.

And now for the much more annoying and frustrating part: Bringing the included chink motherboard to life so it can actually move the motors and stuff
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>>1678073
Also i am pretty happy with it so far, the thing is heavy like a motherfucker and solid like a rock. There is zero wobble in any of the axis
>>
Damn Uline has great shipping and a great website. Going to get my cart today.
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>>1678073
pretty cool little machine, what are you thinking for application?
>>
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>>1678101
milling wood, alu, copper
engraving steel and acrylic for edge lit signs
and mainly making PCBs with THT holes in a single step, where you put a blank pcb in and pull out a finished pcb ready to solder basically (and with a, extra step or two later also double sided pcbs and solder masked and shit)
my friends are going to jizz into their pants when they realize i can make them cool key chains and shit with anything they want engraved on them
In combination with my 3d printer/laser engraver i am now a one man Foxconn. The only thing missing are suicide nets around my house.
>>
>>1678113
wait so you can mill custom PCBs? are they better than breadboard stuff?
>>
>>1678114
bread boards and pcbs are apples and potatoes
not really comparable, breadboards are for fast prototyping and pcbs are for basically the finished product
>>
my cart has arrived
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>>1678022
dude its like right here
https://github.com/grbl/grbl/wiki/Connecting-Grbl

https://blog.protoneer.co.nz/grbls-pwm-functionality-how-to-control-a-laser-or-variable-speed-spindle/
>>
https://youtu.be/3qw7c-UAYQg
little kevin cutting aluminium 3.5mm doc 20% stepover. it doesnt like the hsm toolpath at the end and crashes. video sped up in some spots because of youtube length limits
>>1678011
meant 500mm/min
>>1678012
stress testing with doc and step overs to see what is too much. the machinebase/parts are all cast iron, but the aluminium extrusion encloser i made resonates like crazy aswell
>>1678021
3/16 4flt carbide what i snapped in half at work. my current spindle can only go 4000rpm so i needed the biggest i could fit so i could go as fast as possible without scaling the feed to the rpm with a smaller endmill
>>1678027
yeah, it makes way more chips than i though it would

guy with chinkmill- run with grbl for a while and bCNC. bCNC is p good and has decent enough cam functions for what you seem to want to do (pcbs and engraving) it supports most gcodes and you just need to configure the spindle pwm with s values once defined. only real trouble i had with non supported commands are when i was trying to thread mill with some g91.5 or something, and mastercam outputs needed some editing. i upgraded later to a beaglebone with CRAMPS running machinekit (linuxcnc) because grbl did not meet my needs completely and i wanted my machine to be completely portable. hopefully the ups man brings me my mesacards for little kevin v2
>>
>>1678183
with that machine, high helix for sure.

45 degree helix will put 50% of the cutting pressure up toward the spindle with the rest radial.
>>
>>1678183
>>1678191
http://www.lakeshorecarbide.com/316variablefluteendmillforaluminumzrn.aspx
>>
>>1678118
I put a computer on my homedepot one so I could quickly move it around if the machine is spewing coolant or oil all over the place.>>1678128
>>
>>1678282
interesting idea
>>
>>1678073
>>1678113
Modelname and how much was it?
>>
can someone point me in the direction of a quality but affordable lathe milling attachment for a full size 12x36 lathe? most of what i see on ebay/amazon is for mini machines or just looks cheap.
wedge mount would be preferred (bxa250 size) but direct tool post stud is ok too.
>>
>>1678693
is there any way you can up the investment and buy a mill?
>>
btw how is that guy's mill retrofit coming along?

I want to see that big fucker shred some metal.
>>
>>1678693
that sounds like something you buy instead of something else and then spend every day wishing you had just bought the something else
>>
>>1678741
>>1678950
Don't have the cash and floor space for a mill at the moment and I'd rather not buy a shitty minimill for the same or almost as much as some used iron. Plus this is just for some simple things, nothing so complicated it would require an actual mill.
>>
>>1678672
it's cnc 1419 for pricing just ali it, it varies based on where you live and shit (vats, shipping etc)
>>
If i want to make a screw hole for m5 screw with this thing into aluminium, i first need to predrill the hole with a 5mm diameter drill is that correct?
>>
>>1679586
https://www.lincolnmachine.com/tap_drill_chart.html
>>
>>1679586
m5 by what?

looks like .9 and .8 are standard pitches, 4.2 or 4.3mm tap drill size
>>
>>1679603
>>m5 by what?
what do you mean? isn't m5 a standard that is always same diameter? the only thing that can be different is the screw length
>>
>>1679606
thread pitch is a thing, you drill the hole a different size depending on the thread pitch.

there are usually at least two thread pitch specs, fine thread and coarse thread.
>>
>>1679608
Fuck. Then the standard is useless
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>>1679659
h'what?

I assumed the standard was standard...

there are different thread percentages allowed, in the american system a normal drill index has a special tap drill chart for using the most common sizes for tap drill sizes.

There is an allowable range you can drill the hole.
>>
>>1679586
Obviously not, an M5 thread is like 4.8mm diameter, what are you going to tap into? You predrill M5 with about 4mm. And you need 0.8mm pitch for the common standard, but everything is going to be 0.8mm unless you really go out of your way to get non-standard pitch, you normally don't have to care about the pitch.
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>>1679659
No you're just a retard. If you drill it out to 5mm, what the fuck do you think the tap is going to cut? The drill is your minor diameter and the tap is your major.
>>
What is the best way to organize my tool libraries?

I currently have 4 folders, one for endmills aluminum, endmills steel, drill bits, and thread mills
>>
>>1679693
taps...
>>
>>1676688
Absolutely. I program an Amada 1212 and 3610 and we move all sort of easy profiling work from our machine shop to our lasers. Sometime you have to be creative, but it's doable and almost pure profit if the job was quoted as a complete machine shop process. Just be sure when you get a laser that it is powerful enough for whatever material type + thickness you work with.
>>
alro website says "order closed" like it does for the previous order, which arrived.

does that mean the order shipped and they're letting UPS handle the rest or did it end up somewhere it wasn't supposed to go?
>>
>>1679693
insert-type subcategories
>>
Why are MVJNR toolholders just so versatile? I use mine for turning odd angles all the time.
>>
Best way to find a machinist apprenticeship? Best machinist resources to study? I really want to learn as much as possible while entering the trade.
>>
So I have been slowly collecting junk. I just went to organize my box and realized I am out of space. Fuck.

What yall think of my horde so far?

Pic 1/5 is my junk that came with my machine
>>
>>1679855
Pic 2/5 is the machine in question. Im sure some of yall have seen it, usually when i am asking for help after ruining parts...
>>
>>1679857
Drawer 1 of machinging/welding garbage
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>>1679859
4/5 drawer 2
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>>1679860
Drawer 5/5 is a turret tailstock I dont want, and cant find a way to store well.

If anyone recognizes it, and would like it— its free assuming you are in NC/VA
>>
>>1679857
>that belt
bruh...just use a v belt.
also those belts are a pain in the ass, don't you have a quick adjust so you can just throw a lever and change the speed? the old lath at the shop from the 1920's has this feature.
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>>1679926

that model as is is missing those parts from what i can tell

but i agree that belt needs to go
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>>1679926
Idk whats inconvenient about it? I have had 0 issues since I installed it last fall. Probably have about 30 hours of runtime on the machine since then... I cant justify cutting my other belt but as soon as it fails I’m replacing it with a link belt too.

Want to talk about inconvenient belts? I would have to drift out my lathe spindle and the bushings on the rear pulley shaft to install a standard V belt where ai currently have links.
>>
>>1679951
just know that it will eventually wear out your pulley from improper fitment.
>>
>>1679957
And? Pulleys are a commodity, there is an adequate replacement at my local tractor supply I just would have to bore the shaft diameter out a little.
>>
>>1676673
Something about the walking roid advertisement who hosts Titans that makes me feel like I just got stupider every time he talks. That man is the machining equivalent of the fat woman with curlers in her hair describing what the tornado sounded like.
>>
>>1676982
Carbide is noticeably more dense than hss. How is anyone fooled by this?
>>
>>1680080
They call it carbide with a coating in the description, but it's really just potmetal with paint. Chinks are chinks
>>
>>1676973
Get a used carbide lot, ideally resharpened. On woods i use whatever, anything cuts even those dull roughing endmills that you never get around to sharpening.
>>
>>1679862
you never know you might want it
>>
Wow the market for grbl gui interfaces is really sad and shitty.
At first i wanted to run the machine hadless on my pi like i do my 3d printer with octopi, but then i realized that even doing it like a pleb through a dedicated computer through usb will be crap, because of the selection of the available programs is nonexist, they are all shit, stuck in the 90s interface, dead, or all 3. And if you want one that decently supports auto leveling with a probe then the already minute selection shrinks even more.
I had no idea hobby cnc world was this stunted software wise.
And even the professional world is still desperately handing on fossilized dinosaurs like the parallel port
Machinists... i am dissapoint.
>>
>>1680133
Mach 3?
>>
>>1680142
If i am not mistaken then mach 3 uses direct machine control, so you need the paralel port fuckery, or pci or something similar, i am using grbl to move the machine, so i personally am only limited to programs that can send gcode instead of direct stepper control pulses
>>
>>1680080
You can't measure density of jpegs on eBay, and if you want to refund the item, you have to ship it back to china, which will probably cost 20-30 times as much as the bit cost.
>>
Fuck, cnc coordinate zero is at maximum + and then you move into minus? that is annoying as fuck since 3d printers home at 0 and then move into plus
That will be so fucking confusing when manually doing gcode stuff
>>
>>1680216
i ordered a lot of bits from china, mainly drills and end mills and they are so far all heavy as fuck and shatter when you drop them on the ground so i assume they are all legit carbide
>>
Where to start with machining?
>>
>>1680222
Learn what you're doing, honestly the Titan fundamental cnc stuff with all the aerospace parts and prints. Every now and then a simple CNC part that requires a lot of controller memory will come up that I can easily do for $$$$ with wide open tolerances, but the stuff simple enough to do on manual machines is lower paid like $100 profit area.

Remember that if the print is fucked up and the part is impossible to make you'll be on the phone haggling with some retarded engineer over it. Don't take jobs with tight tolerances at first, hell even jobs with a print instead of a 3d model because if you just accept jobs without knowing what to look for on the print you will 100% fuck it up.

Before or during that process you will have to iron out several things like
>getting the material, tools, etc. delivered in time to actually do the work
>inspecting the parts (every dimension), packaging the parts for shipping, and shipping them out.
>>
>>1680309
I currently have no experience machining and would like to apprentice. Would you recommend a cert from local trade school/community college before applying?
Absolute entry level here.
>>
how many flutes does this have?
>>
>>1680367
Those aren't endmills
>>
>>1680367
Looks like 3, but they're not endmills, they're grinding tools for engraving shit.
>>
>>1680374
>>1680375
The store says they are endmills:
>10Pcs 1/8'' 0.8-3.175mm PCB Twist Drill Bit Set Engraving Cutter Rotary CNC End Mill For Metal Drill Bit S08 Drop ship
so what are they called them? i thought that you only have either drills bits or end mills and thats it
>>
>>1680377
>"store"
Chinks will call an apple an orange if it means one extra sale. Engraving bits is probably the correct term. There are a million other things aside from drill bits and endmills.
>>
>>1680377
Dude they call it 3-4 totally different tools in that text alone. They're burr bits meant to clean edges, they're not designed for any serious cutting, at least not ones you but in a pack like that from China.
>>
>>1680379
Those aren't anything close to what an engraving tool looks like.
>>
>>1680382
There are different types of engraving tools. These in particular aren't any good for milling so I can only imagine they're used for engraving, maybe PCB milling.
>>
>>1680382
>>1680386
Oh yeah, now I remembered, they actually are PCB milling bits.
>>
>tfw 10+ emails a day from xom wanting me to make more parts

jesus, CNC really is pretty fucking valuable if you have the controller for it.
>>
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>>1680133
>grbl gui
yeah they are not very nice, but like i said before, bCNC is the best one imo
>>1680133
>stuck in the 90s interface
objectively best interface era
>>1680133
>decently supports auto leveling with a probe
like i said before, bCNC, but, bed leveling isnt really a thing for cnc. tram your machine as best you can making the bed perpindiclar to the z axis and you dont need to "bed level"

>>1680133
>I had no idea hobby cnc world was this stunted software wise.
its not, you are just at the very beginning of a learning curve
>>1680133
>dinosaurs like the parallel port
learning curve. only the most basic of setups for emc and mach3 use parraports. proper controllers use DSP's and FPGA's, then you can start using things like encoders and scales in closed loop
>>1680219
no, this is just your settings. you can work in any quadrant you want, but it sounds like your limit switchs/homing direction are causing you to work in the -x/-y , also you should be using work coordinates ,
>>
used cnc machine suggestions?

below 15k a fixer upper as long as it has a control with ~4mb of memory (or upgradeable like a fadal), slightly over 15k bigger travels and the same control memory requirements
>>
>>1680675
check state department of education auctions. I found out the school I went to sold 2 machines for $100 each.
>>
>>1680441
Fuck xom, they want itar and so many other certs just to even start. Most of us don't have 3k for that shit.
>>
So I'm between school and my first industry job and I'm thinking about making small parts in my garage to casually sell on ebay. Does anyone know about any desktop CNC mills/lathes for under $2000 that can
>cut stainless steel under the right conditions
>run on standard residential power
>actually fit on a desk, like a 2.5'x3' footprint
Currently considering Taig micro stuff because Tormach's stuff is too big for the garage I'm sharing with housemates. Sherline's little machines also seem like they'd be perfect, albeit a little too weak.
>>
>>1680678
I didn't do the itar but they allowed me anyway.
>>
>>1680685
precision matthews?

they are a slightly higher grade of chinesium than the other brands like grizzly, etc.
>>
>>1680688
Have you actually made parts for them? If not then try and see what I mean
>>
>>1680691
Yes I have made a couple grand worth of parts for them so far. Working on building some relationships with local businesses so I don't have to rely on them 100% at the moment or I would probably be working on a job right now.

Material certs are provided by the raw material supplier, finishing certs are provided by you because you aren't allowed to outsource any of the work, just print out a paper with the finish type and other details then sign it and upload the picture.
>>
>>1680694
Wtf, they told me to pack sand last year. I may have to revisit them in the future.
>>
>>1680539
>, bed leveling isnt really a thing for cnc
YES IT IS
you can have the flattest bed on the planet and you still need to level every single time when you mill things like PCBs
>>
>>1680539
>DSP's and FPGA's,
No way to directly interface those with regular desktop pcs out of the box which makes them not really hobby if you also need to buy an entire separate cutsom cnc controller box
> bCNC is the best one imo
being the most alive person in a cemetery is not a high bar to reach
>>
>>1680733

No, you don't. If keeping a level, flat bed is a problem, you bought a straight-up garbage machine. Frequent bed leveling is a consequence of 3D printer frames usually being both cheap and insubstantial. CNC mills, routers, lathes, or what have you, should not require any sort of fuckery to keep the bed level.
>>
>>1680758
for fucks sake son, you don't level the bed you level the work piece
>>
Holy shit this look amazing, what is that?
All the end mills they sell here are just gay silver color
>>
>>1680785
if your machine is square all you have to do to level the workpiece is put it in the vise and whack it with your deadblow
>>
>>1680824
Just buy normal endmills from a reputable supplier before you get chinked.
>>
>>1680828
that is simply not true, for pcbs for example it is impossible to level it because their surface irregularities are like a polygonal mesh not just a simple plane
>>
>>1680840
so that is why auto level is needed it creates a dense level grid and then the bit always knows where the perfect surface 0 is
>>
>>1680701
That's what I did, be sure and mention you applied once before.
>>
i can't do active coolant ejaculation, so i have to hand spray in some lube into the cut, what sort of spray can lube can i use? i want some simple generic brand
would wd40 work?
>>
>>1680824
The ones that look like that and don't cost more than your router are chinkshit not worth buying. Either buy normal HSS or normal carbide, chink carbide tools are usually good quality.
>>
>>1680689
Looks pretty decent, no CNC available on their site though
>>
>>1680858
Depends on what you're doing, but in general any kind of oil works to some extent, wd40 as well. WD40 is especially good for aluminium as far as I know.
>>
>>1680864
how about olive oil?
>>
>>1680872
It'll probably smell nice. I have some organic cutting oil that also smells nice when it burns.
>>
Xometry released a pdf manual for "mastering cnc tolerances".

https://twitter.com/Xometry/status/1162424787383279624

looks like some GD&T stuff in there and some limits and fits stuff.

24 pages
>>
>>1680740
>>1680740
>No way to directly interface those with regular desktop pcs out of the box which makes them not really hobby if you also need to buy an entire separate cutsom cnc controller box
learning curve. yes there are, i just got mine in the mail today actually. they come as cheap as $60. the ones i got are ethernet and spi. they have usb, all kinds of PCI(e) and even stand alone units that work with emc, mach3 or have their own software. i just got a couple form mesanet(opensource), they are cheapest for sure and work with standard 25pin cnc breakout boards. . there is also masso and kflops and tons of chink ones to name a few

>>1680733
k what ever, your the pro here, but since its not a thing, the more popular cnc controller software may not support it out of the box, but support them as forks or custom menus

>>1680840
>level it because their surface irregularities are like a polygonal mesh not just a simple plane
i dunno nothing about that shit, but i just measured 3 blank pbcs, of dif sizes and 1 dif thinckness, across 6 points, 2 boards had cornwe to corner max .001" dif. the 6inx6in square had .002" all seem pretty linear about it
>>
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I'd been thinking of getting a 3D printer for a while now, but with how often people near me seem to throw away wood shit, I was thinking of getting a CNC machine instead so I don't have to buy filament and can probably make much bigger things. I don't really know that much about them, so what would be a good starter CNC machine? Maybe something like pic related?
>>
>>1681193
What's your budget, how much space can you allocate for a machine, and how big are the projects you're thinking of?
>>
>>1677747
>>1677746
>>1677696
>>1677000
>>1677751
>rebuild wheel type toolchangers
That's me. We had 4 robodrills at one shop, running 18h/day on max 24/7. One 24k rpm spindle burnt out because no routine maintenance was ever done, spindle cooling system got clogged up, bearing seals burnt out and the rest went downhill fast. No issues running full rapids all day every day. Depending on the parts, toolpaths, coolant, and material, the toolchangers get right full of shit very quickly and have to be taken all apart and cleaned. It's a bitch.

IMO the perfect machine for alu gottagofast would be a 20+k rpm robodrill or brother with a normal (or high speed) arm toolchanger with a properly boxed in tool magazine so shit doesn't fly up under the wheel skirt.
>>
>>1680785

That's not "leveling". That's just "touching off" or "probing". And that particular variant of it isn't very common in the machining world. Why? Because if your workpiece is so thin and/or flexible that it can't even maintain flatness when held, it's not going to be rigid enough to hold tolerance against the cutting forces you're about to put on it.

The CORRECT way to solve this specific issue (sheet stock that needs engraving to a precise depth) is proper work holding. In this case, a vacuum clamp is ideal. A pressure foot would also work, if you had one.
>>
>>1681295
I was thinking $3000 tops, I'm moving soon, so I don't know yet and not very big. I can't see myself making anything bigger than a square foot wide by a couple of inches tall any time soon, or at least not anything that I can't make from gluing smaller parts together. I'd like something that can do fine details so I don't have to sand everything.
>>
>>1680858
aren't you not supposed to use spray bottle coolant with carbide tools or is that boomer lore?
>>
>>1681186
>.002"
when you work with traces for smol smds, every planck length counts
>>
>>1681193
cnc 6040 is super popular and cheap too
>>
>>1676673
I'm a poor fucker, Is there a brand or general advice you would recommend for me to get into machining?
>>
>>1681424
cnc 3018 is dirt cheap and a great way to find out if you even enjoy fucking around with cads, endmills, gcode and so on
>>
If you mill aluminium for an hour per day with a 3mm carbide 3 flute end mill and use conservaive feedrates, what is the very rough estimate of the lifespan of this endmill?
>>
>>1681322
You're really supposed to use flood coolant with all tools in certain materials, but you can get away with mist and air.
>>
>>1681298
So they should really make it to where those wheel skirts are enclosed and practically no chips or coolant can get in there right?
Also, which do you prefer, brother or fanuc and why?
>>
>>1681443
>>1681298
Wait, are these all 30 taper?
>>
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How do I be a better teacher?

as part of my course I'm helping teach people straight out of secondary school how to mill and turn (9 zoomers split between 3 more experienced students). I try to let them do everything after giving verbal instruction and only correct them or change something if they are about to make a mistake but I have no idea how to teach

I'm shy and soft spoken and I don't think I'm good at explaining it to them :(
>>
>>1681477
explain more than what is strictly relevant, starting from zero. the mechanics of it, the tools, the holder, the machine, the setup, everything.
>>
>>1681441
"very long"
>>
>>1681477
hell if you want, you can show them a youtube video "movie" for more information
>>
>>1681477
Every time they make a mistake, force them to put their hand under the endmill and then let it slowly go through their finger at a 5mm/min feedrate
I guarantee you they will only ever make one mistake
>>
>5 flute roughing endmills for aluminum for extreme HSM speeds and low radial

https://www.kennametal.com/en/products/20478624/57493250/1522849/100121202/100121260/100151578/100147779.html
>>
>>1680377
They are specialized router bits for cutting the fiberglass of PCB materials.
>>
>cleaning out coolant tank
>nasty ass oil everywhere
How do I get this oil out of every nook and cranny?
>>
>>1681534
degreaser?
>>
>>1681441
So fucking long it's not worth thinking about unless you're doing something that will break it eventually like slotting.
>>
>>1679713
Not him, but also interested in a CNC laser cutter.
Got any recommendations for low-ish cost cutters that'll fit a 4x8 sheet? I'm talking primarily for acrylics, wood and the like. I'd love to get one for metal in the future, but I know it'll be out of my current budget.
>>
>>1680676
Machines run pretty much exclusively by students are 100% going to be run into the ground.
>>
>>1680872
>>1680873
Olive oil has a very low smoke point. You're probably better off with canola.
>>
>>1681567
laser that can cut metal? slow down there bill gates
>>
>>1681567
Boss laser, probably like 10k
>>
how do you do it?
how do you resist the temptation to slurp down every last drop?
Just look at it, so milky, so creamy, so perfectly white, i bet it tastes like ambrosia
I literally have to only use air to cool my cuts, because every time i use the mother's milk, it takes the every last shred of my willpower to not chug down the coolant tank, i just can't take it anymore... i can feel it.. i will give in to the temptation any day now
>>
>>1681607
Take you a swig, then you'll never have the temptation again
>>
>>1681554
I have a shit coolant tank to where some places are almost impossible to get to. Do they make degreaser in a form where I can just pour it in and just wait and then suck it all out?
>>
>>1681607
bruh you sound like a skyrim character

>>1681609
yes they do, local hardware store
>>
>>1681608
It's just oil and water, so it's not like it's dangerous
>>
>>1681585
Like I said, out of my current budget. Did a lot of work with laser cutters before and I really liked the flexibility it offered for part geometries.
>>1681589
I was actually looking at those. Thanks!
>>
>>1681612
Mmmmmm, aluminum chips. Yum!
>>
>>1681614
i can suggest 50w co2 chink lasers, relatively cheap, work well, and cut everything except shit like metal and then you can get a small cnc for the metal and it will still cost like 100 times less than a single metal cutting laser
>>
>>1681616
Milling sheet metal would suck massive dongs, though.
>>
>>1681621
beggars can't be choosers
>>
>>1681626
How thick of an acrylic sheet does your 50w CO2 laser manage?
>>
>>1681621
speaking of, I'm setting up to do that right now.

going to drill holes in the stock on the drill press and screw the plates down then 2d contour the profiles with tabs set with a small solid carbide high feed mill.
>>
>>1681630
What gauge?
>>
>>1681633
10 gauge steel
>>
>>1681636
I'd really appreciate a pic of the edge when you're done. :)
>>
>>1681639
yeah I know they have a radius on the bottom so you have to dip below the part to clean it up, subplate is steel too.
>>
>>1681643
Just to be clear, I wasn't being sarcastic or anything. I legitimately want to see the results.
>>
>>1681645
oh okay
>>
>>1681612
Taste like shit though
>>
>>1681645
sounds great so far, can't finish the floor with it though unless like 5 thou stepover
>>
>>1681669
I'd be super worried if it were any thinner than 10 gauge, to be honest. What's the distance between fasteners?
>>
>>1681672
12" or so, 4 of them in a square, 3.5" between the 2 at each side, could put some in the middle too.

can already tell high feed mills are amazing and I'll probably buy a lot more of them.
>>
>>1681673
could maybe use some low profile socket cap screws instead for a wider contact area (head is larger diameter).
>>
>>1681715
Or he could just put a washer under it.
>>
>>1681717
nah I hate using those fucking things, slower to change the blank out, and the order is for 300 pieces. It's just not worth dropping a washer on the floor every couple pieces.
>>
>>1681722
Yeah, okay. That's fair. Getting screws with a nice flange would be more worthwhile, then.
>>
>>1681723
maybe but a low profile screw is probably more useful, there isn't a clearance issue on this particular fixture but there could be on another
>>
just had my first job interview today. it was with a production shop that has a bunch of swiss machines and a couple robodrills. what is it like having to run a bunch of machines at the same time? the company sounds cool but the job as they described it to me sounds like cancer. I think they also start pay at like $12 or $13 which sucks. I don't know if I an afford to turn it down if I get an offer though.
>>
>>1681772
$12/hr does suck pretty much anywhere but the poorest places in America like coal country.
>>
>>1681787
they didn't outright say that much but when they asked about pay I said that I would feel bad making less than minimum wage in seattle and they said they have setup people who have been with the company for years who don't make $15 so I'm assuming it's going to be crap.
>>
>>1681793
they probably lied to you, ask for a good entry level wage.

hell, check the BLS (bureau of labor statistics) for how much people in that career make in your area then keep in mind the figures are usually the median (middle).
>>
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>>1681815
which one is it?
>>
>>1681826
top one
>>
>>1681829
what is the bottom one then? like someone who runs a die press? according to the website $13/hour is bottom 10 percentile for wages. is that normal for a starting wage?
>>
>>1681833
what does the (8) link lead to?

it probably says there are too few of that job to count
>>
>>1681833
idk what that site is referencing but most button pushers don't make anywhere near $22 let alone so much more than that to justify that being the median. They're full of shit if they said their setup guys make less than $15/h though. $12-13/h is normal for someone with zero experience. You're going to fuck shit up and they need to limit their costs until you know how not to fuck shit up. If you can prove you're not an idiot, you should get a decent raise after your probation period/a year. Button pushers don't make any money because they're not worth anything. Make yourself worth something and if after a year they won't give you anything, start looking elsewhere.
>>
>>1681867
is my community college degree really so worthless that I'm not any better off than someone who has never touched a machine before?
>>
>>1681882
Welcome to the job market, I have a degree in mechanical engineering with 2 years experience and 5 years of industrial maintenance experience and no one will even talk to me.
>>
>>1681911
>Spain
>you need a car, high skill of english, years of experience but also being fresh from trade school so we can pay you little. also you have to be avaiable at any time.
>we will pay you penauts
>sorry, you don't fit the requeriments.
>Ispain
>>
>>1681882
If you're doing the same job as Jose that dropped out of school, yes it is. If you have a degree you should be looking at setup jobs.
>>
>>1681964
I'm trying to apply for setup/programming jobs but this company said they start new people as operators. is that normal?
>>
>>1682000
That's certainly not unheard of.
One option is to find a place that does apprenticeships.
>>
Yes I think high feed mills are genuinely fucking awesome.

MSC even sells a quarter incher for $40

they are
>faster (1/2 to 2/3 the time of conventional)
>quieter
>longer reach
>and probably even last longer, caveat that deep slots it will want to recut chips but the chips are tiny so it's still better

If you have a deep slot or pocket in steel use it. Through spindle coolant ones are available too and the tool life will probably blow anything out of the water.
>>
>>1682013
Are you ramping into the slots?
>>
>>1682017
No, straight plunge like 10 thou down then the slotting
>>
>>1682018
For 10 thou I guess it won't matter much, but it's generally a good practice to use at least a helical plunge.
>>
>>1682020
right the slots are like 187 and the tool is like 177
>>
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I've got little ball coolant dispenser things in my lathe tool holders that are pressed in. Has anyone removed one before and tapped the hole for something else? I have a AMEC drill that I would like to make TSC.
>>
rrreee these tabs are too thick
>>
>>1682020
>tfw only 5k RPM spindle so I can't do the 800 SFM with that small tool
>>
>>1682091
can you use a thread adapter instead?
>>
>>1682121
Maybe, I haven't tried, but the thread is tiny like a m6 or m5. I hope to find a metric to barb hose fitting
>>
>>1682118
I know those feels. I always want more.

I keep almost stalling the 25HP spindle with facemills or roughing endmills. I keep wishing it would go faster. 10000rpm just isn't fast enough for small diameter tools. Axis accelerations just aren't fast enough.

help
>>
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>>1682338
>management keeps trying to get us to run 3" facemills on stainless in a HAAS minimill
>mfw this shit starts cutting
It's ridiculous, we have to run it at like 7IPM and it'll still be like 60% load and sound like the machine is falling apart. They don't seem to understand that those things are meant for like 1/2" max tooling, maybe 1" if using HEM toolpaths. We have a tapping job and we have to peck tap the fucking thing. If you try to feed it all in one go it overloads the spindle and alarms out.
>>
>>1682360
How big is the tap?
>>
>>1682361
Like 7/8". It's been a while since I've run it so I don't remember but it's fucking huge. I keep telling them we should just thread mill it but they never do.
>>
>>1682363
Oh yeah no fucking way. Threadmill 10/10, big taps need low gears.

Management can be dumb as hell.
>>
>>1682364
It's pretty amazing at times.
>Hey we're gonna try new tool, tool cost 5 times normal
"k"
*lasts 5-6 times what the normal tool does*
"k yeah, I need a new one now"
>wtf, they want how much to resharpen this? nonono, we're going back to old tool
"....k I need 6 of them."
>we just ordered 8 of them!
"Yeah and we've already gone through them, I need 6 more for the rest of the run."


"Hey we need to check the coolant more often, it's getting really bad."
>how often?
"Like at least every other day? It should be once a day though."
"Nonono, that is too much time. Once a month is plenty."
He says, while our machines float from 6% to 20% concentration every few days.
>>
>>1682360
torque at RPM?

>>1682364
they make gearbox spindles for that high horsepower shit, but the haas ones seem to have a lot of problems.
>>
>>1682367
Yeah my experience with gearbox spindles was with Okuma and Feeler. Mid 1990s Okuma with low gears and CAT50 spindles are fucking unstoppable. The Feeler was newer, 10k spindle with low gear at 3k and under, it was great too. CAT40, with a 3" facemill it could do 0.5" deep cut in 6061 Alu with full width cut at like 50"/min. Just a total doll.
>>
>>1682367
I don't know the specific specs for that year model but the Minimills are only like 10-15 HP so it can't be much. They're small machine meant for small parts and tools, not hogging and high HP machining. Like I said, at ~100RPM that 7/8" tap goes right to 200% load.
>>
>>1682369
>>1682367

Oh lol they're half that HP. I looked it up, it's like 33ib-ft at 1200RPM for the current model.
>>
If i do g0 x10 (relative) the x moves to left, is my machine setup wrong? On my 3d printers that moves them correctly to right, since +x is to right
>>
>>1682390
yes, but you just need to flip a setting usually
the right end of the x axis on cnc machines is 0 and then to do work you move in the negative direction
so if you home the machine in most setups your machine position will be X-200 (if your x axis can move 200mm at maximum)
>>
>>1682366
Jesus, how many parts do you get out of 8?
>>
>>1680367
can those only be used for milling the copper away and cutting out the pcb, or also for milling the pin holes?
it would be great if i could just mill the holes all in one go along with the traces and not have to change for a drill bit
>>
>>1682438
hmm this sure doesn't look like it can cut sideways
damn chinks
>>
>>1682444
fuck! chinks don't seem to sell end mills smaller that 0.5mm, looks like i will have to use a v bit and i hate those shits because you need to calibrate perfect z level
>>
>>1682410
8 endmills is 4 sets of rough/finish. We get ~30 pieces per set. We're cutting pure tungsten with them and after 30 pieces they start cracking and chipping the material.
>>
>>1682488
you will need to use auto bed leveling because pcb surface irregularities are like a polygonal mesh not just a simple plane
>>
need a first desktop mill buying guide
>>
>>1682735
They're all shit.
>>
>>1682735
precision matthews mini mill + quality ground ballscrews from Japan Germany or 'Merica, clearpath servos + drives + power supply, gaming desktop + DB## card, buy some lovejoy couplings and bearings and crap.

The ballscrews should be a dual-ballnut type too. Then you have a /diy/ Tormach 440 that hopefully cost you less than $7,000.
>>
>>1682803
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZR5c3Q2S2M
>>
>>1682390
the table should move to the left which makes the spindle move right relative to the workpiece
>>
>>1682407
You shouldn't be using machine home as your work offset.
>>1682390
No, the table should move left. You told it to go to move positive 10 whatever in X which is on the right side of the table. To move that part of the table under the tool, it needs to move left.
>>
>>1680824
I didn't know machining had a LED FANS SO COOL market
>>
>>1682855
Yeah "special" proprietary coatings are that for sure.
>>
>>1676973
Uncoated, coating will only cause friction in wood.
Also you need to calculate your chip load, if you have a fast spindle typical to chinky desktop CNCs, you need a 2 or even a 1 flute endmill.
>>
>>1682735
>Desktop mill
Yeah, nah. They're routers more than they are mills. At most you'll be cutting aluminum with them.
>>
anyone here uses fusion 360 to CAM stuff for machinign? how the fuck do you cut a body shape into a stock?
there is millions of tutorials on how to cut away all the stock that isn't a part of your model, but i need to do the exact oposite, where if i have modeled for example a 1x1x1cm cube and have a 10x10x10cm stock, then i want to cut out 1x1cm sized cube hole into that stock

the best i managed to find is engraving but that only traces the cube and doesn't cut the inside of it
>>
>>1683090
Make the cube in fusion, then go to the cam part of fusion and do tool paths to make the cube. Make sure you make stock offsets.
>>
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>>1683090
mmhmmm...
>>
>>1683139
Oh i see so i need to model the stock in the designer instead of using the stock in the cam setup
got it
>>
>>1683147
That is best practice for CAD in general.
If you model the blank and then model the machining operations, you won't get strangled to death by whoever has to actually machine the thing.
>>
>>1683225
>be using fusion
>hit simulate, simulation stock model pops up
>right click -> save stock
>hop back over to design, import -> STL
>back to manufacture, right click setup -> use model as stock, select STL
>>
>>1683090
look up mold making/modeling?
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahR0CwzH16M

oy vey betta clean up my profiles
>>
Have I just been retarded until now? MSC is a kennametal distributor, you can buy most if not all of their product line there.
>>
>>1683387
I used to think Titan was kinda cool since he was self-made, maintained his muscle mass, and stayed updated when it came to modern software and stuff. Unsubbed after every video he posted about MILLION DOLLARS and FIVE-AXIS CAM INCONEL STATUE and MY SON'S AUTISM and PRISON
>>
>>1683528
Why would his business success turn you off?

The personal stuff I can see, the inconel parts are display pieces for the business, which is just plain a good idea. Gotta have some neat doo-dad to show the corporate types if they ever come to visit.
>>
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>>1683529
It's not his success, it's how much of an unaware vain tool he looks like when it comes to marketing and social media. Ever see the reality show about himself that he made? It was so formulaically cringe that it looked like a Tim and Eric skit.
>>
>>1683531
Oh yeah his interpersonal communication is a bit over the top and cringy at times, I'm more interested in his business success than anything though, and that's what he claims to be sharing.
>>
>>1683534
>business success
literally just make sure the parts you deliver are well within tolerances required and you don't take forever to make them
boom done

also don't blindly follow all of his advices, like that crazy shit where he machines stainless steel at 1000mm/min
>>
>>1683568
>>1683534
>>1683531
>>1683529
>>1683528
>>
Is the manufacturing business the ultimate idle game?
>make things by hand until you have enough money to make them faster and with less involvement
>keep making money and buying means to make more things faster
>>
>>1683572
Automation is the future
Soon the tool monkey machinists will be out of a job and the only open position will be CAD and CAM design, but as the AI development progresses we will be more and more fucked, the CAM will be the first of the two to get fully automated by the AI, so for the forseeable future if you want to have job security you should stick with CAD business end of the machining
>>
FUCK
i ordered a new spindle from chinks and the package tracking says that the package transportation was suspended
what the fuck does that mean?
it's a fucking motor not a fucking bomb
>>
>>1683586
maybe they had to pay a new tariff so they want to cancel the order and make you buy it again at the new price
>>
can i get some tips on milling acrylic? have ordinary 3 flue .8mm flat carbide endmill
what feeds and depths do i run?
>>
>>1683463
Carbidedepot is cheaper but if you're buying bulk I would buy msc when they have a sale
>>
>>1683620
Slow RPM, high chip load, lots of air blast if not a coolant spray. If it's not melting or snapping your tool then it's fine.
>>
>>1683577
>Soon
If by soon you mean around this time next century.
>>
>>1683687
Not him, but give it about 20 years. Automation is here, but it's going to take a while until most of the human element is removed
>>
>>1683687
>If by soon you mean around this time next century.
oh you naive naive man
you look at the progress ai is making, specially since they started using neural networks for deep learning shit, this will happen within the next 20 years
>>
>>1683736
Kindof a moot point if the people who drive people/stuff around are pushed into unemployment and collectively flip their shit.
By the time AI is screwing over CAD/CAM guys, society will already be on its knees.
>>
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Holy shit, thanks a lot Fusion 360, you fucking asshole
WHAT THE FUCK IS THAT DOING THERE
god fucking damn it
>>
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>>1683760
never fucking mind
i am done with machining for today
>>
>>1683624
>Carbidedepot

I'm definitely checking this out.
>>
>>1683760
retract height?
>>
>>1683766
i gave command to move to the start of the job and then AFTER that it gave the command to lift up to free move height
>>
>>1683760
nigger, learn what cutting air is before you actually cut metal.

go to your z offset and add 3.0 inches , then run your code to see if it actually works.
>>
>>1683773
That's generally a good practice, but it's not always feasible (IE huge jobs that take dozens of hours to do).
>>
>>1683773
nigger i did i just didn't notice it didn't lift up for the first move
>>
>>1683775
yeah but the guy is like brand new to cnc
>>
>>1683779
I doubt he'll forget the lesson, at least.
>>
>>1683760
tool heights tab on the controller? how do you measure tool lengths on that thing anyway?
>>
>>1683764
>>1683760
that actually looks like more of a cam bug though, should have ran the simulation.
>>
>>1683785
you screw the tool into the collet and then jog it so the tip is touching 0x0x0 coordinate on the work piece and then send a gcode to zero the work coordinates and now the machine knows exactly where to and how high to go
>>
>>1683736
And you think every shop is going to dump $10-50 million dollars overnight to upgrade? There's still shops running nothing but manual machines that thrive because they can do shit with an 80 year old lathe you can't on a CNC without it being a 3 million dollar machine.
>>
>>1683790
There are people, in 2019, who still use exclusively AutoCAD...
>>
>>1683792
Jesus Christ how horrifying
>>
>>1683790
If investing $10 mil one time means you can fire 10 000 people and save on all their wages and literally come ahead at the end of the same year then absolutely
>>
>>1683797
I don't think you understand how few employees most machine shops have. 10,000 would be like fucking Boeing and their costs would be hundreds of millions to replace everyone like that.
>>
hory sheeet
there are 11 axis cncs? i thought 5 was the maximum
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdCRCcwDeKQ
>>
>>1683790
the cost of the machines isn't normally the limitation, it's the return on investment.

big machine shops literally buy half million dollar machines by the half-dozen on a whim--as long as they can pay for them with their performance.
>>
>>1683833
But unlike machinists, no matter how expensive the machine is, it will never love you.
>>
when a print says something like 0.3 9 it means the tolerance is still to a single digit right?

but 0.39 means two digit tolerance?
>>
>>1683770
it doesn't do that automatically you have to make sure the spindle is clear of the work before you hit the green button. I also don't see a height offset in that code so it probably would have crashed anyway.
>>
>>1683849
Look in the notes, it'll usually say something like:
>uon all tolerances +/- .003
>>
>>1683885
yeah I'm aware of that, but there is a bigger space between some numbers

0.39
0.3 9 probably not the same thing, 0.3 9 likely uses the tolerance for the single digit
>>
>>1683849
No that sounds like an extra space as a typo
>>
>>1683897
my ass it is, then how do you specify a two-digit dimension with the one-digit tolerance?
>>
>>1683903
Then call the fucker up and ask them
>>
>>1683903
You make an explicit note attached to the dimension you retard. Prints have basic typos like that all the time and putting a space there it's not an approved dimensioning practice by any standard.
>>
>>1683925
>You make an explicit note attached to the dimension you retard.

duh, the extra space is repeated in a couple places too
>>
>>1683944
An extra space is not an explicit note. That is not a normal or recognized practice and you need to call this engineer before you fuck up the whole job. If that's actually what it is, you're both retards that need to take a metrology class.
>>
>>1683944
>>1683950
I've often questioned why there's nothing like this used in standard practice, where I work there's a generic set of tolerances for everything unless otherwise noted that's just based on the number of significant figures on the dimension. This makes it impossible to specify a dimension like 0.875" without making it an unnecessarily small tolerance or having to put a specific note for each dimension. There's a number of Engineers who get around that by just rounding to something close like .9, but it creates issues where something is supposed to be centered or symmetrical and it ends up being slightly off since the shop will make it exactly to the print rather than reading between the lines and using tolerances.
>>
>>1683963
They don't have uon tolerances? What the hell kind of engineers do you have?
>>
>>1683980
Probably Indian "engineers"
>>
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>>1683963
^ this
>>
>>1683963
>0.875"
Not allowed to write the fractional equivalent? Would make sense for imperial dimensioning and you're making the print for the guys in the shop.
>>
>>1683980
>>1683997
It'a a shop within a large corporation so there's a fair amount of "We've always done it that way" attitude, for .875 there's nothing stopping them from putting 7/8" which would have it at a ±1/64" tolerance but the current trend is to avoid using fractions, and even then it doesn't do you much good if it's something that's an unusual dimension.
>>
>>1684004
There's a name for that: "Argumentum ad antiquitatem".
A shop shouldn't have to rely on some old dude knowing that something is fucked up and just sidestepping it. One day that old dude won't be there and it'll leave everyone else scrambling to fix a problem that should have been fixed decades ago.
>>
>>1683984
the space is just a result of the odd font used, not really a problem though the tolerances aren't crazy.
>>
>>1683963
>I've often questioned why there's nothing like this used in standard practice,
Because it's horribly ambiguous and subject to miscommunication. "Is that space intentional or is it a typo? Is that space supposed to be there, or did the scanner fuck up? Is that space supposed to be there or did the printer fuck up?" A space alone is a terrible way to denote such things. There are reasons these rules exists.
>rather than reading between the lines and using tolerances.
Our job isn't to "read between the lines" our job is to make shit to fucking print and not abuse tolerances. If it's to print and doesn't fit, that's not our problem, it's the problem of your retarded engineer.
>is makes it impossible to specify a dimension like 0.875" without making it an unnecessarily small tolerance or having to put a specific note for each dimension.
Literally what are fractional dimensions.

>>1684028
If you know it's just a font issue, why the fuck did you even ask such a stupid question?
>>
>>1684044
>If you know it's just a font issue, why the fuck did you even ask such a stupid question?

that's the answer from the guy
>>
>>1684044
>>is makes it impossible to specify a dimension like 0.875" without making it an unnecessarily small tolerance or having to put a specific note for each dimension.
>Literally what are fractional dimensions.

this is stupid

>need this dimension 0.939 +/- 0.010"
>better just add the extra .01 callout instead of using 0.93-9 or similar
>>
>>1684028
what the hell, he says it must just be my end but the jpeg he sent for the other part has the exact same stuff on it.
>>
>>1684054
Wait, are you telling me the engineering department knowingly uses a font that creates unclear specs?
Next you'll tell me that they use lower case letters on the drawings, too.
>>
>>1684074
in other news, I'm getting some tri-lobing on these drilled holes, I would bet it's the drill point angle being too steep for how thin the material is (0.130") Is it worth grinding a 140 deg point on it or so?
>>
umm some of these lakeshore carbide endmills are ground significantly undersized, like 0.182 instead of 0.1875
>>
>>1684127
maybe the variable pitch is screwing up the measurement
>>
>>1684057
>>need this dimension 0.939 +/- 0.010"
>>better just add the extra .01 callout instead of using 0.93-9 or similar
If it's already +-.01, rounding .001" is exactly what they're going to do. The entire point of dimensioning standards is to make things as crystal clear and non-mistakable as possible, not be the fastest shortcut ways to dimension a print. In your specific example, "9" is right next to "-" on the keypad. Did the engineer actually mean to press that or did he fat finger it and not notice? A big ass note that says +-.01" is much harder to accidentally place and much easier to notice if it has been. It takes five seconds longer to do but could prevent thousands of dollars being lost if not hundreds of thousands.
>>
>>1684134
That's not the issue it's lazy ass engineers over-tolerancing because they just want to let the catch-all tolerances take care of the actual requirement.
>>
How do I not raise a burr drilling 10 gauge steel?
>>
>>1684217
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HOxfZKIZQk
>>
When i machine stuff like pcbs or acrylic does that shit fly into the air? i don't have a shop vacuum so i wonder if i should be wearing a mask
>>
>>1684235
can you smell it?
>>
>>1684236
I don't know, i have a chronic medical condition where my sinuses are constantly partially clogged so my smell sense is greatly reduced, so unless the smell is very strong i can't smell it
>>
>>1684237
well if you use a surface grinder without vacuum or coolant your nose will be filled with the stuff, if that helps. you'll have grinding dust all fucking over you, in your hair etc.
>>
>>1684237
silicon might mean silicosis tho
>>
>>1684240
>TFW chips somehow get inside your work boots
REEEEEEEEEEEE
>>
Back at it again
If the endmill breaks again i am going to write a stem letter to the chink who sold me those bits
>>
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>>1684332
>>
>>1684333
>Those exposed electronics right next to the bed
I hope you're milling a fancy box for those.
>>
>>1684335
I like to have exposed mains power around my machines because i'm super hardcore
>>
>>1684332
It's most likely your fault, not the bits', even if the bits are shit.
>>
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>>1684333
Came out Perfect this time. I was just hoping for more transparent finish
>>
>>1684386
If it's an acrylic, you can clean it up with a torch.
>>
>>1684407
that would just melt it
>>
>>1684420
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mmd56UMHDK0
I'm not talking out of my ass.
>>
>>1684426
Interesting. I thought you were just trying to trick me into making some acrylic suicide gas
>>
>>1684428
You could also try doing it by moving a soldering iron near the surface. Baking it would probably also work.
>>
>>1684386
looks like you're raising a burr, should have bought a plastic endmill or something

the only one I've used (very small ball nose) from Harvey worked out great, no burr in polypropylene.

http://www.harveytool.com/prod/End-Mills-for-Plastics/Material-Specific-End-Mills/Browse-Our-Products_253/End-Mills-for-Plastics---Ball-Upcut---Single-Flute_336.aspx
>>
4 years with no updates,
suddenly a new gelbart vid
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyYcomX7Lus
>>
>>1684506
In fairness, he is using it to advertise a business he benefits from (and discloses it).
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yO0go_g7RcY

ahhh so that's why you get the high pressure thru spindle coolant
>>
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that feel when business going good, making parts and shekels

and still get to dick off half the time on the internet
>>
Is it doable to make dosh on hobbyist-tier CNCs or do you need to invest 20K+ to be able to work anything worthwhile? (i.e. make something actually useful and not sales based entirely in consumable PR-driven shit)
t. Office drone desperately looking for any kind of hobby-turned-work to make a buck out of.
>>
>>1684651
find a niche and go ham. other than that good luck making anything on a hobbyist machine.
>>
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>>1684651
Initially it's hard to get people to trust some rando with a knee mill in his garage because businesses depend on the parts you're expected to make, and if you don't deliver or you're late they can get screwed over. A locally advertised repair shop might do you good though.

>>1684670
It can be done, you have a lot longer cycle times though, and if the schedule they want the parts done on is intense you shouldn't accept that work, most especially if you have another day job taking up your time. At the moment I'm considering taking a well paying job for a single big stainless part on a Tormach because I have the time to do it, and the schedule is long enough. Fucking family wants me to visit so I probably won't get to.

That guy on here doing an upgrade on that big box way cnc mill could probably rough out that material 2x as fast and make bank on a job like this. But if you spend 8 hours a day making someone else money it's gonna be hard.

The caveat to this advice is that those are the high paying jobs that keep you rolling in shekels, but there are an awful lot of smaller lower paying jobs if you want to penny pinch your way to a real job.

>small cold rolled or brass parts with a few unremarkable features, $120
>small flanges in plastic, $170
>etc.

Doing those is probably a lot less stress than big expensive parts in hard materials.

You can do a good bit of those in a week and put yourself into a profit margin territory, the awesome thing is a desktop PC controller lets you do the jobs that involve 3d surfacing (large programs) and 3d surfacing turns those small simple parts into CNC territory parts that pay more.
>>
>>1684690
>At the moment I'm considering taking a well paying job for a single big stainless part on a Tormach because I have the time to do it, and the schedule is long enough. Fucking family wants me to visit so I probably won't get to.
DO IT. Explain to family that this is important for you, and you can visit anytime.
>>
>>1684721
I can't, they will be super pissed they've been warning me it's coming for like a month at least.

Also, jobs are like fish in the ocean. There will always be more work.
>>
>>1683963
>omething is supposed to be centered or symmetrical and it ends up being slightly off
isn't that what gdt is for?
>>
>>1684721
>DO IT

what the fuck do you care?
>>
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The entire machine is now covered in highly abrasive acrylic dust. I dont like that. Those lead screws will grind those bearings to dust and develop tolerances and slack
Fuck, guess i will have to add some sort of a skirt around the spindle and get some tiny vacuum to clear it while milling
>>
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>>1684721
>>
>>1684721
In 30 years when all your family is dead and you are sitting next to your CNC alone using your tears of regret as coolant, hating yourself for choosing money over spending time with your family while your still could, you will fully realize that not even the best paying machining job in the world will buy you a single extra second of time with them
90% of machinists die filled with regret, because they pick machining over their family, don't be one of them
>>
>>1684818
well he probably figured it was super important to the business, which mine is a fledgling business for sure.

Reality though, it's just one opportunity of a nigh-infinite stream of them, and I don't believe that passing on a few of them is going to affect the business unless it becomes a habit. Especially considering how impersonal the process becomes using online sources for jobs. No missed shook hands, etc.
>>
>>1684800
Small shop vacs aren't expensive,
>>
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I tried to machine this name tag
Any idea why the inside of the numbers looks so shit? It was enrgaved in a single pass with a v bit
Should i do multiple passes or something?
>>
>>1684960
How deep?
>>
>>1684975
1mm
>>
>>1684978
Too deep.
My engravings are 0.5mm max depth wise.
>>
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>>1685005
i figured it out partially, it was actually deepter than that because when i use v bit in fusion it sinks it deep enough to exactly fill in the curve so with my 30 degree v bit it went over 2mm deep
This is a test where i told the fusion to use vbit but i actually used 2mm flat endmill so it only went 0.5mm deep and it looks much better
>>
Electropolished or lapped? Aside from the cleaning that electropolishing provides, is there a difference? Embedded abrasive aside, of course.
>>
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>>1684732
>they've been warning me it's coming for like a month at least

Ah, something scheduled that can't happen at some later time? You sounded like they just suddenly sprang this on you, which is something else entirely. Try to not let them make a habit of it, though - for both your sakes.
>>1684816
>>1684793
>>1684818
Ha, hit a nerve, did I? There are times when you really gotta take time out from the family.
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eds48L4cJjM

hypocycloidal gears
>>
I want to make a tool changer like this for my machine since manual tool change is a pain in the ass, and the prices of the air commercial air based changers are a joke https://youtu.be/-IGAYd8OnOE but the problem is that only drills come with that plastic ring, all my other endmills like vbits and such are only smooth metal rods with nothing to grab on on them so the design on the video wouldn't work for them. can you buy those plastic rings for regular endmills too?
>>
>>1685268
the spindle has a drawbar right? through-hole at least?
>>
>>1685276
No it's just an ordinary er11 collet with a screw on cap like you see in the video
>>
>>1685277
the spindle has a built-in ER11 ?
>>
>>1685280
I am not sure what you mean. The motor has a shaft and on the shaft is this er11 holder
when you want to change drill bit you manually loosen the nut and change the bit and then tighten it
>>
>>1685281
It works the same way as when you need to change a drill in your egular hand held drill with a chuck
>>
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>>1685281
huh so the spindle is just a solid shaft.

You could build a special chuck for it that has a ring on the OD that you push or pull on with the Z movement to release the tool.

brake mechanism for large lathes might be interesting, they have some little roller/cam things that act like a toggle action, like a luger.
>>
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>>1685285
The Volcanic/Henry/Winchester toggle lock might be a better example.
>>
>>1685268
use your thing to cut some rings for them and either pressfit or glue them on or something
>>
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Is there a drill or cutter for a drill press that creates a round bowl shaped divet similar to the kind left by a centre drill but without the middle bit?

A ball nosed endmill might work but I've only used square endmills so idk if the tip would leave the right profile
>>
>>1685542
A ball nosed endmill would work, are you just trying to get the shape of a center drill without the tip or does it actually need to be round?

Depending on how accurate it needs to be you could also probably freehand grind a drill bit that would get you close enough, might take a few attempts though.
>>
>>1685543

It doesn't need to be perfectly round but I want it to look vaguely hemispherical. It's not for any practical use just for aethetics
>>
>>1685551
ball endmill would work.....
>>
>>1685551
ball endmill would work.....

also, fuck comcast.
>>
how do I get a job? applying through indeed isn't getting me anywhere.
>>
>>1685841
Go on google maps and search for businesses in your area that WOULD hire someone with your specific skill set within the range you can reasonably commute.
Find their email address and/or fax number and send your CV to them.
Imagine you're running a business and you got someone going on leave because they are a new parent, someone got injured and can't work, one of the old guys running the machines is retiring or maybe someone just quit. Maybe you just got a brand new client and they need more man-hours than you have available to do the project. Whatever the reason, you're sweating bullets, wondering how you're going to get shit done and suddenly the perfect candidate's CV just falls into your lap.
That's how you get a job.
>>
>>1685857
how do I know if they would hire me? the first thing I did was send my resume to all the companies in the state that I really wanted to work at but they all didn't reply or said they weren't hiring.
>>
>>1685869
Shotgun method.
Send out hundreds of applications. Literally any company that manufactures stuff with machine tools.
>>
New thread

>>1685875



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