[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Search] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/an/ - Animals & Nature


Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.



File: download (29).jpg (34 KB, 655x682)
34 KB
34 KB JPG
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47198576

>A scientific review of insect numbers suggests that 40% of species are undergoing "dramatic rates of decline" around the world. The study says that bees, ants and beetles are disappearing eight times faster than mammals, birds or reptiles. But researchers say that some species, such as houseflies and cockroaches, are likely to boom. The general insect decline is being caused by intensive agriculture, pesticides and climate change.

>The researchers found that declines in almost all regions may lead to the extinction of 40% of insects over the next few decades. One-third of insect species are classed as Endangered.

>"The main factor is the loss of habitat, due to agricultural practices, urbanisation and deforestation," lead author Dr Francisco Sánchez-Bayo, from the University of Sydney, told BBC News.

>"Second is the increasing use of fertilisers and pesticides in agriculture worldwide and contamination with chemical pollutants of all kinds. Thirdly, we have biological factors, such as invasive species and pathogens; and fourthly, we have climate change, particularly in tropical areas where it is known to have a big impact."

>Some of the highlights of study include the recent, rapid decline of flying insects in Germany, and the massive drop in numbers in tropical forests in Puerto Rico, linked to rising global temperatures. Other experts say the findings are "gravely sobering".

>"It's not just about bees, or even about pollination and feeding ourselves - the declines also include dung beetles that recycle waste and insects like dragonflies that start life in rivers and ponds," said Matt Shardlow from UK campaigners Buglife.

>"It is becoming increasingly obvious our planet's ecology is breaking and there is a need for an intense and global effort to halt and reverse these dreadful trends. Allowing the slow eradication of insect life to continue is not a rational option."
>>
We're killing this planet and it will be far too late when something is finally done to try reverse the damage. At this point it's obvious.
Until the catastrophic damage is right there for everyone to see, our need for profit and comfort will reign over rational decisions.
A lot is being said but few care to listen, much less act.
>>
Thanks vegans.
>>
>>2940170
Don't worry, it will be fine.
>>
>>2940170
Daily reminder that the only way to truly save the environment is to become a Breatharian coprophagist.
>>
Why South America don't have this problem?
First world new ""safe"" chemicals aren't as safe, as old ones?
>>
It is winter you fags, this is why you don't see much insects. Stupid scientists.
>>
File: aquaponics.jpg (317 KB, 1280x960)
317 KB
317 KB JPG
>>2940142
Reminder that cockroach milking and aquaponics is the future. Currently popular agricultural methods are unsustainable, change is inevitable.
>>
>>2940197
Brazilian food is so full of hormones that you can't tell females from trannies anymore.
>>
>>2940142
But insects are pests. Good riddance.
>>
>>2940199
>cockroach milking
>>
>>2940211
That is hispanic thing.
Same in spain I'd say. Same even in Chechnya
>>
File: reducereuserecycle.png (198 KB, 718x430)
198 KB
198 KB PNG
>>2940199
the virgin aquaponics vs the chad Breatharian coprophagist
>>
>>2940217
And humans aren't? Anything you've encountered your entire life that scientists considered a pest probably makes up >1% of all bug species.
>>
>>2940433
Slipped like fraudian'
>>
File: annihilation.jpg (149 KB, 500x731)
149 KB
149 KB JPG
>>2940142
This is the canary bird of human kind and the world as we know it. The only time that there has been a noticeable decline of insects in the fossil record was during the Permian-Triassic event, the most severe mass extinction in the entirety of natural history. When the comet struck the Yucatán peninsula and a magma plume spewed its content on Deccan insects didn't disappear. They are now.

If there was any doubt that we're in the midst of a new mass extinction of life on Earth there isn't any more. The question that remains is for how many more generations this vandalism of ourselves and our only home will go on until the biosphere becomes too meagre to sustain large endothermic animals.
>>
>>2940437
Insects aren't that important.
>>
>>2940441
Even if that was true you are missing the point completely.
>>
>>2940433
By definition pests are that cause problems to humans.
>>
>>2940437
>muh human extinction
Humans, unlike other species, can adapt super quickly, thanks to engineers and shit.
As long as engineers and other smart (non-humanities garbage tier) people exist, humans survive.
>>
>>2940142
>insect population bottlenecks
>the resilient few reproduce
>end up with a bunch of plastic-and-smog-proof superbugs
>carboniferous part 2: arthropod boogaloo

I see no problems.
>>
>>2940506
No you retard insects are just going to disappear forever not a single species will be left nothing complex ever happens. Life on earth is doomed unless we send lots of money to the government who will fix the problem. The green new deal will save the world.
>>
>>2940437
Related https://twitter.com/PunishedScoob/status/1070472926028271616
>>
File: 1478475111016.jpg (23 KB, 436x432)
23 KB
23 KB JPG
>>2940508
>>
>>2940509
This is what happens in third world.
>>
>>2940510
>>2940519
better link https://youtu.be/rGbb5ZctwMI
>>
>>2940441
fucking retard
>>
>>2940524
Yeah, insects are retards.
>>
>>2940523
I have one question: why trash plastic, when it can be recycled for really cheap?
I mean, they've collected it to the truck anyway...
>>
>>2940528
And yeah, that doesn't look like generic trash...
>>
>>2940170
/thread
>>
If only jobs were created to improve the environment and into energy research and implementation instead of towards a pointless job in a pointless office trying to sell pointless shit constantly over and over. Think of all the millions of pointless jobs out there that do nothing of any real benefit and then imagine that workforce being put towards green and energy endeavors instead , how much more fulfilling that would be and how jobs would keep generating if only the industries were turning on a different wheel
>>
>>2940470
You are placing your faith on platitudes and resort to magical thinking in the face of this great crisis.

Human existence has always been entirely contingent on the presence of a rich biosphere with functioning ecosystems. The brightest minds in the world will rot away like any other high trophic member when there's not enough calories around to sustain them. Intelligence isn't this transcendental magical thing that will make it through no matter what, it will be selected out like any other trait once its demands can't be met because the environment has become too poor to sustain it. This is a hard limit to human endeavours.

You are delusional. The fact that you so nonchalantly ensures the future of our species on "engineers and shit" says more about your inability (refusal?) to grasp the gravity of the situation than anything else.
>>
>>2940528
Because the problem is 3rd-Worlders who not only simply don't give a shit about the environment but also are running operations so cheaply at such tight margins that it's simply less costly to pile garbage up than recycle it.

At a broader point, Capitalism as we know it ultimately is a system that evolved in Europe for usage by very specific people (Anglos, French, Germans, Italians, and Spaniards) in a very specific place (Western Europe and North America) in a very specific time (18th-20th century) with very specific technological and economic restraints under a VERY specific political climate. Introduction of other peoples, other places, changes in technology, economics, and political climate radically shift this system out of its fragile balance.

We used to have the technology, both social and physical, to make and use reusable containers from biodegradable materials: horn, glass, leather, wood, and metal. Plastic is cheaper, and people want to be able to throw away cheap plastic crap instead of having to wash their drinking glasses.
>>
File: frog is disappoint.png (358 KB, 530x394)
358 KB
358 KB PNG
>>2940142
this thread, on the very same subject, was made a day before yours, and is currently on page 2. >>2939707

y u no use catalog?
>>
File: DoYourPart.gif (2.29 MB, 320x214)
2.29 MB
2.29 MB GIF
>>2940142
I'm doing my part!
>>
>>2940803
That other thread has a shitty OP and cites a different headline.
>>
>>2940546
If they gave a shit about the environment we and our companies wouldn't buy their products anymore because they wouldn't be that cheap.
>>
>>2940544
Half of these problems are solvable by genetic engineering. We can already manipulate insects to wipe themselves (mosquitoes). Research to crest temperature-hardy corals has been underway for a while now, and these ideas can be applied to any other keystones we need to. Save us the pessimism and reduce your carbon footprint pls, you offer no solutions.
>>
>>2940142
>some species, such as houseflies and cockroaches, are likely to boom
rreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee why did it have to be the worst ones



Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.