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/diy/ - Do It Yourself


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>Your Opinion A Shit edition

Old thread: >>1653525

All the info you need about 3D-printing: https://pastebin.com/7Sb4TVdy

>Need help with prints? Go to:
https://www.simplify3d.com/support/print-quality-troubleshooting/

If that doesn't help you solve your print problems, please post:
>A picture of the failed part
>Printer make & model
>Filament type/brand
>Bed & extruder temperature
>Print speed

>What printer should I buy? [Last updated 7-9-2019]
Under 200 USD: Creality Ender 3
Under 500 USD: Creality CR-10
Under 1000 USD: Prusa i3 (Mk2 or Mk3)
Over 1000 USD: Lulzbot or Ultimaker
Buyer beware: some chinkshit clones are garbage. Some can be genuinely good, though.
Instead of buying a new printer, you could consider building your own: https://reprap.org/wiki/

>Where can I get free things to print?
https://www.thingiverse.com/
https://grabcad.com/
https://google.com/

>What CAD software should I use?
Solidworks, Inventor, AutoCAD etc. all work, but Blender and Fusion 360 are free:
https://www.blender.org/
https://www.autodesk.com/products/fusion-360/
>>
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First for Pew Pew
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What'a the best way to check for STL errors for free?
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>>1657227
throw that shit in a slicer and see if it works
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Top handguard complete. Gizmodorks PC at 275C/120C at 30mm/s 0.2mm layer height with fan on at 10%.
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>>1657227
Slic3r (and PrusaSlic3r), FreeCAD, etc have STL verification and fixing ability.
>>
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>>1656910
>costs around 153€(170.49$) for 1kg (2.205lbs)
Where'd you find a price? I looked a few days ago and all the sites I saw said something along the lines of "coming soon" or "not yet available"

>>1656929
You are like little baby, watch this

>>1657083
This is why I'll try and see if I can get a small furnace or something similar, the turnaround time is just too great otherwise
>>
>>1657283
>This is why I'll try and see if I can get a small furnace or something similar, the turnaround time is just too great otherwise
Read about the standard process. You're not going to do it in your home.
>>
>>1657283
Just go next level and /diy/ a CNC.
>>
>>1657315
I know it mentioned it requires a furnace that can reach steel sintering temperatures, but I can't seem to find that info again. I haven't read anything about the debinding, though, so if you could point me towards that I'd appreciate it. Besides, who said anything about home? I know for sure at least a few of my coworkers are interested in trying it out, might be able to reasonably convince someone to allocate some budget for materials experimentation.

>>1657324
That's on the list after a laser
>>
i need to smooth and glue together several pieces of PLA. is there some to PLA like acetone is to ABS? or am i stuck with sandpaper and two component glue?
>>
Not sure if this is a place to ask but a few of my projects require some sort of accuracy and was wondering if anyone would recommend me a pair of electronic calipers.
>>
>>1657341
Acetone is to PLA what acetone is to ABS.
>>
>>1657353
Mitutoyo.
>>
>>1657356
Not him but is there a PETG equivalent that makes acetone seem like lemonade?
>>
>>1657362
ethyl acetate
>>
>>1657341
I've been using weld on acrylic cement and it works great so far. get the IPS weld in 3 on Amazon for like $15
>>
>>1657229
Not really sufficient, depending on your source. I've been trying to convert some models directly from video game files to printable, and it's QUITE TRICKY. Things will print and then try to throw supports in tiny gaps that didn't seem to exist on the slicer. That kind of thing.
>>
>>1657356
Acetone IS NOT a solvent for PLA - if your PLA is being dissolved by acetone, you've got crap PLA which is either not PLA or has so much filler that that's what's being dissolved. Seriously. Stop spreading this.
>>
>>1657375
neat, thx. all i need now is find it or a similair product in germany...
>>1657356
tried it and it only softens the material and cases the layers to seperate.
>>
>>1657377
Check in Blender if there are separate components, try and Boolean Union them together; if not, run through Netfabb's online repair service and check it again in your slicer after it auto-fixes it.
>>
Does marlin set all unused pins to input mode?
I want to connect filament sensor to unused pins that are marked as servo pins on the board, but i wonder if i have to use a resistor in case marlin is retarded and sets them as outputs by default
>>
>>1657353
Mitutoyo is the go-to brand, but if you can find a pair of TESA Browne & Sharpe calipers you like cheaper than Mitutoyos, go for it.
>>
what's the best printer for making dry sump parts? they have to be pretty strong.
>>
>>1657455
any printer with an all-metal hotend and the build volume required for your parts can do the job, but if you're printing them out of any material with significant heat resistance you'll need an enclosure, so pick one that's easily enclosed, maybe a Voron 2.1? Otherwise any old printer will do, the only company that's actually doing anything revolutionary with FDM at the moment is Markforged with their long-strand filled materials.
>>
>>1657341
>is there some to PLA like acetone is to ABS?
sure:
Pyridine, Benzene, Ethylacetate, Tetrahydrofuran, Dichloromethane, Chloroform or Acetonitrile
have fun!
>>
>>1657447
>Does marlin set all unused pins to input mode?
Depends on the marlin version, board and controller:
https://github.com/MarlinFirmware/Marlin
>>
>>1657484
that's gay... guess i'll just add a resistor in series so even if it shorts output to ground it will be just like 1ma
>>
>>1657490
jesus dude, learn to compile.
>>
>>1657477
>>is there some to PLA like acetone is to ABS?
>sure:
>Pyridine, Benzene, Ethylacetate, Tetrahydrofuran, Dichloromethane, Chloroform or Acetonitrile
>have fun!
Wrong. I tested benzene and chloroform and neither dissolved PLA. Chloroform slightly softened PLA after a day, benzene had no visible impact on PLA. From what I've heard THF works, but never had chance to test it.
>>
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I made a board game. The ancient Royal Game of Ur. It has a hinge so it folds up and you can store it when not in use.
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>>1657763
>>
>>1657763

Pretty badass.
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>>1657283
>Where'd you find a price? I looked a few days ago and all the sites I saw said something along the lines of "coming soon" or "not yet available"
https://www.igo3d.com/basf-ultrafuse-316l-175mm-3000g
It has just been released in Germany do I don't know how long it will take outside of this shithole.
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I got 2 150watt lizard bulbs from petsmart today and holy cow does it make a difference.
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>>1657790
inside the enclosure is 45C right now.
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>>1657792
poor abs lizard
>>
How does /3dpg/ deal with a tight filament spool?
I just noticed my extruder having a hard time feeding filament into the hot end because the filament was wrapped too tightly around the spool.

Top mounted spool holder on the Ender 3 doesn't seem like a good idea when it comes to problems like this.
Maybe I'll print a spool holder that sits off the the side.
>>
>>1658032
...Are you sure you don't have a tangle, anon? Can't say that's ever been a problem. What brand of filament?
>>
>>1658032

Sounds like a tangle. Cut your filament, untangle, rethread.
>>
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how the FUCK do i fix this shit.
>prusa i3 mk3s
>hatchbox PLA
>0.1mm layer height
>fan off first 3 layers
>extruder temp 215 iirc
>bed temp 60
i have first layer problems as well but I know how to fix those. there's also a problem with the bottom of the top platform where all the layers are separated.
>>
>>1658097
>how the FUCK do i fix this shit.
READ THE FUCKING COPYPASTA
https://www.simplify3d.com/support/print-quality-troubleshooting/
https://www.simplify3d.com/support/print-quality-troubleshooting/poor-bridging/
https://www.simplify3d.com/support/print-quality-troubleshooting/stringing-or-oozing/

Seems like a solid test print to me apart from the stringing. Bridging what looks like 30-40mm is never going to happen anyways, so the bottom of the top platform usually looks like that, I've seen much worse.
The stringing test at the top can be improved with tuning extruder temperature and retraction settings.
>>
>>1658103
Are the little cylinders inside of the circular holes supposed to come out?
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>>1658132
Depends on the test, where did you get the STL?
>>
>>1658064
>>1658068
Anycubic PLA.
On second thought, I don't think it's a tight filament spool. I'll check for tangles, but it looks decent to me.
I'm wondering now if the problem is the spool being too heavy to rotate on the holder well enough.

I just finished a 5 hr print, manually rotating the spool when it looked like it was getting too tight
>>
hey guys newfag here.

Getting an ender 3 for my birthday. What should i know before going in?

anything i NEED before i put it together? like parts that improve it vastly?

Any programs that are better than others.

any other info for a first 3d printer?
>>
>>1658254
use cura to slice your models
get a 235x235mm borosilicate glass plate and stick a sheet of 0.5-1.0mm thick PEI to it if you want to print PLA
consider getting a bltouch
replace the stock bowden tube couplers and tube
>>
>>1658254

I got an Ender 3 pro a month or so ago. I hope you enjoy troubleshooting. That's not to say it's a shitshow or anything, but it's a very dumb machine and you have to baby it a little, especially early on. All replacement parts are fairly cheap. You probably want to think about a replacement bed very early, I and several others in these threads have had problems with warped beds on new Ender 3s. Generally the Ender 3 is a very nice piece of tech with some weird corners cut, but all fixes are pretty cheap so as long as you're up for the occasional fix, it's a great deal.

It's fun as shit though. I've been just using Cura like most people as I have no slicer preferences, and learning Fusion 360 for modeling, since evidently no one uses what I learned in high school anymore (Autodesk Inventor) and I don't even know how to get a hold of it. Order lots of filament. You'll probably need to replace the bowden tube and couplers. I've ordered replacements, but after having to take apart the hot end and fix a gap once, it's been cruising, so I'm in no rush.

Just like, load up Thingiverse and start printing shit. It's so much fun.
>>
>>1658254
You're in for a treat, anon. I got mine maybe 6 months ago and I've had an absolute blast with it.

Aside from what >>1658256 says, definitely look into getting some better springs for your bed. I found my stock ones were extremely weak and were easily jostled out of calibration.

Definitely learn how to 3d model, if you don't already. It's something I wish I knew before I bought a printer, since I'm stuck printing other people's designs, and very poor designs of my own. You'll get a lot more use out of your printer if you know how to design your own models.
>>
>>1658254
>anything i NEED before i put it together? like parts that improve it vastly?
No, keep it standard, run into problems, learn from them, then consider printing or buying upgrades based on your wants/needs.
>Any programs that are better than others.
Go with Cura for your first prints, consider Slic3r or Simplify if you run into specific problems that Cura can't solve.

>>1658256
>get a 235x235mm borosilicate glass plate and stick a sheet of 0.5-1.0mm thick PEI to it if you want to print PLA
Regular borosolicate glass will get good enough adhesion for PLA, no need for a PEI sheet.
>consider getting a bltouch
For a first timer, hell no. Learn how manual leveling works first, then figure out for yourself if you really need to spend money on something you rarely have to do.
>replace the stock bowden tube couplers and tube
They work fine on all three I've worked with, what's the deal with this standard recommendation? If it ain't broke don't fix it (although they may be broken in some cases, just none I've seen personally).
>>
>>1658256
bro i dont speak chinese wtf?

>>1658257
troubleshooting is fine as long as its a learning process and not a shitty product. I heard the ender 3 is the best starter printer for the money (i eventually want to print MAYBE gun parts and everyone in those communities says ender 3)

Quick question. I saw there is an ender 3 pro, im getting that one but dont have any idea what the difference is between the other ender 3's.

>>1658262
im glad. I was thinking of going to college for additive manufacturing but i thought it would be smart to see if i like doing it first before pursuing it as a possible career.

>>1658264
thanks i dont know what most of these terms are but i know what the bed is but have no idea what these different modifications are and their purpose.
>>
>>1658254
>Getting an ender 3 for my birthday. What should i know before going in?
read the fucking op
>>1658254
>anything i NEED before i put it together?
watch the fucking assembly video from the sd card
>>1658254
>any other info for a first 3d printer?
download a slicer like Cura
also get a 3d cad software and learn 3d modeling and some mechanical engineering basics or you will be thingiverse pleb downloader forever
>>
>>1658275

Pro has a removable bed (which is fine) and some mild improvements like a different power supply and the fans are properly covered. As far as printing goes they are identical.
>>
>>1658277
lots of people here seem to think the bed on the ender 3 is shit. Is that something im going to have to replace?
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>>1658280
I think the standard bed is okay for a while, but it will eventually wear down.
I got a borosilicate glass bed and hairspray, and so far it works very nice. already printed PLA and PETG without problems on it.
>>
>>1658275
>I heard the ender 3 is the best starter printer for the money
It arguably is.
>(i eventually want to print MAYBE gun parts and everyone in those communities says ender 3)
Disclaimer: be careful printing gun parts, guns are controlled explosions and when the material fails they become uncontrolled explosions. That said, Ender 3 is fine for the purpose if you know what you're doing. Or have a long enough piece string to pull the trigger.
>Quick question. I saw there is an ender 3 pro, im getting that one but dont have any idea what the difference is between the other ender 3's.
Minor upgrades, nothing to worry about, standard version is best bang for your buck but the fancy versions have some worthwhile upgrades.
>I was thinking of going to college for additive manufacturing but i thought it would be smart to see if i like doing it first before pursuing it as a possible career.
Don't. Get into general mechanical engineering first, it's much more worthwhile. Additive manufacturing cam become a tool in your toolbox for engineering, as it should be, and not your only tool as it would be in a highly specialised college course.
t. Mechanical Engineer who is doing his graduation intership at a an Additive Manufacturing company.
(1/2)
>>
>>1658275
>>1658289
>thanks i dont know what most of these terms are but i know what the bed is but have no idea what these different modifications are and their purpose.
Allow me to explain:

>CAD programs
Computer programs you use to draw stuff. This gets turned into a seperate file format, and then sent to your slicer program for, well, slicing.
>Cura/Slic3r/Simplify
Slicer programs. Slice a 3D object into 2D layers with a specific layer height. Said layers are then converted into machine code, which gets transferred to your printer through USB or SD.
>Borosilicate glass
Special glass that doesn't crack or shatter after heating and cooling several dozen times (heat cycles), which happens in 3D-printing. Most 3D-printed material sticks well to this stuff, making it a great material for your print bed.
>Manual leveling
Leveling the bed so that it's perfectly parallel to the plane that your printhead is traveling in, usually done using screws at the bottom of the bed carriage.
>Autoleveling
A BLTouch is one of the sensors that attach to your printhead, so the printer can perform an autoleveling routine. It calculates how un-parallel the bed is, and adjusts the Z height of the printhead accordingly. There are pros and cons to auto and manual leveling, the main pro of autoleveling is convenience.
>Bowden tube (couplers)
The bowden tube is the plastic tube that filament gets fed into, if you have a remote drive extruder like on the Ender. Basically, there's a stepper motor that forces the filament through the bowden tube into the print head where it gets heated, melts, and then gets deposited onto the bed. Apparently, some users here have experience iffy quality bowden tubes on their Enders, which may cause more friction and all sorts of problems. I've never had a bad bowden tube, your mileage may vary.

>>1658280
Try it first, if it ain't broken don't fix it.
>>
>>1658290
thanks for the help. hope to become a regular poster!
>>
>>1658290
>Try it first, if it ain't broken don't fix it.
Good advice, but it's hard to tell what's broken and what isn't when you're just starting out. People are really good at getting used to broken things.
>>
>>1658296
what would be some signs that something isnt right other than the obvious of the prints coming out wrong
>>
>>1658296

True that. My glass bed is arriving today, but to get shit to print I've just been having it start with 4 bottom layers and definitely starting way too fucking close to the bed to get it to stick across warped sections.
>>
>>1658304
Read the OP for Christ's sake.
>https://www.simplify3d.com/support/print-quality-troubleshooting/
If prints go wrong, they usually exhibit at least one of the problems mentioned in Simplify's troubleshooting guide.

Take this guy for example: >>1658305. This sounds like bad adhesion in the first few layers, as well as warping, so:
>https://www.simplify3d.com/support/print-quality-troubleshooting/not-sticking-to-the-bed/
>https://www.simplify3d.com/support/print-quality-troubleshooting/warping/
Which gives us the following possible solutions:
>Relevel build plate
>Reduce first layer printing speed
>Adjust temperature or cooling settings
>Disable fans (for the first few layers)
>Use an enclosure
My favorite solution being:
>Use brims or rafts

To add to this
>Having it start with 4 bottom layers
Amount of bottom layers is unrelated to warpage/adhesion, you're messing with the wrong parameter here.
>definitely starting way too fucking close to the bed
Adjust it then, having the nozzle to close to the bed will damage either the nozzle or your new glass bed, and will result in bad adhesion.
>>
Any newbie bed leveling advice? I own my printer for 4 days no, still can't level that bed.
>>
>>1658317

Believe me I've leveled it to death, fucked with every setting imaginable, and I print pretty much everything with a brim.
>>
>>1658318
I use a gcode that probes all 4 corners of the bed, and then the centre, and then all 4 corners of the bed. That way I can verify my bed is level throughout the bed.

What are you printing on? Look for warping on the bed itself. No matter how well you level your bed, if it's warped, it's not gonna stick properly.

Heat the bed and nozzle before you level. Everything will expand once it's heated up.
If you're doing the paper trick, you want it lightly scratching the sheet of paper. If you have a feeler gague, try and feel for about 0.1mm between the nozzle and bed.
>>
>>1658322
I have dial gauge and I was concerned for the consistency, but it looks to not be warped.
I do the paper trick, because I don't know any other way, and even if I do all the corners same feeling, prints don't turn out.
>>
>>1658318
Here's my routine:
>Clean the nozzle!
>Warm up the bed to operating temperature (60 degrees in most cases)
>Take a 0.1mm feeler gauge (a sheet of paper will do in a pinch)
>Move the nozzle to a corner of the bed, slip the feelgauge between the two, untill you can barely feel them rubbing
>Repeat with other three corners (1, 2, 3, 4)
>Repeat crosswise, just to be sure (1, 3, 2, 4)
>Best to leave a bit more space between them, rubbing your nozzle is bad, mkay
>Start print
>Look if the lines are flowing into each other!
A nozzle too close to the bed will print scraggly lines or a very thin layer you can look through. A nozzle to far from the bed will cause lines that don't flow into each other, resulting in spaghetti once you take them off. I prefer starting off too far, and then adjusting untill I see that perfect line flow - on my uni's UM2's I would regularly skip the build-in leveling wizard, and just adjust by hand while the printer was working on the brim, restarting once if necessary. The look on a teacher's face once he saw what I was doing was priceless, ''But you should always use the leveling wizard!''.

>>1658321
>If it ain't broken, don't fix it
Sounds like you kept fixing it untill it broke, meaning you need to go back to square one. Clean the plate with isopropyl alcohol, grab one of the prints that stuck on the old buildplate (you do archive all your prints, right?) so your new ''improved'' settings don't ruin your print. if the above leveling trick doesn't work, level the bed way too high (1mm), start that old print and then keep adjusting the bed higher and higher untill it does stick. Assuming your temperatures/speeds/cooling is fine, this should work (but you should post them regardless, maybe something is wrong). Sorry if I come across a bit harsh.
>>
Just got a printer and had it miscalibrated on Z leaving some very visible marks on the printing surface before I could stop it, is it fucked? I'd say they're probably 0.5mm deep.
Should I get a glass plate instead?
>>
>>1658336
>Just got a printer and had it miscalibrated on Z leaving some very visible marks on the printing surface before I could stop it, is it fucked?
I am currently printing on a cratered Ultrabase on my Chiron, prints just fine. They even sent me a replacement under warranty, it's been sitting here for several weeks because printer is fine comrade.
>I'd say they're probably 0.5mm deep.
Everybody says they've got a 20cm penis, but I never trust measurements taken by eyeball - use some calipers.
>Should I get a glass plate instead?
Have you tried printing with the scratches? If it sticks and the bottom looks acceptable to you, why bother?
>>
>>1658343
I printed a small test object and it got loose after about 2 hours, but could be other reasons. I'll play around with it some more and see how it goes, thanks.
>>
>>1658335

I watched all the videos on troubleshooting adhesion problems and tried pretty much everything. Always results the same, sticks fine in all but the center bottom right area of my bed, which is warped. So I'm replacing it. End of story.

Besides, I'd like that nice smooth bottom action.
>>
>>1658254
Prusaslicer and Sn4k3's profiles will be a big help. I literally just got mine last week and I have yet to experience any probrems. For bed leveling check out CHEP bed level gcode.
>>
What's the best way to dry PLA? Can I just set the oven at some temp and then set the spool in?
>>
>>1658377
Yes. As long as your oven is accurate and doesn't overtemp at such low temps.
>>
>>1658377
Do you want to get cancer? Because this is how you get cancer. Best way to dry PLA is in a chemical drying over, set to 40-50 degrees for 24 hours. Once your filament is dry, keep it dry by keeping it in an airtight container together with your silicone bag collection.
>>
>>1658384
>Do you want to get cancer? Because this is how you get cancer.
Yes, listening to this Anon definitely causes cancer.

PLA is not toxic. So long as the filament really is just PLA without anything like styrene snuck in, baking it in an oven is fine. The reel itself is probably just PP and cardboard.
>>
>>1658384
>heating up PLA, one of the most harmless plastics, at 50C, way under the temp of anything really happening to the plastic, other than air evaporating a bit, will give you cancer
thanks anon, great post!
>>
>>1658404
If it doesn't give me cancer will it give me holes in my brain?
Even more holes I mean.
>>
>>1658406
maybe if you jam a length of filament in there
>>
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>>1658254
Use a set square while assembling, make sure everything is squared up, one of my upright extrusions was leaning back a bit and caused all sorts of bed levelling issues, even with a bl touch.
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My friend just gave me three of these boards, I can't find any info on what they are model wise other than that I know they are for driving the stepper motors. Any idea on what the name/model/manufacturer of this board is specifically? Any piece of info to help Google would be appreciated.
>>
>>1658472
it's a random Chinese stepper driver/controller. Driver chips are easy enough to look up, but god only knows what firmware is on that microcontroller.
>>
>>1658485
presumably its some kind of serial, connect to pc and ask it who it is.
>>
>>1658257
>no one uses what I learned in high school anymore (Autodesk Inventor)
My entire office uses it, and we work with aerospace stuff, so it's not completely dead. Lots of the third party models we have are from Solidworks though
>>
>>1658353

>Slap on the glass bed and level
>Instantly perfect bottom layer

Fucking fantastic. Now I just wish there was a better option than these stupid chip clips to keep it down. Anyone have a preferred solution?
>>
>>1658658

Most people seem k with the clips. Quick to release and everything. My bed came with an adhesive bottom. Really not sure why, it does literally nothing as soon as you turn on the heat.
>>
>>1658472
>STM32 F7
>DRV8843
You just have to figure what pin goes where and you are set to compile marlin for it.
>>
>>1658692
stm32f07

stm32f7 would be a beast for a 3d printer ;)
>>
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The elegoo mars was mentioned a thread or so back, i got one in the sale, but haven't seen anyone else post about it, pretty good experience so far, took me about 10 minutes to set up and be printing the test print (custom rook)

they came out great so i tried a model with supports, using the chitubox default settings/supports i had a couple print failures where it stuck to the fep as the default auto supports in chitubox aren't so great, after more tests with manual placement and different settings i have a better way which requires minimal manual support placement

my method now is to open the stl in prusaslicer, fix, rotate and add supports, export the new stl with supports, open that in chitubox, then slice it with the 'rook' settings (the default chitubox settings are different), not had any failures since i started using this method, I have also updated to the epax firmware which enables network printing and turns the fan off unless its printing

pic is most recent print, a necron cairn ship for battlefleet gothic ~8cm diameter, elegoo transparent green resin, thanks for reading my blogpost
>>
what printer <$300 is best for only doing functional prints? or is that entirely based on material
>>
>>1658727

How is the smell/mess situation? Have you tried to slice and print directly from prusaslicer?

>>1658732

For functional prints you need an FDM printer, so most likely Ender 3
>>
>>1658658
if you don't want to use clips you can get a silicone thermal transfer pad and just lay the plate on top of it.
>>
>>1658741
there is a smell, doesn't really bother me and it's not too bad with the cover on, the ipa for cleaning is a lot more harsh smelling, apparently the elegoo resin doesn't smell as strong as anycubics, but i've not tried that,

mess wise i let the model drip for a while after its finished so most of the liquid resin goes back into the vat, there is a part you can print to hold the plate at an angle for dripping, i haven't bothered, then i take the platform off, scrape the print off onto a sheet of paper towel (set the support raft angle in prusaslicer to 45 to allow the spatula to pry underneath, default is 90), you can see the green line on the towel from the edge of the platform which is the most mess, then fit the platform back and put the cover on, for cleaning i dunk the model in a pot of ipa swish it about for 5 minutes, i clip the supports before curing while they're still a little flexible so i don't get shards everywhere, then i put the towel, supports and gloves in a waste box which goes outside to cure, then into the bin,

prusaslicer outputs a different format (.sl1) to what the mars uses (.cbddlp) i don't know if you can convert between them, not looked into it
>>
>>1658745
.sl1 is literally a zip file with an image for each layer and a little document that contains the settings.
>>
>>1658658
buy swiss clips, they dont stick up as much.
>>
>>1658747
i've not looked into it, but a quick search throws up a tool for converting from .sl1 to photon (i think they're the same as .cbddlp) which seems to rotate the images by 180 and change the format of the settings, so doable, but not sure if there is any benefit to doing it that way
>>
Is the crealty cr 10 really much of a step up from the ender 3?
>>
>>1658280
I threw on a 5mm glass sheet on the bed and that fixed the warping. The stock magnetic bed is quite shit on it tho. It works on smaller prints and you can always choose to print on the straightest corner.
>>
>>1658807

No, it just has a bigger build volume.
>>
>>1658807
In terms of print quality and features? No, if anything the added bed mass will result in more ghosting just by design.
However, if you want a cheap 300^3 mm printer, the CR-10 is currently the best value you can get. For the 400^3mm range it's a tossup between the CR-10S4 and the Chiron, the 500^3 mm market is dominated by the CR-10S5. Just figure out beforehand what size object you want to print, choose your printer accordingly and remember that smart splitting of prints is always the best option.
>>
>>1658828
>>1658816
Thanks Im mainly looking to print minis and terrain for my dnd games. Maybe some castle walls and towers etc.
>>
>>1658861

Tomb of 3d printed horrors youtube channel will be your shit.
>>
Anybody try this? Or anything like this?
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2047554
Looking to upgrade my spool holder since I noticed my current spool needing a bit more than a light tug to get it moving.
>>
>>1658861
>Minis
Better off with an SLA printer, unless you tweak the hell out of a solid FDM printer. Can be done on a CR-10 mind you, just don't expect 0.2mm resolution in your minis.
>Terrain
CR-10 would be perfect for that, depending on the terrain blocks you plan to print.
>>
>>1658872
Stock spool holder on the Chiron is shite, printed that one, it fell off the table, stuck it on with double sided tape, never had any problems since.
>>
>>1658872
Yes, greatly prefer it over center-mount holders.
Only downside-- you have to use spools with smooth rims. That's most of them these days but not all.
>>
>>1658873
>Better off with an SLA printer, unless you tweak the hell out of a solid FDM printer.
Not really true. Just go to a .25 nozzle. It's all the tweaking needed, at least on a decent printer like a Lulzbot or Prusa.
>>
>>1658874
>>1658875
Fantastic. All my spools are smooth rimmed, and I have some spare rubber feet kicking about.
Thanks anons.
>>
>>1658097
dude this looks great. just adjust retraction speed higher and retraction distance, go cooler on temp if you can
>>
>>1658727
wow, thats a nice print
>>
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Does anyone have recommendations for printing with TPE, TPU, TPC?
I own a standard (un-modded) Anycubic i3 Mega.
Do I need a special extruder?

thanks
>>
>>1659216

You need a direct-drive extruder, bowden won't work well. Ideally a Titan Aero.
>>
>>1659221
are these hot ends / extruders generally cross-compatible or should I spend a few hours researching hot ends / extruders that fit my machine (Anyc. i3 Mega)?
>>
>>1659234

You won't be able to mount a different extruder just like that, you'll first need to look for an x-carriage design that allows you to mount your specific extruder of choice and then print it. For the titan aero a quick search gives this - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3042297 ...but the aero is expensive, so if you want to use a different hotend/extruder combination you'll need to see if someone has designed a mount specific to that. Or design one yourself if it doesn't exist.
>>
>>1659221
Need is a strong word anon.
>>
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Screwing around with a DRO mount for my router table.
>>
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Why would I have striped extrusion like this?
>>
>>1659369

Try 5 degrees hotter. Nozzle likely too close. Check to make sure you're feeding well.
>>
>>1659369

Nozzle is too close to the bed
>>
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gradient filament
Y/N
>>
>>1659433
Yes if faggot
>>
>>1659433
shit pic
>>
>>1659216
Go slow. Like, REALLY fucking slow. 10-15mm/s to start out.
>>
>>1659433
N, that looks like shit quality, look at the colour banding
>>
>>1659433
sure if you want people to think youre gay
>>
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What videos do you guys recommend for learning Fusion360? I tried a couple tutorials but had trouble modelling a fucking jar lid.
>>
>>1659663
just go at it desu
no need for tutorials
go into the sketch mode, draw a shape using the circle tool and the line tool and then press E to extrude that shape
you can pick up the rest of the features as you go, for now just sketch on a given plane and then extrude
it's really simple
>>
>>1657360
>>1657353
>>1657451
Get the 15 dollar harbor freight ones... You're 3d printing not making aerospace components... Why buy calipers that can cost almost as much as his printer?
>>
>>1659709
>You're 3d printing not making aerospace components
There's no reason those can't be one and the same, there's nothing inherently wrong with printing quality parts

>>1657353
I can vouch for the Mitutoyos as well; probably anything off of McMaster-Carr is decent
>>
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>>1659709
>t. poorfag
>>
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>>1659713
No just no reason to spend ~$100 on calipers for his sub $200 ender 3... But you're right he should go pick up some carbide tipped mit 0-12s cause you know he's not a poorfag he can afford it, what's $800 to a college kid on a budget? The $15 dollar harbor freights zero out and repeat dimensions and can go back and forth between inch and mm I'll take the 85 bucks I saved and buy more firmament. tots a poorfag tho pic related
>>
>>1659727
You're acting like the calipers will ONLY be used for his 3D printer (which, they didn't even directly mention, as they said "few projects"). Do you buy a new nozzle for every print? New plate for every type of meal you eat?

>carbide tipped
>college kid on a budget
>$800 calipers
Way to pull words straight out of your ass.

Good tools last long.
>>
>>1659732
My bad theyre only 500 on sale but my point still stands, mitutoyo anything is overkill for 90% of 3d printing, especially if he's coming to fucking 4chan for advice, but if he's not a poorfag of course he can afford them so he can totally show me up on a Chinese manufacturing forum.
But you my friend need to get your sarcasm filter fixed
>>
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>>1659751
I don't know what you're trying to achieve with your cherrypicking but this is on the first page of results on Amazon Prime for "Mitutoyo calipers". There's no way you arbitrarily happened to pick an expensive 12" caliper when the majority is 0-6" or 0-8".
>>
>>1659762
why go for mitutuyo? Your tool is going to be more accurate than your machine.
>>
>>1659763
Why not? Who says the calipers would only be used for 3D printing? Surely you can think of more things to measure than just parts or the printer? I have no idea why you've taken such offense to the idea of getting a decent quality tool
>>
>>1659764
I'm not him, I just typed that question. Also i'm mechanical engineer and can't think of any use for good quality calipers outside of work, they cost shit ton to maintain and are way too accurate to be useful for anything I do.
>>
>>1659766
>can't think of any use for good quality calipers outside of work
I guess you don't do home projects? I use mine several times a week.
>cost shit ton to maintain
I don't understand. I've never had to "maintain" calipers and they've always kept their accuracy. The only thing I can think of is dirt getting into the rack/gears, and I don't use calipers where it's dirty
>>
>>1659768
>I use mine several times a week.
I use mine also several times a week, but mine aren't that accurate, they are cheap 30bux once, because accuracy isn't critical in my home projects, if you need that accurary sure, more power to you but if you buy expensive tools because you perceive them better, you are doing something wrong.
>I've never had to "maintain" calipers and they've always kept their accuracy
Have you tested them for consistency?
most calipers even if they are kept in good storage will loose their calibration doe to expansion and contraction due to heat in two years.
>>
>>1659763
>>1659766
This guy gets it

My point is that if he buys the cheapest mit digimatics then he's 2/3 to all the way to buying his second printer for a printer farm
I specified digital because they go back and forth between inch and metric quickly and easily and can be used to do quite alot of specialty measuring without doing math
Now the harbor freight digital calipers will perform 90% of the mits at one tenth the price at an accuracy more than adequate for 3d printing or home use, idk about you but I rarely need sub .005 dimensions around the house and 90% of my home needs a satisfied by a fucking tape measurer.
But since as was mentioned earlier since the original anon isn't a poorfag (unlike most hobbist 3d printers who are in fact poorfags or college kids and would probably rather buy a second printer or more filament than hundred dollar calipers) wel he can most assuredly afford the best tool available to him so fuck yea let's get those 12 inch carbide tipped digimatics, money is of course no object to him.
>>
>>1659751
>>1659762

Allow me to interject, but i use vernier calipers and i'm fine. If you absolutely need to measure things that are smaller than 0.05mm just get a micrometer.
>>
>>1659709
Cheapo electronic calipers crap out much faster than brand name stuff like Mitutoyo, meaning they always run out of juice exactly when you need them. They also lose accuracy as their voltage supply drops, and that can get into the range of the accuracy of a 3D-printer. If you want accurate and cheap, get name brand vernier calipers. If you want accurate and easy to read, get name brand digital calipers. There's no need to save a small amount on cheapo measurement equipment when the proper stuff will last you a lifetime.
>>
>>1659763
>Your tool is going to be more accurate than your machine.
If you understand anything about measurement, statistics, Gage R&R and such, you should know that it's a good thing to have measurement equipment that is an order of significance more accurate than the deviation of your products.

>>1659771
>I specified digital because they go back and forth between inch and metric quickly and easily
This isn't necessary per se, if you're in Europe you hardly need to work in imperial. Even if I need to, using metric modeling still works unless you need a precision fit (in which case you need a micrometer, not calipers), or a specific thread pitch (in which case you use thread gauges). I'm doing fine with a set of TESA dial calipers that cost me 25 euros, they're easier to read than verniers, don't run out of battery like digitals, and most importantly: don't get ''borrowed'' because everybody here uses Mitutoyo verniers.
>>
>>1659772
I'm sorry to tell you, but most people here can't read vernier calipers.
>>
Friendly reminder to NOT upgrade cura to 4.2.1
>>
>>1659855
what's wrong?
>>
>>1659663
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5bc9c3S12g
>>
>>1659855
this
also every update after 4.0.0 fucked slicing for me, models were stuck halfway into the build plate
>>
>>1659856
The fags just went and changed the default profiles for all the creality printers, copying them from the creawesome fork because "hurr everyone was using them so they must be better"

Except when you save a custom profile in cura it only saves your edited settings, so all the settings people left to default got overwritten (including fucking line width that got changed from 0.4 to 0.44)
>>
>>1659813
>If you understand anything about measurement
in metrology there is this thing called "accuracy" that is defined as "accuracy of output to true value" if output of your measure is too fine, you are wasting money. if your output is too rough, you aren't wasting enough money.
>>
Holy shit. I did not realize you bastards would make such a fuss over my caliper question. I flipped a coin and will save for the weeb caliper since I will need it for other projects as well. The 3D prints are for rough prototypes.
>>
>>1659872
Get the weeb vernier calipers if you want to save money, or look for used digital ones.
>>
>>1659872
You could get cheaper calipers, like Bahco or Neiko, Mitutoyo is not only game in town.
>>
>>1659813

Mitutoyo calipers are only accurate to .001", so you'd better bust out another thousand for a micrometer set.

Getting super accurate is much less important in 3d printing than machining. If you need perfect fit on something, you can always just print multiple mock-ups in different sizes to check a single portion of a build before committing to a multi-day complex print. Try that on a huge steel part with multiple milling operations.
>>
>>1659883
>Mitutoyo calipers are only accurate to .001", so you'd better bust out another thousand for a micrometer set.
0.05mm actually, so about 2 thou.

>you'd better bust out another thousand for a micrometer set.
Like I literally said, you only need micrometers if you need precision fits. The average 3D-printer guy will not get below 0.1mm (4 thou) accuracy, and that's way too big for precision fitting, so no micrometers needed.
>>
>>1659860
for 0.4 nozzle a line width of 0.44 is prolly better than 0.4
>>
>>1659883
>>1659885
My bad, the digital ones are indeed 1 thou. The vernier ones are 2 thou.
>>
>>1659874
I'll look into that further. Thank you.
>>
>>1659855
I can't get the damn thing to print proper supports. It's leaving some ridiculous overhangs even when I turn the angle setting all the way to 0.
>>
>order ender 3
>not even here yet
>already ordered $150 in mods

this is gonna fucking kill me
>>
>>1659901
There are lots of issues open on the github about supports. They really messed up this update
>>
>>1659909
refund that shit dude
it ain't worth it
you could have bought a used prusa or something for that price
>>
>>1659909

That sounds like a personal problem. Get a glass bed and nothing else. See how that does you.
>>
>>1659914
prusa's a fucking meme printer for soys

>>1659918
needed an all metal hot end as well to print actually usable objects
>>
>>1659914
>used prusa
are you fucking you best friends gf after he dumped her? no?
guess what
>>
>>1659920
First printer?
>>
>>1657790
>I got 2 150watt
That's like three Easy-Bakes, sheit.
>>
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Alright fellas, I suck at design so some advice would be helpful here.
I want to print an enclosure type thing but my printer is too small to handle the size I want so I've split the body into four corner brackets that need to be joined at the points highlighted in pic.
Interior looks don't matter and strength isn't really a concern either since it'll be reinforced by the top and bottom panels.
How would you design those corners so that I can affix them together in a way where from the exterior they look as flush as possible?

I was thinking of using snap joints but I've never designed any before + too much tolerance and they won't be as snug as I want.
>>
>>1659855
>upgrading past 3.6
That UI man, I just can't deal.
It's like they thought they were designing a slicer for phones.
>>
>>1660070
>print an enclosure
There's a reason why nobody prints them - it takes a long time, it looks kind of bad, and there's much easier ways to put 5 walls around your printer (usually acrylic). It might also deform over time if you're making a heated enclosure.

Try a dovetail joint or look into other methods of wood joinery and apply those to your design, I've found they work pretty well with printed parts since you can design the exact sizes you need and not have to rely on an existing cutting tool.
>>
>>1660076
I think he means an electronics enclosure, not a printer enclosure, cumbrain.
>>
>>1660076
>>1660084
Bingo.
I appreciate the thought though, a dovetail might work.
>>
>>1660084
No need to be an asshole about it
>>
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>>1660090
>No need to be an asshole about it
how new
>>
>>1660090
>No need to be an asshole about it

no need to go all reddit about it
>>
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>>1660090
>No need to be an asshole about it
your first day here?
>>
>hotend fan isn't working
>can still stay steady at 200c

do i need one?
>>
>>1660194
Eventually heat creep will get to the filament and/or drive gear and probably give you feeding issues, so unless you've got a really good heatbreak and heatsink, yes
>>
>>1659813
Hate to break it to you buddy but you know you're on an American website populated by Americans? The only metric most people not into 3d printing know is 1,2or3 liter soda bottle sizes. The ability to switch between inch and mm at a button press is invaluable
>>1659808
Yes cheapo calipers eat batteries faster than higher quality but 3pack of button cells is what, 5 bucks at Walmart? As far as the accuracy loss the damn things won't even power on before they loose so much accuracy that they won't be fit for use 3d printing
>>
>>1660227
Genuinely curious. Is there any benefit over metric that US customary uses other than local familiarity? I only ask because I briefly heard this suggested in passing.
>>
>>1660247
it makes division by certain bases easier.
>>
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>>1660247
The first thing that immediately came to mind is drill sizes. Fuck whoever came up with this stupid sizing system.

I just read your post again and realize this wasn't what you were asking, but fuck this thing anyway.
>>
Can anyone recommend a cheap entry level printer that I can buy of something like Aliexpress?
>>
>>1660274
ender 3, get it from the creality3D store
>>
>>1660278
I see those are on Ali, is there a reason for going through their store specifically? Probably to avoid counterfeits I imagine.
>>
>>1660247
There is no practical one... What's easier to figure between a 9/16 socket and a 5/8s or 12mm-13mm obviously the metric is easier... But we're back to back world war and moon landing champions so inch is obviously better /sarcasm. It's just what we were taught in school so it's what we use
>>
>>1660227
>Hate to break it to you buddy but you know you're on an American website populated by Americans?
And therefore I know both metric and imperial, thank you very much. Americans should do the same, really, both systems are equally useful.
>The ability to switch between inch and mm at a button press is invaluable
Not really. You can draw metric parts in imperial units, and the end result will be close enough in FDM 3D-printing.

>>1660227
The problem isn't that batteries are expensive, the problem is that they run out when you need them (time = money).
>As far as the accuracy loss the damn things won't even power on before they loose so much accuracy that they won't be fit for use 3d printing
The worst part of cheap calipers isn't that they die - it's that they give false readings when they're dying.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnDype-j3hk
>>
>>1659920
>thinking that you're cool if you spend hundreds of hours tinkering your chinkshit machine
>not knowing that PLA is basically one of the strongest cheap plastics out there
baka my dude
t. someone who had a $100 chink printer for a year before buying a prusa
>>
>>1660070
just friction fit them lol
and if that doesn't hold add a drop of glue
>>
>>1660194
depends on the hotend design
imho a teflon insulated e3d design doesn't necessarily even need a hotend fan
but if it is an all metal hotend you're gonna have a bad time
>>
>>1660369
>not knowing that PLA is basically one of the strongest cheap plastics out there

You're speaking to an engineer, retard. Keep your mouth fucking shut little guy.
>>
>>1660399
lmao
have fun trying to print PEI from your fucking ender 3
i'm sure we'll see you come crying back complaining how your chinkshit machine doesn't live up to advertising and shilling
>>
>>1660404
>Being against open source hardware and software
why are retards so retarded?
>>
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So i hooked everything up for my 2.5W laser engraver mod, the hardware is all done, including pwm (laser strength) support and all i need now is to generate some gcode for engraving.
it's just... something about this particular setup seems like a bad idea... i just can't put my finger on what it is...
>>
>>1660399
>What the fuck did you just fucking say about me, you little bitch? I'll have you know I graduated top of my class in the Polytechnic, and I've been involved in numerous secret classes on...
>>
>>1660434
what the fuck are you talking about?
how the hell could you make that conclusion from my post? is reading comprehension not your strong point?
>>
>>1660404
>Implying you're printing @ 350-400c
Doubt.jpg
>>
>>1660477
whut??
>>
>>1660479
PEI temps. They DO make filament for FDMs.
>>
>>1660435
Nice ceiling engraver
>>
>>1660483
yeah i know
what are you trying to say?
>>
>>1660435
>mirror bed under high power laser
are you trying to go blind?
>>
>>1660527
We established that earlier. He considers it his many duty to blind himself, his family, his pets, his neighbors, the mail carrier, and random passers-by.
>>
>>1660538
>>1660527
>>1660435
>Not mounting the bed at 45 degrees
>Not mounting a fourth axis with a mirror
>Not being able to set your own electronics on fire
2/10, apply yourself.
>>
>>1660517
I'm trying to say that no one who posts on a Mongolian throat singing forum is getting up to those temperatures (especially >>1660404); your bog standard heater core maxes out at @ 280c, you'd need a purpose built machine to do it.
>>
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>pastebin says avoid chinkshit: gives example of chinkshit being creality
>recommended printers are two crealitys
>>
>>1660586
>your bog standard heater core maxes out at @ 280c, you'd need a purpose built machine to do it.
The e3d v6 is only limited to 295 by the thermistor, you can replace it with a thermocouple and hit 400+ easy. baseline Mosquito hotend can do 450.
>>
>>1660591
There isn't much to buy in the 500 USD and lower segment that isn't chinkshit, so you might as well buy the most popular one with the most support and a reasonably good (but not exactly perfect) track record. Creality has proven to be kinda good, but especially good value, and it's hard to recommend anything but that if you've got a small budget.

t. wrote the pastebin
>>
>>1660591
>>pastebin says avoid chinkshit: gives example of chinkshit being creality
>>recommended printers are two crealitys
Because all of you are too cheap to buy Prusa.
>>
Does anyone here know of any premade tool changer solutions you can buy (brackets, servo mounts etc.) that don't cost an arm and a leg like E3D's experimental rigs? Or ideally a design you could print that's known to actually work.
>>
>>1660601
>Or ideally a design you could print that's known to actually work.
>known to actually work.
this makes it sound like you want a toolchanging system that's "plug and play". Those don't exist, they all have to be tuned around your specific setup and hardware.
>>
>>1660595
okay, suppose that makes sense. i want to dip into trying this stuff and i dont want to sink a shitload into it, and i dont really plan for my builds to be very large at all. i plan to use other materials in my projects and print the more finicky smaller parts
>>
>>1660603

Not "plug and play" exactly, i meant something that's known to work reliably with good repeatability. I'm still on the fence on whether to go with IDEX or a tool changing setup for my printer. IDEX looks more reliable, but tool changers don't require an extra stepper and driver and can potentially have more tools.
>>
>>1660610
those aren't the only options. you could just get an e3d Kraken like a normal person.
>>
Is there a STL trove for miniatures and terrian to print that is not already on Thingverse? Looking for Printable Scenery especially.
>>
>>1660611

Not a big fan of the multi-head hotends, they're widely known for having the idle nozzle ooze and leave boogers everywhere on the print.
>>
>>1660630
then get a cyclops and waste half your filament on purge blocks.
>>
>>1660633

IDEX is better than that though - at the cost of an extra stepper and driver you get no purge blocks, you can mix direct with bowden, have different temps per material, you can do two copies at the same time... Believe me, i've weighed all the options and i've stopped on either that or a tool changer.
>>
>>1657190
Ok so I see the suggested options for a first timer buying a new printer, what should someone who is rather shit at building and debugging get for the less than $600 range?
>>
>>1660666
no matter what you get, you'll have to "debug" it, it's part of the process. The good news is that it's fairly easy and once you learn it, you've got it. It's not that hard.

Prusa i3 mk2s kit is $600.
>>
>>1660671
Thanks
>>
>>1660597
Prusa's just onions shit. Literally the only advantage of buying a Prusa over a totally opensource chink machine is if you're low IQ and need constant customer support.
>>
>>1660722
>Prusa's just onions shit. Literally the only advantage of buying a Prusa over a totally opensource chink machine is if you're low IQ and need constant customer support.
Mmmmm, no. It's an old troll, and it's getting tiresome.
>>
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>>1660591
>recommending a bowden style printer for anyone ever
>>
>>1660732
how often do you print very soft flexibles
>>
I got my ender 3 just a few weeks ago and I have yet to have a single fucking problem. I had one (1) failed print that was due my own failure. I am on my third roll of fillament and it is the tits. Prusa is cool though but I am happy I was impatient and decided to go a cheaper route. Maybe I was lucky but I suspect a small few you are literal brainlets.
>>
>>1660734
Never with a bowdennnn
what the hellll
fuck it's oozing againnnnn
>>
>>1660722
>Literally the only advantage of buying a Prusa over a totally opensource chink machine is if you're low IQ and need constant customer support.
That's why all the chinese printer buyers spend all their time replacing parts to bring things up closer to Prusa's standard?
Prusa is the only minimal printer that uses high quality parts across the board, as opposed to whatever was cheapest out of some Shenzen basement that week. And is also open source.
Not to say it's perfect. But it starts way the fuck closer. I want to mess with my printer out of the box, not spend months trying to get it passibly working.
>>
>>1660732
>>1660734
so im guessing bowdens a problem with flexible soft stuff. is this something that a new person operating in a budget would do ever for any reason, and not of upgraded by this point? is this likely to become an issue for me or anyone starting with an ender, ever?
>>
>>1660739
flexible filaments have very few uses because they're not actually soft. they're like tire rubber. they're very durable and have insane inter-layer adhesion but practically, there's not a whole lot of instances in which you'd actually want to print it.

bowden machines are fine.
>>
>>1660739
>so im guessing bowdens a problem with flexible soft stuff.
Yes. Not all flex, but it gets harder as the flex gets softer.
>is this something that a new person operating in a budget would do ever for any reason
Well, yeah. If you don't care though, you don't care.
>and not of upgraded by this point?
Going to direct extrusion on a chink printer is gonna be annoying and cost as much as the printer. or more.
>is this likely to become an issue for me or anyone starting with an ender, ever?
Only if you care about flex filament.
It's a limitation of bowdens. All bowdens. Not just cheap chinese printers.
>>
>>1660740
>flexible filaments have very few uses because they're not actually soft. they're like tire rubber
Depends. Some are very soft.
I use them to make print-in-place flex hinges for mechanisms.
>>
>>1660744
>I use them to make print-in-place flex hinges for mechanisms.
you could do that with PC or Nylon and not have to worry about multiple extrusion.
>>
>>1660746
multiple extrusion isn't a worry. At least, I have no trouble with it.
Neither PC nor nylon deal with long term fatigue very well. And both warp.
>>
>>1660749
>Neither PC nor nylon deal with long term fatigue very well.
??? PC is THE material used for living hinges in the injection molding industry
>>
>>1660751
Pure PC? I disbelieve. The stuff crazes like nobody's business under static deformation load.
>>
>>1660752
whoops i was thinking of PP, my bad
>>
>>1660753
Oh, there you go. Yeah, that sounds more like it.
>>
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>>1660753
>whoops i was thinking of PP
Yes. Yes you were.
>>
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I've been trying to print with Gizmo Dorks PC and any large print fails about halfway through. I have a heated build chamber at 55C and am printing at 275C with a 120C bed. It seems I can only ever print small objects with this. I am printing at 20mm/s

Anybody have experience printing with these kinds of materials have any tips? My prints are just coming apart mid print, It seems like they might be warping apart but I can't tell for sure since it always happens over night.

I've had good success with hatchbox PC but they stopped selling it on amazon and elsewhere the price went up from 30 to 50 bucks.
>>
>>1660762
add a lizard heater bulb to your enclosure so it gets hotter
>>
>>1660765
I already have 2>>1657790
the print in that image cracked an hour later before it was finished.
>>
>>1660767
gotta cool the stuff super-slowly. Like bring it down to room temp over an entire day (depending on item size). Heat doesn't conduct out of the inside very quickly, PC is a good insulator.
>>
>>1660586
>no one who posts on a Mongolian throat singing forum is getting up to those temperatures
Well... don't be so sure about that. I know at least one other person in this thread does high temperatures. They do Ultem and I think are trying to do PEKK; I've done PEKK, Ultem, PVDF, and will be trying PEEK soon. Amateurs and people new to printing aren't the only regulars here.
>>
>>1660671
>>1660682
Prusa no longer sells the MK2S (on their site, maybe you can find new old stock or secondhand), but the MK3S is great. $800 (flat, delivered to your door, no extra costs), though.
>>
>>1660762
Are you sure there's no hidden drafts somewhere, maybe through cracks in the enclosure? It might be a heated chamber, but there's still the chance of a small amount of cold air coming in through a seam and screwing things up.
>>
>>1660722
why the fuck do you keep going on and on about prusa not being open source when that is blatantly not true?
>>
>>1660739
>>1660734
even with nonflexibles bowden are fucking shit
going from a bowden to a direct drive made a world of difference to me
>>
>>1660722
>opensource chink machine
I know there's been a few companies who slap the open source label on their site/printers but don't actually follow through; I don't know them offhand but this was the first link that came up
https://makerhacks.com/3d-printer-companies-abusing-open-source/
>>
>>1659216
Print very slow.
>>
>>1660739
do NOT use direct drives, it makes the extruder block very heavy and it overshoots when changing speeds during print so you end up with ugly poops all over the print
>>
>>1660597
>Prusa
Thanks, I can already use the toilet on my own.
>>
>>1660597
>paying money for the research costs when chinks make the exactly same quality printers for 3 times less
in fact, chinks make better printers than prusa, for example my printer is completely made from metal, not like the prusa trash where a a lot of the parts are 3d printer and it looks like shit
but yes be a good boy and give prusa money so chinks can copy more stuff which i can buy for cheap, thx
>>
>>1660847
lmao a few hundred grams may be too much for your rickety chinkshit machine but a properly designed printer with ordinary quality parts will handle it just fine
>>
>>1660851
>in fact, chinks make better printers than prusa
They could, but they don't. Because they know the average American is so cheap he squeaks, and one thing the Chinese know how to win is a race to the bottom.
>for example my printer is completely made from metal
So were Soviet cars.
>prusa trash where a a lot of the parts are 3d printer
Because Prusa comes from the RepRap project where the whole point was a 3D printer capable of printing another 3D printer. And they've stayed true to that and true to Open Source. Unlike your Chinese printer with most of the chip labels sanded off.
>be a good boy and give prusa money so chinks can copy more stuff which i can buy for cheap
No worries. Ain't my house that's gonna burn down, but hey, you saved a hundred bucks.
>>
>>1660605
Consider that SLA printers are also getting cheaper, and if you're only printing extremely finicky parts they might be a better option than FDM.
>>
>>1660732
>>1660736
I have printed flexible materials on bowden printers just fine. For 95% of all users they're fine, which is why they can be recommended for first time users.

>>1660817
>going from a bowden to a direct drive made a world of difference to me
Wierd, it made zero difference for me on an Anet A8 (was converted to bowden by someone else, I took it back it direct drive), and I printed flexible materials just fine on an Ender 3, AC Chiron and UM2 (so across the quality spectrum).
>>
>>1660851
>Yet another feeble attempt to trash-talk Prusa printers

The only worthwhile argument i ever see out of these posts is that the printers are expensive. Any other gripe about open-sourcedness, quality control, usability or support always falls flat on its face. There has even been this funny *seething* pasta people whip out whenever a Prusa vs. Chinks debate comes up.

Prusa has remained the most open-source friendly company i know, their fork of Slic3r is a joy to use and freely available for someone like me who has never bought any of their products. Yes they're expensive, but that pretty much the only option you have when you're not based in Shenzhen. Like >>1660860 said nobody can beat the chinese in the race to the bottom, so why not make something that works well and is at least more affordable than an Ultimaker.
>>
>>1660919
Uesh but the prusa mk3 kit starts at $745. Not really affordable.
>>
>>1660969
that's what the good parts cost. As for 'affordable' it depends-- I just bought two more for testing during parts development.
>>
>>1660969
You can download all the parts, print them, and buy off the shelf bits for everything except the control boards. And I think the Chinese have cloned that, god knows if it'll run compatible firmware.
Even with crap parts, I wonder how much you'll spend on it...
>>
>>1660767
add mylar film or aluminum foil to the inside so it reflects the heat back
>>
>>1661035
acrylic is opaque to medium IR anyway. No need.
>>
>>1660738
>Not to say it's perfect. But it starts way the fuck closer. I want to mess with my printer out of the box, not spend months trying to get it passibly working.

Yes, I know you're a brainlet and it would take months for you to have your printer working. That is my entire point. Thank you for supporting it, Prusa NPC.
>>
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>>1660919
Yes anon. The argument is the Prusa is overpriced. Good job finally understanding it.

Boy, Prusa users sure are getting smarter by the day!
>>
>>1661075
>Yes, I know you're a brainlet and it would take months for you to have your printer working.
That's really all you've got? That you're somehow 'smarter' for buying a printer that needs upgrades out of the box and constant attention to do reliable prints?
>>
>>1661084
Oy vey! Did you post from your iPhone or Mac?
>>
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>>1661087
projecting hard dude.
>>
>>1661038
>acrylic is opaque to medium IR anyway.
Acrylic is IR transmissive, that's why it's used for the little windows on remote controls. Foil, on the other hand, reflects like 93%.
>>
>>1661115
>Acrylic is IR transmissive, that's why it's used for the little windows on remote controls.
"Wrong IR"
Remotes are near-IR just barely past red. Heat is a much much longer wavelength.
>>
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>>1661091
>Prusa AND a thinkpad

Walking meme
>>
>>1661150
both worked out of the box, dude. Nor has either stopped working at any point :-)
>>
>>1661151
I'm sure you're very proud of being so low IQ you can't easily upgrade them yourself... ;)
>>
>>1661162
Mmm, yeah, look in the pic up top.
But that's OK, you're a customer I don't want.
>>
>>1661162
You deserve to die.
>>
>>1659663
follow the instructions of fusion 360
https://f360ap.autodesk.com/courses#getting-started-for-absolute-beginners
>>
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>PRUSA! PRUSA! PRUSA! PRUSA! PRUSA!
there are only two kind of people shilling this hard on a corporate intranet engineering subreddit:
czeckem Josefs
massive Faggots

I don't think you are a Josef
>>
>>1661183
>>1661218
Have sex
>>
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>>1659663
>I tried a couple tutorials but had trouble modelling a fucking jar lid.
>>
>>1661268
to be fair, threads are hard unless you use a pre-scripted/modeled cheat.
>>
giving polycarbonate another shot
>>
>>1661278
prolly work better on the inside, on the outside it has to go back through the acrylic and you probably lose some energy that way
>>
>>1661280
I figured as much but thats to much effort. It is already about 5C hotter than normal and it just started so it is working some. I think printing at 10mm/s will be the best chance at success.
>>
>>1661278
are you using 100% polycarbonate or some mix like the ultimaker pc?
>>
>>1661278
Nice setup.
Is this a cr10? Do I have to upgrade something to go >300C besides a full metal hotend on a creality machine?
>>
>>1661269
>to be fair, threads are hard
Not really. Difficulty depends on how you want to add them and how accurate you want them to be. For machining purposes the threads in the model aren't important for anything other than visual indication because the spec notes will be followed instead.

In Solidworks and Fusion you just make a bore in the minor diameter, then pick an edge to Tap the thread from, and choose the diameter, pitch, and offsets. For male you make a bore with the major OD of the thread and pick the parameters. Then add a thread relief as a revolve cut where needed. And a chamfer for the thread start.

If you just want to model a thread you need a sketch with a centerline for it, then a cross-section of the thread profile that matches the specs for that thread type. Getting thread spec manuals has varying levels of difficulty. I had specifically had trouble tracking down DIN specs for glass bottle threads a few years ago.
>>
>>1661530
>Not really. Difficulty depends on how you want to add them and how accurate you want them to be. For machining purposes the threads in the model aren't important for anything other than visual indication because the spec notes will be followed instead.
3d printing thread, not machining. You model what you print, and unless you're using a thread library, it's hard.
If you are using a thread library, you probably don't have a jar lid. Or 1/8BSPT for that matter unless you bought the full Monty.
>>
>>1661531
>it's hard.
Sorry-- not exactly hard. More bloody tedious. And nothing out there deals with really long spirals well when you're building from scratch.
>>
>>1661532
Be easy on him, he's probably a Prusa user.
>>
>>1661536
>Be easy on him, he's probably a Prusa user.
I'm a Prusa user [among others], and you can fuck right off with that nonsense. It's shitting up every thread and it's not funny.
>>
>get into 3d printing
>realize 99% of all popular youtube channels are geared towards autists making miniatures

Lads...
>>
>>1661544
So find the ones that aren't.
>>
>>1661544
I feel you, personally I gave up on the search for good ones.
>>
>>1661495
its gizmodorks and I have to assume this is the most pure version of PC I have used because its fucking impossible to print with. My print in >>1661278 failed. Came apart mid print and was still warping even with a 120C bed and a chamber so hot I had to take out my digital thermometer because the screen was turning black.

This filament was a waste of money
>>
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>>1661531
>If you are using a thread library, you probably don't have a jar lid.
>>1661532
>And nothing out there deals with really long spirals well when you're building from scratch.
I use three different CAD packages regularly for various reasons and they all treat threads and helical paths slightly different. Alibre requires you to make the sketch profile you want to use to generate a thread, so you have to draw the whole profile using toleranced dimensions for minor and major. And then you have to make sure that no part of the sketch goes outside of the intended pitch. I've done this more than a few times to make non-standard (sloppy) threads for printed parts that need to screw together after printing without any clean up and with lower potential for galling.

In Solidworks the thread wizard does most of the work for you, but you might have to clean up the thread profile sketch after the fact if there's nothing ideal in the library.

What I forgot to mention and what is the absolute easiest way to go about this is to just utilize the McMaster-Carr catalog. You can download a model of a fitting, plug, screw, or other piece of hardware that includes the thread you want to model. Then simply use that model as a boolean subtraction on the part you want to print and you've skipped the whole process of modeling the threads from scratch. This works perfectly fine for tapered threads which are an absolute bitch to model accurately.

If you need to change the thread fit you can just scale the McMaster part model a tiny amount on diameter only to make it a sloppier tolerance.
>>
>>1661588
>What I forgot to mention and what is the absolute easiest way to go about this is to just utilize the McMaster-Carr catalog. You can download a model of a fitting, plug, screw, or other piece of hardware that includes the thread you want to model. Then simply use that model as a boolean subtraction on the part you want to print and you've skipped the whole process of modeling the threads from scratch. This works perfectly fine for tapered threads which are an absolute bitch to model accurately.
Yep, that's what I do too.
>>
>>1661544
>99% of all popular youtube channels are geared towards autists making miniatures
those are recommendations based on your viewing history...
>>
>>1661544
If you can print minis with good results you can print anything
>>
>>1661692
oh yeah? can I print RAPE? I swear to God you people are fucking terrorists and when I'm in charge you're all going to prison.
>>
>>1661696
actually printing a model of someones body without their permission, like ellen from the last of us is rape in some legal jurisdictions, so yeah. you can print rape
>>
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>>1661698
>>
>>1661696
I mean if you really want to. Sure. Go make a 3d model of it and youre golden.
>>
I don't get it.
I have the following gcode
M42 P4 S255
G00 Z0
G00 X50.828810 Y0.199180
M42 P4 S0
G00 X0 Y0.199180
M42 P4 S255
G00 X50 Y0.199180
M42 P4 S0
G00 X0 Y0.199180
M42 P4 S255

The m42 turns a pin ON or OFF, if i enter the M42 commands into the terminal in octoprint manually they work flawlessly, but if i execute the gcode above, then the pin goes LOW for a fraction of a second and then remains HIGH for the rest of the print
how is that possible?
the gcode is simple as fuck, turn pin on, move right, turn pin off, move back, turn pin on, move right etc
>>
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Yes! it's working!
My laser attachment is performing beautifully.
Look at that shit
I turned my 3D printer into a .... laser printer
badum tss
except this one doesn't need any toner
>>
>>1661750
are you still doing that retardmode shirt with the mirror bed?
>>
>>1661753
I am not going remove the bed surface every time i want to use the laser module.
I just placed a piece of wood over the mirror to cover it which is enough since the laser won't burn through it
>>
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>>1661750

This would've been a more appropriate test image
>>
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>>1661750
What a waste of a first print.
>>
>>1661692
Except literally everything useful
>>
>>1661544
So what would you rather print?

Legitimate question
>>
>>1661544
To be fair, short of a professional level, that is 99% of the usefulness of an SLA printer... If you can get good at painting them people pay out the ass for those minis.
>>
>>1661874
What are you planning on printing that you cant print with a setup that is good enough to make minis?
>>
>>1661940
something bigger than a mini.
>>
>>1661944
I dont see why that would be a problem at all.
>>
>>1661960
SLA printers are... small. Unless you want to drop near industrial dosh.
>>
>>1661750
Despite your absolute shit choice of first image, I'm curious how you added a laser attachment. Most guides I've seen are basically pic related where it says "get a laser diode and then here's your first result"
>>
>>1661976
IIRC we had the L-cheapo fag here on /diy/ some time ago.
http://www.robots-everywhere.com/re_wiki/pub/web/Main.LCheapo.html
>>
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>>1661976
Despite your shitty taste in memes, I shall graciously answer you.
It's simple as fuck.
First you buy a laser with a driver on ali from chinks. 2W is enough to engrave most shit.
Then you devise some way to attach it to the extruder, 3d printing an adapter is the best way, but you can ghetto rig it with duckttape if you are lazy
1/2
>>
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>>1662054
2/2
then you need to find a free PWM pin on your printer's board and attach one wire to it and a second wire to a ground pin.
Then you will connect those two wires to the TTL pins on your laser driver.
Personally i am using optocoupler separation when itnerfacting any outside electronics with my printer to avoid accidental nasty shorts and shit when you are using multiple devices with separated non isolated power supplies, better safe than sorry.
My chink driver board that came with the laser died literally after 5 seconds of using it so i had to build my own from an lm317 instead, which is surprisingly easy to do, but i doubt you will be unlucky enough and have to do it as well.
And thats it. After that you turn that pin on or off with the gcode M42.
If you use duckttape you can do the whole thing in 10 minutes.
>>
>>1661893
Maybe something actually practical like hip replacements for example?
>>
>>1662059
You're hoping to make an amateur hip replacement and the people making minis are the autists?

Surely you're aware there are several million dollar SLS printers that can produce titanium and even tungsten parts yes? Issue is I don't think they have a degree of accuracy down to make something like a hip joint without quite alot of post processing, and I don't think the final results are as strong as traditionally produced metal surgical implants.
>>
>>1662059
As of now you should see 3D printing for bio mechanical in the sub $3000 range as quick and relatively inexpensive prototype creator. The beauty of it is that quality printers are becoming cheaper. I mean don't let me stop you. Go to the /sci/ wiki and pirate the anatomy books there. Bone is honestly an amazing material. It would be interesting for the SLS technology to create artificial bone.
>>
>>1662065
I am saving up money so in couple of years when the 3d printers advance more, i can buy one like they had in 5th element and print myself a waifu
>>
>>1662067
Better start on working on now so you don't have to play catch up to the tech whet it does come out. Get to it.
>>
>>1662064

>Hip replacements

Wait you mean like REAL hip replacements? Not prototypes? That's sketchy as fuck my man. I don't think I'd put my life on anything 3D printed.
>>
>>1662064
>Issue is I don't think they have a degree of accuracy down to make something like a hip joint without quite alot of post processing, and I don't think the final results are as strong as traditionally produced metal surgical implants.
Racecar anon here, we had a sponsorship with a company that made 3D-printed implants, mainly facial (dome, jaw, sockets, etc.), while they weren't talking as much about joint replacements their implants that keep your brain inside your head very much are as strong as traditional methods, if not stronger, and fit much better even without post processing. They've developed methods to go from MRI to CAD to CAM, and the kind of fit they can achieving is great according to most doctors. I'd severely doubt bearing surfaces and movable joints though, although they did a few jews including sockets and apparently they work well.
>>
>>1662079
Not sure what the fuck he meant. Theoretically an Ender 3 could do prototype hips. I would agree though, if the products of SLS printing are anything similar to those clays with copper/silver in them that you can make shit out of then burn the clay away to have a solid metal object then they are likely brittle.
>>
>>1662079
>>1662082
It would be much easier to cast a positive and lost-PLA cast it.
>>
>>1662083
Do you actually have experience with lost pla? Ive been dicking around with trying to forge flat ring blanks for another hobby I have so I can buy bulk smelting metals instead of premade rings.
>>
>>1662085
I actually have two PLA intake manifolds for an Indian at a local artist, who is going to cast them (one brass, one aluminium). Cost me 50 EUR for the two of them which is a helluvalot cheaper than CNC milling, it'll just need finish machining (clean up the inside, plane the mating surfaces).
>>
>>1662079
You were literally 3D printed from base elements by your mom's uterus
>>
I have been using Solidworks for four years now, have gotten several certifications on it and it's by far the quickest program for me to work with thanks to all that experience. However, I'm graduating university, probably going to work 4 days a week as an employee (already have offers lined up), leaving a day or two for technical consultancy and prototyping. Leaving uni means I lose my SW license, buying one for a small business is cost prohibitive and I'm not pirating it because on two seperate occasions SW went in dry with no lube on people that were using it pirated versions for their own business, costing them several thousands.
So, what's the best program to replace SW with? Fusion360 seems attractive for a small business and I've tried it, but the workflow just isn't as smooth as SW for me. What other programs should I consider?
>tl;dr What is best CAD to replace Solidworks?
>>
>>1662131
literally first post recommends Blender and Fusion360
But if you already know how SW works, you can literally use FreeCAD. it doesn't matter at this point, you already know how 3D CADs work all of them behave in similar way.
>>
>>1662133
I made the OP and recommended Blender and Fusion on behalf of other anons mentioning them ITT in the past year or so. Yet, they seem clumsy compared to SW. FreeCAD seems even more obtuse.
>>
New Thread
>>1662142
>>
>>1662137
Inventor is Autodesks copy of SW if you want actual SW alternative, there is a change that they will break down on your company too if you use their software for "free" but unlike SW you can actually get fully working software by telling them you are still in education.

If I understand you correctly and you want an actual CAD for engineering purposes and not just for 3D printing.
>>
>>1661091
>heater right next to your drives
making me nervous there anon
>>
>>1662081
wow. imagine using jew so much autocorrect puts it above test or jigs
>>
>>1662131
Inventor's not bad. I transitioned pretty easily from SW to it; each program has its quirks and features but you get used to it pretty quick. Still costs a pile of money, though.

Fusion is vaguely comparable in that it's an Autodesk product but it's even easier to pick up than most others due to its "user friendliness", which is sometimes a downside, but it's free if you make under $100,000 a year with it, but it sounds like you've already investigated that.

>>1662133
FreeCAD sucks ass, though, all things considered.
>>
>>1662593
>FreeCAD sucks ass
this true and sad.
how can it be unfucked?
>>
Is the possibility of making some side cash with a 3d printer possible or did people saturate the fuck out of the market with stupid shit?
>>
>>1662950
>find niche
>exploit
>???
>profit
Cosplay seems to still be the big-ticket item if you market yourself correctly, or if you can come up with reasonably unique designs that people will actually want to buy for shit like planters, coasters, earrings, etc.
>>
>>1662143
>new thread
>this one still on page one
The fuck is wrong with you?



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