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File: araneus diadematus.jpg (577 KB, 1501x2105)
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Why are there so many people deathly afraid of spiders? It's understandable in an area where deadly spiders can be found, but this fear of spiders extend to countries where none of the spiders pose any threat.

If this is some sort of universal human instinct, how come I always loved spiders, even as a kid?
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>>2888133
It's not universal, it's just a common psychology. Fears, by their very nature, are irrational so you really can't imagine what it's like to be arachnophobic unless you actually were.
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It's an instinctive fear.
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>>2888133
>but this fear of spiders extend to countries where none of the spiders pose any threat.
This is not true, at least for me. As a child, I was always confused as to why people from different countries feared spiders. Later I realised how different spider species were compared to where I live.
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>>2888146
>Fears, by their very nature, are irrational
No. Fears can be irrational, but usually aren't.
People have natural aversions and fears for evolutionary psychological reasons. Saying "fears are inherently irrational" is one of the most wrong things you can say. Irrational fears are rare.
The average european fears maggots because the people who didn't eventually died off because their food stores got infected. Entirely rational fear.
Spiders are usually feared for the same reason all other small many-legged things are feared: They carry disease and are a sign of poor hygiene, and ontop of that many can be venomous, hence why a natural aversion towards them developed.
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>>2888257
>People have natural aversions and fears for evolutionary psychological reasons
or for cultural reasons.

see it's impossible to test either hypothesis because it's illegal to take human children and raise them not to fear spiders simply to support or debunk a crackpot evo-devo musing.

so we'll likely never know if you're right or not. That won't stop you from believing it, but it will stop anyone with an IQ above 130 from taking you seriously when you do.
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>>2888271
It's not impossible to test this hypothesis, no. Identical twins born with identical DNA but raised in different cultures are a thing. You can test and quantify the effect of genetic influences like this.
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/207570

Lay off the shitty pseudiscientific pop culture webcomic shit you've been digesting and actually read a book, nigger. You've been entirely and provably fucking wrong on both accounts here, humble the fuck down and educate yourself before posting further.
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>>2888271
>doesn't know what twin studies are
>mouths off about having an IQ higher than 130
>posts pseudo intellectual dogshit webcomics
epic
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>>2888280
>posts an article that disproves his point
>doesn't understand it
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>>2888257
>The average european fears maggots because the people who didn't eventually died off because their food stores got infected.
Fun fact, Sardinians and Corsicans apparently don't because they have a local delicacy made by deliberately letting cheese get infested by maggots
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casu_marzu
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>>2888291
No true 'average European' in 5, 4, 3, 2...
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>>2888285
I never said there aren't cultural aspects to it. I simply said there are evolutionary psychological reasons.

You retorted by saying
>ACKSHAULLY YOU CAN'T TELL BECAUSE WE CAN'T RAISE BABIES TO TEST!
Which is a completely fucking RETARDED thing to say because people much smarter than you figured this out long long long before you were even born and came up with ways to quantify cultural vs hereditary influences in human psychology, specifically through twin studies
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twin_study

The study I linked is just one example of a twin study on the exact subject of fears. They're neither "inherently irrational" like you claimed because there is provably an evolutional aspect, nor is it impossible to prove there's an evolutional aspect because twin studies exist. I never said there's no cultural aspect to it either, that's a strawman you set up in your head.

I don't really understand why this is the hill you want to die on, but go right ahead

>>2888293
I said average european because european humans generally had to manage food stores for rough times and winter (unlike say, africans in general), and letting pests infect them was ruinous, hence the natural aversion. I don't really get what you're trying to say. You thought when I referred to the average european as a group of people I meant everyone without exception regardless of circumstances?
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>>2888293
They're definitely outliers no matter which definition of Europe you go by. I just wanted to share this disgusting knowledge
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>>2888295
>Which is a completely fucking RETARDED thing to say because people much smarter than you figured this out long long long before you were even born and came up with ways to quantify cultural vs hereditary influences in human psychology
yes, but we still don't have any unequivocal evidence that fear of spiders or snakes or maggots is genetic.

isn't that interesting?

you can be so right and still completely wrong. I wonder why that is?
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>>2888297
>yes, but we still don't have any unequivocal evidence that fear of spiders or snakes or maggots is genetic.
Literally the study I linked you two posts ago, though. It tests wether there's a hereditary component and it found there to be one, although it's obviously not solely hereditary (which nobody ever said it was)
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>>2888300
yep, I'm still giggling about that one, thanks.

it tested for a hereditary component in LEARNING FEARS FROM OTHER PEOPLE.

like I said, you didn't understand it. It's fine. I don't expect you to.
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>>2888303
Read the actual body of the study instead of reading the headline and conclusion and thinking that's all that the study proves.
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>>2888296
it's cool stuff. I came across it while working for a chef that trained in Germany and smuggled some contraband eurofoods home. He also showed us Jamon Iberico which was freaking amazing. The maggot cheese wasn't impressive but I tried very little of it.
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>>2888306
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>>2888308
I'm not sure ifI'd ever try the maggot cheese, sound like a bridge too far for me. On the other hand I've also tried an Icelandic delicacy called Kæstur hákarl which is the fermented flesh of a greenland sleeper shark. It smells like literal piss. Wasn't exactly great but it was definitely an experience
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>>2888310
That's really epic, I often just post reaction images when I completely miss the point of what was posted too. I won't spoonfeed you since you seem to be in a habit of moving goalposts, which you did twice, you can read the study yourself tho and maybe learn from it.
Reminder that before you moved goalposts your argument was that "fears are inherently irrational" and didn't know what twin studies are. Just to requote how much of a retard you are

>People have natural aversions and fears for evolutionary psychological reasons or for cultural reasons.
>see it's impossible to test either hypothesis because it's illegal to take human children and raise them not to fear spiders simply to support or debunk a crackpot evo-devo musing.

You actually said this.
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>>2888312
I envy you that, I've wanted to give it a try ever since I first came across the stuff on Wikipedia. I think I learned about it because of an /an/ thread on sleeper sharks a long time ago. It sounds fascinating, the piss smell but relatively less disgusting flavor.

did you hold your nose before taking a bite?
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>>2888313
I read the study in its entirety.

I read much faster than you do. I have to, I read studies all day.
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>>2888315
It does indeed taste a lot better than it smells (although that's not much of an accomplishment) and I didn't hold my nose. I also offered some housemates to try it but some of them immediately spit it out.
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>>2888327
yeah I don't know if I could swallow it, I'm not really into piss. Were you in Iceland when you tried it?
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>>2888328
No, my mother went there and brought some back. I'd definitely want to go there myself someday but I'm still a student
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>>2888331
I'd love to see the place. That whole thing about burying your poisonous food until it becomes edible is interesting. Makes me wonder how that was discovered.
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>>2888333
I can see how alcohol was an accident with people eating rotten fruits but hakarl seems a lot less likely to happen on accident and I would love to know as well.
Also, nice digits
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>>2888334
I'm imagining farmers burying toxic shark flesh for fertilizer and then noticing a dog eating it later or something. The real story is probably a lot more interesting.
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All spiders are venomous. That is one of the requirements of an arachnid being classed as a spider. Just because the venom isnt deadly doesn’t mean it doesn’t hurt. If it causes pain and doesn’t have the mental capacity to form some kind bond so that I can trust it won’t bite, I’ll avoid contact with it.
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>>2888133
Primal memory.
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>>2888133
I'm not really afraid of spiders, I just like to keep most wild animals in a position where I could do something about it if they tried biting me. For spiders, that's anywhere that's not on me, unless they're jumping spiders
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Learned fear. When children grow up around people that freak out around certain animal, they usually develop a fear of it.
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>>2888133
In survival terms, it's better to be afraid of a spider that turns out to be harmless than to be complacent and get bitten and die.
It's similar to how we see faces where there aren't any.
It's better to think you saw something, and react, than to get surprised by that tiger in the bushes.
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>>2888133
>this thread is so fucking full of pseuds

Anyway, OP, as someone who used to love spiders, then became phobic, then loved them again, here's my conjecture:

I loved all manner of creepy crawlies as a kid, but after an incident where a particularly large wolf spider cornered my sister I became phobic. I guess seeing adults (my sister was in her twenties and my father entered the room) screaming at this thing taught me it was worth being afraid of. Little kids are dumb, they trust the reactions of their parents and superiors.
>Plus, wolf spiders are pretty ugly motherfuckers with respect to their more neotenous, jumping peers

Another factor was that I was frequently bullied as a kid for being a girl that liked creepy animals. I may have associated the negative feelings of being bullied as the "worm girl" with the animals themselves. Sort of like how, when I got bullied for like Pokemon, I stopped playing the games even though they were still perfectly entertaining.

As for the origin of human fear of spiders in general, that's out of my hands.

>>2888257
>muh evolutionary psychology argument
I could easily fucking say that a better hunter is one that can remain quiet and not throw a shit fit and get mauled because one of thousands of animals in the brush toppled into his hair. Unless you empirically prove it, there are just as many arguments from selection that justify or penalize arachnophobia.

There are plenty of European cultures that don't penalise maggots - ever hear of maggoty cheese?
>mfw your post

>spiders
>european insects
>carrying disease
This isn't Africa where malaria is a thing, most European insects are harmless. Furthermore, even if you do make a big list of potentially dangerous European insects, you're making the assumption that they recognise this thing as dangerous. Europeans during the Black Death couldn't put two and two together to figure out that rats and fleas because they were too busy throwing Jews down wells.
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>>2888146
>Fears, by their very nature, are irrational
You're thinking of phobias.



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