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I work on a cattle farm and was thinking about getting a sheep to practice on to expand my resume. Can only find bulk sheep though, what sort of place sells single sheep?
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>>3111367
I mean a couple so they don't get sad.
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>>3111367
What sort of practice will you be performing?
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>>3111374
doggy style using the Welsh method
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>>3111395
kek
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>>3111374
Shearing, dipping and general maintenance
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>>3111374
Kissing
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>>3111784
Dipping sheep? Is that where dyed wool comes from?
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>>3111367
>A sheep
They're herd animals you dip, purchase three from literally any farm via private treaty. They're cheap and you can legally just slit their throat if you don't want to deal with them anymore.
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>>3112097
I know, it was late and my foot was sore. I said right under I'd grab a couple. I'm going to see some Ouessants in the town when I get a chance now. I hope they say
>here's your ewe
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>>3111367
If you go around farms that have them during lambing season you can probably easily get some lambs that have been rejected by their mother or their mother died or she had no milk.
They are not that hard to raise (and one more thing on your resume I guess) but not all farmers are willing to put in the work so they might be happy to get rid of them really cheap.
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>>3112481
Don't lambs end up really weird if you hand rear them? I'm looking for a typical ewe to get into.
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>>3112325
Try Craigslist?
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literally go to a livestock auction. they normally sell them individual or in pairs of 2-3
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>>3111784

I shear for just about everyone in my area. Trust me you don't want to do it. It's not like the aussie wool sheds where everyone has their part and by the time the gun shearer gets to it they just have to take the back and move on. I do a couple hundred a year and it still takes me 10 minuets a sheep on most jobs, and some jobs I've had take over 30 minuets per sheep. It's a thankless job, the start up costs are pretty high (my shears alone cost me $700 used not to mention all the spare heads/blades/miscellaneous equipment) , you will be plagued by pimples for three days after handling them from all the lanolin, and I'm only 26 and am already have problems in my back and shoulder from it. If you want to do it, then I suppose that you should give it a shot, but you really don't want to do it.
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>>3111784


If you are still not convinced, a few things to keep in mind...
>you will cut sheep, I cut sheep, the man who taught me cut sheep, and the best shearers in the world cuts sheep. It's part of the game and save a few specific cuts it won't hurt the sheep. If a customer has a problem with this to the point that they are causing problems with your ability to shear, don't shear for them ever again, it's not worth the headache.
>charge a set up fee, lot of small scale operations out there who will get your name from a friend and expect you to drive 3 hours to shear their 5 head for the same price, make sure your gas and time is covered.
>charge enough, and be firm on what you charge, I spent years charging $3 a head and making $10 an hour by the time I was done. You are performing a service that they can't do or don't want to do, you are a tradesman and deserve to be paid as one.
>learn to clip hoves, lots of small operations need that done as well, it only takes a minute to do, and you can charge more. It's the easiest part of the gig, but clip hooves after you shear or you are just sharpening them for them to kick you with
>wool is worthless, do not except wool as payment, do not offer a discount to keep the wool. If you somehow secure a contract with a wool buyer buy the wool from them after it's all settled if the wool is suitable
>find a helper, the most time consuming part of shearing alone is working the sheep, give someone (perhaps a local kid looking for beer money) 10% and save the headache
>be firm on conditions. tell the owners to pull them off the pasture ahead of time if it's going to rain, if they have wet sheep tell them to call you back when they are dry. If they have lots of rock/sand in the barn charge more because you will use more blades which means more time or money getting them sharp again
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>>3116327
Sale yards tend to sell a lot by the head on small sheep and weight on bigger animals, but you still buy the lot. He needs contact a breeder to get a handful of quality sheep.

>>3113339
Bottle lambs will turn out just fine, maybe a little smaller from getting stunted as lambs but otherwise not a terrible sheep.
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>>3117184
Thanks for the input, yeah I don't want to do it for a living, just want to give it a go on a really small scale and make something out the wool. I'm happy enough chasing cows really.
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They're a herd animal so do better with friends. As with other ruminants they bloat (and die) easy so diet is critical. Don't overdo the grains, include lots of hay.



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