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Is this some elaborate ironic joke americans make towards euros?

How are people who are taking lifelong mortages for houses that last barely 20 years not rioting in the streets about this?
>>
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please tell me this is some movie set or smth...
>>
how did this started even? how does it get approval?
>>
>>1527742

Decent americans can afford a new house ever 10-15 years, and poor people get them free, so what is your point.

you've probably never had a butter burger anyway.
>>
im not a contractor, have never built a house, or framed a wall or whatever. what should houses be made out of? i was in a garage built out of redwood the other day.

if one were to build a house, what would be the best material: stone, brick, concrete, hardwood, solid logs, those weird lego blocks? again, im not a house guy; so im clueless.
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you really are desperate to troll arent you.
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>>1527742

If properly sealed, the use of OSB isnt a death sentence for a house. The use of treated plywood for the first few feet would be smart. Blame improper constuction for the failure you posted not the material, pywood would most likely have also failed if exposed to the same conditions.

In north america we have been blessed with plentiful forests and lots of land. OSB makes efficent use of what would otherwise be manufacturing waste to make a product that comparrs very similarly to plywood.

You should also consider that it is more and more rare for American houses to be passed down and most people do not stay in their homes longer than 14 years, meaning that their willingness to pay for generational materials will be diminished. Also renovations are commonplace and wood based construction allows for easier renovations.

But you probably already knew this and are just looking for a rise.
>>
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>>1527755
>In north america we have been blessed with plentiful forests and lots of land. OSB makes efficent use of what would otherwise be manufacturing waste to make a product that comparrs very similarly to plywood.
>You should also consider that it is more and more rare for American houses to be passed down and most people do not stay in their homes longer than 14 years, meaning that their willingness to pay for generational materials will be diminished. Also renovations are commonplace and wood based construction allows for easier renovations.

none of this MAKES ANY SENSE.

If you really have good wood (you dont, you have only young pine) you would make houses last longer and use the product longer = fewere waste, more quality trees.

also, regarding people moving, they dont have to build a new house, they can buy a used house = better quality house, better initial ROI, beter mainintence ROI no tornado, fire or earthquake costs.

>>1527750
>if one were to build a house, what would be the best material: stone, brick, concrete, hardwood, solid logs, those weird lego blocks? again, im not a house guy; so im clueless.

depends, all material can do every part of the house, but it has to be quality and craftsmans. what are you thinking right now?
>>
>>1527742
I’ve explained this in other threads.

You want to finance the lot not the structure. It’s more cost effective to build and knock down/rebuild than it is to finance mid grade materials. The real estate market in the US moves much more quickly than in Europe.
>>
>>1527763

whoever named that image is clueless. most un-treated wood will rot if used on a roof where the roofers were smoking crack.
>>
>>1527768
Pssttt... dont feed the trolls
>>
>>1527768
>most un-treated wood will rot if used on a roof where the roofers were smoking crack.

another stupidity of american construction...it rots because:

1. its OSB
2. its is "TREATED" (in case of young pine)

You can use raw wood as shingles for roof - but you have to use old growth and cut it in proper time of the year and moon, that way it will last centuries

>>1527766
>You want to finance the lot not the structure. It’s more cost effective to build and knock down/rebuild than it is to finance mid grade materials.

enitre construction is owned by mafia and shaddy business, only they profit + illegal workers, the real worthy estates are old brick/rock houses which only increase its value with time
>>
>>1527750
>what do I use?
Stone foundation, wood framing, shiplape sheathing. You can then enjoy your mold free 200+ year home.
Make sure the roof extends out far enough to dump rain and snow away from the foundation.
Never use plastic (tyvek) it will hold moisture agains the wood and you'll then have rot. The home needs to breathe.
>>
>>1527763
Osb, MDF, etc are all materials that are made from waste products. Wood chips and sawdust and wood with too many knots or bowed too badly.

The osb is covered in weatherproofing and then some other siding or covering solution for physical protection. The osb is there to reduce racking. You keep water out with what you stick on top.

Works fine.
>>
>>1527773
Take off your tinfoil hat. McConstruction is not some scam being perpetrated by shady contractors. If you actually knew what the profit margins in construction looked like you’d understand why, but you don’t know anything.
>>
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>>1527775
>Stone foundation, wood framing, shiplape sheathing. You can then enjoy your mold free 200+ year home.
>Make sure the roof extends out far enough to dump rain and snow away from the foundation.
>Never use plastic (tyvek) it will hold moisture agains the wood and you'll then have rot. The home needs to breathe.

+1
long lost brother is that you?

>>1527776
>Works fine.

what is the guarantee? or youll blame it on Mexicans?
>>
>>1527777
>If you actually knew what the profit margins in construction looked like you’d understand why, but you don’t know anything.

I know about the margins that explains why there is so much weasels within it
>>
>>1527780
flat roof improper roofing material
>>
>>1527751
we live rent free. I feel bad for them
>>
>>1527763
>but it has to be quality and craftsmans. what are you thinking right now

ive never lived in a house built after 1947. i was mainly just curious about houses; i wont be building or buying a house anytime soon. although, im considering just living in a quonset hut with a couple car lifts or an old warehouse.
>>
>>1527773
>You can use raw wood as shingles for roof - but you have to use old growth and cut it in proper time of the year and moon, that way it will last centuries

here

there churches are around 400yo, all wood, wood shingles are just re-tarred from time to time

WOOD LASTS ONLY IF YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING
>>
>>1527783
>quanset hut or warehouse
Dont do it. Just build a 120sqft home with quality materials
>>
>>1527785
Your pic related is a perfect example. Thank you for this
>>
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>>1527787
that is quality!

>>1527788
here is an infographic with basic tips
>>
>>1527791
Thank you!
>>
>>1527780
Shut the fuck up you dumb shit. You don’t even know how much things cost.
>>
>>1527794
>cost
Its cost when you consider it to be disposable.
It should be seen as an investment
>>
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>>1527794
>Shut the fuck up you dumb shit. You don’t even know how much things cost.

NEW con-tractor of NEW apartments with an integrity of a USED car salesmen detected

ps-dont forget to put fake plastic rock veneer over it to raise value and decieve buyers
>>
>>1527751
Alright sherlock it's obvious OP wanted to post 3 pictures.
>>
>>1527798
>fake plastic rock veneer
Top kek. I also hate when people put non functioning "ornamental" shutters next to their windows
>>
>>1527796
>>1527798
This so much. The reason we have so much crap in the states is because it's always the cheapest fuck who gets the job or the cheapest product that gets the go ahead because it costs less and in the short term rakes in the cash. I hope to god that mentality will change because it's what will ruin us in the end.
>>
>>1527787
>Dont do it
yeah youre probably right
>>
>>1527800
>Top kek. I also hate when people put non functioning "ornamental" shutters next to their windows

check what happens with it with time, its like a perfect picture of decadence >>1527745

>>1527802
>cheapest

that is the joke, ITS NOT CHEAP. If I was paying 15k for an apartment that explicitly says that it will last 10 years, it would be a deal, but this stuff costs areound 150-250k, in some areas close to 400k all same cancer of a build.
You pay full price for cheap...
>>
>>1527804
Pic related
>>
>>1527796
Yeah you dumb fuck, it is an INVESTMENT. An investment is supposed to appreciate (go up in dollar value). Appreciation is not derived from the structure, it comes from the land. The house that sits on that land could be built to last 200 years or 20 and it would have a negligible impact on the value, assuming the same size. You also are obviously ignorant as to how interest and mortgages work, financing upgraded materials and construction techniques is foolish because you are paying tens of thousands extra in interest.
>>
>>1527802
>>1527798
Are you stupid fucks even paying attention? Nobody wants to finance mid grade materials. This el cheapo shit is explicitly asked for by the customer.
>>
>>1527742
>lifelong mortages for houses
Long mortgage is 30 years
Typical mortgage is 20 years
Many opt of 10-15yrs to reduce interest
yurofags must not have such a long life
it just seems long because of how pitiful you are
>>
>>1527811
>You also are obviously ignorant as to how interest and mortgages work, financing upgraded materials and construction techniques is foolish because you are paying tens of thousands extra in interest.
>financing upgraded materials
How the massive of a house are you thinking about?
Tell me what sq ft-age your fantasizing about? I will then be able to show you where your priorities are out of order
>>
>>1527785
Tar being the secret ingredient there ... banned in a lot of places to seal wood, cause it's a carcinogen.
>>
>>1527815
not him, but how much sqft is big? how big is 200sqft? i cant picture it in my head
>>
>>1527815
Yeah, once again you don’t know what things cost or how they are priced. House construction is priced out at $/sqft, so looking at any specific size of house doesn’t mean anything. McConstruction runs at $100-$120/sqft, midgrade materials and techniques is $200-$300/sqft.
>>
>>1527744
Looks exactly like my neighbor's $1mil McMansion, when it was being built. OSB with facade bricks over it 3 stories high. Diarrhea & AIDS in contractor form.
>>
>>1527822
So what sized home are you fantasizing about?
3800sqft? 5000sqft?
>>
>>1527820
>>
>>1527825
Do you lack reading comprehension and math skills? Size doesn’t matter, the dollar per sqft is the same if you use the same materials.
>>
>>1527829
>the dollar per sqft is the same if you use the same materials.
Why wont you answer the question? How many sq ft doyou want for your home?
Doyou want me to go first to make you feel safer?
>>
>>1527791
>tyvek is asthma and cancerous
no, polyethylene is very, very stable.
>steel screws
... aren't really used in framing, nails are much stronger, and there are stick-built houses that are approaching 100 years old.
Also concrete and steel have very similar coefficients of expansion. Use stainless or fiberglass if you're worried about rust jacking...
Average people don't build themselves castles or M&T framed houses because it's goddamn expensive.
Croat does make lots of other good points about resiliency and moisture though. What does croat have to say about insulation?
>>
>>1527817
>banned in a lot of places to seal wood, cause it's a carcinogen

More likely due to "muh environment"
>>
>>1527831
I own multiple properties, your question is meaningless to me. I’m currently living in one of my condos.
>>
>>1527823
>$1mil McMansion, when it was being built. OSB with facade bricks over it 3 stories high. Diarrhea & AIDS in contractor form.

ughhh, what area? also 3 stories high of brick VENEER is a hazzard.

>>1527833
>nails are much stronger

correct, since shear resistance.

>What does croat have to say about insulation?

if you REALLY need it, use rock wool but even that creates mold in the long run betwwen structure walls and isolation layer, thick monowall of brick or stone or wood is always superior
>>
>>1527837
Top kek. You know what I'm getting at with my question and your extreme efforts to dodge me prove I'm correct. I think we can kill the thread now to save you from further embarrassment.
>>
>>1527841
Can you imagine being some poor homo, minding your own business walking to a destination when suddenly the stamped concrete veneer falls from 3 stories high onto your head?
>>
>>1527780
My house was added onto by a bubba who was a drunkard and a cheapskate.
The roof had LESS overhang than this one. Water ran down the wall, between vinyl siding, and foil faced foam in the stud cavity. When I took off the moldy drywall, and foam board, the OSB was like soggy oatmeal.

That stuff has to stay dry!!
>>
>>1527846
So now what are you going to do?
>>
>>1527842
Pick any arbitrary square footage and make your point little bitch, oh wait, you don’t have one. I invest in real estate so I’ll crush you with legit numbers all day dumb fuck.
>>
>>1527850
>I invest in real estate, bitch.
>MY D-DAD WORKS AT N-NINTENDO, FAGGIT.
Top kek. I'm sure you and I are done here.
>>
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>>1527841
Most McMansions are like that.

>>1527844
At least it isn't some shithole in asia.
>>
>>1527853
Got an actual argument? Here I’ll make it easy - 3k sqft, show me what you got sport.
>>
>>1527854
Kek. Now post the leaning commiebloc
>>
>>1527833
>What does croat have to say about insulation?

here is the video, vertical layering of different materials is always a risk>>1527854

>>1527844
>Can you imagine being some poor homo, minding your own business walking to a destination when suddenly the stamped concrete veneer falls from 3 stories high onto your head?

hope the hope would survive and sue.

>>1527846
lol, also, you should have used a gasmask when doing it, that molde that lives in those walls, especially around isolation can literally send you to emergency.

>>1527823
>facade bricks over it 3 stories high

Imagine someone gets drunk at 3rd floor, and smashed trough drywall and leans on what is a venneer in this case...
>>
makes housing cheap so we don't have to fit multiple generations into one medieval stone structure with rooms the size of walk in closets
to make you even angrier i'll add that i also drive a vehicle with an automatic transmission, you're so mad right now
>>
>>1527863
>molde that lives in those walls, especially around isolation can literally send you to emergency.
This is terrifying
>>
>>1527848
This was in a remodel/renovation. I replaced all rotted sheathing with half inch cdx plywood. Alls good now.
>>
>>1527866
>makes housing cheap

they arent cheap, they never were more expensive. con-tracktor detected!

>>1527874
>This is terrifying

pic rel is how it looks but from a cavity wall hack job, even rockwool isnt safe, but it is a safer option
>>
>>1527896
This is why it is important to teach your children the value of outdoor recreation.
Children as well as adults need fresh air and sunshine more so than excessive sqftage of a mcmansion.
>>
build solid foundation
use red aerated brick for isolation
use reinfroced concrete for beams
use reinfroced concrete for roof
put terra on roof

there. its not expensive. why do anything other than that?
>>
>>1527917
Yes it fucking is you dumb shit. Masonry is labor intensive and %70 of your construction costs are labor. Builders LOVE masonry homes because the profit margins on them are amazing. You literally don’t know how much things cost.
>>
>>1527896
you're telling me that you think you can get a house made of brick or other masonry for the same price as one made of lumber? this is what you actually think?
>>
>>1527917
What are you croats squirting into the cracks of the window frames if anything?
>>
>>1527945
>>1527941
>Masonry is labor intensive and %70 of your construction costs are labor. Builders LOVE masonry homes because the profit margins on them are amazing.

Im not talking about that disgusting veneers to hide that god-awefull OSB, Im talking about legit masonry, like BUILD A HOUSE OUT OF BRICK.

If you actually BUILD A HOUSE OUT OF BRICK you dont have to do 2 jobs like you do with veneering. And it had isolation properties so you to 1 job instead of 3...price drop!...use aereated red brick yours trully will provide as a european luxury to USofA and job becomes even faster (its faster since aerated is like 4 times the size of solid one)
so you pay less than 1/3 of the price. Im not kidding, americans are getting scammed, here every peasant builds a house that way

*reinforced concrete roof optional

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ha6le4zpGQ0
>>
>>1527947
How long would a structure like this last?

What are the challenges if any with this kind of construction?

Also, what maintenance is expected?
>>
>>1527941
>>1527945
>>1527946
GET YOUR RED AERATET BRICK PEOPLE
GET YOUR RC BEAMS PEOPLE

would you buy such a product? seriously?

>>1527946
>What are you croats squirting into the cracks of the window frames if anything?

wood pegs for stabilisation, after its expanding foam (not a fan)
>>
>>1527947
i know exactly what you're talking about and you are still wrong

to summarize your whole argument: since there are no framers involved, the house is cheaper

i can't tell if something is getting lost in translation here due to your shitty ESL or you are an actual retarded person
>>
>>1527952
Do you guys encapsulate the expanding foam with anything after you apply it?
>>
>>1527947
>If you actually BUILD A HOUSE OUT OF BRICK

Solid Brick, double wythe construction is exactly what I’m talking about, get the fuck outta here with your straw mans.
You are paying a mason $35 an hour for two to three weeks instead of some carpenters $20 an hour for 2-3 days. Even if he’s the fastest best mason in the world he is still delayed by the curing time for the mortar/concrete (yes you pay for that delay time), so you physically can’t lay all the courses in a few days.
>>
>>1527956
How is cutting cost by reducing labor wrong?
>>
>>1527959
>paying someone to lay brick
Why not /Diy/?
>>
>>1527960
you're not actually reducing labor, you're simply replacing cheaper labor - framing - with more expensive masonry labor in addition to higher material costs
>>
This is how it looks with isolation and facade

>>1527951
>How long would a structure like this last?

50-100 years my guess

>What are the challenges if any with this kind of construction?

barely any...possibly RC beams crack after 50 years which is preventable with a solid roof?

>Also, what maintenance is expected?

barely any, not kidding - I havent heard anyone complaining, its a standard build. problems might arrise only if you put outside isolation.

>no mice
>no mold
>no hidden drywall problems
>easy electronics isntall
>can survive a tank shooting at it
>earthquake resistant since RC
>fire resistante
>water resistant

what is not to like?


>>1527956
>to summarize your whole argument: since there are no framers involved, the house is cheaper

CORRECT, count the people in video 4-5plebs in 4 month = bombproof house
>>
>>1527960
You aren’t reducing labor. Stick framing is the lowest skill, least man power intensive construction method out there.
>>
>>1527957
>Do you guys encapsulate the expanding foam with anything after you apply it?

yes, offcourse, its there for airflow and additional stabilization, usually wood goes over it

>>1527959
>>1527962
look at the size of those bricks, these are rediculously FAST and you dont need that much skill for aerated euro brick, only for solid brit style brick
>>
>>1527966
So if you were to /Diy/ brick or stick, which would cost you more in labor (?)
the answer is free is free. Now you can use the money you saved in labor, on better materials.
uoure thinking like a contractor this is /Diy/ not /contractor/
>>
2-3 months, minimal labour, you guys are missing out...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwjV8d2KwuM


>>1527965
>>no mice
>>no mold
>>no hidden drywall problems
>>easy electronics isntall
>>can survive a tank shooting at it
>>earthquake resistant since RC
>>fire resistante
>>water resistant
>>
>>1527970
Yes, if you were going to /DIY/ and consider your time to be free, stick framing is a poor choice. This thread isn’t about DIY home builds, it’s an ignorant Croat shitposting about a US real estate market he doesn’t understand.
>>
>>1527965
I like humble Croatian red araeted brick construction.
I do have another question, however, does the mortar not crack with seismic activity?
How do you properly repair post earthquake damage?
>>
>>1527773
comfy
>>1527785
>steeple to the sky
for what purpose
>>1527787
breddy comfy desu
>>
>>1527974
>2-3 months
So yeah, like I said, labor intensive. A stick frame McConstruction house of the equivalent size would be done in three weeks. That’s with all the finishes too.
>>
>>1527975
We dont need to deviate from the fact that this is a /Diy board.
You admit his methods are superior for a /Diy/ project, correct?
>>
>>1527978
What about this one >>1527815 do you not find it comfy af?
>>
>>1527965
that fucking colors are puke
>>
RC+red aerated is SIMPLE my dudes, also here are some stairs in REINFROCED CONCRETE MY NIGGA

how much bhai? I ship You pai!

>>1527976
>does the mortar not crack with seismic activity?

you mean cement? cement is stronger than red aerated brick so the brick will crack first (same material as terra tiles, highly water resistant but BRITTLE).
Its not common to see any outward damage when quakes, RC beams are always stable after.

>>1527979
>So yeah, like I said, labor intensive. A stick frame McConstruction house of the equivalent size would be done in three weeks

oh man, compare the results and mainintence, dont think like a chinamen.

>>1527983
choose your own then
>>
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how much bhai yenkee boi?
you pay I ship send container.
>>
>>1527981
Of course. I’m not denying that the construction methodology yields a better quality final product with low long term maintenance costs. My best performing rental is a solid masonry mid century bungalow, I love that thing.

However, this entire thread is being memed up with the idea that cheap construction practices are a scam being perpetrated by shady contractors and that’s not the case at all.
>>
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>>1527987
euros manage to make everything they touch look gay somehow
>>
>>1527988
>cheap construction practices are a scam being perpetrated by shady contractors and that’s not the case at all.

it absolutly is the case, here in my charming 2nd world country Ive never heard anyone having house problems with:

>>mice
>>mold
>>hidden drywall problems
>>hard electronics isntall
>>not surviving a tank shooting at it
>>earthquakes
>>tornados
>>fires
>>water


so how on Earth do you have those problems? its mindbogling, are you like 1st world and all?

>>1527993
what am I looking at
>>
build solid foundation
use red aerated brick for isolation
use reinfroced concrete for beams
use reinfroced concrete for roof
put terra on roof

literally, every peasant here has a self-built house like that, its that simple to /diy/ it

+buy red aereated brick from me
you can brag to your friends later that you have "european materials", also values in resale rises!


how much bhai yenkee boi?
you pay I ship send container.
>>
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>>1527993
>>1527988
>>1527983
>>1527982
>>1527981
>>1527979
>>1527976
>>1527975
>>1527978
>>1527970
how much bhai yenkee boi?
build house fast with yropean magic fast brickh. no mice eat it, no blackie shoot it. no tornado eat it.
you pay I ship send container.
>>
>>1527995
>America
>1st world
not for a while
>>
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>>1528002
yu bhai? how mut?
>>
>>1527995
Looks nice.
What you say is true. In my part of the US, near Washington DC, there are wood-built houses newer than 1920 era, or a few brick mansions from 1700’s and 1800’s, and some cinderblock cottages that survived past their owners.
>>
>>1528008
serious question - if I start the "Humble croatian builder" company in USA, would it by legal to build by humble croatian construction method?

Its ridiculously easy in terms of labour and obviously there exists a nedd for humble croatian construction to help your houses stop being eaten by mice, bugs, water etc.

here houses are more "stouty", unlike your lowrise, kind of light victorian but you can design anything using humbleCroatianConstructionMethodTM so desing wise it would fit american taste.
>>
>>1527791
the part about material property sounds so familiar.
i think i wrote that text on diy some while ago and it was pasted in there.
>>
>>1528013
Hmm, it definitely looks quite a bit more compact than the kind of house you would see here, but I live in California, where anything dense would just smash your brains out in an earthquake so everything is plywood and plaster.
As regards to your question about the building code, as long as your house follows the building codes where you are building, it would be okay. I think the biggest hurdle would be to find a suitable customer. Many people are not building new houses, and those new houses are frequently part of a big planned community that has already subcontracted some big building company to make all the houses the same, with very modern design and big A/C heater units to compensate for all the heat loss and gain from the large windows and thin walls.
>>
>>1527995
German brick salesman here how are ya doin´g the easy electrical installation.

as much as i like brick electric gets put into chiselled slots in the walls and then plastered over impossible to change anything without busting your walls open again
>>
>>1527750

Well built old houses lasted so long because they were made of materials that were not moisture sensitive and/or had good breathing/drying qualities (usually quite air leaky). However, as a trade off, old homes had generally very poor insulation values compared to modern wall systems. Stone, brick, old growth lumber, and lime plaster, the classic old school building materials, deal with moisture well, if they get wet. For example a stick framed house with old growth lumber is another world apart from new growth stick frames. This is due to old growth having a bigger hydric buffer capacity (simple definition is how much water a material can absorb), allowing it to absorb and release more water than new growth, never mind old 2X4s being true dimension lumber.

So where does the problem arise? Well we need some background. Modern homes are built now to be better insulated, to reduce heating/cooling costs, and to meet modern standards of comfort. To meet modern standards of comfort, a home needs heating and/or cooling (unless it's autistically engineered to the point of being self equalizing, which is really really hard and expensive to do). This is were problems start. Heating/cooling creates a temperature differential between the outside and inside of the home. Homes were still leaky, so what happened was that if it was hot and humid outside, and you had the AC going, the outside air would leak in and find a cold condensing surface, where moisture would accumulate. On the flip side in winter, you had warm humid air on the inside, which would leak out and condense on the first surface at the dew point. This is the whole problem. Condensation of moisture in and around the structure.
Homes built out of more classic materials, could withstand this phenomenon. Water could condense somewhere in the walls, but the materials would absorb/resist it, while the leaky/breathable nature of of the home would dry the walls out shortly after.

Can't..
>>
>>1528077

However, homes started to be built out of cheaper materials, that are much more moisture sensitive, but even then, as long as a home could dry out fast enough, it was rarely a problem. (Pay attention) As time went on, it was discovered that the more air tight a house, the more efficient it was, and the more comfortable as well. This is where things went really bad. Builders started building airtight homes out of cheaper moisture sensitive materials, but they often neglected the fact we learned earlier about condensation. It turns out, even if a house wasn't leaky, moisture still condensed in and around the structure due to temperature differentials. Moisture was still condensing, but now, in the quest for air tightness and R value, moisture was condensing on moisture sensitive materials with no way to dry out. New homes rotted in a couple years, mold was growing every where, shit was bad meng.
Builders have learned their lesson (mostly), that vapor/air barrier placement is critical. You need to see sure anywhere moisture would condense could dry out fast enough.

To get back to your question, I and many others don't like OSB and some other materials because they are extremely moisture sensitive and will literally disintegrate with a little bit of moisture. Why use these materials then? They have other useful properties usually, but the main factor is cost. Don't get me wrong, you can build a fine house out of OSB and drywall, but you need to take a lot of precautions to protect these materials, it takes time and know-how, something few builders invest in.

There are other reasons I don't like many modern materials, like VOC emissions, fire resistance, and sustainability (petrochemicals, high energy cost to produce etc).

Cont...
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>>1528079

Good materials for me can handle some level of moisture, are fire proof/resistant, have no or low VOC emissions, and are (somewhat) sustainable. Some examples are MgO board, rock wool, brick/most types of stone/geopolymer concrete (regular concrete is OK but geopolymer is better in almost every metric), plain old lumber, good plywood, mud brick, compacted earth, lime plaster, copper for piping, and some gypsum boards. This is by no means an exhaustive list.

A final word, generally, HOW you use any material is far more important than what materials you use. Good and bad structures exist made out of all types of shit, but, of you know how and have the means, select for more durable materials and construction methods.
>>
>>1527746
>poor people get them free
That's news to me. Where do I sign up?
>>
>>1528081
What name would a Burger know MgO board by? Is that Durocher or Hardie board??
>>
>>1527742
US population has doubled in the last 50 years. We need more houses, and we need them now! There's no time to build them properly; they need to go up quickly.
>>
>>1527746
>someone never had to wash the dishes growing up
>>
>>1528088

No I don't, most stuff would be Chinese I know that, which I would avoid unless you know exactly where it came from and how it was manufactured. Some is Canadian made. MgO board is great stuff engineering wise, but depending on the formulation, is corrosive to common fasteners, and you have to use stainless steel screws/nails etc. Some formulations are perfectly safe for normal fasteners, so if you don't know which is which, problems occur. It's a new product to NA so you have to shift through a lot of shit and know your building science. Used commonly elsewhere in the world though. Think of MgO as much tougher drywall.
>>
>>1528088

Oh to add Hardie board is basically just cellulose fiber mixed with cement, absorbs moisture, but otherwise OK. I've seen good things done with it as a siding material (you need an airgap between the siding and sheathing with a moisture barrier/membrane because it absorbs and can hold water like brick).
>>
>>1528088

Just to expand on
>>1528106

You want chloride free MgO board. Seems like the only US manufacturer is
https://www.northamericanmgo.com
>>
>>1527742

we call it chip board where i live. aka shit board.

goes brittle and swells. the resin breaks down within 15-20 years.

Think those old school desks. that would flake and fall apart. imagine a house made of the same shit.

The standard of building materials are fucking disgusting now. its amazing what cheap crap they make houses with these days.
>>
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>>1528077
>>1528079
>>1528081
thanks, mister. saved
>>
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>>1527742
>build house out of wood chips
>cover it with a garbage bag
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBMMDY3LFAA
>>
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how much bhai yenkee boi?
build house fast with yropean magic fast brickh. no mice eat it, no blackie shoot it. no tornado eat it.
you pay I ship send container.

>>1528028
>the part about material property sounds so familiar.
>i think i wrote that text on diy some while ago and it was pasted in there.

YES YOU DID

It was in a thread about conctractor horror stories, I had suspussions on my own with woodwork finishes, but your post made it click for me and how it translated to ever other material and build and how wrongly we force them to interact..

I guess I was kind of a douche for not crediting your, but I hope you dont mind, it wasnt to steal the glory or smth, just a good written sentance that I needed not to change.

thank you!

is this you also? >>1528077
>>1528079


>>1528037
>as much as i like brick electric gets put into chiselled slots in the walls and then plastered over impossible to change anything without busting your walls open again

now imagine doing it with Knauf/drywall...


>>1528091
>US population has doubled in the last 50 years. We need more houses, and we need them now! There's no time to build them properly; they need to go up quickly.

bs! here >>1527763
>>
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>>1528077
>>1528079
>>1528081
4u with love

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3VS5N-EHrM
>>
>>1528035
>Hmm, it definitely looks quite a bit more compact than the kind of house you would see here, but I live in California, where anything dense would just smash your brains out in an earthquake so everything is plywood and plaster.

that is totally wrong - because those house look so stouty and have thick walls they are earthquake resistant since they have a wise base (1-2 floors, but they are never "thin" like Victorian houses). RC + heavy terry tiles with concrete roofs makes the magic of earthquake and tornado resistance.

Big house mass prevents it to move, but you need to build solid foundations for this mass, just a slab wouldnt cut it, look how much work goes in foundations

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwjV8d2KwuM
>>
>>1528037

This is the thing I don't get about European use of those brick blocks. Why not leave the brick as the load bearing part of the wall, leave a small gap, put up some wooden studs, put your plumbing and electrical in that wall cavity, then insulate it with whatever, slap some drywall on the studs, and now you have a thick, very well insulated, strong wall. I don't like the idea of those blocks being the whole wall, while they are good I just don't see that working somewhere Cold like here in Canada. Do you guys use the red brick as the entire wall system in Germany?
>>
>>1528288
Those bricks have a ton of air cavities in them, they insulate really well. It's possible to add a thin layer of extra insulation, usually PS, but I don't think they typically do it with this kind of brick.
>>
>>1527917
>use red aerated brick for isolation

Most our houses are build with air spaced brick walls here, but it will never do you a zero emission house. There are no easy solutions, moisture buildup is always a risk when you try to really get the best insulation.
>>
>>1528233
>Big house mass prevents it to move

If a tectonic plate is moving, your dinky little foundation which weighs bugger fuck all in the grand scheme of things is going to move. The movement is inevitable, the question is if the house will stay together while moving. Reinforced concrete and wood framed homes have a better chance than masonry in that respect.
>>
>>1527746
This.

Fucking eurocucks. I don't have the means or the give a duck to build some roman Coliseum shit that will last 700 years when ive got like 50 ledt at best and no kids
>>
>>1527750

Preformed concrete foam blocks. Agit stacks like legos, insulates well, doesnt hold moisture.

I would brick it or use local river rock and build a fucking castle
>>
>>1527777
This.

Landed our dream job. Me and my 3 best friends got to work fornone of theirs dad.

We built a house and then it all folded...
>>
>>1527794
Calm down Jeff. Don't you have a dock to tear up?
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>>1528325
>Reinforced concrete and wood framed homes have a better chance than masonry in that respect.

The reinforced concrete one needs to be a pillbox in order to not crack all around
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>>1528321
>moisture buildup is always a risk when you try to really get the best insulation.

Ive seen demos of those houses, moisture buildup in red aerated brick is basically none - its clay and doesnt attract mould, the real mouisture lovers is styro or rock wool isolation. Its simply a great invention.

>>1528359
>>1528351
stay jelly amerifats.
>>
>>1528401
Historical trivia here:
I worked in wire closets of DC office buildings built in the 1932 era. The construction material then was Terra Cotta block. Cinderblock presumably came along later...
>>
>>1528088
Frickin auto correct. *Durock
>>
>>1528408
>The construction material then was Terra Cotta block. Cinderblock presumably came along later...

I dont like cinder blocks that much, you should use them only for load (red for wall since better isolation) and if its a load beam, I think its more stronger done in RC pour in mold than RC pour in cinder blocks...?
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>>1527836
>Banned for ecological reasons
>Used to pave roads
>>
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my house was build from pumice bricks ~70years ago as load bearing material and a RC Layer on-top of the walls.
we later added Styrofoam to the outside for better insulating.

but our house is still leaky the real problems arise if you get autistic following the EU regulations like the Blower Door Test where they seal the door and pressurize the house and measure the amount of pressure loss. WTF a house is not supposed to be some sort of airtight vessel.

also on historic houses insulating is a whole different story.

>>1528288
if the house has heated up it keeps the temperature very well since the bricks act as thermal mass.
hot water radiators do the same water can store some energy to .

so during the night the boiler switches off and only goes on if he has to heat tap water so it stays free from bacteria.the valve and pump for the radiates are switched off .
to house however only gets 2 Kelvin cooler so from ~70F to 64F which is perfect to sleep and in the morning the heater has to use a little more oil but the longer the run-time of the burner the more efficient does it run.

we need around 390galons of oil a year i think we could get it lower but our burner is oversized with 20kw power 1800l/300 is around 9kw which would be enough so the burner only runs for short amount of time.
>>
>>1528401
Draft is the insulation killer, ventilation is the moisture killer ... unfortunately draft and ventilation are equivalent. Fiberglass insulation with a vapor barrier will have 4x the insulation per thickness of that brick.

It's a balancing act.
>>
>>1528440
If the house is nearly airtight you can do ventilation with a cross flow heat exchanger.
>>
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>>1528440
>>1528288
Are you guys talking about retrofitting insulation?
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>>1528228
no no
i feel pleased someone appreciates my posts
>>
>>1528441
Our issue here in the USA is energy comservation. We're soo concerned about the environment that we fuck ourselves over it. Then when we try to help the environment, we fuck it harder.
>>
>>1527976
this is also the most common construction around the world
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>>1527993
its actually a pretty red, but if yiu kike that better fine
>>
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>>1528184

One problem there is the short overhangs.
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>>1528441
>Fiberglass insulation with a vapor barrier will have 4x the insulation per thickness of that brick.

Im not saying that insulation doesnt work, my question is how long does it work and are there some hidden toxic effects within it (since most plastic based products have some serious toxins you only find about when its too late).

Also rarely do I hear that poly based material are far more prone to bacterias and fungi unlike more "earthly/natural" products.

>>1528440
>but our house is still leaky the real problems arise if you get autistic following the EU regulations like the Blower Door Test where they seal the door and pressurize the house and measure the amount of pressure loss.

oh shit man, that airtight is such a meme, was it a req?

>>1528446
>retrofitting insulation?

its done differently on the continent since cavity walls arent common, but yes esentially. pic rel

>>1528447
thanks friendo! where are you from?
>>
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>>1527775
>Never use plastic
Found the retard who thinks everyone lives in a temperate climate. People in places with 100F 80% humidity or below freezing for several months per year actually enjoy having insulated houses. The tightness of the house is a huge factor in maintaining comfortable temperature and humidity levels without wasting massive amounts of money on HVAC.

Really all you guys ranting about muh modern shit construction need to understand that there is a cost/benefit analysis to everything and there are legitimate reasons to use OSB, wood framing, etc, and there are reasons NOT to use it. It depends on a variety of factors and there is no perfect solution that fits everybody's situation. Personally, I plan on doing a lot of nonstandard-for-my-area techniques when I build my house down the road (e.g. ICF, basement in north Texas expansive soil), but for the most part those things are just to suit my own preferences and needs, not because they are objectively superior in every way.
>>
>>1527791
>Mc Mc Mc Mc Mc Mc
This is fucking nauseating to read. Would it have been less effective to just write like a normal human? It's sad when someone who clearly has useful knowledge distorts their delivery with rhetoric instead of letting their argument speak for itself.
>>
>>1528465
>Found the retard who thinks everyone lives in a temperate climate. People in places with 100F 80% humidity or below freezing for several months per year actually enjoy having insulated houses.

then BUILD A HOUSE OUT OF BRICK OR STONE, you know stuff kids throw at each other but like bigger, not plastic that is shaped as rock and put over that dosghit OSB pannels not worthy of a doghouse but BUILD A HOUSE OUT OF BRICK OR STONE to keep you cool.
Also dont put that dogshit shingle crap on roof, youll cook yourself and the rood use terra tile to keep you cool, youll sleep like a baby in blazing summer. there. simple. stop with overdesign stupidity already.

PS-modern materials have their place but only in temprorary builds there they are superior in terms of cost benefit, roi whatever, but almost never structurally


>>
>>1527863
>molde that lives in those walls, especially around isolation can literally send you to emergency
This is only true if you have a preexisting condition like asthma or immune system disorder. Healthy people aren't going to get seriously ill from mold. You'll have essentially all-year allergy symptoms but nothing life-threatening.
>>
>>1528465
>Found the retard who thinks everyone lives in a temperate climate. People in places with 100F 80% humidity or below freezing for several months per year actually enjoy having insulated houses.

or BUILD IT OUT OF WOOD, you know the stuff that grows out of the ground but after you cut it. BUILD IT OUT OF WOOD to have great insulation and that it lasts. there. simple. stop with overdesign stupidity already.

>>1528472
>Healthy people aren't going to get seriously ill from mold.

mold around living place is not a joking matter.
>>
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>>1528081
>>1528079
>>1528077

What do you think about the hempcrete?

It looks very neat material and I'm considering using it in my next house instead of rockwool.

Thanks.
>>
>>1528470
>BUILD A HOUSE OUT OF BRICK OR STONE
Brick and stone are shitty insulators. That's one of several reasons why they're not widely used anymore, anywhere--not just the US--besides as veneers for aesthetics. If you want an insulated house, you basically have no practical options besides some form of plastic to seal air gaps.
>>
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>>1528475
>BUILD IT OUT OF WOOD
Whoops forgot to attach this to my previous post: >>1528478
>>
>>1528478
>Brick and stone are shitty insulators.

maybe from cold, but from hear...oh man, a 1m thick stone house on blazing sun is an experience you have to feel, its just so fresh inside.

>>1528480
even if that data is true, longterm speaking wood and brick is still great ROI...and what do they define as "common brick"? You still make fireplaces out of brick
>>
>>1528462
old houses are granted some protection from the new energy saving laws

the Styrofoam was done before the problematic was really known but we have no problems with it so far.
in the summer it really keeps the heat out of the house and in the winter the walls are warmer.

but it gets harder and harder to do something because lets say you want to renovate you have to match these regulations that get more strict every year.

so far we have no mold or moisture problems but i think that's because the house has thick enough walls and is very dry build.
>>
I recently bought my first house which is over 150 years old for cash cheap. The foundation was obviously redone at some point but the main beams look to be original. It had a fire a little over ten years ago so the second floor is all new. I really don't know much about construction so wanted to get some opinions on older houses.

Can I expect my house to last another 100+ years if I maintain it well? So far I've pulled out the old supports they had in which were basically just a bunch of trees and replaced with pressure treated 6x6 beams (the floors still have a slope to them in spots but i brought it up quite a bit and added plenty of support where needed). In the spring I plan on filling the cracks in the basement walls with an epoxy cement. Any tips for maintaining an old house like mine?
>>
>>1528487
>In the spring I plan on filling the cracks in the basement walls with an epoxy cement.

I assume your basement is rock - DO NOT use cement, use lime mortar, cement is too hard and will crack the rocks when wet, and do not use poly insulation of any kind on wood, not ever.

without pictures, that is the main thing I can say.
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>>1528488
It's actually cinder block (obviously this part of the house is not 150 years old). Does the same still apply? Pic related is what I planned on using.
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>>1528490
>It's actually cinder block

oh, so its been redone entirely? then cement is ok, idk why do you need epoxy when repairing cinder blocks?

anyway, here is damage cement can do on stone

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Omxc4OK9eE
>>
>>1528492
Yeah redone entirely... probably over 50 years ago. One of the cracks is large (about an inch) where a large beam sits so I figured epoxy cement would be a better choice than regular cement.
>>
Hey cro-bro, saying hi from /pol/---I regularly particpate in your threads whenever I see them.

Question: What do you do for a living?
>>
>>1528231
If everything that is said in this video is true, I cannot understand why I have never heard about it, nor seen any houses of that kind
>>
>>1528231
This video is pure fuckery.
>>
>>1528488
Actually the cement will not crack the rocks when expanding, it is the cement that will crack as it will not be able to crack the rocks when it expands.
>>
>>1528498
This
>>
>>1528498
>>1528520

Hes obviously shilling bricks and concrete.
>>
>>1528483
>a 1m thick stone house
lol
>longterm speaking wood and brick is still great ROI
Yes, there are advantages of using wood and brick as sheathing. Insulation is not one of them, and again, people are not willing to live in low-insulation houses in many environments.

You seem to value longevity over all other considerations--insulation/moisture control, convenience, speed of construction, cost. I think this is why you seem so upset that people make different choices than you, because they are willing to trade some longevity to get all those other benefits. In a market and culture where keeping a house within a family for more than 50 years is extremely rare--and that's about the crossover point where properly installed modern "tight" construction materials are rated until walls may need to be opened up--all you're doing when you build for longevity is providing a building for someone else when you're dead, and given the trends of energy efficiency and climate control, no one's gonna want it at that point anyway.
>>
>>1528555
>>1528498
>>1528520
>Question: What do you do for a living?

Im not a tradie, but was surrounder by tools and crafts my entire life. I would like to do some reformed hippie type trades, something sustainable etc. Like those Northmen guild from Latvia. or simply introduse Anglos to joys of aerated red brick.

PS-tell pollacks to stop banning me in those thread I already got 3 bans, everytime some OSB shill con-tracktor reports me as off-topic.

>>1528505
>>1528500
>cannot understand why I have never heard about it, nor seen any houses of that kind

for same reason noone warned you about BPA, gen mod food, dangers of insulation, lack of strenght of OSB...

>>1528518
>it is the cement that will crack as it will not be able to crack the rocks when it expands.

actually both will crack, watch here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Omxc4OK9eE

>>1528561
>You seem to value longevity over all other considerations--insulation/moisture control, convenience, speed of construction, cost.

there is a sweet spot, by mind you Im shilling aerated brick and RC method (even with possible rock wool insulation!), which is absolutly not a longevity method, but simply a superior in almost all ways, more practical and comfortable choice for the average men + far better as investment.

You can make better choice when you know what you can buy and what you are buying.
>>
>>1528561
>You seem to value longevity over all other considerations--insulation/moisture control, convenience, speed of construction, cost.

for instance there is even a use for OSB - some kind of cinematic build or to pour concrete in it (not optimal since it has friction unlike plywood but it can work for cheaper projects). Sometimes you need high end, sometimes even low end is "acceptable tolerance". All Im saying.
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>>1528561
>You seem to value longevity over all other considerations--insulation/moisture control, convenience, speed of construction, cost.

think about it like this - its like a proper tool for the job (or proper level of job execution):
-sometimes you need to build that damn fast to stop flooding so you use RC, sometimes you have time so you use other methods of water control so fishermen on the lower side still can go fishing,
-sometimes you need wood joinery since its a heavy roof, sometimes you dont have time and just screw it and its acceptable.

But for some houses to have as many problems is simply not an "acceptable tolerance". Lada Niva is a "crappy" jeep but it steel does everything in need to, Victorinox knife is a "crappy blade" but it still serves you the most unlike the Damascus one you keep on the shelf (and there is nothing wrong with that if you can afford it).

But for Lada Niva to explode after 1 year or Vic to not cut every 2nd time would not be "acceptable tolerance" of execution.
>>
>>1528580
You sound a bit autistic. Get a life brate.
>>
>>1528596
opusti se šefe.
>>
>>1528596
Tldr. People are building cheaply becuase do Not give a fuck. Houses are not ment to last 200 years. In the same manner as your clothes, furniture, cars electronics etc.

Everyone wants new things fast. Things that work and are fancy. I would spend 200k on a new car or boat, rather on some retarded bricks and mortar that I will need to wait for like 2 to 3 years to dry out.

Fuck this shit m8.

>>1528580
>>
>>1528603
>Houses are not ment to last 200 years. In the same manner as your clothes, furniture, cars electronics etc.

they are meant the last according to your needs, but that isnt my point - regarding your 200k boat, would you complain if it would fall apart beyond repair after 5 years?
>>
why not ICF?
>can be handled by one guy
>legos
>pay concrete mixer to pour that's pretty much it
The only disadvantage I can think of is that certain species of worms eat Styrofoam.
>>
>>1528566
>>1528569
>>1528580
>>1528620
Well we agree then that there should be different approaches in different circumstances and that there isn't a one size fits all solution. For example, that house that seems to be built on some stacked rocks sure as hell wouldn't work in a climate that has earthquakes, but clearly it's worked for wherever it is. But it wouldn't make sense for me to claim that building your house on a stacked rock foundation is superior to slab on grade without qualifiers.

And I agree that people should learn about different building techniques to be able to make informed choices, but that's true in everything. You'll always be better off and be swindled less the more knowledgable you are on cars, finances, home maintenance, you name it.
>>
>>1528624
I believe it's more expensive, and there aren't nearly as many builders familiar with it as lumber framing. Probably over time it will be more popular, especially in areas with tornadoes.
>>
>>1528643
Brick house will still be wreck after a tornado. And probably a lot cheaper to rebuild than repair.
>>
>>1528414
Yeah, I was just saying that the US did use them 90 years ago, as infill. Must have been dropped shortly after...
Now, cinderblock is infill, poured concrete for skeleton of these 4-6 story office buildings I see.
>>
>>1528288
inner insulation is shit tier, it will mold your house without doing proper venting (which gets sometimes fogetten)
Not everyone uses the red bricks, there are a lot different
>>1528037
you put pipes in the slots to later change the wiring
change in function can be done by either smart home meme or star topology wiring, which is a bit more expensive than the traditional ones
>>
>>1528639
>For example, that house that seems to be built on some stacked rocks sure as hell wouldn't work in a climate that has earthquakes, but clearly it's worked for wherever it is.

exactly, my point is if there isnt a certain existing level of quality and execution (which is hard to define but the standard obviously exists) its time to panic.
Like your 200k boat, I understand if you want it, luxury is here to serve and entertain us - if after 5 years of "regular use" it would need an entire new hull, you wouldnt say "its just mainintence", but that its a scam or a bad product which is my point about certain houses.

>>1528653
>Yeah, I was just saying that the US did use them 90 years ago

That is very suprising to hear! I havent seen any pics or cross sections before 1970 that use cinder block, do you have pics?

>>1528624
>>1528643
>why not ICF?

overdesigned meme. same stuff as RC&aired but expensive, more proprietary, weaker and more toxic.

>>1528659
>inner insulation is shit tier

it is, but not even outer is without problems...why didnt noone tried a monowall with aerated brick? Everyone just does one layer with them.
>>
>>1528643
>>1528624
>why not ICF?

another big potential problem - isolation is embeded into structured on all sides, if mold develops you cant just skin it from the outside like with euro systems + probably need special screws etc.

Same potential issue is with cavity walls, but on a larger scale.
>>
>>1528669
>>1528653 (You) #
>Yeah, I was just saying that the US did use them 90 years ago
Sorry - I got transferred from the historic area to the up-county area that’s been new construction on a former 1947 naval surface warfare installation.
>>
>>1528476

I haven't seen that used in Canada yet (not saying it isn't I just personally haven't seen it) so I can't comment on it without just saying that it looks like an interesting material, the problem is here in Ontario Canada in the summer it's 30c+ with 70-100% humidity and then can drop down to -25c in the winter with 10% humidity, so while theotetically, hempcrete looks good for that kind of stuff, I'd need to see some 10+ year old homes in similar climates.
>>
>>1527945
Where i live yes it is about the same price. Material prices are nearly irrelevant as some people already mentioned the cost is in the labour. My parents paid next to nothing for their house as they did most of the work themselves.
>>
>>1528673

Why is there insulation in that wall pic? When I was talking in >>1528288 that's definitely not what I meant. You're right when you say that's mold central. The brick absorbs moisture to a degree, while the concrete? blocks on the other side are more moisture resistant, the cavity is going to be damp, and of you restrict the air flow with insulation. . . Yikes!

>>1528669

Also is response to the brick mono wall, they just won't cut it here in Canada, the temperature differences between summer and winter pretty much require more insulation than a wall like that would provide. Our codes pretty much require it now.
This is how you could use those blocks here in order from exterior to interior:
Exterior veneer of brick, siding, plaster on board, whatever.
Small air gap/air channels between the veneer and wall to facilitate drying. Semi permeable vapor membrane, humble tar/asphalt paper works well, or the super advanced membranes that allow water out but not in. Semi permeable because the wall has to dry, this is the balancing act, I favour drying speed (more permeable) over air tightness and water proofness (less permeable).
Your red blocks, then wooden studs behind them, rock wool/any other fire resistant non petrochemical insulation, vapor barrier, dry wall/what ever.
>>
>>1527827
20x20 is 400sqft buddy
>>
>>1527820
20'x10' is 200sqft
>>
So how were those Swiss houses from earlier in the thread insulated? Were they just squat and thicc or what? I've been looking at building a cabin for shits and giggles (land being fairly cheap) and I like the idea of a modified A-frame on stilts.
>>
>>1527776
What this guy said. If you take care of your house and replace your siding and shingles and not just let it go to shit it'll be just fine.
>>
>>1528566
What do you do for a living?
>>
>>1528806
shitposts on 4chan I think. He's here all the time
>>
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>>1528476
>What do you think about the hempcrete?

No experience with it but looks promising, either way if I was to build a house to last 50-100 years it would be hard to rely on material that hasnt been present more than 10, but conceptially I dont see anything wrong with it.

>>1527945
>you're telling me that you think you can get a house made of brick or other masonry for the same price as one made of lumber?

yes, in Europe its actually cheaper to do RC&Terra aerated brick build than wood. Far less labour.

>>1528718
>Why is there insulation in that wall pic?

stone wool fitted later, cavity walls arent made with it in mind - search what happend when they fit foam insulation in it, they it looks like alien invasion how much mold it gets

>The brick absorbs moisture to a degree, while the concrete? blocks on the other side are more moisture resistant

its the other way around, red terra bricks are more moisture resistant but more brittle than concrete bricks (that is why terra tiles are used for roofing and not concrete tiles - concrete is very pourouss to water)

>the temperature differences between summer and winter pretty much require more insulation than a wall like that would provide.

double aerated brick wall would be almost 60cm thick, that is a pretty strong insulation (and if even that is not enough with heating during winter, you add external rock wool any time).

>>1528786
>So how were those Swiss houses from earlier in the thread insulated?

same way Dick Proennecke built his cabin in Alaska - just wood.

>>1528806
>>1528808
brick salesmen since chan posting doesnt pay that well.
>>
>>1528786
https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/types-homes/energy-efficiency-log-homes
wood is a poor insulator, login cabin dwellers burn wood all winter to heat their homes.
>>
>>1527917
>concrete roof
why?
seems over complicated, expensive and fucking heavy, just use wood beams with roofing on top
>>
>>1529044
>expensive and fucking heavy,
the funny thing that's it's actually cheaper in europoorland
>>
>>1528476
google translate that shit
https://przelom.pl/14756-przedwojenny-przeboj-budowlany.html
well known from at least 1933 in euroland
shit compared to modern materials but OK in milder climates
This one is from Poland but similar materials were used everywhere in Europe
Maybe it became better with time but still styro or mineral wool is way more efficient
>>
>>1528478
>>1528480
you know that in yuropooe caliphate we use external insulation? We don't just build houses out of one material
there is whole science to insulating house properly when temp differential on both sides of wall is 50C or 120 Fahrenheit
granted, that is harsh winter but your regular one will have that at 30C or 90F
>>
>>1528718

Every house is England is made the same way

outside layer of face bricks, cavity filled with insulation, inside layer of support bricks, plaster board stuck onto wall.
>>
>>1528718
>>1529063
in theory you calculate condensation point to avoid wet insulation
water should condense in outer skin if I remember correctly, this leaves insulation dry
If there is only external insulation it should be waterproof like styrofoam and condensation point should be in that
>>
>>1529068
>>1529063
>Every house is England is made the same way

do you make floors out of RC sometimes or is it always wood?
>>
>>1529059
External insulation? What kind? I hope nothing flammable...
>>
>>1529063
Air gapped brick walls turned out to be a very silly idea though. Filling them with insulation as a retrofit kinda works, but it's not a sane way to build anything new.
>>
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>tfw this practice was banned in swedistan because of massive problems with rot
>>
>>1529196
in theory all polystyrene should be fire rated
its still flammable just no easily and should be self-extinguishing
mineral wool is non flammable
not sure what they used in that instance but company I worked for used pressed mineral wool panels between metal sheets as façade for bigger projects
it's a bit finicky to install as it is really easy to make thermal bridges
this is job that can't be done by your regular moron and needs to be done by the book
one wrong bolt caused water mains to freeze once as it went from outside too far and ended up touching steel pipe
on other hand styro with plastic bolts can be installed by lobotomite so take your guess what investors want
>>1529197
it works, just not as good as we want
if you can settle for 10-15degC inside it is perfect
filling with insulation has its own problems
no old house in UK has ventilation system, just hole in wall for fan in bathroom and kitchen
>>
>>1529205
>self-extingushing
Asbestos
>>
>>1529028
>burn wood all winter
Is that worse than the manufacturerers of Xps with their molten polystyrene year round?
>>
>>1529214
Yes.

With current levels of isolation, the entire UK would have to be woodland to heat their homes with wood and the air would be unbreathable. Good isolation saves so much resources over its lifetime that it's easily worth it.
>>
>>1527742
>Is this some elaborate ironic joke americans make towards euros?
>How are people who are taking lifelong mortages for houses that last barely 20 years not rioting in the streets about this?

Wooden plank master race
my house is solid and nearly 100 years old
>>
>>1527750
I'm a contractor. You would be surprised what is allowed to pass. You can frame a house and just have foam insulation as the exterior and but backer board over it and it will pass. It's basically a glorified treefort. I typically like to use pressure treated 5/8" plywood for exterior sheeting at a minimum. The pressure treated keeps away vermin and termites/carpenters ants and 5/8" plywood is quite strong in comparison to 1/2" osb (like in Op's pic). I recommend brick overtop of that as well.

The cost difference for a 1500sq house covered in 5/8" pt plywood compared to 1/2" osb is only like $1000 at most. You'd be surprised how many of the future homeowners refuse that upgrade thinking it's some sort of ripoff.
>>
>>1527755
Own and plywood are not even close to the same it terms of strength and resistance to rot.
>>
>>1527773
In Canada you can't use osb for roof. It has to be plywood. Most use 3/8" plywood, though, which is fucked.
>>
>>1528566
>PS-tell pollacks to stop banning me in those thread
/pol/ mods/jans are fucken faggots now---you can't post anything that isn't loving trump or hating niggers.
>>
>>1527763
>>1527742
>>1527744
>>1527745
>>1527773
>>1527779
>>1527780
>>1527798
(And so on)

(You) must be an absolute hit at parties.

I can’t imagine how little you have going on to be able to keep up this thread
>>
>>1527952
Thats literally how we build here in Brazil. Not talking about slums btw. My aunt lives in a 90+yo house and shit is literally a bunker. Aerated bricks + concrete = a house lasting forever.

Also; in 2015 there were an acident involving a helicopter falling onto a house rooftop. I dont remember wich city, but It just made a crack on the concrete roof kek.

Video related:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GP4a_XllDZA
>>
>>1529199
>banned in swedistan

how was present in swedistan?
>>
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Jet fuel cant melt RC beams.
>>
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>>1529199
meant to ask, why have you used it in Swedistan in the first place?

>>1529205
>>1529196
>External insulation

was it built like pic rel? those maxcompact pannels are aparently fire resistant, but I dont trust them one word

>>1529267
>Wooden plank master race

nice!

>>1529605
ur gay.
>>
>>1527854
this is china
>>
>>1529226
Shit, do you guys even have any major woodlands left?
>>
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>>1528351
Yea, well, us "eurocucks' build homes that last centuries like real Men so. You dumb american shits don't apreciate heritage or history, because you have none, you filthy immigrant mutts.

Have a (you) and go back to your cardboard box that even .22lr will penetrate from side to side or a smallest fart will collapse.
>>
>>1527755
>You should also consider that it is more and more rare for American houses to be passed down and most people do not stay in their homes longer than 14 years, meaning that their willingness to pay for generational materials will be diminished.
That is a fair point, anoun, I forgot you 'murricans do relocate a lot.
Still, it's sad, that lack of attachment to your past and your roots.
>be me
>see some video of beautifull Art Noveau warehouse being demolished to build some fucking wallmart or someshit.
It's a crime.
Like, literally, it's a crime here.
Jewlewood likes to show of symbols of America in their movies, but in reality, it's always the same few bridges & skyscrapers
>>
>>1530327
>I forgot you 'murricans do relocate a lot.

How does that imply that you need to use absolute worse material for your house and that it need to last no more than 15 years?
Its like when people say they are "buying a new car", that doesnt mean they are buying an unused car, but that they are indeed "buying a new car" (for themselves), you pay less than half the price, get good quality etc. Why not buy and create houses the same way?
>>
>>1527854
>>1527856
>>1529901
>>1527863
This is Poland Warszawa Ochota, I live near by. A rare fuckup.
Racławicka, 02-601 Warszawa
>>
>>1530428
>This is Poland Warszawa Ochota, I live near by. A rare fuckup.

and here is what happened with facade and isolation in Split, Croatia during 200-300khm winds, mind you there was close to 0 damage to stone houses with heavy terra roofs. Check out the styro flying all over the street (isolation layer was a mistake.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok-wTUNvEtQ
>>
>>1530324
Last centuries? Post ww2 EU thinks different, literally rebuild to look old, yet its newer.

While NYC is older than most EU. We build with steel and concrete. Keep in mind that those OSB houses are 40-60k, which is what poor families make for 1 year. Yet they still have 300-400 m2, 3-4 bedrooms, 2 car garage and 2-3 baths. Something you cucks dont have, lol 5 ppl families lining up for the bathroom everymorning, fucking communist cucks, loving staying in line dont ya? You can't afford Texas level of big house, you need milions to live like a mid class american in Texas and even then you are going to pay 100% inheritance tax, fucking poor turks.
>>
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>>1530447
>Keep in mind that those OSB houses are 40-60k

bring them here if that really is the case - its not! Those house/apartments can cost up to 500k.

Also, this is not an anti-america thread so why are you ranting? Im as well an apple pie big tits muscle car man and I would never be anti american. Take it easy mang.

PS-dont put me on the watch list.
>>
>>1530447
Architecture ended in 1939.
>>
>>1530453

What's expensive is the land ya commie. He meant the house itself.

Land is an asset. House is liability.

Lern to make difference.
>>
>>1530428
Hey anon, I used to live on Al Krakowska, near Ochota. Moved to Piaseczno outskirts now tho. Which area are you?
>>
>>1527952
Remember to use concrete screws trough the window frame.
>>
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>>1527742
Former contractor here, now in industrial roofing maintenance & repair. It blew my mind when I saw how houses are built. Not just McMansions even multimillion dollar homes here are complete garbage with A shelf typically only outlasting the loan if lucky.

I think it's A multifaceted problem with laxed laws about building regulations formed threw good ol American corruption. that &mostcontractors are cutting every conceivable corner i.e. the cheapest possible buildings materials, while making the bill be as expensive as possible.

Oddly enough sometimes home owners will watch you the entire time like you're going to take something while your boss is literally returning building materials they paid for with out altering the bill. Kek


I'm not an expert but the best modern alternative I've seen implemented is coated OSB with the seams sealed with tape. It seems to hold up much better than standard OSB, but if I ever get to build my own home I'm doing it the right way with real building materials that will last much longer than me.

P.S. sorry for shilling at the end
>>
>>1530918
I remember a house being built in my neighborhood once shortly after the market died. They got the OSB up but work stopped there. After about 5 months in the elements, it started to come apart under its own weight and the wind. No black mold or anything of course. The weather caused the glue to fail and it just turned into soggy corn flakes. When they finally tore the studs down 5 years later they looked fine. Bleached by the elements but still strong.
>>
>>1530941
> soggy corn flakes kek
Yea we had A bunch of that. One of the rich neighborhoods that were going to be estates that have strict rules that they must all look the same no one can build different. These people banded together & bought out all of the empty lots from the bankrupt owner. They did this in order to control who could live around them & enforce those gay ass rules.
>>
>>1530324
>build homes that last centuries
*gets pounded by artillery*
>>
>>1530793
Rakowiec now.

>>1531140
>be a manly man Europeyan
>rebuild like a boss
>be americuck
>boypucci house gets blown out by a smallest niggerfart
>>
>>
>>1527974
>water resistant
Look at the first run.
>>
>>1528013
Would need all kinds of certifications and testings, you probably get sued by 12 different breeds of jew.
>>
>>1530807
>Remember to use concrete screws trough the window frame.

Im not sure we use them, do you have a pic?

>>1530918
>Oddly enough sometimes home owners will watch you the entire time like you're going to take something while your boss is literally returning building materials they paid for with out altering the bill.

WOW! How much worth are we talking about? I guess the best bet is either do it with your trusted friends or alone.

>>1531234
>Look at the first run.

it is probably surface moisture, but terra bricks are pretty waterresistant.

>>1531237
>all kinds of certifications and testings

to prove what? that red red blooded american terra brick isnt toxic? mental.

>>1531179
those facades are very expensive to renew, I prefer raw brick on outside honestly
>>
>>1531242
>to prove it isnt toxic
That and so, so much more!
>>
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>>1531242
They look like this, screwed trough the frame into the bricks.
>>
>>1531357
Honestly, Im not even sure do they do that when mounting windows, all I saw was pegs and foam
>>
>>1528085
Gotta have diversity points for free house.
-5pt male
-10pt white/slant
+5pt female
+10pt single mother bonus
+5pt affirmative action minority
etc.

You need about 20 points to qualify for the wait list.
>>
>>1531438
In my area spices are 70% majority but still get minority home ownership good boy points from the county government, that's made up entirely of spics... not like a little bit, like 100k$ match for the downpayment.
>>
>>1527763
Hey slavanon you the one posting on cripplechan? You should really check out the moon wood thread here
>>
>>1531242
>Oddly enough sometimes home owners will watch you the entire time like you're going to take something while your boss is literally returning building materials they paid for with out altering the bill.
>WOW! How much worth are we talking about? I guess the best bet is either do it with your trusted friends or alone.
It's more likely that they don't want you cowboying their house to save you $50 and half hour of work.
>>
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>>1527750
ICF construction (insulated concrete forms)
>>
>>1527742
Cheap square footage makes sense for disposable structures. Euroautism tism ignores the very different realities but you are too silly to understand why they are different so we have many of these threads.

Rapid development makes building for the ages unprofitable. Gentrification means todays new home is tomorrow's teardown. US structures don't NEED to last 200 years when they meet the wrecking ball in thirty or forty. Insurance is cheap so if a home is damaged it's better it be written off and replaced. This is similar to an automobile sustaining severe damage which can be fixed but whose repairs do not return the vehicle to new condition because that's not possible (straightening unibodies hit hard in the rear, etc).

You should build what you prefer. What others choose doesn't concern you.
>>
>>1527814
>get 30 yr mortgage
>pay it off in 11 years
win bigly
>>
>>1527742
CLT is the better material. Stronger, easier to maintain, better rot resistance and burn resistance. Superior building product that unfortunately doesn't have as much use in the States as it does in Europe.
>>
>>1531480
>You should really check out the moon wood thread here

you mean that documentary from that austrian company >>1531321,?
>>
>>1527773
Wood shakes need to be replaced 20 to 30 years even if properly made
>>
>>1527742
>that last barely 20 years
As long as they're built right, they'll last 100+
>>
>>1527844
t. China
>>
>>1527984
>dont think like a chinamen.
Over 90% of the buildings in China are concrete. They're just horribly mixed (they get the ratios so far off the buildings only last 20-30 years).
>>
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>>1527844
>>
hello autistic croat
>>
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>just your regular freeze-thaw cycle
>>
>>1528085
You gotta have a kid otherwise you get nothing
>>
>>1532464
that wall is clearly done with new cement plaster

with lime plaster this wouldn't have happened.
>>
>>1532173
>Wood shakes

what are you reffering at?

>>1532458
>>1532349
this was in Croatia under heavy storm, exterior insulations simply comes with risks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9m3cXnHdoqY

>>1532461
>hello autistic croat

oh shit it you! waddup my nigga? are you happy with the bricks I sold to you?
>>
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>>1531813
>CLT is the better material

CLiToris timber is shitty over-engineered germanic meme.

And it's price tag is plainly retarded. You will be better of using titanium and aerogel at this point.
>>
>>1527742
how much does it really cost for an aluminum or steel frame building?
>>
>>1532461
I saved this as friendly brickmerchant.jpg
>>
>>1532796
>CLiToris timber is shitty over-engineered germanic meme.
>And it's price tag is plainly retarded.

what is the price tag compared to a basic steel beam ?

>>1532801
>how much does it really cost for an aluminum or steel frame building?

pricey, but doing those any kind of frames is not smart for a house you live in
>>
>>1531441
I do like spices
>>
>be eurofag
>pay all the upfront costs for a building you will only get to enjoy for 40-60 years
>then it goes to sandniggers, who live in it for free
quintessential definition of cuck
>>
>>1535402
>be amerifatt
>pay 30yo mortage
>house lasts 20 years
>end up without a house and low on money
>rent up a house in a cheap neighbourhood with sandnoggs

to what end?
>>
>>1535402
>be amertard
>live in what would be considered a large, elaborately finished shed in the rest of the world
>hurricane
>die
>at least it was cheap, yeehaw
>>
>>1527742
The OSB is just the sheathing. The framing is done with pine 2x boards. The OSB with get a tyvek wrap or equivalent membrane, then it will get siding. The inside gets insulated and rywalled. The OSB is not exposed to water
>>
>>1536409
>The OSB is not exposed to water
apart from moisture in the air, damp trapped by tyvek, water seeping through tyvec staples/nails, ingress via siding, internal leaks that can't be aired without teardown.
yeah, foolproof.
>>
>>1527751
You're really desparate to call eveything you disagree with a troll.
>>
>>1535402
>then it goes to sandniggers, who live in it for free
>Believing this happens
the absolute state of /pol/
>>
>>1536069
>>1536391
>>1536428
>Very mad
>>
>>1536409
>The OSB is just the sheathing. The framing is done with pine 2x boards.

They didnt tell you?
>>
>>1527742
> Builds roof
> Uses materials that either rot or rust
Fuck that. Why not just turn recycled plastic into roofing sheeting?

It won't rot. Ever.
It won't rust. Ever.
Recyclers are already making fence posts out of recycled plastic. They last decades (The technology hasn't been around long enough to say they last centuries.)

> Buh buh what if they catch fire
That's what insurance is for.
>>
>>1527766
>You want to finance the lot not the structure.
What lot? They're buying up houses and tearing them down on my street the past decade and rebuilding with OSB-popsickle-stick paper-mache townhouses. $250-400k a pop, and you're packed with neighbors on all sides and have no land of your own besides a 1x2 meter "patio"/deck for 2 chairs and a barbecue.
>>
>all the eurocucks butthurt that their house built in the 40s has an F energy rating, wires that are cooked by years of abuse, no ethernet and the walls full of cracks
>B-b-but at least they don't rot, checkmate mutts!
You're all fucking retarded, houses aren't intended to be permanent in an ever-changing world, and what appreciates in a property is the land, not the fucking building you absolute retards, if you kept up with the rest of the world you'd be doing major renovations every 5 years.
You are already being left behind age you don't even realize it.
>>
>>1536860
>Why not just turn recycled plastic into roofing sheeting?
>It won't rot. Ever.
>It won't rust. Ever.

Sun would melt them. Roofs can get very hot and plastic has bad thermal resistance and a bad isolator.

>>1536875
>They're buying up houses and tearing them down on my street the past decade and rebuilding with OSB-popsickle-stick paper-mache townhouses.

Imagine how much human work goes to waste that way, demolition is dangerous and very expensive, then you have to pay for garbaging it.

>>1536956
>if you kept up with the rest of the world you'd be doing major renovations every 5 years.

that is rediculous, you have to renovate in most cases since quality is crap. Buy cheap buy twice, you know how they said, it shouldnt be acceptable to buy a new roof every 20 years.
>>
>>1527917
If you put this on the clay soil in my area it would be uninhabitable in 20 years, arguably worse than an OSB shack.
Also bricks get fucking hot in the summer, it would be impossible to keep that cool.
>>
>>1527742
There's an aluminum framed bank getting thrown up down the street (minus the cinder block stairwell) where they're currently throwing up OSB sides. Made me think of this. I should take a pic.
>>
>>1527794
Whenever I read someone getting butthurt on DIY about the cost of labor, I picture someone like this who has zero education, almost as many teeth, and rolls out of bed huffing and puffing, then shows up and expects to get paid while fucking everything up.
>>
>>1527811
(((investment)))
By the time you factor in all your labor, interest on the loan, taxes, insurance, repairs and upgrades, and inflation, no. No it isn't.
If I didn't have a family, I'd get a gym membership and an old truck with a mattress in the back.
Boom. Instantly free up half your paycheck and most of your weekend cutting the grass, trimming trees, fixing AthroughZ
>>
>>1529044
That's what houses in my area circa 1920 used. Most of the 'shingles' are still functioning well.
>>
>>1528091
This is pretty much the mentality of a lot of contractors.
>Lots of demand! Hey, I gotta gouge you as hard as I can! Not my fault!
>Alright spics, hurry up! I want this done yesterday and we need to start a project the next town over before this house collapses!
>Aye, we're busy! It's a demanding market! What'd you expect?
>>
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>>1528297
>Those bricks have a ton of air cavities in them
But aren't they getting filled with concrete as in the pics above?
>>
>>1536069
forgot
>get shot
>saved by hospital
>bankrupt and on the streets

>>1530918
I'm seeing this, and a lot of other alarming trends from snake oil salesmen.
A lot of which is coming from condos getting thrown up. My question is 10-20 years down the road when the condo has to get demo-ed (and I'm not exaggerating), do the 'owners' become pennyless?
Fuck 'um for living in faggy town homes and pretending they have some secret European culture, just curious.
>>
>>1537845

That is not filling the blocks at all. That's just the beam and floor. In fact since they haven't been prefilled or plugged up, that method weakens the beam as the concrete will bleed through into the blocks and carry the water, cement and sand but leave behind the aggregate.
>>
>>1529681
Fucking hell, a brick and concrete tower? If Croats can do it then I'm building my future home out of brick, earthquake risks be damned. That looks really nice.
>>
>>1531233
LMAO you're an idiot if you buy into this meme. Galvanized steel will rust as soon as the littlest nick occurs. Yeah they're cheap but they're cheap because they won't last as long as the loan you'll take out to pay for it and all the material upgrades you'll need to do to make it liveable. Hot as fuck in summer and cold as fuck in the winter.
>>
My house is an abomination but sturdy. Built in the 40s and still going strong today. The outside walls are brick with the mortar being a mix of asphalt and cement. The inside walls are some kind of thick stucco shit that can survive a fucking gunshot. The framing is all plain wood and there's zero insulation, but there's never any heating or cooling problems.
>>
>>1538061
Prob steel framed with brick sheathing. I hope.
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>>1527742
cheap cardboard houses that rot and have mold then they wonder if they get sick from the fluoride water or chem-trails.
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>>1538068
What are a fucking brainlet? There will be rust if there is a moisture. If you put the right paint and cover everything in Insulation and wood or siding the home will become chocolate .



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