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File: stapelia glanduliflora.jpg (237 KB, 1024x768)
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The Plant General - Stapeliae Edition

Welcome to /plant/, the happy green place on this blue board, where growers, gardeners and horticulturists share their love for things that grow.
Newbies and amateurs are very welcome, and we’ll always try to answer your questions.

This edition highlights the Stapeliae tribe, a branch of the Milkweed (Apocynaceae) family characterised by succulent and often cactus-like stems, bearing large and peculiar flowers.
In fact, these flowers are amongst the most complex in the plant kingdom, rivalled perhaps only by those of Orchids.
They are also becoming more and more available to grow as houseplants, so show these weird bastards off if you’ve got them, or just explain to /plant/ why you aren’t growing a maggot-flower yet.

LINKS
>Royal Horticultural Society
https://www.rhs.org.uk/
>Dave's Gardening Tips
https://davesgarden.com/
>Cacti and Succulents
https://cactiguide.com/
https://worldofsucculents.com/
>Carnivorous Plants
https://www.carnivorousplants.co.uk/
>Orchids
http://www.orchid.org.uk/orchids_for_beginners.htm
>Plants for Beneficial Insects
https://permaculturenews.org/2014/10/04/plants-attract-beneficial-insects/
>RHS Pests and Diseases Directory
https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/plant-problems/all-plant-problems
>Thousands of Botanical Illustrations
http://www.plantillustrations.org/

>Previous Threads
>>2877606
>>2867529
>>
1st
>>
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>>2887963
Do my cyanobacteria count as plants
>>
>>2888036
pitsa is a vegetable so i guess bacteria can be plant too
>>
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>>2888015
Honestly save yourself the trouble and plant them in straight pumice and never water them ever. Aloinopsis and titanopsis I've noticed are a lot more forgiving if you water at the wrong time but with my conophytum I just don't water them until they're a shriveled mess and they bounce back immediately. I went through a clump of conophytum bilobum and a conophytum herreanthus before I learned how to treat them correctly. Those were sad times but the mesembs I have now are doing great.
>>
>>2888036
Preddy cool what do you have them for?
>>
>>2888066
you think that would be better for my senecio (if i find another one), chocolate boi and panda? those are the ones that seem the saddest.

for my jades i was actually thinking of going with more soil to hold more moisture since their leaves are a bit squishy all the time so i dont have to water as often
>>
>>2888096
they're abstract desk plants, I feet them miracle grow and try to keep the water level the same. I have a SAD lamp I keep them in front of. I'm a microbio/botany double major so things like this (photosynthetic microorganisms) really interest me. I'm going to talk to one of my old professors about coming in to do a DNA-barcode and find out what species it is exactly.
>>
>>2888098
I don't know about using pure pumice for other succulents. From my experience other succulents are fine in soil that's a quarter potting soil and 3/4ths pumice/perlite/coarse sand/whatever else I have on hand. All my succulents are outdoors and I live in Southern California though so my conditions aren't the same as yours.
>>
>>2888036
No, they are bacteria, not plants. Cool desk pet though.
>>2888066
>>2888098
>>2888109
I've heard pumice is great for succs, as part of a mix, or just pure pumice, and I've been interested in trying it.
Trouble is, it's pretty expensive compared to regular grit (almost 10 times the price), and only available online where I live.
My plants all do just fine in the soil mix I use anyway, so there's little incentive to try pumice other than curiosity.
>>
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Bought two new Euphorbia the other day, despite being at my limit for space.
On the left E. decaryi (i think. it wasn't labelled).
On the right E. stellata.
Both plants I've wanted for a long time, but never seen for sale, so I snapped them up from the mad plant lady in town when I saw them.
In the middle, it's my E. milii that's been pumping flowers out for 6 months now.
Hopefully somebody will buy me a decent camera for Christmas.
>>
>>2888389
several stores sell it here in my 15k pop town. about $8 for a 4 liter bag (bit under a gallon).
>>
>>2888420
I've never seen pumice here in the UK (except as footsrcubbers), but online it costs as much for 1 litre as I would pay for 25 litres of shingle or grit (flint), which is around £2.50. The top-dressing on my pots alone is probably about 5 litres worth.
>>
>>2888420
You probably live in a country with deposits then. Only a handful of countries have it and it costs a lot to import some dumb rock that only a bunch of plant autists are gonna buy. It's disproportionately expensive in many places.
>>
>>2888449
i dont think we have any land like crete here in sweden so doubt we have natural deposit

and $8 for less than a gallon/4liters is not very cheap. i could prob buy a huge bag of imported akadama for the same weight cost
>>
>>2888389
Here in California it's relatively cheap but hard to find in stores. About $5 for a 8lb bag (around 2.5 gallons). So far I've only found one nursery that sells it.
>>
>>2888043
what is pitsa?
>>
>>2888532
exactly what it sounds like, JFGI
>>
>>2888533
>pizza is a vegetable
i remember hearing about that.
i wish they did grow on trees tbph
>>
>>2887963
never been to /plant/, hi. i live in ohio.any non succulents that I could use indoors this winter? like desk size
>>
>>2888544
Aloe.
>>
>>2888553
>non succulents
my bad. try a good granny bulb, like a hyacinth.
>>
>>2888544

African violets are mostly easy to grow.
>>
>>2888554
>>2888556
cool, ty guys
>>
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Post those bonsai!
>>
>>2888568
post yours
>>
>>2888611
I post mine all of the time, no sense posting ti again.
>>
Post recent plant acquisitions. Pic related is a Sedum Clavatum I recently received in the mail.
>>
>>2887703
Pumpkins are not frost tolerant at all, so look up when your last frost is. I'm zone 8 So I'd start mid March. If you want nice big pumpkins then I'd invest in a heating pad for your seedlings.
https://www.amazon.com/VIVOSUN-Waterproof-Seedling-Hydroponic-Standard/dp/B00P7U259C (not a shill I swear)
>>
>>2888568
I have only one, but it's in training and looks sad this time of year.
>>
where can I buy cool seeds online you guys, I don't like succulents or cactuses or orchids, idk. For example, I went to my boy Thomas Jefferson's house this past summer and picked up some awesome ones, one really weird striped Italian zucchini or something, anyway, any cool online seed markets you guys use. I'm germinating three date seeds I got from a carton from the store, they're doing breddy gud. here's the Jefferson link if anyone's interested: https://www.monticelloshop.org/farm-garden-seeds.html
>>
Hello brothas. Quick question. Its my first time growing thyme and there are several branches suddenly dying. Is this something to be expected in winter or should I worry about something else?
>>
>>2888969
Thyme is an evergreen, but in colder climates it can die back. Just give it a chop in the Spring to tidy it up.
Like the other mediterranean herbs, it really hates being wet in the Winter.
>>
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>>2888992
(Not that guy) It's weird, my thyme, oregano and rosemary seem to thrive better in the heavy clay soil (which is muddy pretty much constantly from November to March) than the ones in better draining positions
Those rosemary shrubs have become huge now after starting from tiny cuttings 2.5 years ago, and I even prune them twice/year
>>
>>2888827
>Sedum clavatum
Very nice species. Hadn't heard of this one, but there are so many Sedum.
As well as these guys >>2888401 , I bought pic related a few weeks ago. I have a Euphorbia problem.
The best plant I bought this year though was a little Adenium seedling that's fattening up nicely.
>>
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Pot of moss
>>
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ID
>>
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>>2889405
it's summer here
>>
>>2889229

How do you guys manage to keep moss good loking AND not rot the plant due to the dampness required for healthy moss?

I already killed a nep trying to keep the moss looking great. Never again,
>>
Found this boi on one of my cups I just bought and the guy who sold it to me told me he keeps them fish/snail free,Do these lay eggs and if so how would I go about removing them if needed?
>>
>>2889544
Also what do you anons use for dirt substrate using it for bioactive and I was wondering if you mix anything other than top soil together like sand
>>
>>2889544
Are you talking about aquatic plants? I recommend posting in the aquarium general, they are specialized in those.

That slug is non-aquatic, so it isn't an issue.
>>
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>>2889187
Very nice. I don't have that same zest for euphorbia but I'm looking forward to buying this euphorbia lactea soon. I'm an absolute sucker for variegated plants.
>>
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>>2889544
The best way to get rid of them would be to search the soil and undersides of the plants and pick them out with tweezers. It's tedious but as long as you can identify the eggs they're easy to find. Look for slimy round clumps.
>>
>>2889551
Nope for herps but thanks
>>2889557
thanks for the info
>>
My tomato plant has lost all its leaves on one stalk (the one that's growing a little tomato, the fruit is still doing fine so far). They just turned brown and fell off in just a week.
The leaves on the other stalk are still mostly green and healthy but I fear whatever this is won't stop there.

What could it be? Is it to dry or does she need more air or is this some sort of terminal tomato bug?
>>
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>>2889417
It depends a lot on the species of spaghnum you get. Some need to be very wet and humid to stay lush while others are ok staying a bit dryer. It's mostly luck with what species you get. They also have different temperature preferences. I have some spaghnum from Alaska that did well for a while but died out after a year, probably due to needing dormancy.
>>
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>>2888401
that stellata is awesome, I had seeds but I couldn't get them to germinate. The only ones I've seen locally were like 60 euros for some reason.

Here's my Pereskia Aculeata, it's probably my favourite plant.
>>
My lithops isnt splitting, I've checked the roots and they're okay. Is it normal?

A few months ago I checked and it had literally 0 roots, trimmed the dead tissue and it has grow some new roots, but still no new leaves. Is it gonna die? pls help me anons ;_;
>>
>>2889405
>>2889409
Looks like a cornflower (Centaurea).
Show us again when it starts to flower.
>>
>>2889552
I have a regular Euphorbia lactea. It's really nice, but it hasn't grown one bit this whole year.
It fell off the windowsill, and then another time the curtain rail fell out of the fixture and skewered it, so it may well be dead.
>>2889722
>60 euros
that is a lot. I paid £10 for the E. stellata and £12 for E. decaryi. I'm lucky enough to have an amazing plant shop in my town.
They sell a bunch of different Pereskia and Epiphyllum.
Has yours flowered yet? Do they have different needs to succulent cacti?
>>
>>2889722
its the fastest growing cactus ever, a weed in s africa and australia and the likes

>>2889754
they need far more water than regular cacti and more calcium than regular plants, likes neutral soils
>>
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My Calathea is still flowering. Two flower stalks even. Very nice.
I mean, not because the flowers are anything to rave about. It's more about feeling that "I must be doing something right".

By the way, no, you can't remove the dried, brown bits. They're still connected to the stalk, and from beneath, new flowers will continue to bloom, over and over.
>>
>>2889754
The pereskia hasn't flowered yet, I have it in pumice and coco coir and it grows really fast.
>>
>>2889747
Leave it alone and don't water it at all. It sounds like your lithops is off cycle and that's why it isn't splitting, this isn't a problem because over the years it'll correct itself. As long as there isn't any root rot and it's regrowing its roots it will be okay with time.
>>
>>2888827
I got this dwarf umbrella yesterday. Fairly common indoor plant but pretty when grown thicker.
>>
>>2890478
it's called a SCHEFFLERA anon
a SCHEFFLERA
>>
>>2890565
read the image file name
>>
>>2890578
sch...schefflera?
>>
>>2890584
I don't get it. Do caps matter?
>>
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>aloe guy: the thread
>>2891004
>>
>>2891032
Honestly just put it back. Even if it looks sad and pathetic like that it could bounce back when the weather gets warmer. If you really wanna to through extra effort you can remove it from the pot and check the roots, as long as they're not rotting you can replant it in a better draining soil and keep it by a southern facing window until it recovers.
>>
Hey guys, I moved to a new apartment and I got gifted this plant.
They told me it was suited for interior and that I should not water it much, but the leafs started turning yellow.
Really new into this plant thing.
>>
>>2891047
I would say it's dying, because the pot is way too tiny for a plant that size. But I don't see any crowded roots near the surface, which is strange. In fact the dirt looks suspiciously fresh. Was it recently repotted or something?
>>
>>2891057
Not that anon but maybe whoever repotted the plant damaged the roots in the process?
>>
bumpen
>>
>tfw my meyer lemon tree had a lot of beautiful flowers
>tfw they all either fall off or the resulting fruit falls off
I get that they wont all stay because it'd be too heavy for this little tree
But none of them stayed last year, and already this year theres piles of petals and little teeny fruits on the floor
Ah well
>>
>>2891047
F
>>
>>2892021
Maybe when the fruits start farming you can trim them down to maybe a handful that the tree can put its energy into. I don't know if it'd work but worth a try to see if a lemon can fully mature that way.
>>
>>
>>2891047
MOAR LIGHT
Seriously I see so many sad etoliated leggy Yuccas and Dracaenas raised in dark offices... it's kinda sad.
Move them to at least a southern window in winter, and put them outside into full sun as early as possible, and move them in as late as possible.
I'm at 50°N, still my yuccas (the very sensitive kind, Y. elephantipes) are only inside the garage during severe cold waves, which means usually only in January/February (in mild winters they can be outside year-round). That way they grow sturdy instead of leggy
>>
>nice succs ya got there, would be a shame if something happened to them
>>
>>2892519
Every once in a while I'll have one of my outdoor succulent pots knocked over in the middle of the night by a stray cat. Truly suffering.
>>
Hello, /plant/. Wannabe Tarzan here. What are the best trees to grow for the intention of free climbing them one day? A lumberjack friend suggested oaks and maples. I am in USDA zone 5 but I’m considering greenhousing as well for a real jungle, albeit I probably can’t afford as big an indoor forest as an outdoor forest. Tropical climbing trees would be cool tho. Pls help treemen
>>
>>2892457
I suppose you can eat that, right?
All cacti are edible afaik.
Looks like a yam.
>>
>>2892586
Honestly, you're not going to be able to plant anything that you will be able to climb within your own lifetime.
But if you are planning for future generations, Oak is the way to go.
>>
>>2892519
is that fucking sphagnum moss?
i hope the cat shits on them tbph
>>
>>2892677
how about kiri ? or is it weak ?
>>
>>2892677
Depends on the type of climbing. A cherry tree is very no-gear noob climbable in just 10 years,
>>
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hyacinth bean is bloomin'
>>
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Hey /Plant/, I posted not to long ago about finding Honesty Flower/ Silver dollar seeds not too long ago, and I gotta say that these guys are the absolute pickiest little gits I've seen in a plant. I had 4 in a little pot and three died off or starting to from what I assume would be root rot, and one may be or not afflicted with it. I found some new seeds not too long ago and wanted to see if any you lads have some tips other than watering less. This is my second batch with one from the first so far.


>>
>>2892930
Sorry for the upside quality, using an IPad.
>>
>>2892930
they look leggy, is there anywhere you can put them to get more direct light for longer? I'd recommend that if you can
>>
>>2892930
Honesty will do far better in the ground, and it hates being transplanted, just like a lot of annuals/biennials.
Beautiful plant though. Does really well in dappled woodland shade.
>>
>>2892948
That's almost the best I can do, I'm at my grandparents house so I don't want to scuff up their space. We have terrible spots for lighting honestly. I do however have a grow light, it's just taken up by other plants atm such as my Pygmy drosera, trying to get gemmae but they are being stubborn. If I had my own place, light wouldn't be much of an issue, but what can you do when you're just starting job hunting.

>>2892957
I did find these around my home, which is mostly wood land. With it being winter though, I'm afraid they won't establish themselves well enough, then again, most plants I have don't go into the ground.
>>
>>2893001
Same Anon, is there any grow lights you lads use that has been great? I've seen the lights on Amazon for sale, but wonder if they are really that good. What do you suggest for a dependable lighting source other than are lovable sun.
>>
>>2893001
Honesty will usually set it's seeds in late summer, which will germinate and grow through until winter.
Then, in the following spring, they will restart growth, flower, and seed, restarting the cycle.
So, technically, it's a biennial, like foxgloves, or forget-me-nots.
Sowing this late in the year is probably the main issue here, and also growing indoors a temperate biennial is going to cause it all kinds of confusion.
>>
>>2888827
Looks like rossetes of an obese ladies breast
>>
>>2893041
Ah, oops, figured I could've grown them without problems. Hopefully I can still grow these little guys to adults at the very least.
>>
>>2893105
Sorry for not including this in my earlier post, but if I were to put this outside, in the ground wise, would that mean they would stop growing, but resume afterwords in spring, or would that just completely kill it.
>>
>>2893107
I would leave them in the pot, but thin the seedlings out to an inch apart to give the strongest more room. Really only 3 will fit this pot.
At least one has sprouted some true leaves, and it might do alright, but it probably won't be a very large plant.
>>
>>2892677
Ailanthus is probably climbable after 5 years even in temperate climate (unless you weigh like 200kg), but then again who wants those
>>
Are ground egg shells a good homemade fertilizer?
>>
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>>
>>2893210
no
>>
>>2893210
They are a good thing to add to your compost pile, but not much use on their own.
>>
>>2889417
Spaghnums whole survival trick is to kill as many other plants as they possibly can.
>>
>>2893210
What >>2893350 said
Worms are great at breaking them down, and they will very slowly break down from bacteria. On their own, the calcium isn't plant available untill they've broken down.
They are good at keeping away slugs though on their own, so if you have a slug problem, it could be a natural fix for that. But otherwise just compost them.
>>
How the fuck do zoos that have pandas grow so much goddamn bamboo? Do they just grow a bunch on soil or grow shoots in a greenhouse or both or
>>
>>2893719
aren't most of the captive pandas in china? they probably feed them dogs.
>>
>>2893719
>how the fuck does a business grow so much of one of the fastest growing plants
>>
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>>2893727
>>
>>2890478
That's a great aesthetic!
>>
finally got my own fiddle-leaf fig
>>
>>2894858
Looks comfy
>>
>>2894858
Very nice anon
>>
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Here's a pic of my mother of thousands (kalanchoe daigremontiana I believe) from a few minutes ago. My other succs are pretty happy right now too. I will share some pics
>>
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>>2895083
Some x Pachyveria props that just started popping cute pink roots uguu
>>
>>2895083
That plant spreads like a weed, be prepared for it.
>>
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>>2895085
>>2895083
Here's a pooping butt. :3 that's about it. I got some other succulents recently that I just transplanted but these three are ones that I've had for a few months
>>
>>2895089
They're hardy as fuck too. Nothing kills this thing. My friend ripped it out of her backyard like 8 months ago when it was a just a prop from a much larger cluster of adult plants. They had to be like 10 years old or older AND they've survived like 3 major hurricanes so they're pretty tough
>>
>>2893214
what a beauty
>>
Suggestions/tips for a starter bonsai?
>>
>>2895298
Aloe
>>
>>2895298
>kalanchoe
Jade plant, they're nearly undestructible
>>
>>2895396
>>2895298
>>kalanchoe
How did end up in my post? Ignore it
>>
Hey anons I’m fairly new to plants but bought these at a expo,what would you recommend for a substrate? I bought some isopods a months ago and made some substrate with sand,topsoil without fertilizer,orchid moss and some oak dried oak leafs but I don’t know how good it looks,sorry for the low quality photo
>>
>>2895409
Isopods are A.natasum and A.Vulgare
I think I had to much sand in both of those
>>
>>2895412
>>
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Over the past couple months, I've gotten my first houseplants as gifts from my mom. Not a great pic, there are 4 slightly sickly aloe vera plants recovering from their conditions at the store and a nice Christmas cactus from ALDI. I keep them under a 50w LED grow light (unplugged for the pic) on a timer from 7 A.M. to 11 P.M. Gonna keep building a collection of succulents until I have a shelf full of them. This setup is kind of ghetto at the moment, got other plans for my money, but I'll eventually get a proper shelf with a hook for my light.
>>
Hey Pl/an/t,
So I put down tulip bulbs, a bit ;ate granted, this november and I've just realised they've actually sprouted! That's not supposed to happen so far as I know right? What should I do, it's only going to get colder here.
>>
>>2895391
aloeagle
>>
>>2895680
You weren't too late, and there's no problem with them sprouting this early, assuming you have planted them deep enough.
A nice mulch of compost this time of year always helps.
>>
>>2895680
They generally tolerate low temps quite well, and when it gets colder they will just stop growing. That said it's really damn early and if the new growth dies to frost they won't come up this spring, only the next one. If you're in a cold climate and there's no snow yet cover them with a generaous amount of mulch.
>>
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>>2895298
Pepper. This is my first one, grown from seed 2 years ago.
Let it go wild in a big pot/full soil, at the end of the season you cut it down and put it in a smaller pot, take it inside if temps drop below what a pepper can take.
If it survives the prune & starts putting out leaves again, you can put it in a bonsai pot & start styling a bit.
Or you can put it in a bonsai pot right after pruning, but survival chances are a bit lower then.
Starting it in a small pot from seed works too, but it'll stay thin for a -long- time.
>>
>>2895727
>>2895752
Mulch, got it. What the fuck is mulch though and how do I get it? Should I put so more compost over them before the mulch just in case? I'm new to this whole thing...
>>
>>2895806
A mulch is any material used to cover the surface of the soil.
They help to retain moisture, minimise weeds and protect roots from freezing temperatures and to improve the soil. They are also used just for ornamental reasons in the case of gravel or bark chips.
>>
>>2895806
What anon said. You can use fine bark, straw/hay, leaves, pine needles, grass, sawdust, wood chips. Whatever is on hand, really. My tulips are covered with thuja branches from the hedge. When people start throwing out christmas trees en masse I collect them to use as mulch.
>>
>>2895808
>>2895816
Awesome, thank you so much for all your help. I'll keep you posted.
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>>2895800
This is fucking awesome
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I forgot to water my ficus benjamina for a couple weeks and it dropped all leaves. Is it still alive or can i throw it out?
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I don't know if Euphorbia anon is still around but I have a question. Should I get a normal euphorbia lactea or a crested euphorbia lactea? Either way it would be variegated and on it's own roots but I cant decide which I like better.
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>>2895903
Picture of a crested euphorbia lactea for reference.
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>>2895903
Can these reliably survive on their own roots? I dislike grafts and really wanted to take some cuttings of this one but the specks of green seem too miniscule.
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>>2895915
They can, yes. If you decide to take cuttings be careful with the euphorbia sap and be aware that it'll take months for the cutting to dry and root.
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>>2895903
>Should I get a normal euphorbia lactea or a crested euphorbia lactea?
Whichever you prefer. I personally don't care for crested or grafted plants. If you can find it, there's a fully white variety called 'Ghost' or something that is really cool.
But E. lactea is my least favourite of all the Euphorbia I own. It looks cool, but it grows slower than anything I've ever seen.
I might replace it with a Euphorbia trigona 'Rubra', pic related. Similar size and branching, but with a little more interest with it's red foliage.
>>2895925
>sap
I've had the sap all over my hands from pruning Euphorbia characias with no ill effects, but I know a guy who got some on his lips and it looked like he'd been punched in the mouth.
I've heard stories of the sap literally spraying into people's eyes, but I don't know if that's true.
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>>2895882
F
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>>2895847
Thanks mang. If you have facebook, check out the fatalii bonchi group!
And there's also bonchi.net
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Here are my Joseph Coat Roses from earlier in the season
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>>2896037
Joseph's*
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>>2895933
Fortunately I already have a Euphorbia trigona, it's still small but it's been growing quickly ever since I got it. The ghost variation looks cool but all I can find is cuttings and small rooted pieces, maybe I'll go for the middle and get something already established like pic related, I don't know if it counts as a ghost or not with the green specks. Euphorbia are all so strange, it's like each one should be in it's own genus.
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Any tips and bits of advice for growing a bonsi from the seed and taking caring of it?
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>>2896065
hope you're young and patient, because it's gonna take ~20 years for it to look even remotely presentable
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>>2896135
Got it. Really takes that long from seed eh?
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>>2896176
You could put it in the ground and grow as a regular tree for a couple years for faster progress I guess, but it's still 5 years you could save by just finding a nice young tree in a regular nursery and chopping it down to bonsai size or even air layering an interesting looking branch. You could get something fast growing like a larch, ficus or willow but these also require much more care to keep them in desired shape. Why do you want to do it from seed?
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>>2891047
mine takes more water than you would think. it looks like that in the winter and in the summer i put it outside and it looks awesome. When you get the hang of it put it outside in the spring and cut it down. Then it will grow back looking awesome
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>>2892512
my dracaenas has to come in when it freezes I think or it losses all its leaves. i'm about 40 degree N. are you saying i can leave it frozen until december. in a pot??
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>my houseplants have scale insects

no, noo, noooooo, NOT AGAIN

I literally had the worst year, it took me over 4 months to achieve spider mite holocaust and finally be free of them, now I get shackled with this?!!! I regret picking up gardening as a hobby so fucking much
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>>2887963
Can someone please identify this plant? Tried reverse search but to no avail.
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>>2896368
Of course put it inside when there's prolonged frost, but a short nighttime dip to -2 or so is not a problem at least for my species. Some yuccas can even be planted into the ground and there tolerate -10 or more, like Y. gloriosa
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>>2896350
Duly noted.
>Why do you want to do it from seed?
One of my friends knows I like plants and decided to gift me a sow and grow Bonsai kit. I'd hate to let there gift go to waist.
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>>2896590
Yucca brevifolia can be grown accross the UK, and I've never known one to die from the cold.
Down here on the south coast of England, people grow Agave, Opuntia, Albizia, Acacia, and all kinds of tender plants in their gardens. Just last week I saw an Agave that was over 6 feet high in somebody's front garden. Madness I say.
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>>2896595
Good luck with that.
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>>2896604
Well that's like zone 10 or so, which is exceptional at that latitude. 8a here is a bit more limiting, still OK for some windmill palms and the hardier yuccas
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>>2896616
We don't use USDA zones in the UK, but I think we average around 8-9. We have a weird climate here for our latitude.
The south coast of England is quite mild though. I've seen plenty of winters here where it rarely goes below 0C, but it's very wet and windy.
Just off the south-west coast, the Isles of Scilly are actually considered to be a sub-tropical climate. Pic related is Tresco Abbey, absolutely worth visiting. It's astonishing to see what they are able to grow there.
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>>2896651
not the guy you responded to but I actually like the zone system. its surprisingly acurate
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>>2896660
It's a nice guide for perennial ornamentals, but for things like annual crops or also some fruit trees, amount of summer heat is also important
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>>2896660
The closest comparison we have is the RHS Hardiness Rating for plants. H1(a, b and c) for the tenderest plants, up to H7 for the hardiest.
https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/trials-awards/award-of-garden-merit/rhs-hardiness-rating
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>>2896710
The USDA ratings are only based on minimum winter temperature, simply to determine whether a plant can survive outdoors all year around, or if it requires protection in the Winter.
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>>2896455

God I hate those scaley fucks so goddamn fucking much, they got all over my nepenthes. had to chop a lot, and pick them manually and rub a shit ton of alcohol.
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Last chilies of the year. 7 pot yellow, habanero and chocolate habanero.
They aren't as spicy as they should because the plants are basically dormant at this point.
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>>2896862
looks like candy



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