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Thread hymn.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGNiXGX2nLU

Last thread: >>1502958

>Haas automation videos.
https://www.youtube.com/user/haasautomation/playlists
>Titans of CNC
https://www.youtube.com/user/titanamericanbuilt/playlists
>>
Contributions

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qq5dFeBhvRQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPIkPGqjBCc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABeio9yOtkI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gJ0PDWs0iU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQ332KGc-6M
https://www.natool.com/engineering-data/tap-style-guide
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92ztzCP76ho
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WN1usZ2K8xI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeKreZqgi9M
https://metalcutting.com/%E2%80%ACwire%E2%80%AD-%E2%80%ACcut%E2%80%AD-%E2%80%ACedm-advantages-disadvantages/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrWskHpk3oo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbMbFvsRTJo
>abom79 is a good channel for manual machining and good "big old iron" work
https://www.youtube.com/user/Abom79
>ThisOldTony provides great videos in the range of hobby garage machining
https://www.youtube.com/user/featony
>Clickspring shows what can be done with truly rudimentary tools
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCworsKCR-Sx6R6-BnIjS2MA
>Robrenz is a wealth of high precision machining, toolmaking, and metrology
https://www.youtube.com/user/ROBRENZ/
>Joe Pieczynski has good tips for the budding machinist on a variety of topics mostly related to manual machining
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpp6lgdc_XO_FZYJppaFa5w
>NYC CNC is half-decent most of the time if you can get past the tormach shilling bullshit
https://www.youtube.com/user/saunixcomp
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CX92C3klOiY
>>
and maybe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Zy3yElAWwI
and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1oASjbm2F8
and https://www.youtube.com/user/Threadexpress
and this guy does aluminum and steel casting (cool) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzaz39hUUKM
and for old iron and restoring it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nc5Z_Mo2J0Y&t=0s
and this guy isn't particularly funny, but sometimes interesting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4vaszLFBOE
and stefan gotteswinter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJgXH6K9GIU&t=1s
and another guy that does metal castings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5pu3hJ7SZE
and watch this redneck build a million dollar business in his barn https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4aP3SIWIVlY&t=0s
and this guy isn't too big an idiot https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDJOJSBXswo
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCkSr3M8GXbS4txqPY7OMxQ/featured
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXoG9uEMIpA
http://www.cnc1.com/files/PDF/FANUC-CNC-Specifications/Fanuc_0i-MD_Standard_Features_and_Options.pdf
http://www.sharp-industries.com/sites/default/files/parts-book/FANUC%20Series%20Oi%20%26%20Oi%20Mate%20Model%20D%20-%20PARAMETER%20MANUAL.pdf
http://www.sharp-industries.com/sites/default/files/parts-book/FANUC%20Series%20Oi%20%26%20Oi%20Mate%20Model%20D%20%28VMC%29%20-%20OPERATORS%20MANUAL.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=poOngCE7tyM
https://www.youtube.com/user/AndersonPrototypes/videos
https://www.youtube.com/user/artisandice/videos
https://www.youtube.com/user/jhawkdesign/videos?sort=dd&shelf_id=0&view=0
https://www.youtube.com/user/l0ckcr4ck3r/videos
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuusVnkjtCWzO5FHLNsDxRg
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6QfeDvhEuA5DiUoypF9OYw/videos
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7BdO8koXBLWmzjYLT2aSoA/videos
https://www.youtube.com/user/tjzelick/videos
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BOdwByzXls
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIEi1ElHa6w
>>
http://tachino.o.oo7.jp/index.html
this one is toptier diy and even in 2018 he post pics like hes on a 56k
http://www.ibara.ne.jp/~ymnr/index.htm
this one is good too
http://mecha-tech.la.coocan.jp/index-e.html
http://www.eonet.ne.jp/~mmf/index.html
http://mini-senban.com/mini-senban/
http://secsuzuki.blog19.fc2.com/
http://sec-suzuki.com/
https://jisakuyaro.com/
>>
I have a 255mm miter saw that supposedly cuts steel, it did cut steel decently when the blade was new, but it dulled after a while. I resharpened it on a nigger rigged sharpener, but after the sharpening the blade doesn't hold the edge for shit in steel. It works fine in other materials, but in steel a single cut fucks it. What could be the reason for this? Is the grit too low, or did the fact that I probably cut off more from some teeth than others somehow cause a cascade failure?
I'm using a 200 diamond resin wheel for sharpening, trying to follow roughly 11 degrees on opposite side for each tooth, which is about what it originally had.
>>
>>1521600
complete carbide saw blade or abrasive cut off blade?
>>
>>1521605
sounds more like a HSS bandsaw blade to me

tell him to buy a good blade made for steel and try it again
>>
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>>1521605
It's a carbide tipped circ saw blade, this one in particular.
>>1521606
If it never cut steel decently I wouldn't be wondering, but it worked when it was new, only after dulling and resharpening, it stopped cutting.
>>
>>1521611
carbide tipped it ought to
>>
I have to post this because I'm mad and nobody is here to bitch at.
Had a guy with way more experience on out mazak lathe than me set it up, run like 30 parts, then go home. He said it was running fine all day.
I check all the inserts, drills etc.
All in good condition.
Start it up.
Immediately chews through the insert, holder, and dings the turret.
I've called him 5 fuckin times and he hasn't answered.
Why are people like this
>>
>>1521632
what the hell all you did was turn it on?

I'm not quite understanding. Were you running the program he did?
>>
>>1521632
>Why are people like this

why what? why are you incompetent, or why do people sometimes not answer their phones? did he say he'd be waiting for your call?

obviously you should have asked him to watch you run one piece before he left, but he seemed to think you knew how to do your job.
>>
>>1521635
leaving a machine with some fucked up settings (G55?) before you go is asking for disaster.

>>1521632
Be courteous but concerned.
>>
>>1521632
Did he separate the job into two different programs? Have a fuckup and post half of the operation to resume from?
>>
>>1521634
>>1521635
I watched him run two parts.
I walked away to grab gloves, came back, and he said he was taking off.
It's just frustrating is all I suppose.
As for knowing how to do my job, this isn't my job, he asked me to take half his shift.
>>1521636
>>1521637
I was just looking through the program and it looks like for whatever reason all the final diameters for each operation are set to zero. What the fuck.
>>
>>1521639
did he run it from the conversational tab or something?

I have no idea, sorry.
>>
>>1521639
>this isn't my job, he asked me to take half his shift.

then why didn't you tell him you didn't know how to run the machine?
>>
>>1521644
Yeah, me either. I'm gonna call it a wash. Order isn't due for like three months anyway so whatever.
>>1521647
Why is there always, always someone like you in every thread?
I do know how to run it. In the 15 years I've worked here, I've never had to run through a program and check two dozen individual lines to make sure they actually had values instead of being zeroed.
>>
>>1521652
>I do know how to run it

1. you said he ran 30 parts
2. you said you watched him run 2 parts
3. you fucked everything up on your first part

how did he make two parts with you watching, and yet the program was a mess?
>>
>>1521656
It's automatic, you dumb slut. The program will loop forever if you keep the bar feeder loaded and hit go when the part finishes.
I don't know what the fuck he changed or did in the 1 minute it took me to grab a new pair of gloves, but whatever it was, he didn't tell me.
>>
>>1521666
>I don't know what the fuck he changed or did in the 1 minute it took me to grab a new pair of gloves, but whatever it was, he didn't tell me.

do you think he deliberately sabotaged it? could be.

and you've been doing this for 15 years you say?
>>
what does it mean if coolant pressure is way down and what does come out looks watery? is the filter on the pump clogged or something?
>>
>>1521676
check coolant level in tank
check concentration
clean tank filter (if any exist)
pull pump out of tank
check for chips in the sump
clean out sump
clean pump (there's usually a steel mesh over the submerged part of the pump)

If that fails, unhook pump hoses, submerge pump, and test it. If it shoots coolant like it's going out of style, the pump is OK and there's a clog somewhere in the hoses. If the pump dribbles, something is wrong with the pump but you should still check for clogs in the lines by hooking up another pump to the hoses and seeing if coolant pressure is OK.

Also, listen to the pump when it's running, if you hear crackling, it means it's cavitating. It's either fucked, has fucked seals or something, has air in it, or something is clogged on the inlet side.
>>
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big kevin, my lil cnc is coming along quite nicely
i whopping 46x46x90mm of workspace
>>
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grbl is fine for testing this shit but im not loving it at all, too damn barebones. now i just gotta make a probe and tool changer ....and get real cam software
>>
>>1521652
>In the 15 years I've worked here, I've never had to run through a program and check two dozen individual lines to make sure they actually had values instead of being zeroed.
Oh shit, sounds like he fucked with the offsets to get the final diameters.
What a cunt
>>
>>1521685
Is that a normal toolmakers/grinding vice? I'm getting a mini mill soon and those are the only kind small enough, but I'm kinda worried about them not having enough clamping force.

By the way, did you make that whole thing yourself or is it some sort of kit+cnc conversion?
>>
>>1521747
he used linear slides from a company, looks like his project is coming along nicely.

and depending on how big your mill table is, a 4" vise might fit better than a normal 5" or 6", I have two 6" vises.

grinding vises are kind of a pain to work with because of getting the T lined up in the slot
>>
>>1521682
Are you using the cnc sedition shield ? I’m using the same one and I get jerky movement out of it? Did you have the same problems ? What is your configuration?
>>
>>1521632
Tear the tools down. That’s all u can do at this point. You don’t have to be a master machinist to take shit apart. Don’t leave him a mess
>>
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>>1521747
yeah its the 1"/26mm grinding vise, for the baby cuts this thing takes its fine, i sometimes use them for fullsized milling ops, but its usually light cuts anyways because i usually only need to use a grinding vise if im doin babycuts, but a 2-3-4" ones should be fine clamping wise if you keep in mine they are grinding vises and also
>grinding vises are kind of a pain to work with because of getting the T lined up in the slot

all scratch built using THK kr20 stages, 40mm wide, 6mm ballscrews with 1mm pitch
>>
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i also put a sweet v into it

>>1522085
no microstepping, i have my accels set to 10mm/s -25mm/s, but i have other issues like the motors locking up at higher speeds that i didnt have on my 3d printer so im trying to figure that out, and the trimpots tuned best i can do by eye, but sometimes when it rapids they stall out
>>
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Okay, here we are. took me quite a while to get these good and compressed because of holidays and cleaning up shit.

This is the first picture of the lathe finally being put on the truck.
>>
>>1522970
fuckin' nice

how many horsepower?
>>
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>>1522970
Here is the lathe arriving at the destination.
>>
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>>1522975
And this is how it was "Dropped." (ie. fell off one of the skates as it was being pushed into position.)
>>
>>1522977

VIDEO PLS
>>
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>>1522974
20HP, came with a phase converter, metal chip dumpster/hopper, and chip conveyor. not bad for 10k.

That isn't actually rust in the 1st picture. That's just grime and nasty old coolant splatter. I'll post videos after I get it up and running.

>>1522977
Also, this nearly killed me because I was close to that side when it fell. I also nearly died a second time when I was returning the forklift because a woman nearly ran into me and the semi the forklift was being loaded onto. when I was directing traffic. people are fucking nuts on my road.
>>
>>1522981
soon™

I haven't had time to get it hooked up to electricity because I had to place the machine in the shed in pic 2 because it wouldn't fit in the comfy insulated shed.
>>
>>1522984
yep gotta stay warm when working otherwise shit happens, the machines too.

Don't know if coolant freezes easily but it would probably be a bad thing.
>>
>>1523034
i know where I live if you don't keep it heated it will rust up
>>
>>1523034
>>1523036
We don't get too cold, but I do need to get some semi-permanent doors on the shed. Also we usually get 70-100% humidity everyday, so I'm going to put a light sheen of oil on all the moving parts so they don't rust.
>>
>>1523046
that'll work well enough, I keep my lathe oiled with way oil

donnow if you ahve acccess to the ways on your CNC lathe though

if you can, get the oil pump to run then job it back and forth, and do a warmup routine if it's cold when you start it

and your CAM software doesn't set the tool offsets, gotta do that on the machine ;)
>>
>>1523046
You may know this already but I recommend 3 lubricants and rust inhibitors for any machine in cold storage.

CRC 3-36 for daily use. It's like WD-40 but better. I use it after I clean up after a job.

CRC SP 350 for areas that will get exposed to coolant and or cold air. I use it every month. I give my machines a once over.


CRC SP 400 for hard to reach areas that dont see the light of day are not critical to the operation of the machine and will get wet. It drys as a wax so a light coat is all you need. Use it once a year if that on my machines. Under tables, way covers and such.

I was battling rust a lot untill I got a decent heater for the garage.
>>
>>1523143
>>1523264
I'm more worried about the humidity affecting the electronics because we get about 32f during the night right now and then get back into the 50's in the day.
But I'll keep all of this in mind
>>
My shop (not a machine shop) is getting a Mazak milling machine (dont know the model, its old), and nobody knows how to use a mill. Gonna make small parts with it.

Im going to be watching through the videos in the OP this holiday week, but was wondering if there is a more pointed resource specifically for a Mazak or something.
I want there to be a little trial and error before we can pump out basic parts, its going to be a really good thing for us.
>>
>>1523336
cnc or manual?
>>
If I know G-Code pretty well and have quite a bit of experience with heidenhain machines, will Mazak be easy to learn? How different is it to a Haas control for example?
>>
>>1523472
Its a CNC
>>
>>1523476
read the manuals, hope you know cad and cam, and then burn the incense to please the machine spirit.
>>
>>1523478
I downloaded and started learning Fusion3d for my 3d printer, is that going to work for CAD or would I need something different?
>>
>>1523490
I've never used fusion3d. I recommend fusion360 as its free and it comes with cam
>>
>>1523490
Fusion360's CAM has worked very well in my experience for Haas machines at least, not sure if it's as good with other controls.
>>
>>1523490
Watch Nyccnc videos and Titan series and Google how to do things in fusion. Lots of other fusion teachers on YouTube as well. You can get going in less than a week with those sources.

Make sure fusion has a mazak post. I bet it does.
>>
anyone got any recs for a bandsaw with a coolant system that is good for under 2k?
>>
anyone work with haas machines? how do they compare to similarly priced machines?
>>
>>1524261
the older haas stuff was supposedly a nightmare, but the newer haas stuff is as good as other brands.
>>
>>1525195
nightmare as in, to get parts for and work on. They made them different to other CNCs or something for a while. I wouldn't buy an old Haas unless I knew it was in good condition.
>>
I'm looking to buy a lathe in central EU, maximum budget is around $2000. I don't necessarily want to spend all my money, but are there any improvements worth paying for in that $1k-$2k range? In years, the ones closer to $1k tend to be from the 60s, $2k 70s.
>>
>>1525373
get an old tos or vdf
>>
>>1525373
Manual stuff can be had for a song like 2k.
>>
>>1522977
Should be still fine.
>>
My god there are so many machine tool mfgrs to choose from.

How important is having a service center nearby? They usually charge by the hour to drive to your location and heftily, right? $150+/hr ?

Matsuura and DMG Mori have locations quite near my planned shop location.
>>
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>>1521579
Simple hobby machinist here.
Turned a little pipe today.
>>
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>>1526024
>>
>>1526024
hope that's food grade stainless
>>
>>1526022
Yeah service is expensive. I usually only call if the machine is under warranty or if I need control fixes. Everything else I order parts and then diy and have them come out to calibrate it after I'm done.
>>
>>1525373
Improvements? Not really, get one with carriage feed if you can. Also look for cross slide feed too if you can find one. Thats pretty much it. Make sure everything looks good like the ways and the spindle.
>>
>>1525791
It's probably gonna be a tos, most second-hand ones are.
>>1526055
Carriage slide are in most of them, cross slide is still relatively common. The best lathe I've seen in my price range was the SV-18RA, which has a much larger range of thread pitches selectable without gear changes as far as I know, but I've only ever seen it selling so low once and missed it, most of the time it goes for 3k and above. Sometimes they also toss up massive lathes for low prices, 1.5m+ work length, but they don't fit my garage.
>>
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So it looks like to me:

DMG Mori, fancy new technology + automation
Haas, ease of use and training for operator and business owner (small business is their bread and butter)
Kitamura, quality of workmanship and engineering
Matsuura, business strategy and automation, small to medium businesses
Mazak, multitasking and automation, more flexible to fit more businesses

did I miss anything?
>>
>>1521685

luv the home hooka pipe/pot behind the cnc though
>>
>>1526208
>Matsuura, business strategy and automation, small to medium businesses
slap on there that they cater to shops that want to pack machines in their shops and they use more vertical space than others.
>>
>>1526032
It's a crack pipe, crackheads don't care about that
>>
>>1521579
Hello anons, I'm completly new in CNC machines (I come from EE), whats a good place to start for building a first cnc machine? Just something cheap that teaches the basic. Whats the cost of a more serious machine if I wanted to go pro? Could the hobby be turned in an investment by selling stuff on the side? Thanks
>>
>>1526522
>starter machine

convert a bed mill or buy a tormach

>serious machine

make do with a bigger tormach otherwise $30,000+ new and $10,000+ old and worn out

https://www.haascnc.com/machines/vertical-mills/toolroom-mills/models/tm-1.html
>>
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>>1526633
this baby was out of a machine shop on the east coast near a port listed for around $3k

bed mill
>>
>>1526633
I'd advise against a tormach and say something like a converted minimill for starters.
pro is probably unattainable for you because what >>1526633 said is true, old haas's that aren't clapped out are $25000+ and require a $2500 phase converter, thousands of dollars in tooling and countless other things that will probably make you in debt for a long time.
>>
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>>1526648
I like my Tormach...

It's a new machine with a controller that can handle all the code you can throw at it. It's underpowered true, but with good tooling you can make some good money with it.

Youtube is full of people who built a machine shop off of a couple shitty Tormachs and being willing to do the work. Case in point, Venom Defense guy is now running a Kitamura horizontal and a Haas TM-# among other things.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWqhGYl1ITM
>>
>>1526697
>>
>>1526697
nah, I wouldn't ever use a tormach for anything machine shop related because I don't trust their batch testing method and I would 100% skip tormach all together and go with a haas minimill or a TM series.
but you do you, it's your reputation on the line.
>>
>>1526772
depends on what kind of work I suppose, aerospace hell no. Massive steel parts, no.
>>
>>1526782
any production parts at all, no.
>>
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>lathe was previously on a metal toolbox, spot welds holding the top broke under the motor mount
>lathe would bounce up and down when it was running

The previous owner had just haphazardly thrown it on there. Wasnt leveled and anything 1/2" or so out from the chuck would be tapered and have all sorts of weird problems.

I bought a new toolbox to throw it on top of and try to properly level, and it wont bounce around anymore either.

Ive having a hard time deciding if im going to keep the chip pan. It would force me to mount the lathe closer to the front of the toolbox as opposed to the middle.
It also has a bunch of holes drilled in it, and cutting fluid and oil clearly accumulated under the pan. Im not sure if thats going to be a good thing on wood, as opposed to just cleaning up the wood every time I use it.

What do you think?
>>
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>>1527158
See how the pan is offset, this is where the motor mount goes when the lathe is assembled.
Also this is a bad picture, the lathe should be scooched forward to where the bend in the side of the chip pan is.
>>
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>>1527162
The other side of the pan, its the full depth of the wooden top.
>>
>>1527158
I would have bought some I beams from a local steel supplier and welded together a frame for it to sit on, but the small lathe I currently have is also mounted on wood and it works fine so who knows.

I would keep the chip pan personally, because you don't want oils and possibly flood or mist coolant destroying the wood over time. Seal any holes with caulk or something?

Nice toolbox too.
>>
How do you get a manufactured product to market? Say you end up with 100 pieces of a $120 item all packaged up and sitting in your shop, what do you do then?
>>
>>1527325
Put it on Ebay and FBA Amazon, then shill and astroturf forums and reddit.
Its what I plan on doing if I can ever find a useful piece I can produce.
>>
>>1527325
Ideally you wouldn't have product just sitting there because that's inefficient. Produce for demand
>>
Anyone else grind their own weldon flats?

Even if it isn't perfect the set-screw just jams up against it and holds it even better.
>>
>>1527158
you don't really want the lathe too far back, I think. Nor too high to work on it.

Is the toolbox about the right height?
>>
>>1527834
It's always been common practice, and if your grinder isn't shit you can easily get a really pretty flat.
>>
>>1527839
The height is right.
My last cart it was on was pretty deep, the chip pan was pushed back probably 6-8 inches from the front and it felt natural to use.
If I were to remove the pan and center the lathe it would feel fine during use.
>>
One damn thing I want to say in this thread is that it takes forever to get anyone to do anything around the holidays. I've been waiting for 2 weeks for my machine to be wired up and I'm starting to go stir crazy with it just sitting
>>
>>1528776
bought a pierson pallet system today

everything takes longer unless you are willing to pay more for it.
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCxbwox3QUM

^ using probing to make better parts
>>
>>1528882
my school has one of those probes but they won't let anyone use it because they know someone will end up crashing it so it just sits there next to the machine.
>>
>>1523785
4x6 and a garden hose
>>
>>1528895
They probably are right.

Anyone know how to make smaller chips on a lathe? I have a video. I turned the feed way down in the video.
https://youtu.be/HKRSmAS6Dpk
>>
>>1528904
well probably sound like a broken record, but the solution is almost always faster feed to break the chips, you could try slowing the RPM down quite a bit.

>90some RPM

Gonna have to try to up the feed to break the chip, alternative would be program stops in to halt feeding every so often and let the chip break off. What material that gummy? Aluminum? Try different tool with a better chip breaker.

And is that a vertical lathe? Pretty damn neat. It almost looked like a facing cut there though... Normal lathe work would be feeding down in the Z direction where you would increase feed or slow RPM to get it to shear the chip off from the force of the machine pushing the tool a tiny bit too fast for the RPM.

For a facing cut it would have to be similar I assume.
>>
>>1528912
Mild steel. And turning up the rpm seems to rapidly increase tool wear
>>
>>1528913
well yeah because too high RPM and it's rubbing and creating heat, the IPM of the feed needs to go up.
>>
>>1528882
also, apparently you can use a probe mounted on the turret to check your part and adjust the machine for thermal expansion automatically.

Pretty neat what Grimsmo has done on his lathe.
>>
>>1528914
What ipm do you suggest? It is usually .015
>>
>>1528915
It probes the machine itself?
>>
>>1528921
it probes the turned part, don't know how tool wear factors in, it might have some way to check tool wear in the machine too it's a pretty nice lathe.

>>1528920
I don't know man, at only 90some RPM though that seems like a lot already. I would step it up slowly like a rational person and examine the result, feedrate override to 105%
>>
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>>1528923
This is 93 rpm at that feedrate. One pass per edge on mild steel. The tools are getting trashed. And I'm using 10% of the spindle power
>>
>>1528925
How many RPM does the machine do? Why are you spinning it so slow? Best thing to do would be download Gwizard free trial on a laptop and generate a speed and feed with your machine parameters.

I have gwizard opened up if you want me to try a recipe for you.
>>
>>1528927
280 rpm or so max. Remember this chuck is 60 inches across.
>>
>>1528928
cut depth?

feedrate?
>>
>>1528927
It's getting expensive
>>
>>1528930
Cut depth .090
>>
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>>1528931
Oops try again
>>
>>1528931
well okay it's up to you

60 horsepower on that thing?
>>
>>1528934
40
>>
>>1528933
Should've bought chinkshit at $1 a piece for experimenting
>>
>>1528933
1.41 IPM is what gwizard recommends with 0.090" depth, insert chipload recommendation of 0.018" ipt (check your insert package) and 93RPM with the result derated to 80% of max roughing cut with those params
>>
>>1528938
turning diameter was set to half an inch, but even at 10 inches it didn't change the recommendation, I suspect the depth of cut with that RPM is the limitation
>>
>>1528939
I can certainly turn up the rpm if I can be sure that tool wear won't increase. I was thinking slower meant cooler.
>>
>>1528941
well it's up to you, don't blame me if the tool snaps right the fuck in half
>>
>>1528943
That tool holder? Its cat 60. I can barely lift it.
>>
>>1528945
does your controller measure your feedrate in inches per minute?
>>
>>1528938
fuck me I lied, 0.86 IPM
>>
>>1528948
Good thing I'm not in tech support.
>>
>>1528947
Ipr. And that was what I said. .015

Fuck me I don't type well when I'm buzzed
>>
The 4'x4' plasmacam is only $8,000?

why the fuck was lincoln electric quoting me $25,000 ??
>>
>>1529340
the 5'x10' is $15,000

both come with their "designedge" software, don't know if it comes with plasma torch and water table.
>>
https://www.cnccookbook.com/gdt-true-position/
>>
I'm kind of interested in servo motors for motion control.
What brands are there out there?
Does anyone know of servo motor suppliers that are for budget-sensitive hobbyists?
So far I've seen ABB, Allen-Bradley, Siemens, Baldor, which all seem like high-end brands but I really don't know. Are there good-but-not-the-greatest brands to look for which are less expensive?
>>
I want to get started with CNC milling, I'm already experienced with 3D printers so I'm not coming at this with no knowledge whatsoever, just not the right knowledge. I've tried to figure things out for myself, but every single instruction I can find is either about those 30$ ebay engraving machines and how to etch a png into some acrylic, or seven hour long videoseries by Russians with incomprehensible accents.
Basically, I have a bunch of parts and assemblies in solidworks. What software do I use to make a g-code I can plug into my controller (Candle)?
>>
>>1529819
If you're familiar with 3d printers, the thing to understand is cnc routers require much more rigidity than printers, and milling machines require even more than routers. I think this old Tony has some good beginner videos that will point you in the right direction, but they point more than instruct. You'll have to pick a cam package and get used to it. Mach, LinuxCNC, emc2, etc.
>>
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>>1529835
My machine shouldn't be a problem. I'm starting out with birch plywood with the end goal of aluminium, and the kit is supposed to be able to handle steel. I'll take shallow cuts and see what happens, I'm not expecting miracles, just that it will be better than using a hand router and my dremel, and it doesn't matter if it takes a lot of time since I work from home and can be around to monitor it for basically the whole day. My goal is to cut robot parts I design out of 2mm aluminium plate.
So far the closest thing to what I want that I've found is http://easel.inventables.com, which lets me import an SVG and export G code. My preferred workflow would be designing things in Solidworks, making a G code out of files that software can produce, and milling them on my machine (It runs GRBL, if that's important). Solidworks and Easel both can use SVGs, so I think this setup will work, but ideally I'd use a more professional software for this. I don't suppose you know of something like a milling Cura, a configurable software that would let me import an SVG, set things like cut depth and feed rate, and output a G code file for my GRBL controller? Essentially I want to be able to cut metal parts like the ones in the picture.
>>
>>1528904
give me the cut diameter, the speed at which you want to go and the insert recommended DOC and IPR.

I'll plug it in my calculator.
>>
>>1529903
Which kit?
>>
>>1529903
>cut robot parts I design out of 2mm aluminium plate
Are you sure you need a cnc anything and not just a bandsaw and a good guide table? Plus maybe a drill press to make holes.
>>
What would I need to start measuring things? I'm not a machinist but I like modeling things in Autodesk Inventor, and I would like to model things from real life. I assume calipers, but what else? And what brands besides Mitutoyo and Starrett?
>>
>>1530064
>model things from real life
Model what? For what purpose/with what accuracy?
Micrometers are the next step after digital calipers, digital calipers are the step after regular calipers. Then you have depth gauges, ID gauges, all kinds of specialty shit, thread gauges, tools for measuring angles. Peak measuring is surface plate.
For 3D printing, you need about digital calipers-level accuracy at most.
>>
>>1529903
pirate mastercam, or fusion360 is free kinda, since your using grbl, and most of those parts look pretty 2D, you can use bCNC to do most basic 2d milling. also prob better off using dxf
also let me know if you want to fight robot arms
>>
>>1530064
It depends on what you want to do and to what accuracy, if it's just things that don't really matter a set of digital calipers would probabaly be enough, however if you wanted to do things like oddball threads or comblex tapered or angled surfaces the number of tools you'd need would skyrocket.
>>
>>1530075
>>1530121
Just shit for fun and to practice my modeling skills, really. I'll check into digital calipers. Tolerance would probably only need to about about .05?
>>
>>1530180
scratch my retarded tolerance
>>
>>1529955
It's a "3 axis mechanical screw driven kit" with a brushless motor. I strongly doubt it can do steel, but like I said I'd be happy with plywood and aluminium.
>>1529984
Well, I don't just want to cut, I do also want to do some light milling. For instance a gearbox assembly I'd cut out of multiple layers and bolt+glue together into a single piece.
>>1530120
Thanks, I'll check them out.
It's not actually my robot arm, I just googled it up as an example of the sort of part I'd be making. Turns out it was a bad example since every single part seems to have been made from cut and bent strips, but c'est la vie.
Right now my project is a model IS-3 tank in the same styling as this picture, complete with torsion bar suspension, friction clutch gearbox and model diesel engine.
>>
>>1530120
>bCNC
So I just checked this out and yeah, it looks pretty good. I stumbled upon it on my own but dismissed it because I assumed it was just for engraving circuits, but now I see that it does have a list of features like handling STLs, and it even runs on rpi which is a big bonus for me since that means I won't need to bring my computer anywhere near aluminium dust. Thanks!
>>
Any of ya'll used TEBIS?
Used it for three years at my old workplace and now everything feels like it's from the 90s.
>>
>>1530504
no never used it, looks neat
>>
what skills should I try to develop before I drop out of school? I can run fanuc shit, read and write g code, and use solidworks and mastercam. going to try to learn some edm stuff. can also do manual stuff but not so good at it.
>>
>>1531135
Don't drop out, that's the best skill
>>
>>1531135
write probing macros

see: >>1528882

and I hope you learned geometric dimensioning and tolerancing
>>
>>1531159
I just have to memorize what all the scribbles for roundness and parallelism and everything are right?
>>
>>1531195
probably?

https://www.cnccookbook.com/gdt-true-position/
>>
New Fusion 360 interface coming soon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3q0q1bAuyQs
>>
I don't have a CNC machine but I hope you'll tolerate me asking a question about machining anyway. Do you reckon I could countersink a door hinge into an aluminium plate with a 700W Bosch hand router, or is that going to ruin it? I do have router bits for metal, would I be better off using my dremel?
>>
>>1531273
It can be done, CNC routers using drywall cutters or hand routers can certainly have the capability to mill aluminum in a light capacity.

What exactly do you mean you have router bits for metal?
I've done it, but was using 1/8" solid carbide endmills. Had to go slow and take light passes. Cheap bits would be worrisome
>>
>>1531295
>What exactly do you mean you have router bits for metal?
Pic related, 3.2mm shaft and endpiece. Probably Chinese, they came with my knockoff dremel.
>>
>>1531298
captcha ate your picture
>>
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>>1531433
Might be because I used Clover.


>>
Does production CNC work suck shit?
>>
>>1531895
I kind of doubt it. The hard part of CNC machining is doing the setups and adding new tools and the CAM.

It takes me a lot longer to do new parts when I don't have the tools figured out and setup for it than to re-run existing parts or parts using tools I already have setup.

For mills it's probably
>take pallet off of machine
>put new pallet on
>check tools, hit cycle start
>take parts off of old pallet, swap into next OP part of pallet

(they probably do two different operations at a time so you have finished parts coming out faster making it easier to gauge quality control rather than running a million of OP1 and having a million fucked up parts)

>swap new stock into OP1
>with various checks and batch testing, etc. scattered throughout
>wait for machine to finish, load new pallet

or maybe they all use pallet changing machines these days, in which case you load multiple pallets at the start of the day and possibly change them all at the same time when the machine is finished, or have a guy watching the machine and a guy loading pallets to keep the machine well-fed

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFIAR0W2y3k
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpTfRp9j6Rg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjpbnBApuhc

Matsuura's advertising for their pallet changing machines advertises "lights out" operation meaning you load the pallets at the end of the shift and let it run over night, and the next day unload the pallets.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=605zoBuNN5k
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cgla4wR3ODU
Great interview on a Matsuura:
https://youtu.be/yWCvsnJELdc?t=176

pallet changers aren't new technology so I'm sure they use it in some form or another

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgqQcGf05pc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMD2ktc6JAo

or maybe orange vise pallets/pierson-style pallets for the smaller guys
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rEZeVbockyQ
>>
>>1531938
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_zwnZRtjAE

orange vise features
>>
>>1531895
>Does production CNC work suck shit?
nah, it's my favorite because I only have to make one CAM file, upload it to the machine/s, set the offsets, run a part, fine tune the offsets, then sit back and watch the machines run, and then occasionally change out inserts.

sometimes if I'm super bored I'll fine tune the CAM program so it runs a bit faster, but mostly I'm thinking about the next job setup.
>>
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is yazda a good machine?
this one is older and has a lot of strange errors in the log.
>>
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>>1532171
the tag
i know they didn't sell many of them, so maybe nobody ever heard of it
>>
>>1532171
on yazas website the current model looks identical to this 20 year old one.

thats suspicious to me. aren't machines like this constantly being superceded and improved upon year by year?
>>
>>1532180
Its a big empty box with a drill that moves around, the only innovation in 20 years is making it stop when you open the door so it doesn't rip your arm off.
The 'user experience' might have changes ( inevitably got much worse) but fundamentally machines haven't changed since the dark ages.
>>
>>1532187
This. Mills have ground wheat into flour for many millennia, the only real difference is durability and power source. Milling flour and milling metal are pretty damn comparable.
>>
>>1532180
I would probably be hesitant on that one.

Probably needs a lot of service and 20 years old they might not even work on it or have spare parts.
>>
>>1532190
What do the errors mean to you
>>
>>1532198
that the servos need tuning by a service guy if not replaced
>>
>>1532209
Did you learn how to do this
>>
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>>1532171
>>1532175
Burn the incense! Recite the incantations! the machine spirit is confused and must be placated!
>>
>>1532219
Sure, you just solder in 330 ohm resistors in series before the power lead to the servo until it stops giving error codes.
>>
>>1532223
You must smear the wheels with the sacred oils too. You're the worst tech priest I've ever met.
>>
>>1532223
http://www.ni.com/product-documentation/2923/en/
>>
>>1532171
they probably installed new servos and they weren't factory
>>
btw if anyone is interested in the "business of machining" grimsmo and saunders have a podcast they don't specifically advertise

https://businessofmachining.libsyn.com/
>>
>>1522977
Next time take a 20-foot stick of heavy channel or tubing and bolt first one then the other to the base at 90 degrees to the long axis of the machine. I use a forklift jack, wedges etc as needed. Being a machinist you'll figure it out.

You can put skates under the transverse tube/channel ends but the width prevents tipping. The machine literally cannot fall on its side. You can use pipe or tubing or whatever as rollers, point being the outriggers control your machine tool while the rolly bits just roll.

If the imbecilic felcher who told me my method sucks in previous threads is reading this, now he can see why skates are shit on their own.

Skates do not positively attach to the machine.
Skates do not preven tipping because machine bases are narrow.
Skate even cost more than doing it right. Fuck tradition. I'd rather not drop machine tools.
>>
>>1532402
I should have added, "cut the stick in half" so you've two 10' pieces. Shorter for lighter, smaller machines as desired. I blame back pain meds....
>>
>>1532171
>>1532223

the omnissiah does not approve

this is tech heresy, a report has been generated and sent to the fabricator general for review
>>
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>>1532409
I posit that it is you who are the heretech. As the Prime Hermeticon explained it, the most important duty of a magos is to seek knowledge and the STCs. Of course xeno and chaos tech should be shunned and destroyed, but there is nothing wrong with using, protecting and expanding on what we already have, like Archmagos Dominus Cawl has been doing.
>>
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>>1532409
it is every tech priest's job to attempt to pacify and nullify problems that occur from the machine spirit's anger and confusion, so that the machine can run effectively and efficiently in service to the machine god.

>>1532412
Praise the omnissiah!

>>1532225
how could I forget to use the blessed oils!


okay, enough RP does anyone have any good rust remover? I have a good bit of rust (probably from coolant) on the threads of a few of my boring bars and I am kind of worried it is going to rust so bad that I will end up breaking the bolt off inside it.
>>
I asked here before about a tool I need to buy but I just realized I barely have any time left now. I need something that can cut off 1" round stock leaving a round end on the parted off piece. will be working with either 6061 aluminum or 1018 steel. also I only have $100-150 max to spend.
>>
>>1532492
i have no idea
>>
>>1532492
sounds like you would have to grind a custom form tool for that.
>>
>>1532511
I think I can do it with a tool capable of trochoidal grooving, but I don't know what ones those are.
>>
>>1532421
>good rust remover?

soak it in evaporust, otherwise the harsh chemical jelly loctite rust remover stuff

remove all the oils before using either of the products, as it will leave a dark stain where the oil was.
>>
Any laserfriends around?
Some upstanding gentleman broke into my local hackerspace and put his foot right through the top of our K40.
I'm assuming the acrilic sheet the cover was made out of is it/UV/relevant wavelength proof, does anyone know where I can find this stuff/a replacement?
Cheers.
>>
>>1532541
what the hell is even the reason for doing that?

inner city youfs decide to break all of evil whitey's toys?
>>
Just learned on Fanuc controllers you can't use logic (macros) in code fed by DNC.

Another downside to old machines.
>>
>>1532570
huge bonus to Haas machines, large program memory.
>>
>>1532541
It's an IR laser, so you'll want an IR-safe plastic. There are plexi plates you can buy that should be fine.
>>
>>1532548
It was right underneath the window they came in through, so that's where their feet went.
>>1532594
Thanks, I'll see what I can find.
>>
>>1532570
like what? sub routines or just other things?
>>
>>1533176
it can't do logic like if/else, probably conditional logic like >, <, >=, <=, ==, !=, and the bitwise operations

You can run the logic parts from the main program memory (2mb on Grimsmo's new DMG Mori) and have the program movement code on the DNC side (2gb)

which is ridiculous considering a new haas has 1gb main memory standard and optional 32gb
>>
>>1533178
some machines you can choose which controller you want too, in which case you might get better memory by not choosing the Fanuc controller
>>
>>1533178
strange, my mazak multiplex can do them and it's a 92 model. I just never do them because it's easier to do it myself
>>
>>1533180
over DNC?
>>
>>1533181
nah, it has onboard memory. Is your file too large for the memory on the machine?
>>
>>1533182
Grimsmo is the guy with the file too large, he has all those custom probing macros in his files too.

The workaround was to separate machine movements and macro code into two different files, storing the macro files on the main memory and the movement files on the DNC storage device.

His Fanuc controller on a brand new DMG Mori sucks.
>>
how would I do a if/then logic for trying to do the following:

>machining surface
>Probe surface
>if surface isn't in tolerance then remachine a few thou smaller
>probe again
>if good then end

I know I would have to write in some manual code I just don't know what/where I would find the syntax for doing something like this. For simplicity lets say the machine is a Haas mill.
>>
>>1533190
You probably don't need a book, but this would get 'er done surely.

https://www.amazon.com/Fanuc-Custom-Macros-Peter-Smid/dp/0831131578/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1547023721&sr=1-1&keywords=fanuc+programming

tormach pathpilot is mostly just linuxcnc programming but here's the reference

https://www.tormach.com/conditional-subroutines-reference/
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYwd2IKSpT4
>>
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>>1533190
okay, here is what I have thought about while reading up on macros and various manuals trying to get a grasp of this.

>machine program run normally
>probe routine
>if [x,y,z] isn't in tolerance then change cutter compensation by +/- .001
>goto line where the program starts
>reprobes
>measures [x,y,z] again
>then repeats if everything is still out of spec

tangent time!
Maybe if you could have the probe measure it you might be able to have it do some basic math and have it compensate off of that like;
>if x=1.001 then 1.001-1.000=.001
maybe this could be used to then adjust the cutter compensation.
/tangent
>>
>>1533198
yeah that's what Grimsmo did and talks about here: >>1528882

that atf letter is pretty funny too
>>
>>1533199
I actually watched it and came to this conclusion. I guess I'll be writing my own tomorrow
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGmPA9ufcDw
>>
>>1533326
>tfw those guys running manual machines listening to metal while they work
>>
Stupid question time: if you buy an old lathe that's wired for 220v, can you just swap the motor for a roughly equivalent HP 110v motor?
>>
>>1533397
Not if the motor is part of a speed control
It often is
>>
>>1533401
Damn. Thanks. Guess I'll keep shopping around for a different lathe.
>>
>>1533616
But you can swap out the speed control too y'know.
>>
>>1533397
Nothing's stopping you from just having the speed control separate from the g-code. If you're not changing spindle speed in the code you'll do fine manually setting the speed.
>>
>>1533397
Why not just run 240
>>
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How obnoxious is it to pull out micrometers and indicators when looking at a relatively cheap used lathe?
>>
>>1534108
depends on who you are buying it from.
>>
>>1534113
Does it make a difference? Not family, two options are a private seller and a small company.
>>
>>1534108

what's obnoxious about it? If the seller knows it is good then they shouldn't care, and if you show that repairs are needed they might sell it to you for a lower price or simply decline your offer.

It's no different than having your mechanic check out a car before you buy it.
>>
>>1534118
It's most likely not in great condition and the price reflects that.
>>
>>1534123
>It's most likely not in great condition and the price reflects that.

And if you are an expert you can determine if the low price makes it a worthwhile purchase. It still doesn't seem offensive to find out what you are buying, especially if the price implies that it has issues.
>>
>>1534129
>if you are an expert
I'm a faggot that's only made like 4 parts on a lathe and watched many jewtube videos.
>>
>lathe cross-slide nut gone
>headstock's gone a bit out of line (.5mm)
>now have a 5mm dia part to machine for a project
>got quoted at £75 with a 0.1mm tolerance.
lol.nope
Anyone fancy giving me your estimates?
>>
>>1534258
>Anyone fancy giving me your estimates?

about tree fiddy
>>
>>1534258
for $100 he's doing you a huge favor

post details of the part, you can't get a damn quote without showing exactly what you want.
>>
>>1534108
Not at all, put an indicator magbase on the carriage with indicator on the ways and move it back and forth. Change there translates to change in part diameter.

If the lathe isn't level the ways might be twisted or something though, and change in elevation or distance on the ways indicator doesn't translate 1:1 to part diameter as it's moving downward at an angle to the part diameter. A lathe with half-worn ways will still make reasonably accurate diameters--on my Pratt and Whitney that's sure the case.

So it gives you more of an idea where the wear is, and to a lesser extent how much. It should be up near the chuck where all the short parts get machined, where the saddle rides there.

The ways are the hardest part to refurbish though, as they are hardened (or should be) and will need to be re-ground by someone with a grinder big enough to do it (afaik).
>>
>>1534827
>will need to be re-ground by someone with a grinder big enough to do it
That or you can scrape them yourself if you have the equipment and patience.
>>
Does anyone speak the dmg language
>>
>>1534839
I thought you couldn't scrape hardened ways? Or it just wasn't worth the extra time?
>>
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>>1534843
>>
>>1534864
CCW means counterclockwise.
>>
>>1534867
I added labels ok
>>
>>1534843
Hmm
>>
>>1534863
I think you can, carbide's harder than hardened steel anyway. Ruskies always tend to do it to their lathes, but it's probably a lot of time.
>>
I just bought 3 horizontal mills
>>
>>1534884
Nice do they have the overarm support
>>
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>>1534867
You think this is intuitive
>>
>>1534897
>You think this is intuitive

the only way I could run that machine would be if it had perfect AI, and would do this when I push the wrong button AKA "kill the tool and the part now" button:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qnd-hdmgfk
>>
>>1534901
i thought DYI liked DMG
dont most have this control on them? it seems fairly common. not that i like it.
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>>1534897
Do you actually need to program that thing via that keypad or does it run standard g-code?

Also, my boss is looking for a mini vertical mill for making injection molding and he was disappointed at how everything under 30k is garbage (i.e: Tormach). What would /emt/ suggest?
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>>1534908
>injection molds
Fix'd.
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>>1534908
Both. Sometimes it's just easier to use the built in editor
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File: buttons.jpg (1.11 MB, 2667x1671)
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>>1534897
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>>1534908
Look at used machines. You can pay a bit more than 30k for a used high quality machine that will be a thousand times better than a new sub-bottom tier machine like a tormach.

Brothers, Fanuc (robodrill), and a lot of other companies have minimills that are more powerful, faster, more rigid, more repeatable, more features, and generally are better in so many ways that it couldn't be typed up in a single post. Used market really is the way to go for a smaller company that needs something decent but doesn't have the capital to invest in a new high quality machine.

Yes, you'll have to shop around pretty hard and do a lot of homework. You'll probably have to TLC the machine a bit before it can run like it should, but even then it'll be incomprehensibly better than literal feces tormach and other such garbage-in-a-box insults to the name "milling machine".
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Should I get a carbide or a HSS parting tool?
>HSS doesn't break so easily, can reuse the same piece for a long time
>lower speed, need to sharpen it

>carbide can cut faster, sharpen less,
>breaks, more expensive, not adjustable depth
Which one is more practical?
Also, what widths are most commonly used? I've been thinking about 3mm, since I'd mostly use it for smaller parts.
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>>1535284
there are a lot of merits to carbide tooling in the home shop, despite what they say.

Mostly because it saves you time.
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>>1535239
lol yes Tormach did piss in your coffee didn't they?

Reminds me of that fat fucking retard "nerdly" who returned his $15k tormach for a $30k haas mini mill and pretends going into debt was a waaay better decision.
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>>1535414
oh nice, Siemens 840D

https%3A%2F%2Fsupport.industry.siemens.com%2Fcs%2Fattachments%2F29064316%2FFB1_0310_en_en-US.pdf

https%3A%2F%2Fwww.industry.siemens.com%2Ftopics%2Fglobal%2Fen%2Fcnc4you%2Fcnc_downloads%2Fsinumerik-documentation%2FDocuments%2FSINUMERIK-Operate-UserGuide-2013-09-color-en.pdf

fucking google won't just give me the link to the PDF and firefaux instantly downloads it instead of opening it for viewing, so deal with teh screwed up link
>>
>>1535414
are you a chicom spy bullshitting your way into a high-tech manufacturing facility?
>>
Sup nerds? I know none of you actually know how to machine, but I've seen a lot of hobbyists on youtube machining either aluminum or stainless steel, and their chips are always long spirals that never break themselves.
Is this a bad thing? What's it a bad thing for, though? If they're not breaking at all, are they only a hassle for cleanup?
>>
>>1535440
Hobbyist machines usually just don't have the power to feed hard enough to break chips. It's mostly just a hassle for clean up, it can also ruin part surface finish and/or become kinda dangerous when it bird-nests.

>>1535295
Fuck yes, a Tormach apologist. Defend them harder, it pleases me sexually.
>>
>>1535440
They're a hassle to clean and they can get caught in shit, at worst causing injury.
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>>1535089
I smiled
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>>1535295
>costs the same as a Haas
>does less
>proprietary spindle taper
>batch tested
Please cry more
>>
>>1535440
>>1535446
A single chip has lower cutting energy than broken chips, and is technically better but causes a dangerous mess. If you're getting multiple chips without a chip breaker, you're either using a free machining material or something is wrong with your setup i.e. dull tooling or lack of rigidity. If that's the case, you're going to see interruptions in the surface because the chip is breaking at the surface rather than at the chip breaker. When parting with a standard hss blade cutting tool, if you don't see a single chip you're doing it wrong.
Professional machines use a chip breaker, which is a sharp curve behind the cutting edge. It does take energy to break that chip, but it's worth it on a production machine. Hobbyists use hss tooling or they don't run inserts at the proper doc & cutting speed to work properly.
>>
>>1535507
>costs as much as a Haas

which is bullshit
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVxOmh5cj_w
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>>1535523
But it's not, John Saunders. Tormach is Chinese crap.
>Costs as much as a Haas
Fine, it is about 2-4k less for a worse machine.
Look, don't try and justify your sunken cost fallacy with us. The bottom line is that Tormach doesn't belong in a machine shop with other brands like Haas, mazak, dmg mori, okuma, and doosan. It just isn't capable of holding the tolerances required for many high dollar customers and that's one of the myriad of reasons that high dollar shops don't use them.

Is Tormach a viable option for people doing hobby shit? Maybe, if they get their QC down and stop linking people to John Saunders videos for people who have problems.
>>
>>1535425
High tech my ass. This pos is over 10 years old. Also why is it called 3d? It doesn't 3d anything
>>
So I am always looking to get more tools, and when I search for Lathes there are always a bunch of cheap valve grinding lathes and brake lathes.

Is there any use to buying either for cheap?
Like would there be any use, other than its intended purpose?
>>
>>1535600
No.
>>
>>1535600
What are you expecting a lathe to do? Allow you to travel in time? Haha, that would be silly.
>>
Is this average
>>
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>>1535612
>>
>>1532402
>>1532408
This... fuck I should have thought about this before I even started.
>>
>>1535614
it's pretty good, I've seen more on newer machines
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>>1535571
How many axis can it control in?
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>>1535667
Hard to say. The pallet is called s2 and the main spindle is s1

It can spin s2 like a lathe and machine that way. And the main spindle is like a 5 axis
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>>1535670
>5 axis
That's 3D.
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>>1535670
horizontal lathe?
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>>1535680
Dmc 200fd
Lathe would be vertical.

Lets call it a 5 axis with turning mode.
>>
Could I DIY a foamboard router/mill by mounting a spindle motor on a SCARA robot arm? It's currently a 3D printer, but I could probably print all the parts to turn it into a CNC?
>>
>>1535710
A permanent conversion?
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>>1535715
No, a swappable head. The printer extruder is held on with four M3 bolts in a square, I'd design something with the same holes to hold the spindle.
>>
>>1535513
what about negative rake angle
>>
how big of an air compressor do I need to run a single CNC machine?
>>
>>1535940
That probably depends on the specific CNC, should be in its specs.
>>
Is the shop rate for a production shop more or less than a job shop?

Surely less, right?
>>
>>1536034

What quantity? One is cheaper in job shop. 1000 is most likely cheaper in production.
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>>1536036
well it's more about the concept of a "shop rate" where you bill per the hours it takes to do a part and then add any special inspection or tooling costs to the top.

If more = cheaper then that pretty much answers the question, production = cheaper.
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>>1535929
for higher horsepower machines, increases cutting forces but tool life is better.
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzBq0XxzSCc
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>>1535571
cause it has 3d simulation lmao
>>
>>1534688
Dimensions in this drawing are in inches, say a tolerance of 4thou
>>
>>1536073
ATF please, just fuck off.
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>>1535940
Usually rule of thumb is 15 cfm per mill with through spindle air blast or 10 cfm just for a tool changer.

Lathes are usually hydraulic, unless you get a strange one.
>>
>>1536034
Can be more depending on overhead costs. I've seen 350 an hour for some shops because they have so much fucking shit to pay for
>>
>>1536086
job shops at $350/hour or production?
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>>1536073
Bruh, is that a fucking selector switch for a glock auto sear? Like >>1536084 said, no one here is jeopardizing their business because you want a FA glock.

Just buy one on fucking wish.com
>>
>>1536087
Both, job shops because HUGE fucking lathes for rollers and tons of of manual machines for some reason, and employees

Production for tons, I mean at least 50, 5th axis machines and mill/turns.
>>
>>1536091
shit, they must have wanted some serious turn-around times on those parts
>>
>>1536095
They're probably aiming to cater to corporate customers who have huge workpieces and need decent volume, it's not exactly the type of market where you've got a huge amount of competition so they'd probably be more concerned more about finding someone who can handle what they need than what they charge.
>>
>>1535940
Some take a lot of air for pallet changes.
We have 40 hp air compressor in class and it can only do one machine at a time
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>>1536108
No wait it's only 20 hp. My bad. I said that because there's two of them but they use one at a time. More of a backup in case one breaks
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>>1536111
okay
>>
>>1536043
I hate it when you're thinning a wall to nothing and you get that big sheet chip that just rips off
>>
>>1536117
yeah that can mess up the tool too, but I do prefer a thin wisp over a 0.100" strip for sure
>>
>>1535718
yeah but it probably wont preform how you like, but it will only work if you post pics
>>1536073
it would prob be cheaper if it was in metric
>>
>>1536107
>>1536095
Production:
Aerospace and satellites, defense projects from other countries, etc.

Job shop:
Oil industry, mining industry, food industry
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Vnc97VKlqQ

mazak really is a multi-tasking machine company aren't they
>>
Any Australians here? I'm going to get an apprenticeship in fitting and turning but I'm not sure if I should go for the maintenance side of things or machining. Any advice would be appreciated
>>
>>1536724
Never. Used one I don't know. Do You like it?
>>
>>1536724
yeah, that's where they make the majority of their money. they don't really cater to small shops in need of standard lathes or mills.
>>
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Are you good at setting up your bore tools? It's hard for me to get it exactly right the first time
>>
>>1536974
Maybe somebody could quickly answer this, would be grateful.
>>
>>1536977

maybe they're ignoring you because your question is not about machining, but I'd say if you have an ordinary drill then bits with hex shanks should work.
>>
>>1536977
rotary hammer and concrete bits
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>>1522970
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>>1538142
only bad thing is it has a knee
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>>1538142
Build a great mill, nobody builds mills greater than me, believe me, and I build them very inexpensively.
>>
>>1538142
>>1538161
wahhh wahhh

it doesn't meet your machinery snob standards wahhh
>>
what went wrong if my knurl looks good on one end but gets all muddy at the other end? I never backed the tool off so I don't see how it could have doubled only in one section.
>>
>>1538250
different force applied?

part bending away from the tool?

teeth gum up with material? I hope you used lots of cutting oil.



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